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Full text of "REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, ONTARIO, 1923"



xeport 

Minister of Education 

Province of Ontario 

(CANADA). 

i923 



CA / L0NO£i 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Guelph, University of Windsor, York University and University of Toronto Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/reportofminister1923onta 



C REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Education 



Province of Ontario 



FOR THE YEAR 



1923 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 
THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




m 




TORONTO: 
Printed and Published by Clarkson W. James, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 4 



a 



PRODUC6D BY 

lUnited Press] 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



SZT\ • PAGE 

f ^j REPORT OF THE MINISTER vii 

APPENDICES 

Appendix A. — Report of the Chief Inspector of Public and Separate Schools.. 1 

Appendix B. — Report of the Director of Technical Education 11 

Appendix C. — Report of the Inspectors of Continuation Schools 22 

Appendix D. — Report of the Inspectors of High Schools 27 

Appendix E. — Report of the Director of Rural School Organization 34 

Appendix F. — Report of the Inspector of Manual Training and Household 

Science 41 

Appendix G. — Report of the Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Classes.... 49 

Appendix H. — Report of the Inspector of Public Libraries 63 

Appendix I. — Report of the Inspector of Auxiliary Classes 69 

Appendix J. — Report of the Provincial School Attendance Officer 73 

Appendix K. — Report of the Director of Professional Training 78 

Appendix L. — Statistics of Elementary and Secondary Schools: 

Summary of Statistics 

I . — Elementary Schools 81 

II. — Secondary Schools 82 

III. — General: Elementary and Secondary Schools 83 

Comparative Statistics, 1867-1922 

I. — Public Schools (including Separate Schools) : 

1. School Attendance 84 

2. Classification of Pupils 84 

3. Teachers' Certificates 85 

4. Salaries and Experience 86 

5. Receipts and Expenditures 87 

Cost per Pupil 88 

II. — Roman Catholic Separate Schools 88 

III. — Protestant Separate Schools 89 

IV. — Continuation Schools 90 

V. — Collegiate Institutes and High Schools: 

Receipts, Expenditures, Attendance, etc 91 

Cost per Pupil 91 

VI. — Teachers' Institutes 92 

VII. — Departmental and Matriculation Examinations, Normal School Attend- 
ance, etc 92 

[iiil 



iv TABLE OF CONTENTS No. 17 

Public Schools 

PAGE 

I. — Table A. — Attendance and Pupils in the Various Branches of Instruction, etc 96 

II. — Table B. — Attendance by Age, Sex and Grade 120 

III. — Table C. — Teachers, Salaries, Certificates, Experience 126 

IV. — Table D. — School Houses, Medical and Dental Inspection, Libraries, etc 132 

V. — Table E. — Financial Statement, Value of School Property 136 

Roman Catholic Separate Schools 

I. — Table F. — Financial Statement, Value of School Property 146 

II. — Table G. — Teachers, Salaries, Certificates, Attendance, Pupils in the Various 

Branches of Instruction, etc 152 

Attendance by Age, Sex and Grade 164 

Continuation Schools 

I. — Table H. — Financial Statement 166 

II. — Table I. — Schools under Public School Board, Equipment, Destination of Pupils, etc. 174 

III. — Table J. — Attendance, Pupils in the Schools and in the Various Subjects, etc 182 

IV. — Table K. — Attendance by Age, Sex and Grade 198 

Collegiate Institutes and High Schools 

I. — Table L. — Financial Statement 206 

II. — Table M. — Boards of Education, Equipment, Destination of Pupils, etc 214 

III. — Table N. — Attendance, Pupils in the Schools and in the Various Subjects, etc 230 

IV. — Table O. — Attendance by Age, Sex and Grade 246 

Vocational Schools 

I. — Table P. — Day Schools, Attendance, etc., Pupils in the Various Branches of In- 
struction, etc 262 

II. — Table Q. — Day Schools, Value of Equipment, etc 268 

III. — Table R. — Evening Schools, Attendance, etc., Pupils in the Various Branches of 

Instruction 2 70 

IV. — Table S. — Day and Evening Schools, Financial Statement 278 

Miscellaneous 

Table T. — Protestant Separate Schools 280 

Table U— Report on Night Schools 281 

Table V. — General Statistical Abstract 282 

Appendix M. — Teachers' Institutes, Financial Statement, 1922 300 

Appendix N.— Fifth Classes, 1922-23 304 

Appendix O. — List of Inspectorates and Inspectors 312 

Appendix P. — Rural School Libraries, 1922-23 317 

/Vn AAppe xdtx Q — Cadet Corps, 1923 319 

^— 'Appendix R. — Superannuated Teachers 320 

Appendix S. — Financial Statement of the College of Education 321 

Appendix T. — Examinations: 

I. — High School Entrance Examination, 1923 323 

II. — Junior Public School Graduation Diploma Examination, 1923 328 



6 



1923 TABLE OF CONTENTS v 

PAGE 

Appendix U. — List of Certificates Issued by the Department, 1923 329 

_Ap£ENnyx V. — Orders-in-Council, 1923 342 

Appendix W. — Autumn and Summer Model Schools, 1923 346 

Appendix X. — Report of the School for the Blind, 1922-23 347 

Appendix Y. — Report of the School for the Deaf, 1922-23 365 








REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Education 

FOR THE YEAR 1923 



To His Honour, 

Henry Cockshutt, Esq., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

Your Honour, — 

I beg leave to present to Your Honour the report of the Department of 
Education for the year 1923. 

The Ontario school system continues to expand from year to year with every 
proof of being well adapted to the wants of the people whom it serves. Its 
founder and great organizer, Dr. Ryerson, left free play for its development as 
the Province grew and as new forms of educational activity were required. 
Owing to its origin and history, the system's prosperity is largely in the hands of 
local boards which, being elected by the school ratepayers, are in close touch with 
popular opinion. To enlightened views, therefore, much of the success which 
has been achieved is due. The Department in administering the school laws, 
as passed by the Legislature, could effect little in the way of vital reform without 
the consent and co-operation of the people at large. This support is never 
lacking and the sacrifices made by the parents of the Province, acting through 
their trustees, call for unstinted praise, especially in respect to the costs of 
education, which tend to increase and not to diminish. The condition of the 
school system at present, I have the honour to report, shows signs of healthy 
progress and of gratifying efficiency, but it also presents features which demand 
the serious attention of all, in order that defects may be remedied and obstacles 
to further progress removed. 

The Elementary Schools 

The statistics which set forth the present condition of the elementary 
schools are impressive. Appended to this report are the details, which are for 
the calendar year 1922, and indicate advances over the previous year in every 
essential respect, such as attendance, more highly qualified teachers, salaries 
paid, and the value of school property. The size of the elementary school 
system is indicated by the fact that there are close upon 7,000 school houses of 
this class and that the enrolled attendance is over 601,000. The value of the 

Mil 



_ui THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

property controlled by school boards for this kind of instruction — that is sites, 
buildings, and furniture — exceeds $77,000,000 and the increase over the previous 
year is more than $8,500,000, a proof that a very extensive building programme 
has been in progress. Under the improved plan for recording the attendance, 
an analysis of the figures will show that in 1922 the percentage of actual aggregate 
attendance to possible aggregate attendance was 86.8, which may be considered a 
good showing. The enrolled attendance in rural schools has increased from 
235,000 to 241,000. The number of teachers with higher certificates grows, 
but the number of men in the profession, while increasing, shows no substantial 
movement. There were in all 1,740 male teachers, or 11 per cent, of the whole. 
The amount paid in teachers' salaries was $16,690,000. The average salary to 
male teachers, taking both urban and rural schools together, was $1,644, while 
that to female teachers was $1,117. In rural schools, which are chiefly taught by 
women, the average salary was $1,144 for males and $987 for females. There 
are now over 10,000 teachers with second-class certificates in elementary schools 
and the number with third-class certificates has dwindled to 1,190. Perhaps 
in no single particular is the advance in education during the past fifteen years 
more remarkable, seeing that previous to that time the rural schools were often 
taught, or more strictly speaking, kept open, by young people with little or no 
professional training. The cost of elementary education in 1922 was $31,900,000, 
or $53 per pupil of enrolled attendance. 

The Secondary Schools 

For the high schools the year has been one of continued prosperity. It is 
apparent that the benefit of the training given in these schools is now generally 
conceded and that they are making a stronger appeal than ever to the young 
people of the Province. The attendance has risen to a point never reached 
before. This general diffusion of secondary education will undoubtedly make 
its influence felt in all walks of life in the course of a few years. The growth of 
attendance has made it necessary for many municipalities to increase their 
school accommodation, and very generous sums have been devoted to this 
purpose. In no previous year has there been so much activity in building. 
The new buildings are much superior to those erected a few years ago in the 
excellence and the completeness of the accommodations they provide and in 
the provision made in them to surround the pupils with wholesome sanitary 
conditions. The demand for teachers and the improvement in salaries have 
brought to the staffs an increased number of university graduates and raised 
the level of scholarship among the teachers. The new course of study introduced 
into the schools three years ago is now in full operation and has been warmly 
welcomed by the teachers and pupils alike as relieving the pressure that was 
formerly the subject of complaint. Further relief was afforded during the year 
by a change made in the examination system whereby candidates for Lower 
School standing may be passed on the recommendation of their teachers without 
writing on the Departmental examinations. This change has not only brought 
relief to the pupils in the high schools, but has also relieved their parents of 
some of the cost of examination fees and has greatly diminished the expense of 
the examination system to the Province. The plan is working out satisfac- 
torily. It places upon teachers greater responsibility and a larger freedom, 
and they are proving worthy of the opportunities given them. 

The increase in interest in secondary education has been accompanied by an 
insistent demand for a wider range of instruction, more especially for courses 
which, while giving attention to the essentials of a general education, will prepare 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ix 

young people directly for employments. School boards have not been slow to take 
advantage of the facilities offered by the provisions of The Vocational Education 
Act to establish such courses. For some years these boards, with their advisory 
committees, have been studying the needs of their respective communities and 
have been formulating plans for courses of practical instruction; but for lack 
of adequate school accommodations many of these plans were not fully realized 
until the present year. In practically all the larger centres the new buildings, 
which have been erected to take care of the increased attendance in secondary 
schools, provide accommodations and equipment for vocational departments. 
New buildings of this type were opened this year at Renfrew, Guelph, St. 
Catharines, Weston, and Kitchener-Waterloo; while independent schools for 
vocational instruction were completed at Toronto (Riverdale Branch), and 
Windsor-Walkerville. There are now twenty-one day vocational schools with 
an enrolment of about 7,000 full-time pupils and about 2,700 part-time or special 
pupils. The evening vocational classes have continued to prosper and are 
becoming firmly established as an important part of the educational service of 
the Province. The extent to which they supply a real need is shown in the 
fact that evening classes were carried on in fifty centres with an enrolment of 
33,500 persons. 

Not the least important of the advances in education in recent years has 
been the growth of the continuation schools, which provide for secondary school 
instruction in the smaller urban centres and in rural communities. This growth 
has been maintained during the year. Fourteen new schools have been estab- 
lished; and marked improvements in attendance and in efficiency have been 
shown also in schools already established. 

The Operation of the Attendance Laws 

The friends of education throughout the Province have been watching with 
great interest the operation of the legislation introduced by the Honourable 
Dr. Cody in 191Q with a view to secure greater regularity of attendance and to 
extend the period of instruction. As he pointed out in introducing his 
school bill, the efficiency of a school system depends very largely upon the 
extent to which children avail themselves of the instruction offered. It is 
manifest that, however good the schools, they have no direct influence upon 
children who are outside their doors. Sufficient time has now elapsed to show 
results from this legislation. The enrolment in the elementary schools has now 
risen to 601,485, which is 21.54 per cent, of the entire population of the Province, 
and the average attendance is at a very high figure. The enrolment in the 
secondary schools has risen to 60,395, and shows an increase of 41.9 per cent, 
during the two years of the operation of The Adolescent School Attendance 
Act. The increased attendance since The Adolescent School Attendance Act 
became operative, particularly noticeable in the upper forms of the elementary 
schools and in the lower forms of the secondary schools, would indicate that 
many juveniles who formerly spent the years of their early adolescence in unneces- 
sary employments, often intermittent and unprofitable, or in actual idleness, are 
now under systematic training and discipline. The number of young people 
between fourteen and sixteen years of age who have applied for "home permits" 
or for "work certificates" has been relatively very small, so small, in fact, 
that it has been found unnecessary to establish the part-time classes required 
under the terms of the Act in all but the largest of the urban centres. Progress 
has been made during the year in organizing such classes. In London and in 
Hamilton practically all adolescents with "home permits" or "work certificates" 



x THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

are enrolled in the academic and vocational part-time classes established in 
connection with the technical schools in these cities. The classes have been 
established and conducted with little or no disturbance of employment relations 
and with a minimum of friction. Employers co-operate freely and willingly 
with the school authorities in making adjustments for the time required for 
school attendance. The pupils themselves have been quick to realize the 
benefits which they are receiving from the instruction in these classes. As 
evidence of this, it is pointed out that many of those who are freed from the 
necessity of attending as they reach the age of sixteen, ask to be allowed to 
remain in the classes. 

Expenditure on Education 

The growth of the various departments of education has been accompanied 
by large increases in expenditures, both on the part of the local boards and on 
the part of the Government. The increase in local expenditure is in a measure 
accounted for by the necessity of catching up with the arrears in building and 
equipment. Between 1914 and 1919 it became a general policy throughout the 
Province — a policy which had the full approval of the Government — to postpone 
all expenditures on school buildings, except in extreme cases, until after the 
termination of the war. For this reason many municipalities, both rural and 
urban, fell behind in their building programmes. The expenditures now required 
have been increased not only by the additional buildings to be provided but 
also by the fact that building costs have risen very materially. These expendi- 
tures have been for the most part cheerfully borne as being necessary in the 
interests of education. There are not wanting, however, evidences to show that 
in certain cases boards, in their desire to provide liberally for education, have 
been led into extravagance, and have laid upon ratepayers unnecessary burdens 
not justified by real educational needs. It may without hesitation be asserted 
that in providing for education the people of the Province want the best that 
can be had, but, especially during the period through which we are passing, 
they do not want their money to be spent with lavish hand on what is unessential. 
To meet reasonable demands boards should practise an intelligent but not a 
niggardly economy. In the erection and equipment of new buildings due regard 
should be given to providing adequate accommodation for all children who have 
the right to attend the elementary or secondary schools, and adequate facilities 
for teaching the courses of study and for caring for the health and comfort of 
the pupils. The buildings should be of pleasing design and durable construction, 
but unnecessary expenditure for over-adornment, for costly building materials, 
or for elaborate fittings should be avoided. 

Immediate Needs and Problems 

The advances which have been made during the year are encouraging, but 
it would be an unwise optimism to overlook the possibilities for improvement. 
Probably the most valuable part of the statistical reports and the reports of the 
officers of the Department of Education are those which suggest needs for 
change and lines of advance. It is to be remembered that in any healthy system 
there must be growth, and that in so vital a matter as education perfection must 
ever be sought, though it may never be found. Viewed from a general stand- 
point, the situation in the elementary schools is most satisfactory. But there 
are many phases of the educational problems connected with these schools 
which demand the closest examination by all discerning friends of education. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION xi 

The Need for a Revised Course of Study 

There has been no thorough reorganization of the curriculum of the elemen- 
tary schools for many years. From time to time new subjects have been added 
with the object of enriching it or of including matter regarded as necessary for 
pupils to master before leaving school. I am convinced that the course of 
study has now become unduly congested and that a general revision should be 
undertaken with the object of reducing pressure and of making adjustments in 
order to relate prescribed subjects of study more directly to the needs of the 
pupils. The extension of the period of compulsory attendance has now made 
it possible to relieve the congestion by extending the course over a longer period. 
At my request the officers of the Department of Education are now engaged 
upon the work of revision, and a provisional course of study will be submitted 
at the opening of the next school term for trial and suggestions. This course 
will contain a minimum prescription of work, which will be obligatory on all 
pupils in the elementary schools, and supplementary courses in other optional 
subjects, which may be taken with the approval of the Inspector. These 
courses will make it possible, where it is practicable and desirable, to adjust 
instruction to meet varying conditions depending, on the one hand, upon the 
needs of the pupils, and on the other, upon the facilities for teaching which can 
be offered. The selection of supplementary courses will permit also of a differ- 
entiation between the courses offered in urban and rural schools. 

The Problem of the Small Rural School 

While there are elementary schools established practically everywhere and 
the number of pupils enrolled is relatively large considering the population of 
the Province, yet the adjustment of schools to attendance is far from ideal in 
many of the rural sections. The steady increase in the number of very small 
schools in a great majority of the counties of Ontario is somewhat alarming. 
There are one-teacher schools in the most flourishing counties where the average 
attendance is from 1 to 5 pupils. This is the case in 117 schools, and there are 
365 schools with an average attendance of from 6 to 9 pupils, and no less than 
824 schools where the average attendance is between 10 and 14 pupils. Thirteen 
per cent, of the rural schools have an average attendance of less than 10 pupils; 
33 per cent, an average of less than 15; and 55 per cent, an average of less than 
20. The financial loss in maintaining many of these schools is startling. The 
following table shows the average cost per pupil of average attendance in the 
groups indicated. The sums given do not indicate the total cost of maintaining 
the schools, but only the net cost to the ratepayers after the legislative grants 
have been deducted: 

In Counties. 

Cost per pupil in schools with average attendance, 1 to 5 $152 76 

Cost per pupil in schools with average attendance, 6 to 10 95 42 

Cost per pupil in schools with average attendance, 10 or less 101 67 

In Districts. 

Cost per pupil in schools with average attendance, 1 to 5 $146 05 

Cost per pupil in schools with average attendance, 6 to 10 81 92 

Cost per pupil in schools with average attendance, 10 or less 92 14 

In Whole Province. 

Cost per pupil in schools with average attendance, 1 to 5 $150 70 

Cost per pupil in schools with average attendance, 6 to 10 92 42 



xii THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Cost per pupil in schools with average attendance, 10 or less $99 46 

Cost per pupil in all Rural Public Schools 64 31 

By adding the amounts collected locally as given above to the Legislative 
grants, the total cost is found to be as follows: 

In Whole Province. 

Total cost per pupil in schools with average, 1 to 5 $243 32 

Total cost per pupil in schools with average, 6 to 10 138 99 

Total cost per pupil in schools with average, 10 or less 151 31 

Total cost per pupil in all the schools 80 26 

The small schools are becoming also a heavy charge upon Government 
grants. The following table shows the amount paid by the Government per 
pupil of average attendance: 

In Counties. 

Amount per pupil in schools with average attendance, 1 to 5. . . $91 75 

Amount per pupil in schools with average attendance, 6 to 10. . . 41 53 

Amount per pupil in schools with average attendance, 10 or less. . 46 08 

In Districts. 

Amount per pupil in schools with average attendance, 1 to 5. . . $106 51 

Amount per pupil in schools with average attendance, 6 to 10. . . 61 20 

Amount per pupil in schools with average attendance, 10 or less. . 66 85 

In Whole Province. 

Amount per pupil in schools with average attendance, 1 to 5 . . . $92 62 

Amount per pupil in schools with average attendance, 6 to 10. . . 46 57 

Amount per pupil in schools with average attendance, 10 or less. . 51 66 

Amount per pupil in all Rural Public Schools 15 95 

These tables show that the maintenance charges for too large a proportion 
of our elementary schools in rural districts are excessive. 

The efficiency of the very small rural school is also being questioned. It 
is contended that there is an inspiration in numbers and an enthusiasm which 
cannot be secured when children are taught individually or in small groups, that 
the incentives of competition and co-operation have a wonderful effect in 
sharpening the intellectual powers and in moulding the moral qualities of chil- 
dren, and that a school with a fair attendance offers greater possibilities for the 
development of the best types of citizenship. 

Additional Facilities for Secondary Education in Rural Communities 

The secondary schools also present problems, and, as in the case of the 
elementary schools, the most pressing of these are connected with rural school 
organization. The means of providing secondary instruction for children who 
live in the urban centres are comparatively easy to find. It is a question mainly 
of buildings, equipment, courses of study, and teachers, and these have very 
largely been provided; but to give equal opportunities to those who live in rural 
sections presents real difficulties. The continuation school inspectors in their 
report point out that a fair proportion of the children who live on farms are in 
attendance at high schools or continuation schools. This is gratifying. At the 
same time it is a well-known fact that there are many children who live far 
from secondary schools who have no opportunity of continuing their education 
beyond the elementary stage unless their parents arrange for their transporta- 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION xiii 

tion or their board away from home. The latter arrangement is often, for 
financial reasons, impossible. Moreover, it is said, possibly with a great deal 
of truth, that a large majority of the children from rural communities are sent 
to high schools and continuation schools not in order that they may become 
better equipped for life on the farm, but because it is expected they will become 
teachers, engage in commercial occupations, or enter the universities or pro- 
fessional schools. The fact appears to be that the children who are to remain 
on the farm, as a rule, leave school at the end of the elementary school course. 
In this day it is generally recognized that a secondary education is as necessary 
and should be as available to the farmer as to the town or city dweller. 

Part-time Winter Schools for Rural Communities 

The difficulty of providing school accommodations at convenient centres 
for children in rural communities is not the only obstacle in the way. Farm V 
labourers are scarce and, accordingly, children who are old enough to work and 
who are not expected to go to school for the purpose of being engaged in some 
other occupation are employed in the house or on the farm during several months 
of the year. We must frankly admit, therefore, that full-time schools for such 
pupils, under present conditions and the conditions that are likely for a time 
at least to prevail, are impossible. But the need for the education of children 
who have been compelled to drop out of the elementary school and to go to work 
on the farm can probably be largely met by the organization of part-time schools. 
These might be conducted during four or five months of the winter. The school 
hours at any school should be fixed to suit the convenience of the pupils in the 
district concerned. Part-time winter classes for pupils in the rural districts • 
are not a new experiment with us; they have been tried out and their efficiency 
proven. In the pioneer days of the Province most of the young people in the 
rural districts of Upper Canada received in this way what elementary education 
they obtained. Young men and women past the ordinary school age flocked to 
the rural schools during the winter months when work on the farm was slack. 
These winter courses, I am convinced, should be revived. The organization of 
part-time classes for those at work in cities and towns is demonstrating 
the value of this form of instruction. Young people at work begin to appreciate 
the value of an education and they bring to their tasks an industry and an 
intensity of purpose that accomplish quite surprising results in view of the 
handicaps encountered. 

Administrative Units 

Now the solution of the problem of the small elementary rural school and 
that of providing full-time or part-time secondary schools in rural districts 
involve exactly the same difficulties, the obstacles which stand in the way of 
securing active co-operation among ratepayers in wide areas where school 
populations are relatively small, and of providing for adequate support and 
equalized burdens. The school laws provide for such co-operation through the 
provisions which are made for united action by rural school boards. These 
provisions apply both to elementary schools and continuation schools; but, 
whatever may be the reasons, we have made but little headway in securing 
co-operation by these means. In Great Britain and in the United States, 
where the same difficulties are being encountered, the solution of the problem 
is being sought by increasing the areas of administrative units*/ In England 
and in Scotland the parish scheme of organization, which corresponds to our 
section plan, has been entirely abandoned; and the county, which is the unit 



3 



xiy THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

for taxation purposes, has been adopted as the unit for school administration. 
In the United States the township unit appears to be favoured, and several 
states, including such progressive states as Massachusetts, Indiana, Ohio, and 
Pennsylvania, have adopted this plan. The Inspectors of the Province, who 
have excellent opportunities for observing rural educational conditions at first 
hand, unanimously favour the creation of larger administrative areas and sup- 
port their opinions with arguments which would appear to have much weight. 
/The majority, I understand, would select the township as the unit. The section 
method of administration owes its origin to pioneer conditions which almost 
dictated the creation of a small local unit, and this form of management doubt- 
less worked well in early times. The Province was then incompletely settled; 
communities were often isolated; roads were bad; communication was difficult. 
The plan was the natural one to be adopted in a sparsely settled country with 
many widely separated communities, just as it had been adopted in the New 
England States before that time. But it has been pointed out that the condi- 
tions which made the plan a necessity in Upper Canada eighty years ago have 
practically disappeared to-day; that the arable portions of the Province are 
completely settled; that isolated communities no longer exist; that a network 
of good roads penetrates all parts of the Province; and that the telephone and 
the automobile have brought the people of a whole township as closely together 
for practical purposes as the people of a school section were formerly. The 
great changes which have taken place in economical, industrial, and social 
conditions at least suggest possibilities for improvement in rural school adminis- 
tration. At any rate, I am assured that the reforms most urgently needed in 
rural elementary and secondary schools can be brought about only through the 
attainment of a much greater measure of co-operative action. My hope is 
that this question will receive most serious attention from all persons who are 
concerned with the support and administration of schools. I shall welcome all 
constructive suggestions for increasing efficiency or for equalizing and, if possible, 
reducing expenditure. 

Respectfully submitted, 



G. H. Ferguson, 

Minister of Education. 



Toronto, March 15th, 1924. 



APPENDIX A 

REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC 
AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

To the Honourable G. H. Ferguson, B.A., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I beg leave, herewith, to submit my annual report for your con- 
sideration. 

I have the honour to be, 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J no. Waugh. 
Toronto, January 31st, 1924. 



Re Changes in Inspectorates 

On February 1st, 1923, Mr. J. H. Sexton, M.A., was appointed Public 
School Inspector of West Middlesex, succeeding Inspector H. D. Johnson, who 
has retired after many years of faithful and efficient service. 

On September 1st, 1923, Mr. E. W. Jennings, B.A., replaced Inspector 
W. H. Stevens, B.A., of West Victoria. Inspector Stevens had for some years 
suffered from certain physical disabilities which made his retirement necessary. 
His work as an Inspector had always been characterized by careful and scru- 
pulous attention to details, and his opinions on educational organization were 
always worthy of consideration. 

On September 1st, 1923, Mr. R. F. Downey, B.A., B.Paed., succeeded 
Inspector G. E. Broderick, of West Peterborough and East Victoria. Mr. 
Broderick had for some years been anxious to retire on account of ill health, 
and it was at first hoped that a period of rest would make it possible for him 
to continue his duties. I regret to say, however, that these hopes were not 
realized. Mr. Broderick had before his appointment as Inspector been a well- 
known and highly respected teacher. The promise of these days was fully 
realized in his success as a Public School Inspector. 

The inspectorates in the County of Lanark and the County of Carleton 
were readjusted. These counties had been distributed into three inspectorates, 
namely, an Inspector in Carleton, an Inspector in Lanark, and a joint inspectorate 
formerly held by Inspector R. C. Rose. The joint inspectorate was abolished 
and two inspectorates formed in each of these counties. The reorganization 
became effective on September 1st, 1923. Mr. R. C. Rose, B.A., was appointed 
to the second inspectorate in Carleton, and Mr. J. C. Spence, B.A., B.Paed., was 
appointed to the second inspectorate in the County of Lanark. 

Mr. W. E. Hume, B.A., D.Paed., was appointed to the Toronto inspection 
staff on November 1st, 1923. During the year, Mr. G. K. Powell, Acting 

(1) 

1 D.E. 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Inspector in the City or Toronto, resigned, and the lamented death of Mr. Walter 
Bryce, B.A., made it necessary to make some additions to the heavily over- 
burdened staff of city Inspectors. In the removal of Mr. Bryce, the city lost 
the services of one of its most valuable educational officials. No man could 
have served the interests of education with greater earnestness and zeal. 

It is a matter of regret that even with the addition, of Mr. Hume to the 
inspectoral staff of the city, this branch of the service is still seriously under- 
manned. The last Blue Book reports show that in the City of Ottawa with 
296 teachers there are two Inspectors; that in the City of Hamilton with 516 
teachers there are four Inspectors; that in the City of London with 253 teachers 
there are two Inspectors, and that in the City of Toronto with 2,000 teachers 
there are seven Inspectors. 

In view of the fact that the pupils who are candidates for the Entrance 
examination to High Schools are passed upon the recommendation of the 
Principals as certified by the Inspectors, it is of the utmost importance that the 
inspectoral staff be kept up to full strength. Without adequate inspection 
it is of course useless to expect that these certificates can have their proper 
value. The present organization appears to be unfair both to the teachers and 
to the Principals of the schools, as it necessarily throws added responsibilities 
upon the Principals which, from the very nature of their position and their 
relation to the teachers serving under them, cannot fail to be embarrassing. 

At the close of the year a temporary readjustment of the two Welland 
inspectorates was arranged by which the Township of Pelham was put in charge 
of Inspector McNiece and the City of Niagara Falls in charge of Inspector 
Marshall. Inspector Hetherington, who had been in charge of the cities of St. 
Catharines and Niagara Falls, is now confining his work to St. Catharines. 

In the inspectorate of Muskoka, rendered vacant by the death of Inspector 
H. R. Scovell, B.A., General Inspector McDougall of this Department carried 
on the work with the assistance, towards the close of the year, of Inspector 
Pentland, of Haliburton. Inspector Scovell had made many friends both 
among the trustees and the teachers, through his uniform kindness and con- 
sideration. 

Inspector Moshier, who exchanged duties with Inspector MacKenzie, of 
New Zealand, returned to his duties on the Toronto staff at midsummer. 

No changes were made in the work of the Separate School Inspectors or of 
the District Inspectors. 

Inspectoral Changes in Prospect 

In order to secure adequate inspection of the different classes of schools 
throughout the Province, it will be advisable in the coming year to consider 
reorganization in the areas referred to below. 

Inspector Benson, of Windsor, has at present charge of the City of Windsor, 
and the towns of Sandwich and Walkerville. Some reduction of the number of 
schools in his charge, possibly by the appointment of a second Inspector in the 
County of Essex, who would also relieve Inspector Maxwell of some of the 
schools in the northern part of the County, would appear to be in the interests 
of education. Inspector Maxwell has, at present, a surplus of approximately 
forty classrooms. 

The following Inspectors have also under their charge an excessive number 
of teachers and some readjustment of their inspectorates is advisable: Denyes, 
Field, Tom, Smith (Kent), Conn, Carefoot, Thompson, Galbraith (Peel), Day, 
Sheppard, Marshall, Trench, Robinson, Campbell, Hamilton, Christie, Sullivan, 
Power, Jones, Finn and Quarry. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 3 

It will be necessary to add at least one Separate School Inspector to the 
present staff, and if the Separate Schools of the City of Windsor are to be adminis- 
tered as they should be by a Separate School Inspector, it will be necessary 
to appoint two. Hitherto, these schools have received attention from the Chief 
Inspector of Public and Separate Schools, but the increase in their number has 
been so great that it seems impossible to continue this arrangement, which in 
the first instance was only tentative. During the period that these schools 
were administered by the Chief Inspector of Public and Separate Schools, they 
have grown from 24 to 55 classrooms. 

Two additional District Inspectors should also be appointed. The last 
redistribution of these schools was made in 1921, but certain areas in Northern 
Ontario have increased so rapidly and the work of organizing new school districts 
has been so onerous that this course is almost imperative. At present, the great 
extent of territory included in each of these inspectorates makes it impossible 
to -secure direct and speedy action in matters of educational organization and 
reconstruction. The need of the additional Inspectors is evidence of the 
rapid development of the Province. 

Special Problems 

Special attention has been given to special problems. Suburban areas, 
especially in the vicinity of Toronto and Hamilton have been filling up rapidly 
with families desiring to escape from the conditions in a crowded city. The 
migration of these families has been accelerated by the low rates of assessment 
as well as by the possibility of securing homes of their own. A great proportion 
of the householders have large families and they are faced from year to year 
with the necessity of increasing, sometimes of doubling, the school accommoda- 
tions. 

The necessary increases in taxation to meet these outlays appear to them 
appalling and they apparently lose sight of certain countervailing advantages. 
The assessment rate on each parcel of property is not increased proportionately 
as its value advances and so school rates from 20 to 30 or 40 or even 50 mills 
must be levied. Radiating into these districts, there are often wealthy residential 
districts where the families are smaller and where the school rate remains static 
or may even decrease. 

The comparison of the two conditions naturally breeds discontent in the 
less favoured areas and their close proximity to the city induces them to seek 
for their children the same educational advantages as are enjoyed by their 
city neighbours. 

Township Grants 

The principle on which township grants were adjusted in the Schools Act 
of 1920 was a 6 mill rate on the mean assessment. For example, the Act of 1920 
calls for a grant of $500 for each principal and $350 for each assistant where 
the assessed value lies between $60,000 and $100,000. The mean assessment 
in this case is $80,000 and a 6 mill rate will accordingly produce $480, a sum 
slightly less than the grant assigned for each principal. If the principle is reliable 
and it appears to have worked satisfactorily, then another class might be added, 
namely, where the assessment is from $100,000 to $150,000; in which case the 
township grant for a principal might be placed at $750 and for an assistant at 
$550 or $600. Indeed, there is no reason why a further class should not be added 
including assessments from $150,000 upwards, where the township grant, 
estimating in the same way, would be $900 for a principal and $750 for each, 
assistant. 



4 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

As the present average salary per teacher in all classes is over $1,000, it 
could not be urged that this adjustment would interfere with the natural laws 
of demand and supply. 

For the purpose of equalizing school burdens, there are, indeed, only two 
courses open, either that suggested above or the establishment of Township 
Boards. 

Assisted School Fund 

The demands upon this fund have been steadily increasing for the last ten 
years. The amount voted by the Legislature of $68,000 for this fund in 1922 
had to be increased by the sum of $32,000. This fund is especially designed to 
assist the poorer classes of schools, that is, schools where the assessment is below 
$40,000. Large demands are also made upon it to assist in the erection of school 
buildings in the newer parts of the Province. 

It is inevitable, of course, where the population is scattered that considerable 
distances have to be travelled by the children on their way to and from school. 
This difficulty is, however, being alleviated by the establishment of consolidated 
schools to which the children are conveyed. Transportation by water has also 
been employed where roads by land were not open. In other cases of real hard- 
ship the Trustees have been required to provide transportation, with assistance 
from the Provincial funds, where this seemed to be necessary. 

It has been found advisable to regulate the demands made upon this fund 
by a careful estimate in each case of the amount absolutely necessary for carrying 
on the school successfully. The amount is fixed in the first instance by the 
estimate given in the applications of the Inspectors in the newer or poorer districts 
for assistance. As, however, they have no means of knowing the general situation 
throughout the Province, in many cases these estimates have been modified. 
No hope is entertained, however, that the educational burden can be mathemati- 
cally equalized, notwithstanding the varied agencies such as township grants, 
general and special legislative grants and the poor school grants, all operating 
in that direction. It may, indeed, be questioned whether such an equalization is 
even desirable in view of the different economic conditions operating throughout 
the Province. 

The Assisted School fund, unless carefully administered, is apt to encourage 
the multiplication of schools, and Inspectors should carefully bear in mind that 
it is, in general, inadvisable to set up School Sections so small that they must 
be a continual drain upon the Provincial Treasury and that where such Sections 
are organized against their advice, applications should not be made for special 
assistance. 

Directly related to the above is the problem of financing School Sections 
including considerable blocks of unpatented lands occupied by squatters who 
are not liable for taxation. 

Trustee Boards in many cases fail to consider the potentialities of the 
School Section they administer and incur liabilities for the erection of school 
buildings of a more expensive type than the conditions warrant. Accordingly the 
surplus liability is apt to be made a pretext for extraordinary demands upon 
the resources of the fund. It is, on the other hand, true, by the way, that 
Trustees, especially in the early settled parts of the Province, are too often 
inclined to resist reasonable demands made upon them for providing more modern, 
more sanitary and more efficient school structures. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 5 

Accommodations and Equipment 

The Inspectors throughout the Province report substantial progress during 
the year. Many new buildings were erected and extensive improvements made 
to existing buildings. Considerable sums of money have also been expended 
in necessary additions to equipment. The hearty co-operation of the trustees 
in these matters is to be highly commended. 

The Ballard School in Hamilton, having forty-three classrooms and built 
at a cost of $401,000, was opened in September, 1923. South Ontario inspectorate 
reports a sum of $475,000 being spent during the year in Public School buildings. 
The average cost for the Province for new buildings, with some exceptions, 
seems to have been from $7,000 to $9,000 per classroom. 

An unusually large number of schools qualified for library grants by making 
additions to their libraries. This is a very hopeful sign. The Public School 
can render no more useful service to those who attend it than to send them out 
with a taste for good reading. Unfortunately the selection of books for school 
libraries has not always been wisely made. There has been a rather marked 
tendency to neglect to provide books suitable for the younger pupils. To 
overcome this defect the Inspectors in many cases are requiring Boards of Trus- 
tees to put in several sets of books for the Primer, First and Second Classes. 
These may be used for Supplementary Reading in class. It is expected that 
the Department of Education Catalogue of Books, recommended for Public 
and Separate School Libraries, will be revised at an early date. 

Northern Ontario 

Very encouraging reports have been received from the Inspectors in the 
Districts of Northern Ontario. Many new schools have been opened, accommoda- 
dations and equipment have been greatly improved, a very large percentage of 
the teachers are fully qualified and salaries have increased. 

Notwithstanding the difficulties and hardships usually encountered in the 
newer and more remote parts of the Province, the teachers in these districts 
are apparently discharging their duties with commendable zeal and efficiency. 
The splendid work they are doing, in helping to make good Canadian citizens 
of their pupils, many of whom are of foreign parentage, is of the utmost value 
to the community and the nation. 

School Buildings in Fire Area 

From the report of Mr. George White, consulting architect to the 
Department of Education, the following extracts are made: 

"The fire which swept over part of the District of Timiskaming in October, 
1922, destroyed sixteen school buildings. 

"Immediate steps were taken to provide, as far as practicable, for the refugee 
children. Furniture was shipped to the Public and Separate Schools at Cobalt, 
to the Y.M.C.A. building at Cobalt and to St. Joseph's College, North Cobalt, 
then unoccupied. 

"Rebuilding of schools was undertaken at the following places, under the 
supervision of the Department of Public Works: 

Haileybury Public School — 

"Three one-room temporary buildings were erected on Ferguson Avenue, 
and two on the present public school playground. At the same time, the ruins 
of the public school, and the dangerous walls were removed, all materials salvaged 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



and the basement roofed in and fitted up with lavatories, to meet the needs of 
the temporary schools. Later, it was found necessary to provide additional 
accommodation and four additional temporary buildings were erected on Latch- 
ford Street, giving a total accommodation of nine classrooms. 

"A permanent building has been built. This building is of brick, two 
storeys and basement in height, and gives accommodation for twelve class- 
rooms, teachers' rooms, principal's room and library. In the basement are 
playrooms and lavatories, fuel room, boiler room and store-rooms. An effort 
is being made to have the building completed at the Easter recess. So far as 
practicable, the old foundations walls were repaired, and the salvaged materials 
were used in the new work. All the new brick was supplied from the Ontario 
Government Clay Plant at Mimico. 

Haileybury Separate School — 

"The same type of one-room temporary building was adopted for the Separate 
School as was used for the Public School, and one such building was erected. 

"A permanent building of frame, consisting of two rooms, was built. This 
building rests on posts and sleepers, but it is anticipated that the school board 
will eventually place the building on concrete or other foundations with a base- 
ment, and brick veneer the upper walls to correspond with the new permanent 
building afterwards referred to. 

"A second temporary building was found necessary to meet the increasing 
school attendance, and an addition was made to the first building. Later, a 
third temporary building was found necessary. All buildings were built on 
the old Separate School playground. 

"In the meantime, the ruins of the old Separate School were taken down, 
old materials salvaged, the basement roofed in and fitted up with temporary 
lavatory accommodation. 

"A new permanent building has been built. This building is of brick, 
two storeys and basement in height, and gives accommodation for six class- 
rooms, teachers' room and library. In the basement are one large playroom, 
boiler and fuel rooms, and lavatories. The basement walls of the old building 
were found to be so disintegrated that new foundation walls were necessary. 
Salvaged material was used in the new work. All new brick was from the Ontario 
Government Clay Plant, Mimico. 

"It may be pointed out that the temporary school buildings at Haileybury 
can be converted readily into bungalows. There is a suggestion already made 
to convert two of the buildings on Latchford Street, into a children's shelter. 

Public School, North Cobalt, No. 4 Bucke — 

"A one-storey, six-roomed school of frame on posts and sills in three units 
of two rooms with connecting corridors, and having two teachers' rooms and 
library, was designed. Of this, two units of two rooms were built. It was 
found necessary to increase this accommodation, and an additional room, 
forming a section of the third unit, was added. 

Separate Schools, North Cobalt — 

"A four-room school building of one storey of frame on concrete posts and 
wood sills has been erected. 

"Buildings of frame were built as follows, at No. 2 Bucke, Evanturel, 
Thornloe, and No. 3 Hilliard. These buildings consist of one storey with one 
classroom for forty pupils and with two rooms attached for teachers' residence. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 7 

"Schools of a similar type to the above, but giving accommodations for 
only twenty-five pupils and teachers' house, have been erected at No. 2A and 
No. 2B Casey. 

Public Schools, Charlton — 

"Temporary provision was made for school accommodation in the old 
agricultural building which survived the fire; minor alterations were made and 
the necessary furniture was supplied to meet the needs. Later it was found 
necessary to increase the accommodation, and a temporary building was erected 
to accommodate forty pupils and equipped with the necessary furniture. 

"A new Consolidated School has been built on the site of the old Public 
School. This building is a frame structure of two storeys and basement, on a 
foundation of concrete, and gives accommodation for six rooms, each to seat 
forty pupils, teachers' rooms and library. In the basement are a community 
hall with kitchen and retiring rooms, boiler and fuel rooms and lavatories. 
This building has been completed, except in some minor details. 

"With the exception of the two permanent buildings at Haileybury all 
the schools are occupied. They have been fully equipped to meet all needs, 
with school desks, teachers' desks, chairs and blackboards. The teachers' 
apartments, where these are part of the school building, have been furnished 
with beds, mattresses, bureaux, kitchen cabinet, tables and chairs." 

Inspectors' Annual Reports 

The following quotations from the Annual Reports of the Public and Separate 
School Inspectors concerning various matters pertaining to the elementary 
schools of the Province are worthy of note: 

1. Teacher Supply 

"For the first time in some eighteen years the Inspector had not to ask for any Temporary 
certificates." 

"For the first time in many years, all the schools secured fully qualified teachers; and several 
schools on the special list were successful in engaging teachers holding a higher certificate than 
was required by the Regulations." 

"There was little difficulty in securing qualified teachers at midsummer 1923, and indications 
are that the supply of trained teachers will, for the future, be ample to meet all requirements, 
as it is understood that the number at present in training at the Normal Schools is greatly in 
excess of what it has been in former years." 

"This satisfactory state of affairs is probably the combined effect of a variety of causes. 
But whatever circumstances may have brought it about, there can be no doubt that one of the 
most potent has been the higher salaries induced by the increased grants of the past few years 
and the mode of their distribution." 

2. Teaching Efficiency 

"Our teachers are much better prepared and better qualified than at any time in the past, 
and the prescribed courses of study are being well taught." 

"My observations lead to the conclusion that much of the retardation of pupils is caused 
by lack of attention to the Primary, First and Second Book Classes in one-room schools. Reading 
should be the principal thing taught in the lower classes, and yet teachers often have only one 
reading lesson per day in all classes to the end of the Senior Second Class. In graded schools 
the tendency is for the teacher to teach too much arithmetic and to neglect reading. I find also 
that many young teachers do not think they should teach spelling in the Primer or First Book 
Classes." 

"There is too much hearing of lessons in a formal way and not enough teaching, also too 
much note giving in new material without assimilation of the subject matter. Rote learning is 
still emphasized." 

"It seems to me that there are many teachers who appear to have no system in the work of 
starting pupils to read, and that as a result, many children of good intelligence make very poor 
progress or else fall by the wayside. In the First, Second, and even in the Third Classes, I have 
found boys and girls who were classed as dull pupils, and who, upon examination, showed that 
the only apparent reason for their dullness was the fact that they had not properly learned the 
sounds of the letters, and hence had no power to become acquainted with new words." 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



"The character of the teaching has, of necessity, improved. The teachers, almost without 
exception, are good disciplinarians. They are earnest in their work and on the whole devoted 
to the profession. There is greater co-operation now between the school and the home. In 
some localities this has been fostered by Home and School Clubs." 

3. Course of Study 

"There have recently been intimations that the revision of the Public School course of study 
is under consideration or in progress, with a view to reducing the number of subjects to be taught. 
Under present conditions the lesson periods in the average school are only from five to fifteen 
minutes in length, and the wonder is that the results are as satisfactory as they are. I have 
long felt that it would be in the interest of all concerned if fewer subjects were attempted. At 
best the school can have only a limited share in the education of any child, and the opinion which 
seems to prevail in these days that the child should receive its whole education in the school, is 
a very erroneous one, and has led to the undue crowding of the Public School curriculum. I 
would therefore welcome a change in the direction indicated." 

4. Teachers' Reading Course 

"Our teachers are well qualified and most of them doing good work, but I regret to say that 
they are making very little or no use of the professional books that have been placed in every 
public library in the county. It has been suggested that the Department of Education make it 
compulsory for the teachers to read at least one professional book each year and to submit a 
synopsis of the book read." 

General Remarks 

During the year Inspectors Liddy and Broderick, by direction of the Depart- 
ment of Education, spent several weeks visiting schools in the State of Virginia. 
The reports of these Inspectors will soon be published in pamphlet form. 

The progress in all departments throughout the past year has been most 
gratifying. There has been an adequate supply of qualified teachers, salaries 
have been slightly increased, attendance has improved, many auxiliary classes 
have been established for the education of sub-normal children and considerable 
advancement made in matters pertaining to the physical well-being of the 
children. 

The valuable suggestions made in the reports from the various Inspectors 
will receive careful consideration. The increasing interest taken in education 
by such organizations as "The Women's Institute," "The Daughters of the 
Empire," "The School and Home Clubs," and others of a similar character is 
also deeply appreciated. 

Appended to this report are the following reports of the Chief School 
Medical Officer, Dr. J. E. Phair; the Director of the Bureau of Visual Aids, 
Dr. L. B. Jackes; and the Director of Junior Red Cross Work, Dr. S. B. McCready. 

Annual Report of Division of School Hygiene for Year Ending December 31, 1923 

During the year just concluded the policy of the Department as regards 
this service has remained unchanged. It has been necessary, however, owing 
to the decrease in the size of the medical staff, to carry on the many division 
activities on a much smaller scale than heretofore, and this has resulted in a 
very material reduction in the number of units for school health supervision, 
which it has been possible to establish throughout the Province. For almost 
the entire year there were available for field work only four physicians as com- 
pared with seven during 1922. The need for supervision and advice in such 
rural or urban centres as are attempting to carry on the work outlined by the 
Department, has taken practically the entire time of the nurse demonstrators, 
and no serious attempt has been made to continue the former plan of installing 
a demonstrator at the conclusion of the survey in each and every prospective 
unit. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 9 

Four new units actually commenced operations since January 1st, 1923, 
two in Wentworth, one in Haldimand, and one in the District of Sudbury, and 
I have every reason to believe that the work of Dr. Kiteley and Miss Shearer 
in Lincoln County, and of Dr. Sirrs in West York, will result in the early 
extension of the work in these districts. 

An intensive survey was conducted by Dr. Kiteley in the District of Hali- 
burton at the earnest solicitation of Inspector Pentland, with the object of 
ascertaining the degree of goitre present in this county, and it is hoped at an 
early date to take advantage of the information gathered, and establish a 
county-wide demonstration of the value of iodine as a preventive measure in 
combating this widespread and serious condition. About one-third of all the 
children examined were found to be affected, the findings of Dr. Kiteley being 
later corroborated by the local physicians. 

Dr. McKenzie Smith has since October 1st been engaged in a survey of 
the district about Haileybury, which was so disastrously visited by fire in the 
fall of 1922. The Ontario Division of the Red Cross Society proposes to take 
advantage of the information gathered and to arrange for treatment in all 
necessitous cases. 

Dr. Cockburn has spent almost the entire year in the Districts of Sudbury, 
Parry Sound and Muskoka, and her report evidences the urgent need of some 
corrective programme for those so situated financially as to be unable under 
existing circumstances otherwise to obtain adequate treatment. 

During 1923 the statistics for the major defects were as follows: Of 15,281 
children examined, 9 per cent, were found to have defective vision, 16 per cent, 
defective nasal breathing, 22.5 per cent, abnormal tonsils, and 46 per cent, were 
found to have decayed permanent teeth. 

A particularly pleasing feature of the survey work this year has been the 
large number of parents present at the time of examination, over twenty per 
cent, of all children examined being accompanied by one or both parents. 

There is also to be noted continued activity along the lines of school sanita- 
tion in the smaller centres, and an awakened interest in the subject of 
effective health teaching. These it is hoped to foster and encourage and bring 
to greater fruition during the year upon which we are just entering. 

Report of the Bureau of Visual Aids for the Year 1923 

A large number of schools were equipped with projection apparatus during 
the past year and consequently there was a greatly increased demand for the 
use of lantern slides from the Bureau of Visual Aids. Some 208 educational 
centres drew upon the slides collection during the year and there were many 
requests which could not be met. 

During the year the Canadian History set in eight parts was almost completed 
and received very favourable comment from the many schools which used it. 
Many new and unique pictures of Canadian animals and birds were secured 
for nature study; and some industries were photographed. Several hundred 
slides were added on the Natural Resources of Canada and these will be placed 
in circulation as soon as the lecture notes are completed. Plans are well under 
way for the duplication and even triplication of certain lantern slide sets which 
have met with very general approval. Of the 9,000 slides now in stock, about 
4,000 are available for distribution. The remainder will be available as soon 
as the lecture notes are completed. 



10 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Junior Red Cross 

Our thanks are again due to the Ontario Red Cross for the valuable assistance 
rendered to the children in the schools through Junior Red Cross activities. 
Acting as a voluntary auxiliary, the Red Cross has co-operated with the Schools' 
Health Division of the Department in working out an improved method of 
teaching health. 

The use of the Junior Red Cross in the schools has shown steady progress. 
In 1921, there were 108 class groups enrolled in the work. In 1922 there were 
256. In 1923, 515 classes with a membership of 15,654 enrolled. As the 
work has won a place for itself in several of the Normal and Model Schools it 
may be expected that before many years this "activity" method of promoting 
Health in schools will greatly modify the teaching of Hygiene. 

In helping us to train our boys and girls in humanitarian ideals also the 
Junior Red Cross has served the Department well. Through their Crippled 
Children's Fund, many schools have found a means of expressing practical 
sympathy for poor handicapped children in isolated parts of the Province. 
By means of the $6,354.51 contributed by the schools to the Northern Fire Chil- 
dren's Fund, every crippled child (eight in all) in the district about Haileybury 
has been or is being given the best possible care and treatment in the Hospital 
for Sick Children and the General Hospital in Toronto; moreover, every physical 
defect discovered amongst children of pre-school as well as school age through 
an exhaustive survey in the fire area by Dr. Phair's staff is being cared for. 
This is commendable co-operation in practical citizenship. 

In the field of international charity, also, Ontario schools have responded 
well. To the Junior Red Cross appeal on behalf of Japanese children who suffered 
from the great earthquake of September 1st, the sum of $9,414.38 has been contri- 
buted by the schools. It is estimated that in these humanitarian undertakings 
of the Junior Red Cross more than 150,000 Ontario pupils have had a share. 
There can be no doubt that the Junior Red Cross enriches the service of the 
school. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 11 



APPENDIX B 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF 
TECHNICAL EDUCATION 



To the Honourable G. H. Ferguson, B.A., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, 

I have the honour to submit herewith my Annual Report on Industrial and 
Technical Schools. 

I have the honour to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

F. P. Gavin, 
Director of Technical Education. 
Toronto, January 18th, 1924. 



Attendance During Year 1922-23 

The vocational schools showed steady and satisfactory progress during the 
last school year. No better evidence of the advances made can be given than 
the following attendance records. 

The number of full-time day pupils enrolled in the vocational schools was 
6,987, an increase of thirty per cent. (30%) over that of the preceding year. 

The enrolment of part-time day pupils was 988, an increase of 72 per cent., 
and the enrolment of special day pupils was 1,427, a decrease of 11 per cent. 

The total enrolment of all day pupils was 9,402, an increase of 25 per cent. 

The total number of full-time and of part-time day teachers was 337, an 
increase of 24 per cent. 

The number of pupils enrolled in evening vocational classes was 33,511, 
and the number of teachers employed was 1,097. These numbers are about 
three per cent, greater than those of the year before. 

The aggregate number of student hours made by the evening class pupils 
was 1,510,315, an increase of 30 per cent. 

The total number of pupils enrolled in both day and evening schools was 
42,913, and the number of teachers engaged was 1,435. 

The following tables show the attendance in the vocational schools since 
the present system of reporting came into effect. 



1921-22 


1922-23 


212 


286 


60 


51 


5,344 


6,987 


4,260 


5,518 


574 


988 


37,776 


60,972 


1,604 


1,427 


351,214 


243,074 


1921-22 


1922-23 


1,075 


1,097 


32,545 


33,511 


1,176,039 


1,510,315 



12 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Day Vocational Schools 

1920-21 

Number of full-time teachers 191 

Number of part-time teachers .... 

Number of full-time pupils on roll 2,600 

Average attendance of full-time pupils 2,123 

Number of part-time pupils on roll 907 

Aggregate student-hours of part-time pupils 40,996 

Number of special pupils on roll 1,019 

Aggregate student-hours of special pupils 223,570 

Evening Vocational Schools 

1920-21 

Number of teachers 909 

Total number of pupils 27,297 

Aggregate student-hours 1,119,287 

New Schools 

A notable feature of the progress in vocational education for the year 1923 
was the completion of a number of school buildings to provide accommodation 
for carrying on the work. The building programme enabled several new centres 
to establish technical schools or departments. During the year there was a 
greater extension of the work not only in new centres, but also in old centres, 
than in any previous year in the development of vocational education. 

The fine new Windsor- Walkerville Technical School was officially opened 
by the Lieutenant-Governor on August 30th, 1923, and was occupied by the 
pupils and teachers on the regular date for reopening schools in September. 
The excellent accommodation provided, and the carefully-selected but neverthe- 
less adequate equipment furnished, met with the most general approval of 
the people of Windsor and Walkerville. The wisdom of holding the official 
opening and inspection of the building just before the beginning of the term 
was shown by the large number of pupils who applied for admission im- 
mediately after the public opening. 

The enrolment in the school for the autumn term was gratifying to the 
members of the Board and to the staff. The day enrolment was as follows: 
industrial department, 68; technical department, 188; home-making depart- 
ment, 8; commercial department, 403; part-time pupils, 2; making a total of 
669. The evening class enrolment was approximately 2,500, nearly twice as 
many as in the previous year. Interesting features of the evening class pro- 
gramme were classes for stationary engineers held five nights a week, and a 
class for machine shop supervisors and advanced machinists held Saturday 
afternoons. 

The new Riverdale Branch Technical School, Toronto, opened its doors 
for the first time in September, 1923. The opportunities for vocational educa- 
tion here offered, with adequate accommodation and equipment, received 
a most satisfactory response. The number of pupils enrolled in the first 
term of the history of the school was 626 in the day school and 1,800 in the 
evening school. Any anticipation that the opening of the Riverdale Branch 
would reduce the total enrolment in the Central Technical School was not 
realized. The enrolment in the Central School remained at approximately the 
same figures as last year. 

The total number of pupils enrolled in the three vocational schools of 
Toronto, the Central Technical School, the Riverdale Branch Technical School, 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 13 

and the High School of Commerce, for the autumn term of 1923 was 4,755 
day pupils and 10,074 evening pupils. 

The new Kitchener and Waterloo vocational school was occupied early 
in September. The efforts made by the local school authorities in charge of 
the planning, equipping, and promotion of the school, and by the management 
in charge of the organization of the work, to make this new school function 
effectively in the educational life of the communities concerned, have produced 
gratifying results. These efforts were directed towards creating educational 
opportunities that would enable, not only pupils at school, but also adults at 
work, to fit themselves into the industrial and commercial life of Kitchener 
and Waterloo as efficient members of the community. 

The day school enrolment was 369, distributed as follows: Industrial 
department, 21; technical department, 160; and commercial department, 188. 
The evening class enrolment was 870, double the enrolment of the previous year. 

An interesting feature of the evening class programme was the special 
efforts of the Advisory Committee to provide practical instruction directly 
related to the needs of employed persons. This instruction included courses 
in masonry, carpentry, and plan reading for the building trades groups, with 
an enrolment of 30, and special technical courses in rubber manufacturing for 
the rubber industries group, with an enrolment of 70. 

The new school building at Renfrew erected to provide accommodation 
for all secondary school purposes, vocational as well as academic, was formally 
opened early in September. Accommodation is provided in this school for 
agricultural, home-making, and commercial departments. The opening of the 
vocational side of the school was retarded for some time, owing to delays in 
getting the necessary equipment installed. Even under the handicap of beginning 
late in the term, the enrolment in the vocational departments was 68, an enrol- 
ment which may be taken as an earnest of what may be expected when the 
opportunities of these classes are offered prospective students at the usual 
opening of the school year. 

The new Guelph Collegiate- Vocational Institute was opened in September 
for occupancy by the classes and was formally opened on November 7th, 1923. 
The enrolment in the vocational school was 235, made up of 65 in the industrial 
department and 170 in the commercial department. The enrolment in the 
evening classes was 929, an increase over last year of 196. 

The new composite school in St. Catharines, known as the Collegiate 
Institute and Vocational School, was formally opened on November 5th, 1923. 
The school had been in use by the classes from the beginning of the term in 
September. The enrolment in the day vocational school was 249, distributed as 
follows: Industrial department, 69; home-making department, 18; commercial 
department, 162. The evening class enrolment was 921, an increase over last 
year of 511. This large increase of 120 per cent, was due in this case, as in others, 
to the greatly improved facilities for giving instruction in the practical subjects. 

Weston is an example of a relatively small community that has established 
a vocational school offering instruction in industrial subjects. Although the 
building was not ready for use in September, 1923, the local school authorities 
went ahead with the organization of the vocational classes, and succeeded in 
enrolling 178 pupils, distributed as follows: Industrial department, 54; home- 
making department, 9; commercial department, 115. Although instruction was 
carried on for several weeks under adverse conditions, the staff was able to 
retain in the classes the pupils who had enrolled. 



14 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



During the year Owen Sound had under course of erection a substantial 
addition to the Collegiate Institute to provide accommodation for vocational 
education. The building is about completed and will be equipped and ready for 
occupancy by the new industrial and technical classes to be established during 
the summer of 1924. 

In August, 1923, the corner-stone of a large addition to the Gait Collegiate 
Institute was laid by a former student of the school, the Hon. Dr. Cody. This 
addition, which makes adequate provision for the needs of the types of vocational 
education related to the industrial and commercial life of Gait, will be ready for 
occupancy in September, 1924. 

The Sarnia Technical School, which was opened in 1922 with a highly 
satisfactory enrolment in the different vocational departments, shows by an 
increased enrolment for this year that the school is meeting with the approval 
of its constituency. The total enrolment in October, 1923, was 331, distributed 
as follows : Industrial department, 120 ; home-making department, 17 ; commercial 
department, 190; and part-time pupils, 4. 

The following table shows the enrolment in the vocational schools and 
departments for the autumn term of 1923. 







Day Vocational Schools 

Enrolment 












School 


.Is 

"C 
+J 

in 

3 
13 

C 


15 
'S 

H 


•4-> 

u 

< 


a 

e 

i 

s 




[j3 
'0 

u 

<u 

e 
a 





155 
u 

3 

< 


s 

u 

Oh 


is 
'0 

a 





jn 
O 


4-> 

(2 


Chatham 


16 
61 

65 

509 
21 
40 
61 

157 

120 
69 

'69 

10 

914 

411 

'54 
68 


*24 
156 
160 
174 

iii 

*26 

384 
91 

i88 


'32 

*69 

16 


5 

'26 

17 

ioo 

17 

'i2 

17 

'is 
"9 

8 


'97 

138 
170 

188 

282 
79 

224 
41 

190 
92 
57 

162 
48 

1,721 
115 

403 


"is 


490 
i36 

"i 

"4 

2oi 

78 
"2 


■55 

"\9 

'ii 

"2 

387 


16 

64 

46 

65 

24 

888 

183 

333 

65 

277 

21 

140 

66 

7 

86 

49 

1,121 

381 

449 

60 

306 


5 

94 

92 

170 

20 

371 

186 

418 

92 

240 

47 

191 

95 

50 

163 

37 

834 

215 

1,272 

118 

363 


21 


Fort William 


158 


Gait 


138 


Guelph 


235 


Haileybury 


44 


Hamilton 


1,259 


Kitchener 


369 


London 


751 


Niagara Falls 


157 


Ottawa 


517 


Renfrew 

Sarnia 


68 
331 


Sault Ste. Marie. . 


161 


Stamford 


57 


St. Catharines 

Sudbury 

Toronto (Central) 

Toronto (Riverdale) 

Toronto (Commerce) 

Weston 


249 

86 

1,955 

596 
1,721 

178 


Windsor- Walkerville 


669 


Totals 


2,645 


1,324 


117 


223 


4,007 


15 


912 


477 


4,647 


5,073 


9,720 



New Building Projects 

The attendance at the London Technical School has increased to such 
an extent that additional accommodation is required. An addition to the rear 
of the building, which will provide for six additional classrooms, is under course 
of erection. It will be ready for occupancy in the spring months of 1924. 

Ottawa has under consideration plans for providing more accommodation 
by the addition of another floor to the shop building. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 15 

Summer School for Teachers of Vocational Subjects 

The third annual session of the summer school for the training of teachers 
of vocational subjects was held in the Central Technical School, Toronto, 
from July 3rd to August 3rd. 

Included in the enrolment for 1923 were teachers of drafting, machine 
shop practice, carpentry and joinery, automobile mechanics, printing, electrical 
work, sheet metal work, foundry practice, dressmaking and millinery. The 
distribution as to men and women was as follows: — 

1st Year 2nd Year Total 
Men ' 33 13 46 

Women: 

Dressmakers 18 14 32 

Milliners 9 7 16 

Domestic Arts Teachers 17 7 24 

Total 77 41 118 

The domestic arts teachers group shown in the foregoing table was made 
up of certificated teachers of domestic science who wished to obtain a more 
extended training in the trade processes and operations of sewing and dress- 
making. This group was not required to take the work in pedagogy, but was 
permitted to devote the whole time to practical work. 

Examinations were held at the end of the session in the lecture subjects 
and in the practical subjects. The work of the first year was completed satis- 
factorily by 21 men and 27 women, and of the second year by 13 men and 21 
women. 

The course of study included : — 

(1) Principles of Teaching. 

(2) School and Class Management. 

(3) Special Methods of Instruction in Vocational Subjects. 

(4) Trade and Job Analyses. 

(5) Courses of Study. 

(6) Practice Teaching and Lesson Plans. 

(7) Shop Equipment. 

In addition to this work the women had practical instruction in either 
dressmaking or in millinery. 

A new feature of the work for 1923 was the study of the equipment needed 
for the kind of shop with which the teacher was concerned. This feature was 
added to the course of training to meet the needs of teachers who are called 
upon, often without previous experience in the selection of equipment, to give 
advice and leadership in the matter of shop equipment. 

The summer school was organized for the purpose of giving some training 
in the art of teaching to a new group being drafted into the teaching service 
of the Province. The industrial and technical departments of the vocational 
schools give instruction and training in the operations and processes of trades 
and industries. To give this instruction satisfactorily the schools must have 
teachers of such practical subjects as machine shop practice, carpentry and 
joinery, electrical work, plumbing and heating, printing, drafting, building 
trades, sewing and dressmaking. As such teachers should be highly skilled and 
fully competent in their trades, and acquainted with the most approved practice 
in their respective branches, they must be recruited from the trades or industries 
into the schools. 



16 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Teaching, however, is a new trade or art to them. It was found, as was 
to be expected, that without some training in the art of teaching the work done 
in the schools by these teachers was not so effective as it should be. A knowledge 
of the principles of education, and of the methods of instruction, and a training 
in the art of teaching, are just as necessary to the teachers of practical subjects 
as to the teachers of academic subjects. 

Since the organization of the summer school for vocational teachers three 
years ago a marked improvement has been made in the work done in the schools 
by these teachers. Next to the remarkable growth and extension of technical 
schools during the past year, this has been perhaps the most notable feature of 
the development of the work. 

The scheme of providing for the training of vocational teachers in summer 
sessions is, however, inadequate and was conceived as a temporary plan, pending 
more suitable provision. The summer school plan does not afford sufficient 
time for the work that should be done, and does not provide facilities for practice 
teaching with classes of real pupils under actual school conditions. The necessity 
for establishing the training institution for teachers of vocational subjects that 
has been under consideration for some time is urgent. 

In addition to summer courses for teachers of practical subjects reported in 
the foregoing paragraphs, there was given a course of instruction in salesmanship, 
open to High and Continuation School teachers. This course afforded these 
teachers some opportunity of training themselves to teach this new subject, 
now appearing in the programme of commercial departments. The teachers 
who attended the course had not only instruction in the principles of salesman- 
ship, but also actual practice, under store conditions, in retail selling in two of 
Toronto's large departmental stores. 

Evening Class Programme 

In the earlier days of the establishment of evening industrial classes in 
Ontario it may have been thought that they formed merely an incidental feature 
in the development of a programme of technical education, and would have but 
a temporary period of prosperity. 

It was thought that the chief function of evening classes was to repair 
the defects in the education of those who in their youth had been deprived of 
the privileges of an education, or had not availed themselves of such opportunities 
as were afforded them. The number of such persons who would realize defects 
in their education and who would have the ambition and tenacity to attend 
evening classes to repair them would be relatively small. In a few years most 
of these would have taken advantage of the opportunity to attend evening 
classes, and the number seeking admission to the classes would begin to diminish. 
If during these years the day school should function more and more effectively 
in the life of the community, the time would come, under this view of the function 
of evening classes, when there would be no longer any great demand for them. 

The history of evening classes in Ontario during the last decade shows that 
this view was an incomplete one. Instead of becoming relatively less important, 
the evening class programme came to occupy an increasingly important place 
in the system of vocational education. 

The evening class programme functions in a variety of ways in the education 
of those who have passed the compulsory school age. It affords opportunities 
to the following groups: — 

1. Young folks and adults who have left school too early and who find 
that they need more education to succeed in their occupations. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



17 



2. Persons who are ambitious for promotion in their vocations and who 
find it necessary to become adept in the more difficult processes of their trades, 
or to become acquainted with the increasingly important volume of technical 
knowledge related to their trades. Effort must be made to keep pace with the 
developments of industry. In spite of the tendency towards large volume 
methods of production, the place of the skilled and informed workman is still 
secure. 

3. Persons who find that on account of the changing conditions of industry 
under which some occupations are disappearing and new ones coming into 
existence, it is desirable to- fit themselves for employment in a new field. 

Evening class groups, since they are attending school voluntarily and with 
a definite and strong motive, are very much in earnest. From this point of 
view they are highly selected. The difficulties in teaching evening classes are 
not those of discipline. In spite of a rather high mortality in attendance, a 
large amount of excellent work is done every season. 

Evening classes are carried on in every city in the Province, with one 
exception, and in twenty-eight towns or villages. The enrolment in most of 
these places is evidence that they are performing a useful function, and meeting 
with the approval of the public. Statistical records of evening class activities 
in other countries show that an enrolment of 20 per 1,000 of population is evidence 
that the evening class programme is functioning properly in the community. 
The following table shows that in a large number of places in Ontario the enrol- 
ment much exceeds this standard: — 



Evening Class Enrolment, 1922-1923 

Cities 



Name 


Population 


Attendance 
1922-1923 


Enrolment 
per 1,000 


Belleville 


12,206 
29,440 
13,256 
20,541 
13,216 
18,128 

114,151 
21,763 
60,959 
14,764 

107,843 
12,190 
20,994 
14,886 
16,094 
19,881 
16,026 
14,877 
21,092 

521,893 

45,650 
9,935 


400 

988 

282 

642 

335 

733 
3,739 

410 
1,091 

485 
4,748 

496 

408 

267 

518 

410 

288 

765 

437 
2,790 (Com'c'l) 
7,240 (Tech'c'l) 
1,655 

169 


33 


Brantford 


34 


Chatham 


21 


Fort William 


32 


Gait 


26 ' 


Guelph 


40 


Hamilton 


33 


Kitchener 


19 


London 


18 


Niagara Falls 


33 


Ottawa 


44 


Owen Sound 


40 


Peterborough 


19 


Port Arthur 


17 


Stratford 


32 


St. Catharines 


20 


St. Thomas 


18 


Sarnia 


51 


Sault Ste. Marie 


21 


Toronto 


19 


Windsor- Walkervi lie 


36 


Woodstock 


17 







18 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Towns and Villages 



Name 

Amherstburg 

Barrie 

Beamsville and Township 

Brockville 

Cobourg 

Collingwood 

Dundas 

Espanola 

Fairbank 

Gananoque 

Goderich 

Hespeler 

Ingersoll 

Iroquois Falls 

Kenora 

Lindsay 

Midland 

North Bay 

Oshawa 

Pembroke 

Perth 

Port Hope 

Preston 

Sudbury 

Swansea 

Timmins 

Welland 

Whitby 



Population 



Attendance 
1922-1923 



Enrolment 
per 1,000 



2,769 
6,936 
3 ; 860 

10,040 
5,327 
5,882 
4,978 
3,051 

12,000 
3,694 
4,107 
2,777 
5,150 
1,178 
5,407 
7,620 
7,016 

10,692 

11,940 
7,875 
3,790 
4,456 
5,423 
8,621 
2,000 
3,843 
8,654 
2,800 



78 


26 


101 


14 


121 


31 


389 


39 


160 


30 


136 


23 


105 


21 


75 


25 


169 


14 


85 


23 


140 


35 


183 


66 


96 


19 


116 


10 


104 


20 


189 


25 


No report 


received. 


265 


25 


223 


19 


303 


39 


252 


66 


52 


12 


172 


32 


343 


39 


31 


16 


63 


16 


194 


22 


70 


25 



Co-Operative Apprentice Classes 

A substantial step forward in the matter of co-operation between the 
school and industry in the training of apprentices has been taken in Hamilton. 
Arrangements have been made by Principal Gill of the Hamilton Technical 
Institute with the Canadian Westinghouse Company, and certain other firms, 
whereby the apprentices will attend the school four hours a week during the 
day and two hours a week in the evening. These apprentices include machinists, 
electric machinists, moulders, carpenters, pattern-makers, and glass-workers. 
At the school the apprentices will receive instruction in English composition, 
drafting and design, shop mathematics, and shop practice. 

The conditions under which the Westinghouse apprentices attend the 
Technical Institute are as follows: — 

1. AH apprentices taken on are to have an educational standard equivalent 
to High School Entrance standing; 

2. All apprentices are to attend classes at the technical school for the 
required number of hours per week; 

3. All apprentices are to be paid the regular rate of pay for the time in 
attendance at day school. Pay is to be deducted in case of absence from school, 
on the same basis as deductions are made for absence from work; 

4. The Technical Institute is to submit a weekly absentee report to the 
Company; 

5. All apprentices are required to write on an examination every six months, 
the examination to be set jointly by the Company and the school; 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 19 

6. The results of the examination will be taken into consideration in fixing 
rates of pay ; 

7. The Company will pay the registration fees for the evening classes at 
at which regular attendance is required, and non-attendance without reasonable 
excuse, or permission, will be considered cause for dismissal; 

8. The schedule of work will be prepared jointly by the Principal of the 
school and a representative of the Company. 

The number of apprentices being trained under this co-operative scheme 
is now fifty-four. Arrangements are being made to offer the advantages of the 
scheme to other trades. This scheme shows the kind of co-operation that must 
be established between the technical school and industry. In such a scheme 
the young apprenticed worker is afforded an opportunity to obtain an insight 
into the science, mathematics, and related knowledge underlying his trade, 
which under modern conditions of industry he can no longer obtain on the job, 
and at the same time to continue to some extent his general education. On 
the one hand, he will become a more skilled workman, and, on the other, a more 
intelligent citizen. 

It should be added that the Hamilton Technical Institute has had for some 
time a similar arrangement with the local branch of the International Typo- 
graphical Union, whereby printing apprentices receive instruction in their art 
at the school during certain specified hours for which they are paid by the 
employers. The number of apprentices in the printing trade is twenty-eight. 

In Ottawa a co-operative scheme for making use of the facilities of the 
Technical School for the training of plumbers and steamfitters has been arranged 
between the Master Plumbers, the local Union, and the school. Under the 
scheme apprentices and helpers attend evening classes for such instruction 
as they do not receive on the job. The City Inspection Department make use 
of the equipment of the school shop in conducting the examinations for civic 
licenses. 

The printing department of the Ottawa Technical School provides for the 
part-time training of apprentices. By agreement between the Typographical 
Union and the two daily newspapers of the city, all apprentices are required to 
attend the Technical School as follows: "Beginning with the second year each 
apprentice shall be required to attend at least one session each week during the 
school term of the Ottawa Technical School, time being allowed for the same 
by his employer." 

Still another co-operative relation between the school and industry has 
been established in Ottawa. The Local Machinists Trades Union asked that 
the school should organize special evening classes for the instruction of appren- 
tices and helpers in the machine tool trades. The Union requires all apprentices 
in the trade to attend these classes, and furnishes the management of the school 
with a list of the names of the men who should enrol. As this list contains only 
the names of persons actually in the trade, it is used as a preferred list in organiz- 
ing the classes. This list is so large that not all who wish to come can be accommo- 
dated, and so there is a waiting list. The existence of this waiting list has a 
very good effect on the attendance of those who have been admitted to a class. 

"Interest in apprentice education, as is true of vocational education in 
general, develops out of social and economic needs. Merely to insure its con- 
tinuance, society requires of its members a great variety of services. So long 
as these services are regularly rendered no particular attention is paid to them. 
Something unusual must happen to make the public appreciate the inconvenience 
and expense necessarily involved when any particular line of work is interrupted. 



20 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Under present conditions very commonly workers are left to learn in casual and. 
informal ways to do the particular jobs which society requires them to do. For 
many occupations no organized system of training has been set up, and boys 
and girls on leaving school drift into such occupations largely by chance according 
as opportunity to get employment of some sort presents itself. 

"Society as a whole has to pay the bill for labour inefficiency. Half-trained 
or poorly trained workers in any field increase production costs, which in turn 
are passed on to the consumer. Clearly the public, labourers as well as others, 
have an interest in securing an adequate supply of well-trained workers for 
every line of necessary work. It is generally conceded without argument that 
the public have such an economic interest, but it is not always conceded that 
educational agencies can be effectively utilized in promoting this interest. 

"Developments in apprentice education seem, however, to justify the 
conclusions that such education should be made an integral part of our school 
training. This does not mean necessarily that the schools should actually take 
over apprentice training where such training is already being provided by 
private industries, nor even that public agencies should always take the initiative 
in establishing apprentice training. It means simply that the public interest 
is sufficiently well defined to make it incumbent upon the State to supply leader- 
ship and assume a considerable degree of responsibility in the development and 
general supervision of apprentice education. 

"For the solution of certain problems incident to the development of 
apprentice and part-time education, a high degree of co-operation is, in fact, 
essential between the schools, labour organizations, and employers. The interest 
of each of these agencies is very apparent. Of the school the primary interest 
may be to serve the individual pupil by providing opportunity for development 
commensurate with the pupil's latent capabilities. In proportion as the pupil 
is rendered vocationally more efficient, however, the employer's interests are 
promoted, since he is provided with a more efficient worker. And, finally, the 
benefits of vocational efficiency extend to the community as a whole, since the 
vocationally efficient worker is, as compared with the vocationally inefficient 
worker, generally a better citizen of his community, and of his country." 
(Apprentice Education, Bulletin 87, Federal Board for Vocational Education, 
Washington, D.C.). 

The Principal of the School 

The need for the Principal of a vocational school overseeing the work of the 
staff and pupils is great. In the ordinary academic school, courses of study 
are uniform and well defined, methods of instruction are refined, and schemes 
of organizing the school are established. Teachers may be left much to them- 
selves to carry on the work along the beaten track. In the vocational school, 
on the other hand, courses of study, methods of instruction, and schemes of 
organization have not yet been determined by experierice. Hence, the respon- 
sibilities of the Principal of a vocational school for planning the work, supervising 
the instruction, and adjusting the organization, to produce effective results are 
greater than those of a Principal of the older type of school. 

The Principal should give a large part of his time to 

(a) a systematic observation of the teaching in class-rooms, as well as in 
shops ; 

(b) a study of the results to determine to what extent adjustments are 
needed; 

(c) frequent conferences with teachers regarding matter and method. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 21 

The Principal should be constantly active in stimulating and directing the 
teachers in the selection and presentation of subject matter suited to meet 
the purposes of the school. In doing this he should make frequent and periodic 
inspection of full-time recitations. He should take special care to see that the 
work of the shops is co-ordinated with the work of the class-rooms, and the 
work of one shop with that of another. Fie should have the progress of the work 
recorded in some systematic way so that he is able at all times to know in detail 
what work has been taken up in every class, when it was taken up, and what 
the results were. 

The Principal should spend sufficient time outside of the school walls to 
learn the needs of the industries of the community, and of the workers of the 
industries, in so far as they are related to the function of the school, to the 
end that the work in the school may effectively meet these needs. 

To a large degree the success and prosperity of the day and evening classes 
will depend on the energy, wisdom, and ability of the Principal, and his interest 
in vocational education. 

Midland Navigation School 

At the request of a number of masters, mates, and engineers connected 
with lake shipping, a new navigation school was opened in Midland in January, 
1923. The school is conducted in both day and evening sessions during the 
months of January, February, and March and provides instruction for men 
going up for the examinations for Masters' and Mates' certificates, and for 
Marine Engineers' certificates. The enrolment for the first session of the 
Midland Navigation School was twenty-four. 

There are now three centres, namely, Kingston, Collingwood, and Midland, 
in which day navigation schools are carried on during the winter months. 

Bulletins 

Special bulletins on particular courses of study were prepared by members 
of the Technical Branch during the year. 

A bulletin on Stationary Engineering was prepared for the use of candidates 
going up for examination for certificates as Stationary Engineers. It was 
prepared by the Technical Branch of the Department of Education in co-opera- 
tion with the Board of Stationary and Hoisting Engineers of the Department 
of Labour of Ontario. The arrangement of the subject matter, with its sub- 
divisions into units, was planned to meet the needs of teachers and students in 
special evening classes for engineers. Copies of the bulletin were distributed 
to all schools offering such classes. Additional copies for the use of students may 
be obtained from the Department at a nominal charge. 

A bulletin on Home Nursing was prepared for the use of teachers of this 
subject. Copies were distributed to all centres where home nursing classes are held. 

A bulletin outlining in detail a course of study in Sewing and Dressmaking 
was distributed to all evening class centres. This bulletin was specially planned 
to offer guidance and detailed directions to the teachers of this subject. A large 
number of these teachers have had no training in the selection and organization 
of the subject, and were in urgent need of such help as the bulletin offered. 
The distribution of this bulletin is already having beneficial results. 

A series of bulletins entitled "Vocational Education," prepared by the 
Director of Technical Education for the Dominion of Canada, is being published 
periodically by the Department of Labour of Canada. These bulletins, which 
may be obtained on application, should be read by all principals, teachers, 
members of governing bodies, and others interested in vocational education. 



22 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



APPENDIX G 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTORS OF 
CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 

To the Honourable G. H. Ferguson, B.A., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 
Sir — 

We have the honour to submit the following joint report on the conditions 
of the Continuation Schools of the Province for the year 1923. 

G. K. Mills. 
J. P. Hoag. 
Toronto, January 2nd, 1924. 



The Continuation School Inspectors have visited each school in the Province 
at least once during the school year. They have paid a second .visit to several 
schools where circumstances made it advisable for them to do so or at the request 
of Boards of Trustees for them to attend public meetings of ratepayers in order 
to discuss building programmes. In addition to visits to schools already estab- 
lished, the Inspectors have been called upon to attend many meetings to discuss 
with Boards of Trustees and with ratepayers the advisability of establishing 
new schools. During recent years the number of calls made on the Inspectors 
to attend such meetings has increased steadily. Already there are requests 
from a number of Boards of Trustees for an Inspector to attend meetings in 
1924, so as to assist in securing the approval of ratepayers to the erection of 
new school buildings or to the enlarging of existing buildings or to approve of 
the establishing of new schools. 

Continuation Schools in Operation, December 31st, 1923 

West East 

(1) Schools employing: The full time of four teachers 1 

(2) " « " " three " 21 7 

(3) " " " " two " 46 55 

(4) " " " " one teacher and at least half the 

time of a second teacher 5 10 

(5) " " The full time of one teacher 25 18 

98 90 

Continuation Schools that Became High Schools 

The following Continuation Schools were given the status of High Schools 
during 1923: Hanover, Huntsville, Lakefield, Mimico, New Liskeard, Thessalon, 
Timmins, Port Colborne, (8). 

New Schools 

Continuation Schools were established at fourteen centres during 1923, viz., 
Brooklin, Capreol, Fordwich, Janetville, Kinmount, Kirkland Lake, Lefroy, 
Mallorytown, Otterville, Selkirk, Sparta, Thornton, Tiverton, Wales. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 23 

Additional Teachers on Staffs 

During 1923, perhaps the most striking indication of public recognition 
of the service these schools are giving may be noted in the increased attendance 
and the consequent increase in the teaching staffs. In three schools the Boards 
made arrangements to increase the staff by half the time of an additional teacher. 
In ten schools the staff was increased from one to two teachers, in sixteen schools 
from two to three teachers and in one from three to four teachers. 

Prospective High Schools 

In each of the following Continuation Schools the full time of three teachers 
is employed: Acton, Alvinston, Blenheim, Brussels, Cookstown, Creemore, 
Drayton, Dresden, Finch, Grand Valley, Lanark, Lucknow, Marmora, Maxville, 
Paisley, Port Credit, Ridgeway, Ripley, Rodney, Stayner, Tamworth, Tees- 
water, Thornbury, Thorndale, Warkworth, West Lome, Wheatley (27). In one 
school, Bridgeburg, four teachers are employed. 

When the attendance at a school becomes so great that it is necessary to 
engage three teachers, and this attendance promises to be a permanent condition, 
it would be in the interest of such a centre to give the school the status of a High 
School. When the attendance necessitates four teachers all grants from Con- 
tinuation School funds should cease. 

The School Boards and Village Councils of many of the places named 
above would take the necessary steps to establish High Schools but for the 
clause in the High Schools Act, Section 7 (1) (a), which requires a population 
of one thousand before a new High School district can be established. However 
wise this provision may have been at the time it was made, it is not necessary 
now when the County pays the total cost of maintenance of County pupils and 
a share of eighty per cent, of the cost of the building. 

The Supply of Teachers 

During the past summer the supply of qualified principals was at least 
equal to the demand and there was a surplus of qualified assistants. Notwith- 
standing this condition it has been necessary to issue temporary certificates, 
principally in Art or Physical Culture. This is largely due to lack of under- 
standing and to carelessness on the part of school boards in making a choice of 
applicants. When boards become aware that a temporary certificate means a 
considerable reduction in the grant, more care will be exercised in selecting 
teachers. During the coming summer it will be possible to select teachers from 
large numbers of applicants and there will no longer be the same necessity for 
tolerating unqualified or inefficient teachers. 

Under present conditions First Class certificates are being obtained at a 
very early age and these certificates qualify the holder to teach what is known 
as High School work to the end of Entrance to the Normal Schools, or Entrance 
to the Universities. The surplus of such teachers should have other conse- 
quences than that of providing school boards with a choice of applicants with the 
resulting decrease in salary. It will make it possible for the Department to 
improve the service given by these schools to the communities in which they are 
located in at least two important ways. While accepting all certificates already 
issued, the qualifications required from principals of all Continuation Schools 
doing Middle School work should, in future, include a course of one year in a 
LTniversity, or the College of Agriculture, or a School of Domestic Science. 



24 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

The additional maturity, scholarship and experience are much needed by the 
great majority of the teachers who are. now entering on this work and, when 
obtained, there can be little doubt but the work done in many of the schools will 
be considerably improved. 

Having a supply of suitably qualified teachers, it would then be possible 
for the Department to consider the advisability of modifying and extending the 
work done in Continuation Schools so that they might serve not only those who 
have passed the Entrance examination and wish to enter some profession, but 
all the youth of the locality. It was for this purpose that these schools were 
established, but the demand, up to the present, of both pupils and parents has 
been almost entirely for the usual High School Course of Study. Because of 
this demand the work of these schools differs in no way from that of the tradi- 
tional High School. 

Schools Better Adapted to the Needs of the Community 

The charge is frequently made that pupils who attend secondary schools 
become educated away from the farm and rarely return to it. There is some 
truth in this but the cause is to be found in the aim of the parents and the 
associations and habits formed by the pupils during the four or five years attend- 
ance at the secondary school rather than in the course of study. However, it is 
true that notwithstanding the fact that we are now giving a secondary school 
education to a much larger percentage of rural pupils than formerly, there is 
little in the usual course of study that tends to interest the youth in the things 
of the farm or of the home. Continuation Schools are usually located in the 
small centres and derive the greater part of the attendance from the farms of 
the surrounding country for a distance of five to ten miles or more. They are 
admirably situated and could readily be made to serve the needs of all the youth 
of the districts in which they are located. That these schools offer opportunities 
only to those pupils who pass the Entrance examination is due to the fact, very 
apparent to those engaged in Continuation School work, that the demand of the 
great majority of parents who have children in attendance is for a course of 
study that leads by the shortest possible route to some profession, or what is 
rather contemptuously referred to by some as a "white collar job." 

That this should be the aim of very many parents and pupils is neither 
strange nor unworthy. In the home there are usually several children to give a 
start in life. It is impossible to provide farms for all and it is especially difficult 
now to put a boy in the way of acquiring one for himself. The parent is trying 
to deal fairly with all his children and his attention is necessarily directed to the 
opportunities which are open to those who have taken a High School education 
as a preparation for business, industrial pursuits, or for entrance into one of the 
professions. He naturally compares the financial and social advantages of those 
who are engaged in these occupations with those of the farmer and he finds them 
attractive. In his desire to see his children established in a substantial way 
either on the home farms or in some respectable occupation he will not willingly 
tolerate anything that appears to interfere with his plans or prolong the time the 
pupil has to spend in the High School. At home he is content to live economically 
and the children who elect to remain on the land are usually satisfied with the 
arrangement as they see their reward in the property about them. 

The chief fault to be found with this arrangement is that the boys and girls 
who elect to remain on the land do not receive any education along the lines they 
have decided to follow in life, as do the boys and girls who live in the large towns 
and cities. In these places public assistance is given towards the building and 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 25 

maintenance of Technical Schools, Art Schools, Commercial Schools, etc., to 
give an education and a training to those who do not wish to take the usual course 
of the High Schools. The courses given in these schools are appreciated and 
used by thousands of the youth in towns and cities. Corresponding provision 
could readily be made for the youth of rural districts in the way of winter schools 
if any demand for it were discernible. It would seem that the very people 
who would profit most by the establishment of winter schools are the last to see 
the benefit and to accept for their children what has for some years been enjoyed 
by the young people of the towns and cities. 

The Increased Attendance 

The marked increase in attendance at Continuation Schools is general 
throughout rural and urban communities alike. It is due to several causes, 
chief among which are the depression in industrial life, the lack of profit in 
agricultural occupations, the attractions of professional life, but most of all 
to the more general recognition of the need of a better education as a preparation 
for successful work in any calling. 

A few years ago the assertion was frequently made, and it is still heard, 
that not more than ten per cent, of the pupils of the Public Schools ever enter 
the secondary schools. However true this may have been at that time, it is 
far from true at the present time. Within a radius of six miles of many Con- 
tinuation Schools it is not uncommon to find ten per cent, of the rural school 
attendance passing the Entrance examination each year and attending the 
neighboring Continuation School. If the average pupil spends seven years in 
completing his Public School course this will mean that about seventy per cent, 
of the school attendance of that district will attend a secondary school. It is 
true that in sections more remote from secondary school opportunities the 
number of pupils who pass the Entrance examinations and go on to school 
does not usually reach ten per cent, of the attendance each year. The most 
marked influence that the Continuation School has on the surrounding rural 
schools is due to the fact that both parents and pupils see an opportunity to 
get a High School education that was not possible before. As a result the pupils 
attend more regularly and make better progress in their later years at the 
Public School. 

Those Not Provided For 

Notwithstanding that it is our aim to provide all the youth of this Province 
with equal educational advantages in so far as this may be possible, there are 
two classes of young people that have not received the consideration to which 
they are fairly entitled. 

The first class is made up of those who do not reach the standard of 
Entrance examination. For various reasons they have dropped out of the 
Public School and no further consideration has been given to them. Public 
effort to maintain secondary schools has, up to the present, been directed for 
the benefit of those who have passed the Entrance examination. Institutions 
maintained by public taxation should serve all the people who wish to use 
them. The Public School system has fulfilled this condition with fair efficiency 
for many years. Continuation Schools are an extension of the Public School 
system rendered necessary by the changed conditions of life. Approximately 
half of all rural and village school pupils will live their lives in rural 
surroundings, and, no matter how the environment of the other half may 



26 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

change, they will always remain deeply interested in and affected by the 
problems of rural life. Because of these facts every effort should be made to 
extend the secondary school system so that it will meet the needs of all the 
youth of rural and village communities. 

The second class is much larger and consists of those located at long distances 
from secondary schools either in the Districts or in the sparsely settled parts of 
some counties, or, frequently, in the prosperous parts of counties where for various 
reasons there is little interest in public education. Such pupils have a right to 
the educational advantages of secondary schools. In many cases the 
absence of these schools is due to the fact that neither School Boards nor 
ratepayers are aware of the very generous provision made for the maintenance 
of Continuation Schools. 

The areas of the two inspectoral divisions of the Province are so 
immense, the distances to travel so long and the number of schools to inspect so 
great that it is impossible to give the organization of such an immense territory 
the attention it deserves so that secondary schools may be brought within 
reasonable reach of as many as possible of the youth of Ontario. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 27 



APPENDIX D 



REPORT OF THE HIGH SCHOOL INSPECTORS 



To the Honourable G. H. Ferguson, B.A., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — We have the honour to submit the following joint report on the High 
Schools and Collegiate Institutes of the Province for the academic year 1922-23. 

J. A. Houston, 
I. M. Levan. 
G. F. Rogers. 

Toronto, December 31st, 1923. 



Inspection 



For the purposes of inspection the High Schools and Collegiate Institutes 
of the Province are grouped together into three geographically related divisions, 
each of which is under the special charge of one of the Inspectors. For the 
present year Mr. Houston has had oversight of the schools in the Eastern division, 
Mr. Levan of those in the Western, and Mr. Rogers of those in the Northern. 
During the year each Inspector has paid an official visit to every school in his 
special charge. 

Growth and Expansion 

The year has been one of marked prosperity for the High Schools, which 
have experienced a continued growth along all lines. The present year shows a 
greater number of High Schools than last year, a greater number of students in 
attendance, more teachers, better salaries, more new buildings, and better 
accommodations. 

During the year the High Schools at North Toronto and Walkerville have 
qualified to become Collegiate Institutes, and the Continuation Schools at 
Chapleau, Elmira, Hanover, Lakefield, Mimico, New Liskeard, Thessalon, and 
Timmins have been raised to the status of High Schools. The High School 
system now contains 131 High Schools and 50 Collegiate Institutes, a total of 
181 schools, as compared with 175 last year. During the year the attendance 
has increased by 5,226 pupils. In teachers there has been an increase of 123, 
of whom 67 are men and 56 are women. While the number of non-graduate 
teachers has decreased by 8, there has been an increase of 131 in the number 
of graduate teachers, and the number of teachers with specialist standing has 
increased by 107. These numbers speak eloquently of the progress made during 
the year. 



28 • THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

There has also been, on the whole, an increase in the salaries paid to teachers, 
as the following tables will show: 

High Schools 

1921-22 1922-23 

Highest salary paid $4,375 00 $4,000 00 

Average salary for principals 2,478 00 2,580 00 

Average salary for male assistants 2,253 00 2,153 00 

Average salary for female assistants 1,786 00 1,806 00 

Collegiate Institutes 
1921-22 1922-23 

Highest salary paid $4,500 00 $5,000 00 

Average salary for principals 3,356 00 3,486 00 

Average salary for male assistants 2,554 00 2,624 00 

Average salary for female assistants 2,023 00 2,112 00 

School Buildings 

There has been continued activity in the erection of new buildings. During 
the last five years more new buildings have been erected and more extensions 
made to existing buildings than in any similar period in all our previous history. 
For this, three causes have been primarily responsible: The cessation of building 
activity during the war, by which much necessary building was carried over to 
the post-war period; the enormous increase of attendance at the High Schools, 
which could not be accommodated in the former buildings; and the legislation 
of 1921, which made the County Council responsible for a proportionate share 
of the expense of new buildings for schools attended by county pupils. 

For the Collegiate Institutes, excellent new buildings have been erected 
and are now occupied at Guelph, Kitchener, Renfrew, and St. Catharines. 
Extensive additions have been made to existing buildings at Brantford, Lindsay, 
North Bay, and the following Collegiate Institutes in Toronto: Harbord, 
Humberside, Malvern, North Toronto, Oakwood, Parkdale, and Riverdale. 
Excellent new buildings are in process of construction for a second Collegiate 
Institute at Hamilton, and for the Jarvis Street Collegiate Institute in Toronto; 
and extensive additions are in course of construction at Gait and Owen Sound. 
The question of erecting new buildings or of extending those now existing is 
under consideration in Collingwood, Fort William, Goderich, and Port Arthur. 

Among the High Schools there has been similar activity. New buildings 
have been erected and are now occupied at Aurora, Carleton Place, Essex, Fort 
Frances, Leamington, New Liskeard, Paris, and Westboro (Nepean High School). 
New buildings are in process of construction at Bradford, Hanover, Mitchell, 
Thessalon, and Timmins. Extensive additions have been made to the buildings 
at Alliston, Arnprior,. Cornwall, Midland, Niagara Falls South, Oakville, Oshawa, 
Tillsonburg, and Weston. In addition, new buildings have been decided on in 
Caledonia, Campbellford, Mimico, Richmond Hill, and Uxbridge; and the 
question of erecting new buildings or of extending those now existing is under 
consideration in Athens, Exeter, and Port Hope. 

We need but compare the newly erected buildings with those erected not 
more than a dozen years ago to realize how much we have advanced in school 
architecture, with what care questions of health such as those of lighting and 
ventilation are considered in the new buildings, how much better is their pro- 
vision for the practical teaching of science, for the carrying on of the exercises 
in physical culture throughout the school year, and for enabling all the classes 
to be assembled together for daily opening exercises or for meetings of the 
literary society. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 29 

The Entrance Examination 

During the year new regulations were issued for the conduct of the examina- 
tion for admission to the High Schools. By these regulations wider powers 
have been conferred on local boards in determining results. The standard for 
passing has not been altered, and it is expected that this standard will be used 
in determining most of the results. But the settlement of all difficult, compli- 
cated or doubtful cases, as well as the final decision in all cases of appeal, rests 
now with the local board instead of being referred, as formerly, to the decision 
of the Minister. As the local boards contain members representing the Public 
Schools as well as members representing the High Schools, who are acquainted 
with local conditions, it should follow that the interests of the pupils, as well as 
of the High Schools, will be properly guarded under the new system. As to the 
effect that this change will have upon the High Schools, there has not yet been 
sufficient time to form an opinion. 

The Course of Study 

As the new programme of studies has been in full operation for over two 
years, it is now possible to estimate its effect with some degree of certainty. It 
was intended to shorten the High School course by one year, to relieve over- 
pressure, and to lessen the burden of examinations. From its first introduction 
the scheme was welcomed, and it has been steadily growing in favour. Changes 
will doubtless be necessary to increase its effectiveness, but it is accomplishing 
what was expected of it. The dropping of one year from the Upper School 
course has had the result of retaining in the schools for Upper School work many 
pupils who, under the former system, would have left school after completing 
the Middle School course; and thus the High Schools are giving to the Public 
Schools many more teachers with first class certificates. The complaints against 
overpressure, so common a few years ago, are no longer heard. No pupil of the 
Lower School or Middle School may carry more than eight subjects in any year. 
The course has been simplified in both the Lower School and the Middle School. 
In the Lower School eight subjects, which under the former system were carried 
for two years, are now carried for only one year each. In the Middle School the 
Ancient and the Modern Languages are the only subjects which are carried for 
more than oneyear. Thissimplification of the course haspermitted intensive study, 
and is giving good results. The examination system has also been simplified. 
Under the former system every candidate for admission to the Normal School 
or to the University was required to pass examinations on eight or twelve papers 
at one time, and if he failed in more than one paper he received credit for none. 
Now he may try an examination, if he chooses, on one paper only, or on more, 
and he receives credit for each paper on which he passes. 

The Lower School* Examination 

The new course has had a radical effect on the conduct of the Lower School 
examination. The provision for granting a Graduation Diploma to every 
pupil who passes a satisfactory examination on twelve papers has had the effect 
of increasing enormously the number of candidates writing on the Lower School 
subjects. So great did the number of candidates become at the Lower School 
examinations that it was found impossible to carry on this examination as before 
and new measures had to be devised for overcoming the difficulty. A simple 
plan suggested itself. This was, to excuse from this examination all those 



30 THE REPORT OF THE No, 17 

candidates who, in the opinion of their teachers and the Principal, were abso- 
lutely sure to pass, and to grant them certificates on the recommendation of the 
Principal. Under this plan only those candidates who were doubtful of passing 
were required to write at the departmental examinations. The success with 
which these proposals could be carried out depended entirely on the cordial 
co-operation of the teachers. The plan was tried at the examination of 1923. 
As was to be expected, teachers and principals accepted the added burden 
which the plan imposed upon them in the finest spirit of co-operation, and 
exercised most praiseworthy care in making their recommendations. The plan 
proved entirely successful and is to be repeated at the examination of 1924. It 
was intended for the advantage of the Department, but has worked out to the 
advantage of the teachers and pupils as well. 

The Teaching 

Reading, Writing, and Spelling. — Much still remains to be done to improve 
the reading of High School pupils. The responsibility for doing this work now 
rests with the teacher of English. It is true that few lessons in literature are 
conducted without a good deal of oral reading. But too frequently the reading 
is done by the teacher, under the impression that he can better interpret the 
meaning of the passage under consideration in this way than can the pupil. 
Doubtless this is true; but it is the pupil and not the teacher who needs this 
practice. The pupil learns to read by reading, and to deprive him of practice 
gets him nowhere. As for the teacher, it is only by requiring his pupils to read 
orally in class — and to read much — that he can discover what he should be 
interested in discovering and correcting, namely, not only his pupil's weakness 
in interpreting the meaning of the printed page so that others may understand, 
but, much more, his oftentimes deep-rooted habit of crucifying the English 
language by his careless, indistinct, or slurred pronunciation of its words. It 
is not uncommon to hear gross faults in pronunciation or articulation pass 
unchallenged in the English lesson. In fact, in not a few schools the accurate 
and careful pronunciation of Latin and French words receives more consideration 
in the classes in foreign languages than that of English words receives in the 
English classes. 

One of the commonest criticisms levelled at our High Schools by the man 
on the street as well as by the employer of young labour, is their inability to 
graduate, after a course which varies from one to four or five years, a large 
proportion of accurate spellers and legible writers. Indeed, the charge is fre- 
quently made that a High School education spoils a pupil's writing and does 
not improve his spelling. In these respects the graduates of our Ontario schools 
are compared, to their disadvantage, with the products of the Old Country 
schools. 

To dismiss, in cavalier fashion, all such criticism as unfair, does not silence 
it. Such criticism indicates that there is a popular demand that we pay more 
attention to some of those subjects that do not bulk very large on our High 
School programme of studies. 

To train a pupil to do exactly as he is told, "to carry the message to Garcia," 
is not the duty of any one teacher on the staff. Here team-work is just as 
necessary as in other branches of school endeavour. Every member of the 
staff should be, by example as well as by precept, a teacher of neatness and 
accuracy; pupils are essentially imitative. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 31 

Canadian History. — Few pupils enter the high school with more than a 
meagre knowledge of Canadian history. This subject, with the story of the 
venturous exploits that won for us the vast tract of land we now call Canada, 
and of the hardships, struggles and sacrifices endured by our forefathers to win 
for us the liberties we now enjoy and prize, is a fascinating story, which, if 
properly presented, has an appeal for young Canadians which should be irre- 
sistible. But to many pupils in many schools it is sheer drudgery, as it concerns 
itself chiefly with writing down and committing to memory dry "notes" of little 
human interest, which make no appeal to the imagination and do little more 
than inspire dislike. Giving "notes" is not teaching history, memorizing 
"notes" is not learning history. The pupil whose teaching does not fill him 
with a desire to know more of the subject has not been taught history in the 
true sense of the term. To be successful in teaching history the teacher must 
have a knowledge of the subject far beyond the narrow range of the pupil's 
text-book. His mind must be so saturated with it by wide reading that he 
may add to the facts of the text-book illuminating details that will make the 
subject one of abiding, living interest. The successful teacher of Canadian 
history has a power beyond that of any other teacher to inspire in his pupils 
an abiding love for his country, and to prepare them for the highest duties of 
citizenship. 

Science. — Complaints are sometimes heard that the changes in the require- 
ments for admission to the course for First Class Public School Teachers in the 
Normal Schools, as well as for admission to the Honour Courses of the Univer- 
sities, have had a tendency to lessen the number of Upper School students who 
take the science options. There is undoubtedly something in this contention; 
whether it is a cause for complaint or not depends on one's opinion as to the 
stress that has been placed on science in the Lower and the Middle Schools. 

In many schools, the only courses offered in the Upper School are those in 
English, history, mathematics, and one or two foreign languages. It is unusual 
to find, except in the larger schools, classes in more than one of biology, physics 
and chemistry. To aggravate this apparent discrimination against Upper 
School science, it is not unusual to find it wounded in the house of its friends. 
For example, the teacher of Upper School physics not infrequently treats the 
subject as if it were a fourth mathematical subject, spending a disproportionate 
part of the time of the class in working problems, the difficulty of which depends 
not on any physical principle involved, but solely on questions of algebra, 
geometry, or even trigonometry. 

It might not be amiss to quote from the introductory paragraph to the 
physics syllabus: "The topics to be presented experimentally, with mathematical 
applications, simple and direct in character." 

Some Experiments in Teaching 

It is always interesting to find teachers launching out into experiments 
with a view to overcoming difficulties, improving their methods, or extending 
the scope of their teaching. Two such experiments are described below. The 
first is a description by Mr. J. D. Morrow, B.A., Classical Master in the Daven- 
port High School, Toronto, of his attempt to interest his pupils in the study of 
Virgil's ^neid. Mr. Morrow says: 

For a long time I found some outstanding hindrances to the successful teaching of the yEneid 
in the Middle School. The method followed was to prescribe a certain number of lines for the 
next lesson and perhaps to give some hints which would be of use in handling the more difficult 



32 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

passages. Frequently, however, the period was so near an end when the new work was assigned 
that these hints could not be given. Certain things happened that evening: the bright indus- 
trious student mastered the passage after much effort; the diligent plodder toiled hard and long 
with but unsatisfactory results and became disheartened; the lazy one looked at it, could make 
neither head nor tail of the first line and promptly bought a "crib." Soon the good news of 
this easy method of doing Virgil spread throughout the class, and soon the teacher could recog- 
nize the fluent recital of the memorized translation. Some of the bad results were: (1) The 
establishing of the idea that Virgil is so "hard" that it cannot be done without this aid; (2) the 
misuse of translations and the consequent stultifying of one of the purposes for which Latin is 
prescribed in the course of studies; (3) the practice of deception, for intuition seems to warn 
the user of a translation that he had better say nothing to the teacher about his "key"; (4) the 
development of a marked dislike for Virgil even in the case of good students. 

In the attempt to escape these evils I have followed for some years a different plan. Our 
Middle School has five periods a week for Latin. From the beginning of the year in September 
I use two of these for Virgil. A lesson is conducted somewhat in this fashion. A few minutes, 
not many, are given the pupils to look over last day's lesson. Then this passage is translated 
aloud by members of the class who, as is to be expected, display varying degrees of proficiency, 
and who, as a result, meet with varying treatment at the hands of the master. By this time 
some ten or twelve minutes are gone. The new work now begins: The first sentence is read 
aloud slowly by the teacher at least twice. This reading, to be of use, must be followed care- 
fully by the student. In many cases the pupil has now a partial idea of the meaning of the 
sentence. Then the words' are attacked individually. The new ones are looked up; an intelli- 
gent guess is invited as to the meaning of those which have English derivatives; the case, tense 
and other identifying marks are noted. When this work is completed, in most cases the structure 
of the sentence is understood by the average pupil and he is asked to give a literal translation. 
At this stage, where possible, it is shown that the author had a purpose in arranging the words 
in the order in which we find them. Next, a pupil is invited to translate the sentences into 
reasonably good English. Oral reading by the pupils with strict attention to quantity and 
accent should follow. Each sentence is treated in this way and the end of the lesson sees any- 
where from ten to fifteen lines done. For home work they are asked to review what they have 
thus helped to translate in the class. It need scarcely be added that to secure the desired results, 
the teacher must see to it that every pupil is taking part. 

Some of the advantages are: (1) The pupils are doing their work under the guidance of 
the teacher and in this way time is saved, as they are kept from entering blind alleys. (2) The 
teacher is assured that his class is doing some work and that of the right kind. (3) The idea 
that Virgil is very difficult is largely removed. The very fact that they are working together 
makes them leap lightheartedly over obstacles which would daunt them under other circum- 
stances. (4) It removes the feeling that a translation is needed. The word "key" is no longer 
taboo in the class. "Buy one if you have money to throw away," says the teacher, "but I suggest 
ice cream or a good show." (5) It gives ample time for a thorough review at the end of the 
year. At the rate of ten lines a lesson, and this figure is too low, the prescribed passage can be 
finished by the end of March. 

In my experience this method of treating Virgil at sight has been fully justified by its results. 

A successful experiment in library work was undertaken in the London 
Collegiate Institute by Messrs. A. I. Ogilvie, B.A., and Geo. L. MacDonald, 
B.A., the two senior English Masters, with a view to bringing every pupil of 
the school into contact with the books, magazines, and newspapers of the library, 
and giving him encouragement and guidance in the use of them. The following 
account of this interesting experiment is from the pen of Mr. Ogilvie, who is 
now a member of the staff of the St. Catharines Collegiate Institute: 

For some time there has been a growing conviction that the school library should be an 
integral part of the organization, and should be of direct and tangible service in the training of 
pupils. This was the idea of the Board of Education of London in providing a large, well-equipped 
library in the new Central Collegiate Institute. 

The work of this library was brought under the control of the English Department and 
was supervised during all periods of the day, one of the senior English teachers having charge 
in the morning, and the other in the afternoon. The primary purpose of the library was to enable 
pupils to carry on school work under favourable conditions of comfort and quiet during their 
study periods, and to encourage them to develop the habit of reading and research by making 
full use of the books, papers and magazines supplied. The average number of pupils in the 
library during each period was from forty to fifty. They were free to read what they wished 
during all or part of these periods. 

As the library was used only by students and teachers of the school there was a heavy demand 
for reference works. The co-operation of the teachers was enlisted in directing their pupils. 
As an aid to this end, lists were sent out to the teachers giving the names of the books and maga- 
zines which had a bearing on their work. In order that the pupils might early be able to use 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 33 

the library with intelligence and facility, a short course of instruction in the use of books was 
given. Pupils were encouraged to form the habit of reading magazines and newspapers in order 
to keep in touch with what the world is doing. 

Although the library did a great deal of reference work, yet it was felt that its highest func- 
tion was to be a source of inspiration and recreation. Occasional lectures on books in the library 
were given, and new books were brought to the attention of readers. Very often the teacher, 
or some pupils who possessed dramatic gifts, read passages from literature such as would arouse 
and hold the attention of students and possibly lead them to the works from which the passages 
were taken. 

The most important aim of the library work was to instill the desire for and the habit of 
good reading. The opportunity to read books is not enough. There must also be contact, 
stimulus, encouragement, and daily association. The school library will not only help the work 
of all departments of instruction, but will also give the pupils a taste for good reading and a love 
for good books. The uniformity of their lives will be illumined by imagination; they will take 
up something of their heritage of civilization; their interests and sympathies will be wider; 
their sense of citizenship more real, and they will possess an inexhaustible source of happiness 
in their homes, a treasure which grows as it is shared, and which cannot be consumed with time. 

When we see greater numbers of young people using the High Schools than 
ever before, and vaster sums of money being expended in erecting better build- 
ings; when we realize that our high school teachers, a body of earnest, high- 
minded, well educated and hard-working men and women, are striving with 
might and main to train our boys and girls for noble manhood and womanhood, 
and for intelligent participation in the duties of Canadian citizenship, we need 
not hesitate to declare that a brighter day is dawning for secondary education 
in Ontario. 



2 D.E. 



34 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



APPENDIX E 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF RURAL SCHOOL 
ORGANIZATION 

To the Honourable G. H. Ferguson, B.A., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my second annual report on 
the Organization of the Rural Schools of the Province. 

I have the honour to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

W. J. Karr, 

Director of Rural School Organization. 
Toronto, January 31st, 1924. 



I. Conferences with County Inspectors 

During the past year, I met sixty-three of the County Inspectors, and 
discussed with each the general conditions affecting school organization in his 
inspectorate. The following is a summary of the result of my inquiries: 

1. — As to Number of Schools Maintained. 

There is general agreement that more rural schools are being maintained 
than the attendance of pupils warrants. I was provided by the Inspectors 
with lists of schools which are attended by such a small number of children as 
to make their continued maintenance highly uneconomical. The pupils in a 
large proportion of these might be accommodated in neighbouring schools, to 
which they might either walk or be conveyed without difficulty or hardship. 
Such an arrangement would effect a very large saving of money both to the 
local taxpayers and to the Government by reducing the number of schools to 
be maintained, and at the same time would tend to increase the efficiency of 
the work by bringing together larger numbers of children. The following 
tabulated statement shows the distribution of 454 schools with low average 
attendance, in each of which conditions are of such a character as to make the 
accommodation of the pupils in an adjacent school both practicable and desirable. 

Brant and Norfolk 7 Grey, East 16 

Bruce, East 10 Grey, South 6 

Bruce, West 9 Grey, West 8 

Carleton, West 15 Haldimand 16 

Dufferin 14 Halton and Wentworth in part 2 

Dundas 7 Hastings, Centre 11 

Elgin, East 6 Hastings, South 5 

Elgin, West 4 Huron, East 11 

Essex, South 3 Huron, West 9 

Frontenac, North 17 Lambton, West 10 

Frontenac, South 23 Lanark, West 17 

Glengarry 12 Leeds and Grenville (1) 19 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 35 

Leeds and Grenville (2) 12 Perth, North 2 

Leeds and Grenville (3) 11 Perth, South 2 

Lennox 17 Peterborough , East 7 

Lincoln 2 Prescott and Russell 10 

Middlesex, East 9 Prince Edward 11 

Middlesex, West 9 Renfrew, North 6 

Norfolk 16 Renfrew, South . 7 

Northumberland and Durham (1) 2 Simcoe, East 2 

Northumberland and Durham (2) 10 Simcoe, North 1 

Northumberland and Durham (3) 3 Simcoe, South 10 

Ontario, North 4 Stormont 10 

Ontario, South 4 Waterloo, South 6 

Oxford, North 1 Wellington, North 10 

Oxford, South 1 Wellington, South 3 

Peel 9 

Total 454 

For many years there has been provision in the Public Schools Act (Section 
74) whereby a school board may arrange for the accommodation of its pupils 
in an adjoining school and provide for their conveyance. Though the above 
table shows that there are many school sections where the adoption of this 
plan would be justified on the grounds of both economy and efficiency, there 
are actually very few instances in the organized counties where it is done. The 
main reasons assigned by the Inspectors are two in number: first, the Legislative 
grants, based largely upon the salaries paid to teachers, are so generous that 
there is little financial inducement to change; and, second, there is an almost 
universal disinclination on the part of school sections to co-operate for educa- 
tional purposes. 

2. — As to School Finance. 

The operation of Section 96 of the Public Schools Act, 1920, which fixes 
the amount that must be levied by a general rate over a whole township based 
upon the average equalized assessment of the school sections, has done something 
towards equalizing the financial obligation of the ratepayers for school purposes. 
The apportionment of the Legislative grants partially upon the equalized assess- 
ment of the section has tended also in the same direction. But despite these 
facts there are still great inequalities in the taxation for school purposes among 
the sections of every township. The following table gives the variation in a 
typical township selected from certain counties in different parts of the Province. 
The figures quoted are for one-roomed schools and do not include extraordinary 
levies for new buildings or improvements. The variations in the rates are 
representative of a general condition in school taxation throughout the Province. 

County Township 

Brant Oakland 

Bruce Carrick 

Dufferin '. Garaf raxa, E . . . . 

Durham Cavan 

Elgin Bayham 

Essex Mersea 

Frontenac Bedford 

Grenville Oxford 

Grey Collingwood 

Haldimand Moulton 

Halton Esquesing 

Hastings Elzevir 

Huron Tuckersmith ..... 

Kent Chatham , 

Lambton Sombra 

Lanark Dalhousie 

Leeds Crosby, N 



Average Equalized 


Rang 


e of Rate in 


Assessment per Section 


Various Sections 


$175,000 


5.2 to 10.4 mills 


230,000 


3.5 


" 7.5 " 


100,000 


6. 


" 13.9 " 


124,000 


8.5 


« 14 « 


125,000 


7.5 


" 14.7 " 


310,000 


5.3 


" 11.2 " 


24,000 


14. 


« 37. " 


79,000 


9.8 


" 18. " 


94,000 


5.3 


" 13.6 " 


100,000 


9. 


" 13.7 " 


230,000 


3.7 


" 11.4 " 


44,000 


13. 


" 22. " 


227,000 


4.4 


" 6.9 " 


244,000 


4.5 


" 8.3 " 


132,000 
60,000 
67,000 


5.5 


" 12.5 " 


11. 


" 21. " 


10.6 


" 19.1 " 



36 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

It would, of course, be unsafe to make generalizations as to the comparative 
cost of education in different townships, because the standards of assessment 
vary greatly. But it is quite clear that within the township itself, where pre- 
sumably assessments are properly equalized, there are wide variations in the 
tax rates for school purposes. It is difficult to justify a method of school finance 
which requires one man to pay five mills in school taxes while his neighbour 
across the road who happens to be in another section must pay ten mills for 
school facilities that are in no way superior. 

The school section with a low assessment in a township in which the average 
assessment of the sections is high, is in a particularly favoured position with 
regard to school taxation. Such a section receives a large township grant in 
accordance with Section 96 of the Public Schools Act, because the average 
assessment of the sections is high, and receives also a large Legislative grant 
because its own assessment is low. There are seventy-three school sections in 
the inspectorates I visited that have no local levy; there are scores of others 
that have a local levy of one mill or less; and there are many that are actually 
maintaining their schools out of the township and Legislative grants and are 
laying by a surplus at the same time. 

3. — As to School Consolidation. 

The County Inspectors are practically unanimous in the opinion that the 
consolidation of rural schools on a much wider scale than has up to the present 
been attempted in this Province is desirable. Those who have had opportunity 
of visiting certain States of the American Union, where consolidation is making 
rapid headway, are particularly strong in their advocacy of the scheme. Those 
who have consolidated schools under their supervision speak unreservedly of 
the satisfactory character of the work done. Many Inspectors have pointed 
out, however, that our present method of establishing consolidations cannot be 
expected to produce the most satisfactory results. It is based upon the prin- 
ciple of co-operative action among sections, which in practice is difficult to 
secure. Even where such action is secured, it is likely to be on too limited a 
scale to obtain the best results and cannot be the» result of any comprehensive 
or well-considered plan. 

4. — As to Secondary Education. 

An increasing interest is being manifested in the extension of facilities for 
secondary education. The establishment of a considerable number of new 
Continuation Schools is tangible evidence that the residents of rural commun- 
ities realize the necessity of further school training than that offered by the 
elementary school in the preparation of the young for the various activities of 
life. Some counties are already almost sufficiently provided with secondary 
schools for the training of those who are preparing to enter the universities or 
the professional schools. 

There remain to be provided, however, further educational facilities for 
that group of rural children who purpose remaining on the farm, whose services 
are required there during the busy months of the year, and whose school training 
is likely to end with the completion of the elementary school course unless 
special provision is made for them. That provision will doubtless be found 
in the near future by the establishment of part-time courses, both academic 
and vocational in character. The machinery for setting up such courses is 
already provided in the Continuation Schools Act and the Vocational Education 
Act. It would seem that the two main problems in instituting the courses will 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 37 

be: first, to make the necessity of this type of training apparent to rural com- 
munities; and second, to secure for its establishment the united action of a 
larger area than the individual school section. From inquiries already received 
it is evident that some consciousness of the desirability of part-time courses for 
rural adolescent children is already abroad. 

5. — As to School Administration. 

There is a general desire on the part of the Inspectors for the establishment 
of a larger administrative unit than the present school section. The following 
weaknesses of the section scheme of administration are frequently mentioned: 

(a) It has resulted in the establishment of more schools than are necessary 
for the accommodation of the school population. This fact has become espe- 
cially noticeable in the last two decades, during which the shifting of population 
from rural areas to urban centres has greatly reduced the numbers of pupils 
attending the rural schools. As a result, the cost per pupil of maintaining the 
schools is relatively high to the communities themselves, and to the Government 
through its system of grants. 

(b) It has resulted in inequalities in financial obligation. Sections with 
high assessment are able to finance their schools by a low rate of taxation, while 
sections with a low assessment are taxed more heavily. 

(c) It has resulted in inequalities in educational opportunity. The pro- 
vision of facilities for secondary education and for part-time vocational courses 
is difficult to arrange, particularly in areas that are remote from the larger 
centres of population. Single sections can seldom afford to establish a secondary 
school or a part-time course even when the number of pupils would justify it; 
and co-operation among several sections for this purpose is not easily secured. 

(d) Despite the fact that one of the strong points urged in favour of the 
section scheme is the development of local interest and pride in the school, it 
is nevertheless true that there is actually a very general attitude of indifference 
towards the school on the part of the people. The annual school meetings are 
poorly attended; the school board meets infrequently; and often the secretary 
himself transacts all the business of the board. 

The establishment of the township as the unit of administration is the 
scheme most generally favoured. By this plan the administrative unit would 
coincide with the taxation unit, and the present inequalities in financial obliga- 
tion for school purposes would be largely overcome. There would, moreover, 
be a tendency to greater economy and higher efficiency through the redistribution 
of the school population so as to do away with unnecessary schools, and bring 
together larger numbers of pupils. Still further, the present difficulties in 
securing secondary and part-time educational advantages would tend to disap- 
pear, because the disinclination to co-operative effort among sections, which is 
largely responsible for these difficulties at present, would no longer be a deterrent 
influence. 

II. Attendance in the Rural Schools 

Statistics for 1922 show that there were in the Province in that year 5,487 
rural school sections, with 5,568 school buildings, including 4,971 one-roomed 
schools. The following tabulated statement grades these one-roomed schools 
according to average attendance: 



38 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



With Average 

Attendance of 

1 

2 or less 

3 " " 

4 " " . 

5 " " 
9 « « 

io « "".!!;;;! 

14 " " 

19 « « 

20 or over 

Percentage under 20 . . 
Percentage 20 or over 



)f Schools 


No. of Schools 


Total 


bounties 


in Districts 


1922 


5 


2 


7 


12 


7 


19 


28 


17 


45 


62 


35 


97 


117 


56 


173 


484 


176 


660 


578 


183 


761 


1306 


335 


1641 


2272 


464 


2736 


2030 


205 


2235 


52.8 


69.3 


55.1 


47.2 


30.7 


44.9 



It appears from this table that 13 per cent, of the schools of the Province 
have an average attendance of less than 10 pupils; 33 per cent., an average of 
less than 15; and 55 per cent., an average of less than 20. The figures are 
practically the same as those for 1921, there being a slight improvement in the 
counties, balanced by a slight falling off in the districts. It is obviously uneco- 
nomical to maintain a school for fewer than ten pupils. It is questionable whether 
it is economical to maintain a school for fifteen pupils or even twenty pupils. 
But, in any event, it is quite apparent that a large proportion of the rural schools 
have too small an attendance to be economically maintained. 

III. Cost of Rural Education 

(a) Cost to Local Communities of Maintaining Schools with Small Attendance. 

The tabulated statement given below gives, for 1922, the cost to the rate- 
payers, for each pupil, of maintaining two groups of schools, viz., those with 
an average attendance of from 1 to 5, and those with an average attendance 
of from 6 to 10. The sums do not indicate the total cost of maintaining the 
schools, but only the net cost after Legislative grants have been deducted. 





No. of 
Schools 

with 

Average 

1 to 5 


Average 

Cost 

per 

Pupil 


No. of 
Schools 

with 
Average 
6 to 10 


Average 

Cost 

per 

Pupil 


No. of 

Schools 

with 
Average 
10 or less 


Average 

Cost 

per 

Pupil 


In Counties 


117 
56 

173 


$152 76 
146 05 
150 70 


461 
127 

588 


$95 42 
81 92 
92 42 


578 
183 
761 


$101 67 


In Districts 


92 14 


In Whole Province 


99 46 







The cost per pupil to the local communities in all the rural Public Schools 
is $64.31. 
(b) Cost to Government of Maintaining Schools with Small Attendance. 

The amounts paid per pupil by the Government in grants to the same 
groups of schools were as follows: 





No. of 
Schools 

with 
Average 

1 to 5 


Average 

per 
Pupil 

in 
Grants 


No. of 
Schools 

with 
Average 
6 to 10 


Average 

per 

Pupil 

in 
Grants 


No. of 
Schools 

with 
Average 
10 or less 


Average 

per 

Pupil 

in 
Grants 


In Counties 


117 

56 
173 


$91 75 

106 51 

96 62 


461 
127 
588 


$41 53 
61 20 
46 57 


578 
183 
761 


$46 08 


In Districts 


66 85 


In Whole Province 


51 56 







1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



39 



The amount per pupil paid in Legislative grants in all the rural Public 
Schools in the Province was $15.95. 

(c) Total Cost of Maintaining Schools with Small Attendance. 

The total cost to the local communities and to the Government of main- 
taining schools with low attendance was as follows: 





No. of 
Schools 

with 
Average 

1 to 5 


Total 

Cost 

per 

Pupil 


No. of 
Schools 

with 
Average 
6 to 10 


Total 

Cost 

per 

Pupil 


No. of 
Schools 

with 
Average 
10 or less 


Average 

per 

Pupil 

in 
Grants 


In Counties 


117 

56 

173 


$244 51 
252 56 
247 32 


461 
127 
588 


$136 95 
143 12 
138 99 


578 
183 
761 


$147 75 


In Districts 


158 99 


In Whole Province 


151 02 







The total cost per pupil in all the rural Public Schools was $80.26. 

Comparisons here show that the total cost per pupil of maintaining 173 
schools with an average attendance of 5 or less was more than three times the 
cost per pupil in all the rural Public Schools of the Province; that the cost per 
pupil in 588 schools with an average of from 6 to 10 was over 70 per cent, higher 
than the cost in the whole Province; and that the cost per pupil in the schools 
with an average of 10 or less was nearly double that in the whole Province. 



IV. Consolidation of Schools 

During the year 1923, consolidations were established at Charlton, JafTray- 
Melick (near Kenora), Katrine, and Sundridge. Consolidated schools were 
completed and opened at Britannia Heights, Burriss, Charlton, Grantham, 
Katrine, Nipigon, and North Mountain. Statistics of the Consolidated Schools 
will be found on pages 284-289. 

Reports of the efficiency of the consolidated schools now in operation are 
of a highly satisfactory character. A few extracts from the reports of Inspectors 
who have schools of this type under their supervision will give some idea of the 
conditions associated with these schools: 

Mr. W. C. Dowsley, B.A., Inspector for Leeds and Grenville, No. 2, 
speaking of the Mallorytown Consolidated School, says: 

The school has been operating very successfully since its opening in September, 1921, and 
transportation difficulties have been negligible. One van missed two trips last winter. This 
occurred on the tortuous "river route" where the road is more likely to fill during a snowstorm. 
The previous winter, I understand, no trip on this route was missed. Horse-drawn vans are 
used on all the routes, and in winter are made very comfortable by tightly curtained tops. Trans- 
portation has been no problem at all, although this feature of consolidation was represented by 
pessimists as its chief stumbling block. The cost of four routes (one of which operates for six 
months only in the central section) amounts to $1,525 each year, and of this 373^ per cent, is 
paid by grant from the Government. The tendency of these costs is to diminish, and there has 
been no dearth of satisfactory applicants for the position of van drivers. 

The hot lunch served to about 75 pupils daily (for five months) in the commodious and 
well appointed dining-room in the school basement, has added not a little to the popularity of 
the school among all interested. 

Mr. H. B. Fetterly, B.A., Inspector for Dundas, reports as follows regarding 
the North Mountain Consolidated School: 

The building is of concrete blocks, granite-faced, and presents a very handsome appearance. 
It contains six ordinary classrooms, a science room, rooms for household science and manual 



40 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

training, library, teachers' room, lavatories with hot and cold water, and a community hall 
seating four hundred people. The building is heated by low pressure steam, has a water supply 
on all floors from a compression pump, and is wired for electricity in all parts. 

The grounds consist of seven acres. Part is being fitted up for playgrounds, and the rest 
will be used for experimental plots in agriculture. 

Four vans are used for transportation. One motor van has a route of over six miles, and 
calls at every door. It makes the trip in forty minutes. The other three are drawn by horses, 
and take about the same time. The transportation system has worked very satisfactorily, and 
there have been no complaints. The drivers are all very capable, careful men. 

Although the school has been open only since Easter, there is a marked improvement in 
the character of the work. The separation of the pupils into the grades, with the consequent 
increase in the number in each grade, has caused a more competitive spirit among the pupils, 
and the teachers have much more time to devote to the various subjects on the school course. 
A number of pupils who had stopped school have decided to return with the intention of going 
through the High School classes. This would not have been possible for them if they had been 
compelled to leave home, as their people were not able to finance them and do entirely without 
their help at home. 

Mr. J. E. Minns, B.A., Inspector for Centre Hastings, speaks as follows of 
the Tweed Consolidated School: 

Tweed Consolidated School has now been in operation for two years. The success of the 
school has fully met our highest expectations. The claims of the Department as contained in 
circulars issued from time to time have been fully realized. That this is appreciated by the 
community generally is evidenced by the fact that the Farnsworth section, one of the largest 
and wealthiest in the Inspectorate, which voted strongly against consolidation in the spring of 
1921, after seeing the scheme in operation for a year, asked for a reconsideration of the question, 
and then voted favourably. 

The transportation of the children has been a success. We have two motor vans and three 
horse vans. During the first year the percentage of attendance of pupils living in the village and 
who walked to school was 86.5, while for the outside pupils who were conveyed, the percentage 
was 91.8. I have no definite figures for the past year, but the Principal informs me that the 
attendance of all the pupils is over ninety per cent. One hundred and five pupils, altogether, 
are being conveyed in the vans. 

There can be no question of the efficiency of the work done. We have an excellent staff 
of teachers who are happy in their work and proud of their school. We have household science, 
manual training, agriculture, art and music, taught throughout the school by teachers who have 
Departmental certificates in these subjects, and what is best of all we have no changes in our 
staff. 

Mr. George E. Pentland, B.A., Inspector for Haliburton, who has four 
consolidated schools in his inspectorate, reports favourably in regard to each of 
them. Respecting the school at Gooderham he says: 

Three sections in Glamorgan township united; and, pending the completion of a four-roomed 
building at Gooderham, temporary quarters were secured for the accommodation of the pupils 
of the consolidated area. Two vans are used for the conveyance of the children, and these are 
very regular in their arrival. The chairman of the board, the secretary, and the principal of 
the school have all written to me expressing the satisfaction of the people in the working of the 
school particularly with regard to the transportation, and testifying to the regularity of the 
pupils' attendance. The present cost is about the same as under the old system; but the educa- 
tional facilities are much better, as fully qualified teachers are now in charge, the children are 
conveyed to school every day, and a High School course is arranged so that children can have 
two years' training after completing the elementary school courses. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 41 



APPENDIX F 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF MANUAL TRAINING 
AND HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

To the Honourable G. H. Ferguson, B.A., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir: 

I have the honour to submit herewith my twenty-third annual report of 
Manual Training and Household Science as carried on in the schools of the 
Province. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Albert H. Leake. 
Toronto, December, 1923. 



General Progress 



Manual Training and Household Science in the schools of the Province 
have proceeded mainly along the path outlined in previous years. New centres 
have been opened in Guelph, Hamilton, Kitchener, St. Catharines, Sarnia, 
Toronto and Windsor, while centres in Fort William, Port Arthur, Smith's 
Falls and Sault Ste. Marie remain closed owing to financial stringency. Pro- 
vision is being made in nearly all new plans, particularly in the large centres, 
for adequate provision for teaching these subjects. 

The practice of free-hand sketching is becoming much more common in 
the manual training room and is resulting in many cases in a much better under- 
standing of the construction work in hand. The lettering on the mechanical 
drawings is showing considerable improvement and the small model is gradually 
giving way to the larger object, in the making of which some constructive ability 
must be shown. 

The tool equipments being installed for Manual Training are in most cases 
adequate, but in one or two cases the equipment installed is more elaborate 
than is really necessary. It is far more educationally and economically sound 
to put in a small equipment and add to it as the necessities of the work grow, 
than at once to purchase a large equipment, some of which will not be required 
for some time and some of it perhaps never. 

Greater attention is needed in a number of cases to the care of the equip- 
ment. Good work cannot be done without good tools. Given good tools the 
teacher may be reasonably expected to keep them in good condition. Cutting 
edges should be carefully protected either in racks on the wall or a properly 
fitted tool cabinet. The tools should be arranged in such a way that any vacant 
space indicates at once a missing tool. By this means the periodical inventory 
is more conveniently taken. 



42 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

The teaching of sewing is becoming much more common not only in towns 
and cities, but also in the smaller places and rural districts. Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London, Peterborough and Woodstock employ special supervisors for 
this work to see that it is satisfactorily taught in the lower grades. 

The Household Science teachers are giving increasing attention to the 
economical preparation of the family meal and many teachers are centering 
their instruction around a meal for four persons. When the limited amount of 
time given to this work is considered, some of the results being accomplished 
both in sewing and cookery are remarkable. 

Manual Training and Household Science are still having to fight their way 
for recognition and a place in the curriculum of many schools, just as science 
did many years ago. Notwithstanding their general adoption they have forced 
their way by merit and not by compulsion. Those few schools that have not 
introduced them argue that there are already too many subjects on the curri- 
culum and that they cannot find time and those schools in which they are taught, 
while not at all complaining, yet wish that better provision could be made by 
the omission of something else or at least that they might constitute an option 
in the course of study. 

Extent of Adoption 

Of the twenty-four cities in the Province, there is only one (Welland) that 
has not introduced Manual Training and Household Science in the Public or 
High Schools, or both. Twenty-two towns in the Province according to the 
census of 1921 have a population of over five thousand and, of those, nine have 
Manual Training and Household Science in their schools. It should not be 
difficult in all towns with a population of five thousand or over so to organize 
Manual Training and Household Science that the whole time of one teacher in 
each subject may be filled. The work of the lower grades is very important 
as foundation work and the Manual Training teacher should have charge of 
the work throughout the grades as well as in the actual Manual Training room 
itself; the same principle applies to the Household Science teacher also. 

In towns with a smaller population it is not possible to employ the whole 
time of a Manual Training or Household Science teacher, but much might be 
done by the smaller towns co-operating in this matter and employing teachers 
between them. It should not be difficult to form a group of three or four towns 
within easy reach of each other, each having its own Manual Training and 
Household Science centres and equipments and each paying its share of the 
special teachers' salaries, according to the time spent in each place by the teacher. 
Now that radial lines are being rapidly extended throughout the Province the 
possibility of such co-operative action is becoming greater and the will to co- 
operate is practically all that is now necessary. The attention of the local 
inspector is directed to this matter. Such actions would not only result in the 
introduction of Manual Training and Household Science, but would also promote 
a better feeling among the different communities and lead to combined action 
in other fields of civic betterment. In still smaller communities a travelling 
shop might work to advantage. 

Summer Courses and Saturday Classes 

During the summer the usual holiday courses were held in Manual Training 
and Household Science for the purpose of qualifying for the elementary certificate 
which is valid in rural schools only. In order to obtain this certificate attend- 
ance is required at two summer sessions of five weeks each. For the first time 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 43 

in many years the students attending were required to pay their own trans- 
portation and living expenses and no contribution towards these was paid by 
the Government. This resulted in a slight falling off of attendance, but the 
numbers were quite satisfactory. All the teachers attending these courses are 
actually in service in the rural schools of the Province and the work taken deals 
entirely with the requirements and possibilities of the rural schools with reference 
to Manual Training and Household Science and the serving of a hot dish to 
supplement the lunch brought from home. The students almost invariably 
do good work and leave with the expressed intention of introducing the subject, 
if at all possible, into their schools the following year. 

Three years ago, owing to the urgent requests of the Public Schools and of 
Wentworth County, classes for rural school teachers in service were established 
at Hamilton Normal School to be held on Saturdays, under exactly the same 
terms and conditions as those obtaining at the Summer Schools. These classes 
have been continued with success ever since and this year for the first time a 
class in Part II work has been commenced. Last year a Saturday Class in 
Household Science was also opened in Ottawa Normal School. In each case 
the classes have been established at the direct request of the Public School 
Inspector, and I am of the opinion that such classes should be held at every 
Normal School where there is any demand for them and this demand is very 
largely at the call of the Public School Inspectors of the county in which the 
school is situated. 

The following extracts from a letter written by Inspector J. B. Robinson 
show how these classes are regarded in the County of Wentworth. 

Permit me to express my gratitude for having the Courses in Part I for Household Science 
and Manual Training provided for by Saturday Classes at the Hamilton Normal School during 
the current school year. I am elated that the Minister has encouraged the work in rural schools 
to this extent and assure you that the influence of the teachers who take these courses is far- 
reaching in improving local rural school conditions. Besides, too, there is in every case where 
these subjects are correlated with the other subjects of the course of study a decidedly improved 
tone of freedom and co-operation among teacher and pupil. 

May I urge that provision be also made for Saturday Classes in Part II course for Manual 
Training at the Hamilton Normal School this year? Eleven teachers in all have signified their 
intention of taking this course if arranged for. 

Permit me to offer the following reasons why this course should be provided: 

(1) Teachers in rural schools are under local disadvantages and restrictions and need every 
encouragement possible to increase their resourcefulness as teachers to improve and increase 
interest in better school conditions. 

(2) Larger vision and greater power is effective through the higher training; this means 
brightness and stimulus for the pupils. 

(3) The conduct of Part II along with that of Part I allows for interchange of thought and 
encouragement among the teachers and directly results in a cheerful carrying on of work during 
the regular school time. 

I trust that the Minister will take these facts into his consideration and make provision 
for the ^art II course in Manual Training this year. I assure you personally that nothing in 
the Inspectorate of Wentworth has done more in bringing about a higher proficiency in the 
rural schools and a more elevated tone than that of the work in Household Science and Manual 
Training. It has met a long felt want in appealing to the interests of retarded boys and girls. 



Training of Teachers 

Household Science teachers are now trained at the College of Education, 
Bloor Street, Toronto, and Macdonald Institute, Guelph, and the needs of the 
schools are being fairly well met by these courses. Students entering these 
courses are required to possess a Second Class teacher's certificate. Successful 



44 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

completion of these courses gives what is known as the "Ordinary" certificate. 
A certificate as a "Specialist" in Household Science is obtained by a four-year 
University Course. The time has come to consider whether the content of this 
course warrants giving the title "Specialist" in Household Science to those who 
successfully complete it. 

At present we have no provision for training instructors in Manual Training 
for the Urban Schools. Since the discontinuance of the course at Guelph, no 
other measures have been taken to ensure a supply of teachers and the matter 
is now one that requires immediate attention. Three courses seem to be open: 
(1) the establishment of a course in connection with an instruction for training 
industrial teachers if and when one is established ; (2) giving a one-year course 
at the College of Education such as is now done in the case of Household Science, 
or (3) the adoption of some such scheme as that in use by the City and Guilds 
Institute of London, England, for the purpose of qualifying teachers. 



The Rural School Lunch 

The progress noted in previous years in regards to the teaching of House- 
hold Science in the rural schools still continues to grow. Scarcely a mail is 
received that does not contain requests for advice and information together 
with invitations to address public meetings in rural districts on this subject. 

The best method of approach to Household Science in the rural school is 
through the medium of the hot noonday lunch or the preparation of one or two 
hot dishes to supplement the lunch brought from home. Owing to the fact 
that many pupils live far from the school, it is impossible for them to go home 
for the midday meal, and they are thus dependent upon lunches which they 
bring with them. Very frequently the pupils are allowed to eat their lunches 
where and how they please, and the method chosen is conducive neither to com- 
fort nor health. In fine weather they do not wish to lose any time from their 
games, and so they eat their food while playing, or they bolt it in order that 
they may get to their play more quickly. In severe weather they crowd around 
the steps or the stove and do not hesitate to scatter crumbs and crusts. In 
one case even a teacher has been seen holding a sandwich in one hand and 
writing on the blackboard with the other. There are now between 450 and 500 
schools serving at least one hot dish at the noon lunch and the almost unanimous 
experience of the teachers in these schools is that the health of the children is 
improved, that they are able to do better work in the afternoon and that their 
attendance is more regular. One outstanding advantage is that the pupils are 
under proper supervision during the noon hour and moral and physical injury 
is prevented. 

Manual Training and Household Science Centres 

It would take up too much space to list the rural schools where these sub- 
jects are taught, but any school board that is considering their introduction will 
be gladly furnished with the names of the nearest schools where the subject 
may be seen in operation. 

In urban centres special rooms are equipped for these subjects and the 
following list gives the names of the various centres with the names of the 
teachers and the salaries received: 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



45 





Household Science Centres 


in Ontario 




Place 


School 


Teacher 


Salary 


Beamsville 


High School 


Ida E. Sutherland 


$1,800 


Belleville 


High School 


Illah R. Baker 


1,450 


Brantford 


Collegiate Institute 


Edna E. Hartley 


2,200 




Central Public School 


Kathleen Vaughan 


1,300 




Major Ballachy School 


Daveda Ridley 


1,300 


Brockville 


Public School 


Margaret Campbell 


1,200 


Chatham 


Collegiate Institute 


Helene Pilkey 


1,700 




Central School 


Anna J. Weir 


1,500 




McKeogh School 


Anna J. Weir 




Cobourg 


Collegiate Institute 


Grace Boggs 


800 


Collingwood 


Public School 


Mary Leona Douglas 


1,200 


Fairbank 


Public School 


Winnifred Cooper 


1,100 


(No. 15, E. York) 








Fort William 


Collegiate Institute 


Pearl Trynor 


1,500 


Gait 


Collegiate Institute. 


G. S. T. Baillie 


1,900 


Guelph 


Consolidated School 


Helen Hepburn 


1,200 




Collegiate Inst, and Tech. School 


Mary A. Stevens 


1,800 




Public School 


M. Lila Cockburn 


1,200 


Hamilton 


Adelaide Hoodless 


M. B. Aitken 


1,750 




Bennetto School 


C. Heslip 


1,300 




Caroline School 


L. E. Allen 


1,250 




Earl Kitchener School 


Agnes M. Sharp 


1,350 




King Edward School 


Jennie McDermid 


1,250 




King George School 


Beatrice Beddie 


1,500 




Memorial School 


E. Curry 


1,300 




Prince of Wales School 


L. Doan 


1,250 




Strathcona School 


C. Hilton 


1,300 




Wentworth School 


Mrs. A. Fairlie 


1,550 




Normal School 


C. Elliott 


2,300 




Collegiate Institute 


Lola K. Mitchell 


2,100 


Ingersoll 


Public School 


Sybil M. Kendall 


1,350 


Kingston 


Public Schools 


Edna McKibbon 


1,350 


Kitchener 


Victoria School 
Suddaby School 


Helena I. Mackenzie 


1,300 


London 


Aberdeen 


Grace Graham 


1,500 




Alexandra School 


Grace Graham 






Boyle Memorial 


Hazel Cunningham 


1,400 




Chesley Avenue School 


Isabel Davidson 


1,500 




Lord Roberts School 


Elsie Ferguson 


1,500 




Riverview School 


Isabelle Craig 


1,800 




Ryerson School . 


Elsie Ferguson 






Tecumseh Avenue School 


Isabel Davidson 






Collegiate Institute 


Mary C. Macpherson 


2,600 




Sacred Heart School 


Gertrude Troy (Sr. Leona) 


1,000 




Normal School 


A. B. Neville 


2,300 


Madoc 


Public School 


Grace Burnside 


1,050 


Niagara Falls 


Collegiate Institute 


Janette A. Mitchell 


2,100 


Niagara Falls, South 


. High School 


Ruth V. Gardiner 


700 


North Bay 


Normal School 


Mayme C. Kay 


2,000 


Ottawa 


Cambridge Street School 


Grace Munt 


1,700 




Connaught School 


Velma Abernethy 


1,600 




First Avenue School 


Lucy White 


1,800 




Hopewell Avenue School 


Mary Hutchison 


1,600 




Kent Street School 


Elizabeth Meikle 


1,800 




Osgoode Street School 


Eleanor Mcintosh 


1,000 




York Street School 


Marjorie Johnston 


1,800 




Normal School 


Miss C. E. Green 


2,300 




Normal School 


Miss L. Monaghan 


1,900 




Kent Street School 


Alma Learoyd (Assistant) 


1,400 


Owen Sound 


Collegiate Institute 


F. E. Prichard 


1,500 




Dufferin Public School 


Bertha F. Olds 


1,200 


Peterborough 


Normal School 


Elizabeth MacVannell 


2,200 




Central School 


H. J. C. Moffat 


2,100 




Central School 


Alice E. Ryley 


1,300 




Prince of Wales 


Alice E. Ryley 




Port Arthur 


Collegiate Institute 


Temporarily closed 




Port Perry 


High School 


Marion E. Glasgow 


1,700 


St. Catharines 


Public Schools 


Jean Malcolmson 


1,500 



Collegiate Institute 



46 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Household Science Centres in Ontario (Concluded) 



Place 
St. Thomas 



Sa 



rnia 



Sault Ste. Marie 
Smith's Falls 
Stratford 



Sudbury 
Toronto 



Tweed 
Walkerville 

Windsor 



Woodstock 



School 
Collegiate Institute 
Balaclava School 
Public Schools 
Collegiate Institute 
Collegiate Institute 
Collegiate Institute 
Collegiate Institute 
Romeo School 
Normal School 
High School 
Annette Street School 
Bedford Park School 
Brown School 
Brown School 
Clinton Street School 
Dewson Street School 
Duke of Connaught 
Earlscourt School 
Earlscourt School 
Eglinton Avenue School 
Earl Grey School 
Essex Street School 
Hillcrest School 
Hillcrest School 
Jesse Ketchum 
Keele Street School 

Kimberley Street School 

Kent School 
King Edward School 
Lee School 

Manning Avenue School 
Orde Street School 
Orde Street School 
Park School 
Parkdale School 
Perth Avenue School 
Queen Alexandra School 
Queen Alexandra School 
Ryerson School 
Victoria Street School 
Wellesley School 
Williamson Road School 
Winchester Street School 
Withrow Avenue School 
Oakwood Collegiate Institute 
Riverdale Collegiate Institute 
St. Paul's Separate School 
St. Francis Separate School 
Normal School 
Normal School 
Public Schools 
Public Schools 
Collegiate Institute 
Assumption Street School 
Dougall Avenue School 
Prince Edward School 
Victoria School 
Wyandotte School 
Collegiate Institute 
Collegiate Institute 



Teacher Salary 

Ethel M. Palmer $1,800 

Edith McGregor 1,100 

Mary W. Howarth 1,700 

Erie Rowena Going 2,200 

Mary P. Shaw 2,000 

Temporarily closed 
Margaret J. Langford 
Mary E. McLean 
E. M. Everson 



Kate Baird 

Annie Earnshaw and Sewing 

Gladys Thompson 

E. W. DeLaporte 

S. Helen Amos and Sewing 

Annie L. Cheer and Sewing 

Kathleen Coggs and Sewing 

Constance Reynar 

Marion Ross 

Annie Earnshaw 

E. Irene Henderson and Sewing 

Ethel O. Farrant and Sewing 

Constance Reynar 

Marion Ross 

E. W. DeLaporte 

E. Marguerite Lindsay and 

Sewing 
M. Edythe Armstrong and 

Sewing. 
Hazel Hendry and Sewing 
Mary Foote and Sewing 
Rhoda M. Ward and Sewing 
Marion Sinclair and Sewing 
Jessie J. Hills 
Velma Lehman 
Gladys Thompson 
Gertrude Dobson 
Christina L. Smythe 
E. M. Cook 
Blanche Clarke 
Isabel J. C. Pease and Sewing 
Mabel A. Edwards 
Augusta E. Shorey and Sewing 
Margaret Milne 
Helen M. Wright and Sewing 
M. Lyle Burgess 
Muriel G. Sinclair 
Hazel Carscadden 
Madeline Daley 
Sr. M. Agatha 
Nina A. Ewing 
Mabel E. Hay 
Florence Garrett 
Helen Rogers 
Jean E. Beasley 
M. Johnson 
M. Hair 
M. Rattray 
M. Johnson 
L. J. Westlake 
Gladys G. Bond 
Lila K. G. White 



1,200 
1,200 
1,900 
2,400 
1,160 
1,260 
1,260 
1,810 
1,610 
2,060 
1,210 
1,660 
1,160 

1,310 
1,860 



1,260 

1,710 
1,510 
2,000 
1,460 
1,410 
2,010 
1,410 

1,560 
2,100 
1,810 
1,810 
1,760 
1,210 
1,260 
1,260 
1,560 
1,210 
2,200 
2,200 
1,200 
900 
2,300 
1,800 
1,000 
1,800 
1,900 
1,700 
1,200 
1,700 

1,800 
2,300 
1,500 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



47 



Place 
Beamsville 
Brantford 



Brockville 
Chatham 

Collingwood 

Cornwall 

Fairbank 

Fort William 

Gait 

Guelph 



Hamilton 



Ingersoll 
Kingston 
Kitchener 

Lakeview Beach 

Listowel 

London 



Madoc 

Niagara Falls 
North Bay 
Orangeville 
Ottawa 



Owen Sound 
Peterborough 



Port Arthur 
Port Perry 
St. Catharines 



Manual Training Centres in Ontario 

School 
High School 
Collegiate Institute 
Central Public School 
Major Ballachy School 
Public School 
Collegiate Institute 
Central School 
Public School 
Public School 
Public School 
Collegiate Institute 
Collegiate Institute 
Consolidated School 
Collegiate Inst, and Tech. School 
Public School 
Adelaide Hoodless School 
Bennetto School 
Caroline School 
Earl Kitchener 
King George School 
Memorial School 
Prince of Wales School 
Wentworth School 
Normal School 
Collegiate Institute 
Public School 
Public Schools 
Victoria School 
Suddaby School 
Public School 
Public School 
Aberdeen School 
Alexandra School 
Boyle Memorial School 
Chesley Avenue School 
Lord Roberts School 
Riverview School 
Ryerson School 
Tecumseh Avenue School 
Collegiate Institute 
Normal School 
Public School 
Collegiate Institute 
Normal School 
Public School 
Cambridge Street School 
Crichton Street School 
Connaught School 
Devonshire School 
Elgin Street School 
First Avenue School 
Glashan School 
Hopewell Avenue School 
Kent Street School 
Mutchmor School 
Percy Street School 
Osgoode Street School 
Wellington Street School 
York Street School 
Normal School 
Collegiate Institute 
Dufferin Public School 
Normal School 
Central School 
Prince of Wales School 
Collegiate Institute 
High School 
Public Schools 
Collegiate Institute 



Teacher 


Salary 


Jas. M. Bates 


$2,300 


James C. Coles 


2,300 


Arthur Styles 


2,500 


G. C. White 


2,000 


Geo. E. Cox 


2,000 


C. M. DeGroat 


2,000 


C. M. DeGroat 




Victor Ellis 


1,900 


F. W. Hiley 


1,700 


I. B. Pengelley 


1,800 


F. J. Phalen 


2,000 


Robt. Hartrey 




J. T. Powers 


1,875 


S. E. Collier 


1,800 


J. H. Hetherington 


1,900 


A. E. Wilcox 


2,300 


James G. Chrysler 


1,900 


F. T. Bowers 


2,200 


W. Morrow 


2,000 


S. Hayward 


2,100 


N. L. Weir 


1,900 


A. J. Painter 


1,500 


Fred Taylor 


2,200 


Norman L. Weir 


1,600 


Ezra E. Parkjiouse 


1,900 


R. M. Gillespie 


1,700 


David Harper 


2,000 


Edmund Geiger 


2,100 


Edmund Geiger 




G. G. Scott 


1,700 


Robt. L. Shortill 


1,700 


George Cowie 


2,100 


S. R. White, Supr. 


2,600 


George Cowie 




Robt. L. Shortill 




W. A. Adams 


2,700 


S. Pickles 


2,400 


J. B. Hough 
W. F. Currie 


1,850 


2,100 


J. E. Chambers 


2,400 


H. S. Winchester 


2,400 


A. Crowson 


2,600 


G. F. Rowe 


2,600 


G. F. Rowe 




A. Crowson 




O. R. Pengelley 


2,200 


A. M. Lee 


2,300 


R. S. Holmes 


2,600 


A. M. Lee 


2.300 


0. R. Pengelley 




J. J. Carter 


2,500 


H. S. Winchester 




J. J. Carter 




H. S. Winchester 




J. S. Harterre 


2,400 


John Capel 


2,000 


F. A. Campbell 


1,700 


A. F. Hagerman 


2,540 


A. F. Hagerman 




A. Hope 


1,700 


Temporarily closed 




T. H. Follick 


2,350 


John R. Seaman 


2,000 



48 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 





Manual Training Centres in 


Ontario (Concluded) 




Place 


School 


Teacher 


Salary 


St. Thomas 


Collegiate Institute 


P. J. Slatterie 


$1,800 


Sarnia 


Public Schools 


R. J. Campbell 


1,800 




Collegiate Institute 


Robt. Dobbins 


2,200 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Collegiate Institute 


T. J. Later 


2,800 


Smith's Falls 


Collegiate Institute 


Temporarily closed 




Stratford 


Collegiate Institute 


F. J. Tench 


2,000 




Romeo School 


D. W. Gillies 


2,000 




Normal School 


S. Pickles 


2,400 


Sudbury 


High School 






Toronto 


Annette Street School 


C. Close 


2,625 




Bedford Park School 


C. V. Webb 


2,425 




Brown School 


Geo. B. Cairns 


2,025 




Clinton Street School 


Andrew T. Wilkie 


2,225 




Dewson Street School 


E. Slaughter 


2,625 




Duke of Connaught School 


J. C. Darrock 


2,025 




Earl Grey School 


J. D. Medcof 


2,425 




Eglinton Avenue School 


C. V. Webb 






Essex Street School 


A. J. Rostance 


2,925 




Hillcrest School 


John Webb 


2,025 




Jesse Ketchum School 


Wm. D. Paton 


1,925 




Keele Street School 


James H. Housego 


2,025 




Kent School 


H. G. White 


2,175 




Kimberley Street School 


W. R. Beattie 


2,625 




King Edward School 


A. C. Burt 


2,550 




Manning Avenue School 


T. Carpenter 


2,625 




Park School 


Geo. B. Cairns 






Parkdale School 


J. C. Hamilton 


2,625 




Perth Avenue School 


T. W. Davidson 


2,625 




Queen Alexandra School 


W. W. Flummerfeldt 


2,625 




Rawlinson School 


W. E. Smyth 


2,525 




Ryerson School 


R. H. Pomeroy 


2,525 




Victoria Street School 


Josie E. Smith 


1,410 




Wellesley School 


Thomas Windsor 


2,025 




Williamson Road School 


Charles G. Mikel 


2,425 




Winchester Street School 


J. E. Robertson 


2,275 




Queen Alexandra 


Jean Hampson, 


1,560 




Oakwood Collegiate Institute 


R. N. Shortill 


2,975 




Riverdale Collegiate Institute 


Edward Faw 


2,850 




Normal School 


J. H. Wilkinson 


2,400 


Tweed 


Public Schools 


S. Howard Connor 


1,800 


Walkerville 


Public Schools 


Harry R. Ponting 


1,800 




Collegiate Institute 


W. S. Day 


2,300 


Windsor 


Assumption Street School 


A. V. Shackleton 


2,000 




Dougall Avenue School 


N. McKim 


2,000 




Prince Edward School 


C. D. Thompson 


2,000 




Victoria School 


A. V. Shackleton 






Wyandotte School 


G. A. Macaulay 


2,000 




Collegiate Institute 


Wm. L. Carson 


2,700 


Woodstock 


Collegiate Institute 


John S. Mercer 


1,700 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 49 



APPENDIX G 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR 

OF 

ELEMENTARY AGRICULTURAL CLASSES 

To The Honourable G. H. Ferguson, B.A., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — 

I beg to submit for your consideration a report on the Agricultural 
Classes in connection with the schools of the Province for the year 1923. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. B. Dandeno, 
Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Classes. 

Toronto, December, 1923. 



Agricultural education in both the primary and secondary schools is advanc- 
ing steadily from year to year. This advancement is shown in the lists given 
further on in this report. It is very gratifying to note that the objections to 
teaching Agriculture in the schools are much less common than formerly. 
Farmers, and others living in country districts, are led to see the advantages 
of agricultural instruction not only to the individual pupils but also to the com- 
munity at large. 

A considerable amount of propagation is still necessary, especially in some 
counties. A perusal of the tables given will serve to show the counties referred to. 

Very effective work is being carried on in many of the cities. Hamilton 
and St. Catharines are the only cities that are not taking up the work. 

Nearly one-half of the schools that are conducting classes in agriculture 
have teachers qualified in this subject, that is, they have teachers who have 
attended the summer sessions, or who have had a course of training in a High 
School. Until a greater number of the High Schools undertake the teaching 
of Agriculture the difficulty in securing properly qualified teachers for this 
subject will always be with us. 

The more important facts relating to the status of the work at the present 
time are given below. 



50 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Number of Ungraded Public Schools with Classes in Agriculture, 
September, 1922— June, 1923 

No. of No. of 

Inspectorate Inspector No. of Home School 

Schools Gardens Gardens 

Algoma D. T. Walkom 2 2 

Brant and Norfolk in part T. W. Standing 18 16 2 

Bruce W W. F. Bald 26 10 16 

Bruce E John McCool 28 13 15 

Carleton W and Lanark E R. C. Rose 21 10 11 

Carleton E Thos. P. Maxwell 17 6 11 

Dufferin W. R. Liddy 33 12 21 

Dundas H. B. Fetterly 55 45 10 

Elgin E J.C.Smith 63 39 24 

Elgin W J.A.Taylor 29 18 11 

Essex S D.A.Maxwell 30 18 12 

Frontenac S S. A. Truscott 1 1 

Grey E Samuel Huff 4 2 2 

Grey W H. H. Burgess 21 10 11 

Grey S Robt. Wright 9 3 6 

Glengarry J. W Crewson 46 37 9 

Haldimand J. L. Mitchener 14 9 5 

Halton and Wentworth in part. .J. M. Denyes 26 21 5 

Hastings S H.J.Clarke 43 33 10 

Hastings C J.E.Minns 27 24 3 

Huron E J. M. Field 35 26 9 

Huron W J.E.Tom 80 60 20 

Kent E W. H. G. Colles 70 18 52 

KentW J.H.Smith 62 32 30 

Lambton W Henry Conn 81 57 24 

Lambton E J.J.Edwards 60 48 12 

Lanark W Thos. C. Smith 37 31 6 

Leeds and Grenville (1) J. F. McGuire 25 21 4 

Leeds and Grenville (2) W. C. Dowsley 42 32 10 

Leeds and Grenville (3) T. A. Craig 24 24 

Lennox E J. Corkill 5 4 1 

Lincoln Geo. A. Carefoot 4 3 1 

Middlesex W J. H. Sexton 64 47 17 

Middlesex E P.J.Thompson 80 37 43 

Manitoulin J. W. Hagan 6 2- 4 

Nipissing P. W. Brown 4 1 3 

Northumberland & Durham (1) .E. E. Snider 47 35 12 

Northumberland & Durham (2) .J. W. Odell 20 12 8 

Northumberland & Durham (3) . R. Boyes 8 5 3 

Norfolk H. F. Cook 34 21 13 

Ontario N T.R.Ferguson 23 13 10 

Ontario S R. A. Hutchison 13 7 6 

Oxford S R. A. Paterson 6 5 1 

Oxford N J.M.Cole 43 31 12 

Parry Sound S.. J.L.Moore 2 1 1 

Peel W. J. Galbraith 17 11 6 

Perth N Wm. Irwin 55 40 15 

Perth S Jas. H.Smith.. 40 32 8 

Peterborough E Richard Lees 13 4 9 

Peterborough W and Victoria E.G. E. Broderick 8 . . 8 

Prince Edward F.P.Smith 26 21 5 

Prescott and Russell A. McVicar 2 2 

Renfrew S G. G. McNab 24 16 8 

Renfrew N I. D. Breuls 7 5 2 

Simcoe N J. L. Garvin 2 . . 2 

Simcoe S E. Longman 6 4 2 

Simcoe E Isaac Day 15 14 1 

Stormont James Froats 62 61 1 

Timiskaming and Algoma in pt . W. A. Wilson 4 2 2 

Victoria W W. H. Stevens 1 1 

Waterloo S L.Norman 16 14 2 

Waterloo N F. W. Sheppard 9 8 1 

Welland S James McNiece 15 10 5 

Welland N J.W.Marshall 11 7 4 

Wellington N Robt. Galbraith 9 6 3 

Wellington S J. J. Craig 43 21 22 

Wentworth J.B.Robinson 37 22 15 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



51 



Number of Ungraded Public Schools with Glasses in Agriculture, 
September, 1922— June, 1923 (Continued) 



Inspectorate 



Inspector 



York (1) C. W. Mulloy.... 

York (2) A. L. Campbell. . 

York (3) W. W. A. Trench 

Dist. Div. Ill John Ritchie 

Dist. Div. IV L. A. Marlin 

Dist. Div. VIII D. M. Christie. . . 

Monteith N. Campbell 



Totals 1874 





No. of 


No. of 


No of 


Home 


School 


Schools 


Gardens 


Gardens 


24 


15 


9 


11 


6 


5 


21 


15 


6 


2 


1 


1 


4 


1 


3 


1 




1 


1 




1 



1241 



633 



Number of Ungraded Separate Schools with Classes in Agriculture, 
September, 1922 to June, 1923 



Inspectorate 



Inspector 



Bruce, Essex, Grey, Huron, Kent, Middlesex, 

Perth, Wellington Thos. S. Melady 

Halton, Peel, Perth, Waterloo, Wellington W. J. Lee 

Essex A. J. Beneteau . . 

Frontenac, Hastings, Lanark, Leeds, Northum- 
berland, Peterborough, Simcoe, Victoria J. P. Finn. 

Carleton, Glengarry, Stormont J. E. Jones 

Kent, Middlesex J. F. Sullivan . . . 

Renfrew V. C. Quarry . . . 

Sudbury, Manitoulin J. M. Bennett . . 

St. Charles R.C.S.S., Toronto J. F. Power 





No. of 


No. of 


No. of 


Home 


School 


Schools 


Gardens 


Gardens 


30 


16 


14 


9 


1 


8 


1 


1 




23 


10 


13 


15 


12 


3 


1 


1 




2 


2 




2 • 


1 


1 


1 


1 





Totals. 



84 



45 



39 



Inspectorate 



Number of Graded Public Schools with Classes in Agriculture, 
September, 1922— June, 1923 

No. of No. of 
Inspector No. of Home School 

Schools Gardens Gardens 



Algoma D. T. Walkom . . 

Brantford City E. E. C. Kilmer 

Brant T. W. Standing . 

Bruce W W. F. Bald 

Bruce E John McCool . . . 

Carleton E Thos. P. Maxwe 

Carleton W R. C. Rose 

Dundas H. B. Fetterly . . 

Elgin E J. C. Smith 

Elgin W J. A. Taylor 

Essex S D. A. Maxwell . . 

Frontenac N and Addington M. R. Reid 

Glengarry J. W. Crewson . . 

Grey W H. H. Burgess. . 

Grey S Robt. Wright . . . 

Guelph City Wm. Tytler 

Halton J. M. Denyes . . . 

Hastings S H.J. Clarke 

Hastings C J. E. Minns 

Huron E J. M. Field 

Huron W J. Elgin Tom. . . 

Kenora W. J. Hamilton . 

Kent E W. H. G. Colles. 

Kent W J. H. Smith 

Lambton E J. J. Edwards. . . 

Lanark W Thos C. Smith. . 

Leeds and Grenville (2) W. C. Dowsley . . 

Leeds and Grenville (3) T. A. Craig 

Lincoln G. A. Carefoot . . 

London City G. A. Wheable, 

Manitoulin J. W. Hagan 



V. K. Greer, 



Middlesex E P. J. Thompson 



5 
9 
4 
2 
2 
4 
1 
5 
7 

12 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
3 
3 
3 

♦2 
3 
1 
2 
4 
1 
2 
3 
2 
9 

11 
1 

4 



52 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Number of Graded Public Schools with Glasses in Agriculture, 
September, 1922— June, 1923 (Continued) 



Inspectorate 



Inspector 



Middlesex W J. H. Sexton 

Nipissing District P. W. Brown 

Norfolk H. F. Cook 

Northumberland & Durham (1) .E. E. Snider 

Ontario S. R. A. Hutchison 

Ottawa City J. H. Putman, E. T. Slemon 

Ottawa Normal Model W. J. Neale 

Oxford N J. M. Cole 

Oxford S R. A. Paterson 

Parry Sound S J. L. Moore 

Peel W. J. Galbraith 

Perth N Wm. Irwin 

Perth S J. H. Smith.. 

Peterborough City A. Mowat 

Peterborough E Richard Lees 

Prescott and Russell A. McVicar 

Prince Edward F. P. Smith 

Renfrew N I. D. Breuls 

Renfrew S G. G. McNab 

Simcoe S Edwin Longman 

Simcoe N J. L. Garvin 

Stormont James Froats 

Timiskaming W. A. Wilson 

Toronto City Walter Bryce 

Toronto " A. E. Marty 

Toronto " N. A. McKenzie 

Toronto " G. K. Powell 

Toronto Normal Model School. S. J. Radcliffe 

Victoria W W. H. Stevens 

Waterloo N F. W. Sheppard 

Waterloo S '. L. Norman 

Welland N J. W. Marshall 

Wellington S J. J. Craig 

Wentworth J. B. Robinson 13 

Windsor City J. E. Benson 

York (1) C. W. Mulloy 

York (2) A. L. Campbell 

York (3) W. W. A. Trench 

York (4) A. A. Jordan 11 

Dist. Div. I S. Shannon 

Dist.' Div. VIII D. M. Christie 





No. of 


No. of 


No. of 


Home 


School 


Schools 


Gardens 


Gardens 


3 


2 


1 


2 




2 


1 




1 


1 


1 




2 




2 


12 


1 


11 


1 




1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 




5 


1 


4 


7 


1 


6 


3 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


5 


5 




3 




3 


3 


1 


2 


4 


2 


2 


1 




1 


3 


2 


1 


3 


3 




3 




3 


4 


3 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 




1 


1 




1 


3 




3 


4 


2 


2 


5 




5 


5 


i 


4 


13 


8 


5 


7 


7 




2 




2 


5 


2 


3 


9 


5 


4 


11 


8 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 




1 



Totals 261 



130 



131 



Number of Graded Separate Schools with Classes in Agriculture, 
September, 1922— June, 1923 



Inspectorate 



Inspector 



Bruce, Essex, Huron, Kent, Lambton, Perth, 

Wellington ■ Thos. S. Melady. . 

Brant, Simcoe, Waterloo, York W. J. Lee 

Essex, Middlesex, Oxford, Welland, Wentworth. J. F. Sullivan 

Essex J. V. Scanlan 

Essex, Kent A. J. Beneteau .... 

Glengarry J. E. Jones 

Windsor City John Waugh 

Peterborough, Simcoe J. P. Finn 

Algoma, Nipissing, Thunder Bay J. M. Bennett 

Toronto City J. F. Power 

Renfrew, Timiskaming V. C. Quarry 





No. of 


No. of 


No. of 


Home 


School 


Schools 


Gardens 


Gardens 


14 


4 


10 


12 


6 


6 


14 


8 


6 


1 


1 




1 


1 




3 




3 


1 




1 


6 


2 


4 


10 


3 


7 


6 


4 


2 


1 




1 



Totals. 



69 



2<> 



40 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 53 

The number of Public and Separate Schools qualifying for grants each year, 
commencing in 1903, is given in the following table: 



Year 


No. of 


Year 


No. of 


With School 


With Home 




Schools 




Schools 


Gardens 


Gardens 


1903 


4 


1914 


264 


208 


56 


1904 


7 


1915 


407 


222 


185 


1905 


6 


1916 


585 


324 


261 


1906 


8 


1917 


989 


466 


523 


1907 


2 


1918 


1,020 


588 


432 


1908 


14 


1919 


1,408 


618 


790 


1909 


16 


1920 


1,648 


702 


946 


1910 


17 


1921 


1,804 


690 


1,114 


1911 


33 


1922 


2,047 


796 


1,251 


1912 


101 


1923 


2,288 


843 


1,445 


1913 


159 











In the annual reports submitted by trustees to the Department of Education 
statements are frequently made bearing upon the work as actually carried on. 
A number of quotations are given; These serve to show what the trustees 
think about it. One or two are also given from the inspectors: 

S.S. No. 3, Colborne, Huron Co.; Harold E. Elborn. 

There is every reason to believe that the system of teaching Agriculture, and also the school 
garden and school fair are of much benefit to the boys and girls. 

In this way the children are getting a very intelligent knowledge of practical Agriculture, 
the identification of weeds, the destruction of same, and also intimacy with useful plants and 
flowers. 

Sec. -Treasurer. 

S.S. No. 8 E. Wawanash, Huron Co. ; K. May Bone. 

The school garden is looking fine and we consider it a valuable addition to Rural School 
Education. 

Trustees. 

S.S. No. 1, Ellice, Perth Co.; Lottie Cartledge. 

We the Trustees of S.S. No. 1, Ellice hereby certify that Miss Lottie Cartledge has had a 

very successful garden in 1923 which was highly satisfactory. 

Fred Henderson, 1 

Fred Shore, > Trustees. 

Geo. Herman, J 

S.S. No. 5, Mornington, Perth Co.; Mabel E. Roe. 

I hereby certify that splendid work has been done in the teaching of Agriculture by our 
present teacher, Mabel E. Roe. 

Charles E. Barrero, 
Trustee. 
Sault Ste. Marie Public Schools. 

Miss Burke teaches Sr. IV and Miss Chandler Jr. IV in the Campbell School. The course 
is, as in other schools in this city, modified so as to bring the work more within the experiences 
and interests of the pupils. The growing of bulbs, flowers, shrubs, and trees is stressed. It is 
hoped to stimulate greater interest in beautifying homes and public property. The importance 
of forestry, including forest protection, in this district is brought before the pupils. The importance 
of market produce and knowledge of such produce is emphasized. 

About fifty per cent, of the time is spent in practical work, such as growing bulbs, etc.; 
candling eggs; identifying noxious weeds — so plentiful in the city. During the lesson periods 
the pupils get a training in practical English and lessons are co-related with other subjects 
such as geography and arithmetic. 

Similar lines are followed in Central School where Miss King teaches Sr. IV, in Cody, by 
Miss Cleminson and in David Kyle, by Miss Casselman. 

A small amount of equipment is needed in some of the schools, for class work. This I have 
discussed with the teachers, who win ask for supplies through the ordinary channels. 

Each teacher holds a certificate in Elementary Agriculture and Horticulture. Good work 
is done in all schools with the exception of Cody, and David Kyle, where the teachers, though 
capable, did not feel, owing to the stress of work, that they could take sufficient time in this 
subject. After Christmas this will be changed and more time taken or work discontinued. 

D. T. Walkom, I.P.S. 



54 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

South Perth and the City of Stratford. 

m All the rural schools in South Perth taught Agriculture and had school or home gardens 
during the year 1923. A satisfactory interest was taken in the work by all concerned. The 
activities of our very capable Agricultural Representative were of great benefit to teachers, pupils 
and parents. 

Five large school Fairs were held, one at the centre of each township, which were remarkably 
well attended. Many prizes were awarded at each fair and everyone in attendance seemed 
pleased with the mode of carrying on the work. 

School gardens were also carried on at six of our larger schools in the city. The work in 
each garden was largely used for nature study and experiments. Each garden was nicely cared 
for and records were kept of the cost and selling price of the produce of each garden. The work 
as a whole was very good. 

J. H. Smith, LPS., 

Div. II, Perth Co. 
Stratford, Ont., Dec. 26th, 1923. 

School Fairs are now quite common in the Province. These organizations 
are carried on generally by the agricultural representatives co-operating with 
the inspectors and teachers. The teacher is expected to become acquainted 
with the agricultural representative of the county in which the school is situated 
in order that she may secure from the representative such assistance as this 
office is prepared to give. The agricultural representatives are under the control 
of the Department of Agriculture. The following list, corrected to January 
1st, 1924, is here given for the use of the teachers. • 



Agricultural Representatives — Ontario Department of Agriculture 

R. S. Duncan, Director. W. D. Jackson, Asst. Director. 

COUNTY NAME ADDRESS 

Algoma J. M. Mcintosh Sault Ste. Marie. 

Brant R. Schuyler Paris. 

Bruce Campbell Lamont Walkerton. 

Carleton CM. Meek Carp. 

Dufferin H. A. Dorrance Orangeville. 

Dundas A. E. Springstead Morrisburg. 

Durham F. C. Paterson Port Hope. 

Elgin ! C. W. Buchanan Royal Bank Bldg., St. Thomas. 

Essex Justus Miller Essex. 

Frontenac A. W. Sirett Kingston. 

Glengarry D. E. MacRae Alexandria. 

Grenville W. M. Croskery Kemptville. 

Grey T. S. Cooper Markdale. 

Haldimand C. Frey Cayuga. 

Halton R. R. Fleming Milton. 

Hastings Ray Atkin Stirling. 

Huron S. B. Stothers Clinton. 

Kenora M. F. Cook Dryden. 

Kent Ralph E. White ChathaYn. 

Lambton W. P. Macdonald Petrolia. 

Lanark F. Forsyth Perth. 

Leeds E. F. Neff Athens. 

Lennox and Addington C. C. Main Napanee. 

Lincoln W. S. Van Every St. Catharines, Box 107. 

Manitoulin R. E. Cumming Gore Bay. 

Middlesex R. A. Finn London. 

Muskoka and Parry Sound R. S. Beckett Huntsville. 

Norfolk G. G. Bramhill Simcoe. 

Northumberland H. Sirett Brighton. 

Ontario R. M. Tipper Uxbridge. 

Oxford G. R. Green Woodstock. 

Peel J. A. Carroll Brampton. 

Perth M. C. McPhail Stratford. 

Peterborough F. C. McRae Norwood. 

Prince Edward A. P. MacVannel Picton. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



55 



Agricultural Representatives — Ontario Department of Agriculture (Continued) 



COUNTY 



ADDRESS 



Prescott and Russell F. Larose Plantagenet. 

Rainy River I. F. Metcalf Emo. 

Renfrew M. H. Winter Renfrew. 

Simcoe, North A. Hutchinson Barrie. 

Simcoe, South J. J. E. McCague Alliston. 

Sudbury D. J. Robicheau Sudbury. 

Timiskaming W. G. Nixon New Liskeard. 

Thunder Bay — 

Fort William Section Fraser Roas Fort William. 

Port Arthur Section F. S. Thomas Port Arthur. 

Victoria A. A. Knight Lindsay. 

Waterloo J. S. Knapp Gait. 

Welland R. J. Bryden Welland. 

Wellington R. H. Clemens Arthur. 

Wentworth W. G. Marritt 18 Market St., Hamilton. 

York R. J. Rogers Newmarket. 



The Names and Addresses of Public and Separate School Inspectors who hold 
Intermediate Certificates in Agriculture 



Bald, W. F., Port Elgin. 

Bennett, J. M., 47 Browning Ave., Toronto. 

Benson, J. E., Windsor. 

Breuls, I. D., Pembroke. 

Boyes, Robert, Campbellford. 

Brown, P. W., North Bay. 

Burgess, H. H., Owen Sound. 

Campbell, A. L., Weston. 

Carefoot, George A., St. Catharines. 

Christie, D. M., Sudbury. 

Clarke, H. J., Belleville. 

Cole, J. M., Woodstock. 

Colles, W. H. G. (Rev.), Chatham. 

Colling, James, Bancroft. 

Corkill, E. J., Napanee. 

Conn, Henry, Sarnia. 

Cook, H. F., Simcoe. 

Craig, J. J., Fergus. 

Craig, T. A., Kemptville. 

Crewson, J. W., Alexandria. 

Day, Isaac, Orillia. 

Denyes, J. M., Milton. 

Dowsley, W. C., Brockville. 

Edwards, J. J., Petrolia. 

Ferguson, T. R., Uxbridge. 

Fetterly, H. B., Winchester. 

Field, J. M., Goderich. 

Finn, J. P., Peterborough. 

Froats, James, Finch. 

Galbraith, Robert, Mount Forest. 

Galbraith, W. J., Brampton. 

Garvin, J. L., Barrie. 

Hagan, J. W., Gore Bay. 

Hamilton, W. J., Fort William. 

Huff, Samuel, Meaford. 

Irwin, William, Stratford. 

Johnson, H. D., Strathroy. 

Jones, Jas. E. Ottawa. 

Jordan, A. A., 63 Orchard View Blvd.. 

Toronto. 
Kilmer, E. E. C, Brantford. 
Lee, W. J., 434 Brunswick Ave., Toronto. 
Lees, Richard, Peterborough. 
Liddy, W. R., Orange ville. 



Longman, E., Barrie. 

Macdonald, N. S., Toronto. 

Marshall, J. W., Welland. 

Marty, Miss A. E., Toronto. 

Maxwell, D. A., Kingsville. 

Minns, J. E., Tweed. 

Mitchener, J. L., Cayuga. 

Moore, J. L., Parry Sound. 

Moshier, D. D., Toronto. 

Mulloy, C. W., Aurora. 

McCool, John, Walkerton. 

McGuire, J. F. , Westport. 

McNab, G. G., Renfrew. 

McNiece, James, Welland. 

Norman, Lambert, Gait. 

Odell, J. W., Cobourg. 

Paterson, R. A., Ingersoll. 

Pentland, G. E., Fenelon Falls. 

Power, J. F., 33 Dalton Rd., Toronto. 

Reid, M. R., Sharbot Lake. 

Ritchie, John, Port Arthur. 

Robinson, J. B., Hamilton. 

Rose, R. C, Carleton Place. 

Scanlan, Jas., Toronto. 

Sexton, J. H., Strathroy. 

Sheppard, F. W., Kitchener. 

Slemon, E. T., Ottawa. 

Smith, F. P.. Picton. 

Smith, J. C , St. Thomas. 

Smith, J. H., Chatham. 

Smith, Jas. H., Stratford. 

Snider, E. E., Port Hope. 

Standing, T. W., Brantford. 

Sullivan, J. F., London. 

Taylor, J. A., St. Thomas. 

Thompson, P. J., London. 

Tom, J. E., Goderich. 

Trench, W. W. A., Richmond Hill. 

Truscott, S. A., Kingston. 

Walkom, D. T., Sault Ste. Marie. 

White, R. O., North Bay. 

Wilson, W. A., Haileybury. 

Wright, Robert, Hanover. 



56 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

HIGH SCHOOLS 

The number of High Schools carrying on the teaching of Agriculture is 

increasing steadily, though not so rapidly as might be expected. One of the 
difficulties is the lack of teachers who are qualified to give instruction in Agri- 
culture. Another difficulty arises out of the fact that, although Agriculture 
is accepted as an option against the Physical Science of the Middle School for 
Junior Matriculation in Arts, it is not accepted in Medicine, Dentistry or 

Engineering. In small High Schools a few students may wish to enter one or 
other of these three faculties, but can not do so if Agriculture is taught because 
the small High School can not provide both options. This, of course, works 
against the teaching of Agriculture, especially in the small High Schools and 
in the Continuation Schools. 

1920 1921 1922 1923 

Schools Jan.- Sept.- Jan.- Sept.- Jan.- Sept.- Jan.- Sept.- 

June Dec. June Dec. June Dec. June Dec. 
Collegiate Institutes — 

Brockville yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Clinton yes yes no yes yes yes yes yes 

Cobourg yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Ingersoll yes yes yes no no no no yes 

Renfrew yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

St. Thomas yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Smith's Falls ... ... ... ... ... ... yes 

Strathroy ... ... ... ... ... ... yes 

High Schools — 

Almonte ... ... yes yes yes yes no 

Arthur yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Athens yes yes yes yes yes yes yes no 

*Beamsville yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Belleville yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Bowmanville yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Burlington ... ... ... ... ... ... yes 

Chesterville ... ... ... ... ... ... yes 

Essex yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Flesherton ... ... ... ... ... ... yes 

Haileybury ... ... yes yes yes yes yes 

Kincardine yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Leamington yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Mitchell ... ... yes yes no no no 

Niagara Falls, South yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Oakville yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Port Hope yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

*Port Perry yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Timmins ... ... ... ... ... ... yes 

Wardsville ... ... ... ... ... ... yes 

Whitby yes yes yes yes yes yes no yes 

Williamstown yes yes yes yes yes yes no no 

Winchester yes yes yes yes yes yes yes no 

Continuation Schools — 

*Drayton yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Mount Brydges ... ... ... ... ... ... yes 

New Liskeard yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Ridgeway yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 

Public Schools with Form V — 

Ancaster ... ... ... yes yes no no 

Forester's Falls ... ... ... yes yes yes yes 

Mallorytown ... ... ... yes yes yes no 

Manor Park ... ... ... ... ... ... yes 

Swansea, York County yes no no yes yes no no yes 

Thamesford, Oxford County, yes yes yes no no yes yes yes 

Thomasburg, Hastings Co ... ... yes yes yes no no 

Todmorden, York County ... ... yes yes no no no 

The Northern Academy, 

Monteith ... ... ... ... ... yes yes 

*Separate Departments of Agriculture. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 57 

The following table gives the number of High Schools qualifying for grants 
since 1915: 

No. With Without No. With Without 

Schools Plots Plots Schools Plots Plots 
1915 1920 

Jan.-June 11 . . 11 Jan.-June 32 29 3 

Sept.-Dec 15 .. 15 Sept.-Dec 25 24 1 

Jan.-June 15 1 14 1921 

Sept.-Dec 20 1 19 Jan.-June 21 17 4 

F 191 7 Sept.-Dec 28 17 11 

Jan.-June 20 7 13 jp22 

^v- 21 7 U Jan.-June 29 27 2 

T T iyi * 01 ^ < Sept.-Dec 30 27 3 

Jan.-June 21 16 5 ^ 

Sept.-Dec 26 18 8 1923 

1919 Jan.-June 26 22 4 

Jan.-June 23 16 7 Sept.-Dec 33 24 9 

Sept.-Dec 30 23 7 

Courses are provided at the Ontario Agricultural College covering two 
consecutive summers of five weeks each. These courses were introduced in 
1913, and the following list gives the number of teachers who have so far quali- 
fied each year for an Intermediate Certificate in Agriculture: 

1914, 12; 1915, 10; 1916, 15; 1917, 15; 1918, 9; 1919, 21; 1920, 25; 1921, 24; 

1922,33; 1923, 20. 

Below are the names of those teachers who qualified in 1923. 

Chisholm, R. J. McWhorter, Thos., B.A., McMaster, M.A., 

Collins, Marie. Toronto. 

Craven, Margaret. Montgomery, Bella. 

Dredge, Dora E. O'Reilly, Madeleine (Sister St. Eugene). 

Firth, Joseph W., B.A.. Toronto. Rowe, James S. 

Gillies, Robert, B.A., Queen's. Stothers, John C, M.A., Queen's. 

Harvey, M. Gladys. Weir, Wm. J., B.A., Queen's. 

Hayes, Helen M. Woltz, Wm. A. 

McEwen, John S., B.A., Queen's. 

University Standing Summary, including Farm Mechanics and Specialists, 
with Degrees: 

Queen's 91 

Toronto 40 

McMaster 18 

Western 4 

Victoria 3 

156 
Without Degrees 106 

THE NORMAL SCHOOLS 

The Normal Schools continue to do very efficient work, notwithstanding 
two handicaps: (1) The class room accommodation is scarcely adequate when 
it is considered that a good deal of laboratory work should be done; and the 
classes are too large for the rooms as they are. (2) Owing to the fact that very 
few of the High Schools give instruction in Agriculture, only an exceedingly 
small number of those attending the Normal Schools have had any instruction 
in Agriculture at all. Consequently much of the time of the teacher is taken 
up with work that could have been done in the High Schools. 



58 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



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1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



59 



Teachers of Agriculture in the Different Normal Schools 

Hamilton G. O. McMillan, M.A., B.Paed., Queen's. 

London G. W. Hofferd, B.A., Queen's. 

North Bay H. E. Ricker, M.A., Queen's. 

Ottawa G. A. Miller, M.A., Queen's. 

Peterborough A. J. Madill, B.A., McMaster. 

Stratford J. W. Emery, B.A., D.Paed., Toronto. 

Toronto Jos. W. Firth, B.A., Toronto. 

All these men hold Intermediate Certificates in Agriculture. 

SUMMER COURSES 

The attendance at the summer courses in Agriculture in 1923 was reason- 
ably good considering the fact that each student paid his own expenses. 
Naturally there is a considerable falling off due partly to the fact that the 
decision to refuse a refund of expenses was made only a short time before the 
session opened. 

The following shows the attendance at the summer session in Agriculture 
at the different sessions since 1911 : 



Attendance at the Ontario Agricultural College 


Summe 


r Courses in Agriculture 




Elementary 


Intermediate 


Inspectors 


Farm 
Me- 
chanics 




Year 


1 


II 


I 


II 


III 
Men 


I II 






Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


— 


— 


Total 


1911 


8 
16 
14 

8 
15 
11 
15 

6 
16 
28 
62 
54 
12 


75 

65 

64 

55 

39 

99 

138 

187 

155 

125 

167 

175 

54 


1 
2 
5 
5 
5 
9 
7 
7 
6 

10 
36 
27 
20 


16 

23 

36 

27 

18 

31 

81 

119 

160 

135 

86 

151 

109 
















100 


1912 
















106 


1913 


23 
13 
17 
15 

9 
20 

9 

7 
24 
15 

9 


4 

4 

1 

3 

1 

11 

19 

25 

15 

12 

3 












146 


1914 


14 

9 

14 

13 

9 

7 

19 

16 

18 

9 










126 


1915 


1 
1 

2 

"21" 








105 


1916 








183 


1917 






10 

9 

10 

10 

7 


276 


1918 

1919 

1920 


9 


79 

86 

8 

*"4" 

4 


456 

489 
374 


1921 -. 

1922 

1923 


8 
15 

7 


7 
.... 


428 
471 
228 



A considerable number of those who enter Part I of the Course leading to 
an Elementary certificate, for some reason or other, do not complete the course 
by taking Part II. The following figures show the percentage of shrinkage 
and concerns the classes at Guelph only: 

Number completing 
Number taking Part I Part II Elementary Decrease 

Year Elementary -Year the following year percent. 



1911 


83 


1912 


81 


1913 


76 


1914 


63 


1915 . 

1916 


54 
100 


1917 


158 


1918 


193 


1919 


171 


1920 


153 


1921 


229 


1922 


229 



1912 


24 


71 


1913 


41 


50 


1914 


32 


58 


1915 


23 


63 


1916 . . . 


40 


26 


1917 


88 


12 


1918 


126 


20 


1919 


166 


14 


1920 


145 


15 


1921 


122 


20 


1922 


178 


22 


1923 .... 


129 


44 



60 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Attendance at the Whitby Ladies' College Summer Courses in Agriculture 

Part I Part II 

Year Elementary Elementary Total 

1919 70 .. 70 

1920 69 46 115 

1921 80 50 130 

1922 40 78 118 

1923 8 40 48 

Attendance at the Northern Academy, Monteith, Summer Courses in Agriculture 

Part I Part II 

Year Elementary Elementary Total 

1920 23 .. 23 

1921 17 8 25 

1922 15 18 S3 

1923 4 7 11 

Attendance at Kemptville Agricultural School, Summer Course in Agriculture 

Part I Part II 

Year Elementary Elementary Total 

1922 64 .. 64 

1923 27 .. 27 



Summer School in Agriculture, Whitby 
By Norman Davies, B.A. 

The fifth Summer School in Agriculture opened on July 3rd, 1923. Forty- 
eight students registered, eight in Part I and forty in Part II. 

The staff and subjects taught were as follows: 

Norman Davies, B.A., Amherstburg High School, Principal, taught Poultry, 
Gardening, Drainage, and took charge of sports and athletics. 

J. A. Short, Swansea Public School, taught Dairying, Floriculture, Horti- 
culture, Beekeeping and assisted with Gardening. 

J. G. Adams, B.A., Oshawa High School, taught Soil, Weather and 
Chemistry. 

J. A. Anderson, B.A., Brockville Collegiate Institute, taught Botany in 
all its branches. 

W. J. Morrison, B.A., Bowmanville High School, taught Entomology and 
Bacteriology. 

R. M. Tipper, B.S.A., Uxbridge, taught Animal Husbandry and Field 
Husbandry. 

Second year was divided into two sections of twenty each for class purposes. 
The small number in each class made it possible for the teachers to give more 
attention to the individual need and the work done was in every way satisfactory. 
As in former years the work was made as practical as possible. Each student 
in first year planted and cared for a small garden. In Floriculture each student 
transplanted a number of plants to flats. In Animal Husbandry visits were 
made to several farms for the study of live stock. This has been found more 
practical than putting up a tent and bringing live stock to the College. 

Every one entered into the sports and games with a hearty zest; baseball 
and tennis occupied the time nearly every evening. The swimming classes 
were unusually successful, about 60 per cent, of those who entered learning to 
swim. 

Through the courtesy of the members of the staff who had automobiles 
all students were able to visit the Ontario Hospital and Oshawa. On Saturday, 
July 21st, forty-two students and three members of the staff went to Niagara 
Falls. This was a pleasant outing and was thoroughly enjoyed. As most of 
our students have never been as far west as Toronto, Whitby as a centre for a 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 61 

Summer School enables them to visit Toronto and the adjacent places of interest. 
On July 25th, Miss McKee of the Columbia Gramophone Co., gave a demon- 
stration of the use of the phonograph in schools, which was much appreciated. 
On Friday evening, July 28th, the students gave a concert in the assembly hall 
which was followed by dancing in the gymnasium. 

While the number in attendance was smaller than in former years, the 
Summer School at Whitby has been a success. All students have done splendid 
work and it is the regret of those in second year that their work is finished and 
the expectation of first year to return for their second year. 



Summer Course at Kemptville 
By G. E. Copeland 

The second Summer School in Agriculture was opened at the Kemptville 
Agricultural School on July 3rd, 1923, with twenty-seven students in attendance, 
one of whom left soon after the course commenced. All of these were in Part I. 

The members of the staff and subjects taught were as follows: 

G. E. Copeland, M.A., of Winchester High School, Principal, taught 
Entomology, Botany, Weather, and had charge of sports and games. 

W. J. Bell, B.S.A., Principal of the Agricultural School, taught Animal 
Husbandry. 

E. K. Hampson, B.S.A., taught Field Husbandry, Soils, and Dairying, 
except Buttermaking. 

A. J. Logsdail, B.S.A., taught Gardening, Horticulture, and Floriculture. 

P. M. Dewan, B.A., B.S.A., taught Poultry and assisted in Animal 
Husbandry. 

W. G. Gardiner, formerly of Kingston Dairy School, took the practical 
work in Buttermaking. 

Miss A. M. Delaney, of the Ottawa Normal Model School, was supervisor 
of the students in residence. 

Miss I. Johnston, matron of the Agricultural School, acted in the same 
capacity in the Summer School. 

Miss E. E. Weaver was office assistant, part time. 

All students except three were in residence. It is felt that those in residence 
derive more benefit from the course than those living outside. Male students 
were not admitted. 

As was the case last year, the staff of the Kemptville Agricultural School 
did the greater part of the teaching, using for that purpose the equipment of 
the school and the stock and crops of the school farm. This Summer School 
is fortunate in having as instructors, men who are not only engaged in teaching 
Agriculture, but who are also in close touch with the various phases of Ontario 
Agriculture. 

Practical work was emphasized in all subjects as far as possible. Endeavour 
was made to relate the work to the courses in Elementary Agriculture for Public 
Schools, and, in this way to be of practical service to the teachers and the 
communities which they serve. Each student planted and cared for a garden 
plot. Collecting trips were made around the neighborhood for the study of 
weeds and insects, as well as field crops and soils. Eastern Ontario being largely 
devoted to dairying, silos and the various silage crops received special attention. 
The newly planted shrubbery and flower beds provided excellent material for 
Floriculture. Other illustrations equally good might be mentioned. 

On the invitation of Mr. Archibald, Director of Experimental Farms, the 
students spent a Saturday at the Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa. Lunch 



62 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

was served in the Pavilion, after which the students were conducted through 
the barns and over the farm by members of the Farm Staff. The excursion 
was very instructive and enjoyable and is now looked upon as an essential part 
of the course. 

The athletic and social sides were not neglected. In the evenings the 
students took part in baseball, volley ball, and tennis, a court being available 
this year for the first time. The gymnasium was used in wet weather. Two 
field days were held but both were interrupted by rain. A curtailed programme 
was put on in the gymnasium. A very enjoyable picnic was held in a grove 
on a branch of the Rideau, which proved a pleasant change from the daily 
round of classes. Impromptu social evenings were held several times under 
the direction of Miss Delaney. 

As was the case last year, a small magazine was published by the students 
at the end of the term. It was made up mainly of selections from the various 
programmes of the term. It promotes a class spirit among the students. 

Based on the experience of two years with this Summer School, I feel that 
the work is of great value to the teachers and through them to the children of 
the country. 

The School closed at noon on August 3rd. 



Summer School in Agriculture, Northern Academy, Monteith 
By G. S. Johnson 

The fourth year, 1923, of the Summer School in Agriculture at Monteith, 
was not attended with the success of former years. The number of teachers 
attending was small owing perhaps, to the fact that the location of this centre 
was more distant and that they were called upon to pay all of their own expenses. 
Also several that would otherwise have come were sent, through some mistake, 
to other centres. Owing to the small number of applicants there was a question, 
for awhile, as to whether any course would be held at Monteith, but it was 
decided to reduce the Staff and carry on rather than to relinquish the centre 
altogether. 

There were four in attendance in Part I, and seven in Part II. Of those 
in Part II six were present in Part I at Monteith the previous year. I would 
strongly recommend that as teachers are now paying their own expenses in 
connection with Summer School Courses, they be permitted to attend Monteith 
from any section of the Province if they so desire. We do not state this believing 
that the course at Monteith in itself offers any peculiar advantages over similar 
courses offered at other centres, but we believe that it gives the teachers an 
opportunity to see something of Northern Ontario and to become acquainted 
with the agricultural advantages of the North. 

The staff and their duties were as follows: 

G. S. Johnson, Principal, Northern Academy, Monteith; Botany I and 
II, Chemistry II, Physics II, Methods II. 

Arthur Archibald, Northern Academy, Monteith; Physics I, Entomology 
I and II, Animal Husbandry II, Field Husbandry I and II. 

Miss I. E. Dobbie, High School, New Liskeard; Bacteriology II, Flori- 
culture and Horticulture I and II, Poultry I, Dairying II, Bees II. 

Owing to the small attendance not much could be done with the organiza- 
tion of games, nevertheless the recreation side of the School was not overlooked. 
A picnic was arranged for at Lake Segekinika, one of the beauty spots of Northern 
Ontario. Apart from this no side trips were taken although the teachers took 
advantage of the week-ends to visit points of interest in the District. 






1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 63 



APPENDIX H 

REPORT OF THE 
INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC LIBRARIES 

To the Honourable G. H. Ferguson, B.A., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir: — 

I have the honour of submitting the following report of your Public 
Libraries Branch for the year 1923, and the statistics, etc., of the Public Libraries 
of the Province for 1922; also a statement of the grants paid in 1923 to Public 
Libraries, and to Historical, Literary, and Scientific Societies. 

Summary 

1. The records of the public libraries of the Province show an advance 
over the previous year in every phase of public library service in as far 
as library statistics can reveal conditions. The experience of your Inspector 
during 1923 leads him to believe that the libraries as a whole have taken another 
step toward giving a larger and better service to the public. The notable min- 
ority giving a large service of good quality has grown somewhat, but the average 
library is not so close to giving first-class service as we should like to find it. 

2. The Province has 466 public libraries on its register, whereas there 
were 460 a year ago. 

3. Public library patronage for 1922 increased 293,620 over 1921. The 
increase is not as great as was expected. 

4. Library expenditure increased $35,427— about 4 per cent, over the 
previous year. 

5. Expenditure for books increased between 4 and 5 per cent. There 
has been a tremendous increase in book expenditure since 1918. In that year 
it was $70,000; in 1922 it was $171,255.26. Although the increase seems 
exceedingly large, the expenditure for books is nearly $50,000 less than it should 
have been to meet the requirements of the large patronage that obtained. 

6. Three new public library buildings were erected and one handsome 
community building containing public library accommodation. 

7. Thirty students received professional training in the Departmental 
training school for librarianship. 

8. Two valuable catalogues were published by the Branch in the interest 
of Canadian books. 

9. An exchange of library assistants was arranged between the Toronto 
Public Library and' the public library of Auckland, New Zealand. 

10. Forty Women's Institutes gave financial assistance to public libraries 
in 1922, in amounts ranging from $4.15 to $250. The total given to rural and 
village libraries by Women's Institutes was $1,881.39. Two library buildings 
were erected largely on the initiative of Women's Institutes. These organiza- 
tions should be credited also with assistance in the circulation of travelling 
libraries. 



64 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

11. The use of travelling libraries increased 17 per cent, in 1923 as com- 
pared with 1922. 

12. The Ontario Library Review was published quarterly as usual. 

Public Library Situation 

An annual pen picture of the public library system of Ontario would not 
show much variation from year to year. Each year resembles its predecessor 
with but slight changes. We are pleased to state that every succeeding year 
shows progress, but rarely to the extent of any great change in the general 
condition. Undoubtedly our libraries are becoming more and more useful as 
educational agencies. Many are making a direct contribution to formal and 
informal education, and your Inspector believes that on the whole they are 
performing a great educational service to thousands of readers who do not read 
with education as their chief aim. 

A small percentage of our public libraries may be considered first-class as 
judged by the best modern standards. A large number are doing fairly good 
work, and a percentage that is altogether too large has not reached a reasonably 
high standard. 

Your Public Libraries Branch is at all times working toward the realization 
of higher library standards, through interest in progressive library legislation, 
advice and instruction to libraries, the training of librarians and the payment 
of grants by regulation. With its 466 public libraries, Ontario still has the 
largest number of public libraries in proportion to population of any country, 
state or province in the world. Our efforts are directed toward increasing the 
number of libraries and encouraging a larger and better service through these 
educational institutions. 

Public Libraries Act and Public Library Expenditure 

The present library legislation gives every free public library the same 
opportunity to render a fair amount of service. The patronage of libraries 
has grown very rapidly under the present Act. This has been due to the oppor- 
tunity afforded for the more adequate expenditure for books and personal 
service. Book expenditure has increased from $70,000 to $171,000 in four 
years and still the book purchasing is not adequate to meet the requirements 
of the rapidly increasing use of public libraries. 

The Act is a good one throughout, but the unique feature is the clause 
relating to the public library tax-rate which gives to a library board on its own 
claim any tax up to that rate which will yield fifty cents per capita of the popu- 
lation. This rate clause has been the subject of a great deal of favourable 
comment in Great Britain and the United States. At this time a brief state- 
ment in regard to the practical working of the clause should be interesting. 
The principle has worked excellently and it is doubtful if any other method of 
specifying a rate would be anything like as satisfactory. The clause has pro- 
duced very good general results. It allows any library board a sum not to exceed 
the specified rate, but a municipal council may increase it to an amount not 
to exceed seventy-five cents per capita. 

Our experience so far should be of considerable value in testing the adequacy 
or inadequacy of the rate. At the time your Inspector studied public library 
conditions in the Province and in parts of Great Britain and States across the 
border, he found that the majority of good public libraries were not spending 
more than fifty cents per capita on library service. One city and one large 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 65 

town in Ontario expended practically fifty cents and three outstanding libraries 
in the United States spent more. At the time the study was made we were 
living in the first years of the European war. It was a very difficult matter 
to determine the value of a dollar and how far it would go for library or any 
other kind of service. However, the rate of fifty cents per capita would raise 
the average claimable library income by nearly sixty per cent. The great 
majority of our libraries could scarcely carry on under the old clause. Your 
Inspector discovered through investigation and the careful forming of model 
budgets that fifty cents per capita would furnish a fair amount of library service 
for a community. He considered that fifty cents per capita would be as far as 
library boards could reasonably expect the Legislature to go in fixing a maximum 
claimable rate. At the time it seemed fair to assume that, in municipalities 
where the demand for good library service was greater than fifty cents per 
capita would secure, public opinion would encourage the municipal council to 
vote the extra amount required. 

Now that our library system has had experience in the working of the new 
clause, we have discovered that it is very satisfactory to the great majority 
of our libraries. Most of them have increased their service, and appreciation 
has been shown by a corresponding response on the part of the people. In a 
few instances the demands of the public have been so great that fifty cents 
per capita could not meet the problem and a special vote of the municipal 
council was required to supplement the maximum claimable rate. 

We had discovered that to give adequate library service in villages and 
small towns the per capita cost under ideal conditions would be somewhat 
higher than in larger places. On the other hand it was doubtful whether the 
smaller places could afford to pay a higher rate than the cities, although the 
demand for library service seemed somewhat greater in proportion to population. 

When your Inspector considered library costs on a service basis, he worked 
on the experience of libraries throughout the English-speaking world during 
the years 1914 to 1918, and recommended a rate based on the standards of service 
that obtained at that time. The per capita demand has grown since that period, 
but the rate claimable in the Act still provides for a fair amount of good service. 
However, in libraries where the demand becomes very large and the librarian- 
ship is of a good quality, it is probable that a rate higher than is now claimable 
will be required ; in such cases a vote of the council can give the needed increase. 
The general situation does not warrant any change in the claimable rate. 

Book Circulation and Book Expenditure 

The circulation of books in the public libraries increased 293,620 
in a year, which was somewhat less than we had expected. However, when we 
consider that library patronage has grown 100 per cent, in eight years, we have 
a feeling of satisfaction when a substantial increase of any kind is shown. 
Although the library boards have augmented their book purchasing by $100,000 — 
$70,000 was spent in 1918 and $171,000 in 1922 — the great increase does not 
quite meet the requirements of the demands of the public. There is some 
satisfaction in the thought that the increase in patronage was not greater than 
obtained while the expenditure on books was but $1 71 ,000. There is a real relation 
between annual book-expenditures and public library patronage. A realization 
of this fact would help the library situation in many places throughout the 
Province. Under-expenditure on books always results in a serious setback. 

An exhaustive study of actual conditions before the war showed that for 
a book circulation of a hundred thousand, a library should spend $2,000 on 

3 D.E. 



66 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

books; now that costs are considerably higher than they were seven years ago 
— book-costs did not seem to rise until about 1917 — about $2,700 should be 
expended for every 100,000 circulated. While the figures are in a sense approxi- 
mate they are so nearly accurate that no library board should disregard the 
relation of book-expenditure to patronage. Whenever there has been a falling 
off in patronage your Inspector has always discovered inadequate book-expendi- 
ture as the chief or sole cause. Boards and librarians are sometimes willing to 
attribute decrease in patronage to causes that have little influence, and usually, 
if not always, in the face of the fact that their records show under-expenditure 
for books. It is pleasant to observe by our records that the majority of our 
libraries realize the need for generous book purchasing. 

Professional Training of Librarians 

Thirty students received training in the Ontario Library School in 1923. 
Twenty-eight were from our own Province, one from Saskatchewan and one 
from Alberta. Our libraries are fortunate in having such an admirable type of 
student offer for library work. About half the students this year were grad- 
uates from universities and the others had matriculation or a higher standing, 
and were successful in passing a departmental entrance examination to the 
school. Our school seems to have gained a good reputation among the libraries. 
We consider that it gives a good intermediate course, that is a training midway 
between a summer course and one covering an academic year. We believe that 
our school has a permanent place in the library system of Ontario, but we will 
soon be in need of a supplementary session for the purpose of giving senior 
training. It will not be long before we require an elementary course of one month 
for giving training in librarianship to the smaller town libraries. Such a course 
might be held every two years; in addition to assisting small town libraries it 
would be found useful for the training of school librarians. 

Certification of librarians for city and town libraries is a subject in which 
your Inspector is deeply interested. A form of certification would add greatly 
to the strength and value of our city and town libraries. It would be well received 
by the libraries on the whole; resolutions favouring a form of certification 
have been passed by the Ontario Library Association on two occasions. 

Catalogues of Canadian Books 

The Department through the Public Libraries Branch published two 
valuable catalogues of Canadian books in 1923. The compilation in both 
cases was the work of the Toronto Public Library. The catalogues were care- 
fully circulated and have assisted in promoting the more generous purchase and 
use of books written by Canadians and of books pertaining to Canada. The 
Canadian Authors Association and large numbers of libraries have expressed 
their appreciation of the Minister's interest in publishing these valuable cata- 
logues. One of them was entitled "Canadian Books; a Study Outline for the 
People" and the other "Canadian Catalogue; Books Published in Canada as 
Well as Those Written by Canadians with Imprint of 1921-22." 

Women's Institutes and Public Libraries 

For a long time the Women's Institutes have taken a great interest in pro- 
moting the use of travelling libraries, and have assisted in the establishing 
of small public libraries. The Women's Institute at Alliston was instrumental 
in securing the funds to build a public library in memory of the local heroes 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 67 

who fell in the great war. In 1922, forty Women's Institutes assisted small 
public libraries, subscribing in the majority of cases small amounts which made 
a total of $1,881.39. Your Inspector prepared a report for the Superintendent 
of Institutes on the assistance the libraries have received from those worthy 
organizations, and the report was read at some of the larger conventions of 
Women's Institutes. 

New Buildings 

Four new buildings were erected in 1923. Alliston erected a modern build- 
ing in memory of her hero sons who fell in the European war. The corner-stone 
was laid by His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in a ceremony held on June 
the 8th. The funds for the building were raised by private subscription. The 
rural community of Glanworth, giving its population as 100, erected a small 
building at a cost of $1,000, raising its funds by private subscription. The 
picture of the library building appeared in the Ontario Library Review and 
was the subject of much favourable comment. The village of Newcastle received 
a very handsome community building from Mr. Chester D. Massey. The 
value of the building is said to be $250,000. This building includes excellent 
accommodation for the public library which was established in 1923. The 
town of Merritton erected a modern building at a cost of $10,000; $8,500 of 
the amount was secured from the Carnegie Corporation by reason of a promise 
made before the Corporation ceased making grants for library buildings. 

Library Work with Boys and Girls 

Last year we were pleased to report the good results of an interesting- 
campaign for promoting a greater interest in library service for boys and girls. 
It is a matter of satisfaction to note that this important phase of library work 
is taking hold with the smaller libraries more strongly than ever and the good 
work in 1921 has left an influence that is spreading throughout the Province. 
The "Children's Books Recommended for Purchase" in the Ontario Library 
Review is being found of the greatest use to the librarians of the Province. 
That section is contributed by Miss Annie Jackson, a specialist on the Toronto 
Public Library staff. The February number of our quarterly was devoted 
almost exclusively to work with boys and girls. 

It is worthy of note that Miss Lillian H. Smith, supervisor of work with 
boys and girls in the Toronto Public Library, was elected chairman of the 
Children's Section of the American Library Association. Miss Smith deserves 
the honour that has been conferred upon her by the children's librarians of this 
continent. 

Travelling Libraries 

It is encouraging to learn from the records that the circulation of our travel- 
ling libraries increased 17 per cent, in 1923 over 1922, especially in view of the 
fact there was an increase of more than 40 per cent, between 1920 and 1922. 
Our work in this phase of the Department's service is still quite limited, and 
no special means are employed to inform the sparsely settled districts of what 
can be done for them. The Women's Institutes are the only organization that 
is somewhat aggressive in promoting the use of travelling libraries. Our reason 
for employing no means of publicity is that the present demand is practically 
all that our resources can supply. 



68 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Toronto Public Library Rendered Valuable Assistance 

Your Public Libraries Branch is grateful to the Toronto Public Library 

Board, Mr. George H. Locke, chief librarian, and to the heads of departments 

and many assistants in the Toronto system for co-operation for the eighth year 

in conducting the Department's library school and for compiling catalogues of 

Canadian books. 

Report on Historical Societies 

Your Inspector was asked during the year to present a report on the 
historical societies of the Province. A brief summary follows of the findings 
and recommendations included in this report: 

Legislative grants are being paid to the Ontario Historical Society and to 27 local societies; 
the latter with a few exceptions are affiliated with the Ontario Historical Society. The total 
annual grant to these institutions amounts to $5,300. 

The historical societies, on the whole, are doing useful and commendable work that is worthy 
of|encouragement. The majority, while having done fair work, could make much better use of 
their opportunities by doing more and by making the results of their efforts more useful to the 
public. A notable minority have done work of a most praiseworthy character that is worthy of 
emulation by the less progressive societies. 

It is difficult to estimate whether the present work of the societies fully justifies the total 
amount of the grants. It is doubtful, if it does; but, under conditions that could be easily 
arranged, the value of the societies to the educational interests of the Province would 
probably be worthy of a more generous expenditure for grants to such societies. 

The desiderata seem to be: (a) That more printed pamphlets and books be published by 
the societies and that a more systematic method for distribution be devised: (b) That a central 
bureau contain a complete modern catalogue of printed and manuscript material produced by 
the societies; (c) That the societies exert their influence through the schools; (d) That all societies 
collect and preserve contemporary historical material; (e) That some central institution such as 
the Ontario Historical Society or a Branch of the Department of Education assist the societies 
in an advisory capacity in order that their work may be of greater benefit to the public; (f) That 
grants be paid chiefly according to work accomplished. 

The passing of a general statute respecting historical societies and also regulations governing 
the distribution of grants would probably be required in order to realize the larger and more 
effective work as suggested. 

Statistics 

I present on pages 290-299 a statement of the statistics of the Public 
Libraries of the Province, and a statement of the grants paid to Historical, 
Literary and Scientific Societies. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. O. CARSON, 

Inspector of Public Libraries. 
Toronto, February 6th, 1924. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 69 



APPENDIX I 

REPORT OF THE 
INSPECTOR OF AUXILIARY CLASSES 



To the Honourable G. H. Ferguson, B.A., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 
Sir, — 

I have the honour to submit for your consideration the following report 
on Auxiliary Classes. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Toronto, December 30, 1923. S. B. Sinclair. 



There are ninety-six Auxiliary Classes conforming to regulation require- 
ments in Ontario. This is an increase of twenty-two classes in 1923 and does 
not include the six adolescent Auxiliary Vocational Classes recently established 
in Toronto. They are distributed as follows: Training classes for very back- 
ward children, 72; Promotion classes for backward children, 2; Open Air classes 
and Forest Schools for delicate, anaemic or undernourished children, 5; Ambul- 
ance classes for disabled children, 4; Myopia classes for children with serious 
visual defect, 3 ; Lip-Reading classes for children with serious auditory defect, 1 ; 
other types, Hospital, Sanatorium and Institution classes, 9. The ambulance 
class teachers go from home to home, and the lip-reading class teacher visits a 
number of schools. 

Outside Toronto, with the exception of a Preventorium at London and 
another at Hamilton, all are training classes, as follows: Public Schools — Wind- 
sor, 4; London, 5; Kitchener, 1; Stratford, 1; Guelph, 2; Owen Sound, 1; Brant- 
ford, 1; St. Catharines, 2; Hamilton, 5; York County, 1; Oshawa, 1; Brockville, 
1; Peterboro, 1; Ottawa, 2; Separate Schools — Windsor, 1. 

During recent years the stress has been placed on the provision of adequate 
facilities for very backward children in auxiliary training classes. The Depart- 
ment has furnished school boards, school staffs (inspectors, principals, teachers, 
nurses and physicians) and the parents of the backward children with information 
concerning the need for such classes and the procedure for their proper estab- 
lishment, maintenance and conduct. The press and a number of social organiza- 
tions have also been instrumental in the dissemination of valuable information 
to the general public. During the last year free surveys have been conducted 
at the request of Hamilton, Runnymede, Swansea and Ford School Boards, 
and the number of training classes has increased from 54 to 72. The surveys 
have been conducted by Miss DeLaporte, B.A., Dr. Eric Clarke and myself, 
with the assistance of the local school staff. The Secord School Board (No. 26 
East York) is the first rural school board in Ontario to establish an auxiliary 
training class. Every training class that has been established is still in operation. 
I have visited all classes and found them doing good work. 



70 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

The only serious obstacles encountered have been inadequate classroom 
facilities and half-time classes. It would scarcely be possible to overemphasize 
the importance of providing these handicapped children with as satisfactory 
heat, light and ventilation conditions as others, a floor area equal to that of an 
ordinary classroom to admit of table and bench equipment for manual work, 
and full school hours for acquiring those necessary facts and habits which they 
can learn only slowly by constant and continued repetition under careful super- 
vision. If such children are taken from an ordinary class and placed in a small 
room cut off from the end of a hall, or in a discarded basement room, and put 
on half time with half the school day spent on the streets, the second condition 
may be much worse than the first. 

The addition of training classes is, in the ultimate analysis, a financial 
gain. Forty ordinary school classes containing 1,600 children, if rearranged in 
forty classes of which one contains the sixteen most backward pupils of the 1,600, 
do better work than before, and more satisfactorily to both teachers and pupils. 
Where such rearrangement can be made the extra cost is practically nil. Even 
in cases where an additional teacher and classroom are provided the additional 
expenditure is more than counterbalanced by the advantages to the backward 
pupils, the other pupils in the ordinary class, the teachers, the parents and society. 

Last year Toronto took a progressive step in the establishment of six 
auxiliary vocational classes for the training of very backward children over 
thirteen years of age, three for girls and three for boys. The results, as in 
many such experiments outside of Canada, have proved so satisfactory that it 
is now proposed to provide suitable buildings, equipment and teaching staff, 
not only for those already admitted, but for all on the waiting list. 

Thirty-five teachers attended the Auxiliary Class Teachers' Summer 
Course in 1923 and paid their own expenses. The Toronto Auxiliary Class 
teachers hold fully attended meetings each month, after 4 o'clock, for the study 
of auxiliary class work. 

The Toronto Auxiliary Class teachers and a few others were greatly benefited 
by a visit in October to the Detroit special classes. In Detroit about 4.3 per 
cent, of the school population receive special class instruction. Detroit also 
has types of classes not yet established in Ontario. These include classes for 
the totally blind and totally deaf. Such classes are now found in many cities 
and their number is increasing. When properly trained teachers are secured 
the results are highly satisfactory. The trend of opinion is in favour of the 
establishment of such classes when a city has reached a point where the number 
of such children warrants the additional outlay. The Provincial institutions 
will always be necessary in order to provide for rural districts and smaller urban 
centres. 

Scientific investigation of subnormal children in special classes has been 
continued for so many years here and elsewhere that the results now furnish 
a fairly safe guide for future procedure in Ontario. 

Fifty years ago a person with only half the intelligence or mental strength 
of people of normal mentality was said to be "half witted." He is now said 
to have a mentality or Intelligence Quotient (or briefly an I.Q.) of 50 per cent. 
Every person has an I.Q. of his own, and I.Q.'s vary from that of the lowest 
idiot, which is practically zero, to that of the most gifted individual, which is 
probably not higher than 200 per cent., or twice that of the person of average 
mentality. Children with an I.Q. below 50 per cent, seldom reach, in adult 
life, a higher mentality than that of a normal child of eight years, and those 
with an I.Q. below 75 seldom higher than twelve years. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 71 



Children with an I.Q. below 50 

The Ontario Auxiliary Classes Act of 1914 wisely provides that children who 
are uneducable in school and who will never reach a mentality above that of 
eight years of age, shall not be admitted to an auxiliary class. In our surveys 
we have found a number of these children in school classes who, unfortunately, 
owing to their inferior natural mental endowment, cannot possibly make any 
progress in the kindergarten or primary grade, or even in an auxiliary class. 
They not only occupy space which might be filled by a normal pupil but are a 
serious hindrance to the teacher, .and a detriment to the other pupils in the 
class. There is need for properly safeguarded legislation by which such children 
can be kept in the home or sent to an institution. 

Children with an I.Q- between 50 and 75 

The auxiliary training class provides for the next higher grade of mentality, 
that is, those children with I.Q.'s from 50 to 75. 

Notwithstanding the rapid advance made in recent years, less than one- 
fourth of these very backward children in Ontario schools are in special classes. 
The most economical and satisfactory method of providing for all is to prepare 
the local school staff to select the auxiliary class pupils and carry on the work 
with the minimum of outside assistance. 

With brief preparation, the professionally trained teacher can, from a 
study of the child's life-history and by continued class observation learn to 
make a fairly close estimate of the child's I.Q. without giving a formal intelligence 
test. The selection and treatment of subnormal children is receiving increased 
attention in normal schools and at teachers' meetings. 

The requisite qualifications for the position of school inspector in Ontario 
demand many years of preparation and include a theoretical and practical 
knowledge of children, and also of psychology and kindred subjects. With 
such preliminary equipment only a brief course is necessary to prepare the 
inspector for official intelligence examination work. The inspectors have 
requested that they be given such a course. 

It is desirable that provision be made for the establishment of auxiliary 
vocational schools for all very backward children over thirteen years of age. 

In many places, e.g. Detroit, there is a definitely organized department for 
the placing and supervision of very backward children after they leave school, 
and it is necessary that this important work be begun in Ontario if the best 
results are to be attained. 

Children with an I.Q- above 75 

In dealing with pupils with I.Q.'s above 75 the first step is to eliminate 
all below 75 by placing them in a training class. Much can also be accomplished 
by grading schools and classes on the basis of mentality as well as knowledge 
into backward, normal and gifted. A valuable experiment in this connection, 
carried on in the Strathcona School, Hamilton, is described in the Ontario 
Educational Association Report of 1923, page 426. 

I have visited a number of small classes containing gifted children with a 
mentality above 120 per cent. They go at a rapid pace and it is a delight to 
observe their work. Before reaching a final conclusion regarding such classes, 



72 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

however, it will be well to know more concerning the special characteristics of 
gifted children, the type of leader that should be developed and the most suit- 
able courses, methods and conditions of study for such development. 

An example of the practical appreciation of the necessity for such investiga- 
tion is furnished at Stanford University, where arrangements were made last 
year by which a sum of $48,000.00 was set apart for continuation of the research 
on superior children, "to permit the collection of medical, anthropometric and 
more complete psychological data regarding such children." 

There are a number of other types of special classes for abnormal children 
nearly if not quite as important as the training classes specially referred to in 
this report. Toronto has made a highly creditable beginning in the establish- 
ment of open-air, sight-saving, lip-reading and ambulance classes. There is 
urgent need that everyone in Ontario assist in securing for all abnormal children 
everywhere an education which will as far as practicable enable them to lead 
useful and happy lives. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 73 



APPENDIX J 

REPORT OF THE 
PROVINCIAL SCHOOL ATTENDANCE OFFICER 

To the Honourable G. H. Ferguson, B.A., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir: — 

I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on School 
Attendance. 

I have the honour to be, 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. P. COWLES, 

Provincial School Attendance Officer. 
Toronto, December 22nd, 1923. 



Number of Attendance Officers 

For duty during the year 1923 attendance officers were appointed in all 
the municipalities of the Province. The total number so appointed was 1,305. 
Of these, 845 were named by township councils, 398 by urban school boards, 61 
by school boards in territory without municipal organization, and 1 by a county 
council. In each of 37 urban municipalities the Separate School Board and the 
Public School Board, or Board of Education, chose the same individual, thus 
preventing overlapping of work and ensuring uniform enforcement of the attend- 
ance measures within the municipality. 

Attendance in General 

It is pleasing to be able to report continued improvement in attendance. 
Not only is there increased enrolment in the schools, but the ratio of the actual 
to the possible daily attendance is higher than ever before. 

The enrolment in the elementary schools in 1919, the year before The 
School Attendance Act became operative, was 546,562, or 20.84 per cent, of 
the population of the Province, as given in the Municipal Statistics. In 1920 
it was 564,972; in 1921, 585,213, and in 1922 it rose to 601,485, or 21.54 per 
cent, of the population of the Province. In this year, 1922, the actual aggre- 
gate was 86.87 per cent, of the possible aggregate attendance, being an increase 
over that of the preceding year of 0.64 per cent., an amount equal to more 
than a full day's attendance for every child attending school. 

The growth in attendance in the secondary schools has been even more 
marked. During the school year 1920-21, the year before the first part of The 
Adolescent School Attendance Act became effective, the enrolment in the 



74 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

secondary schools was 42,551. This rose to 52,254 in 1921-22, and to 60,395 
last year. That is, the increase during the two years of the operation of the 
Act has been 17,829, or 41.9 per cent, of the attendance during the year before 
the Act became operative. To this increase several causes, in addition to the 
operation of The Adolescent School Attendance Act, have contributed. Of 
these the growing appreciation of the value of wider education is undoubtedly 
the most powerful. It is significant to find that in communities where con- 
tinuation schools or high or vocational schools are readily accessible, a very 
large percentage of the pupils of the elementary schools remain in school until 
they pass the High School Entrance examination. It is, moreover, a most 
hopeful situation to find now in the province at large that over 30 per cent, 
of all young persons actually proceed into the schools of secondary education. 

Enforcement of the Attendance Laws 

It may be true that in some communities the attendance officers have 
not attacked their work with enthusiasm, or that they have allowed their 
enthusiasm to wane, when unforseen difficulties have arisen or when they have 
felt a lack of understanding or of appreciation on the part of those in authority 
who appointed them to office; but it is also true that the greater number of 
officers have carried out their duties with zeal and with considerable tact. 
They have not attempted to coerce, but have tried to secure compliance with 
the laws by showing parents and others the pernicious effects of irregularity; 
for it is a fact that the irregularity of a few pupils may, and often does, break 
up the daily programme of the school, frustrate every plan of the teacher, 
and destroy the morale of the entire school. Sometimes it has been necessary, 
in order to protect children from the cupidity, ignorance, or indifference of 
parents or guardians, to appeal to the courts. Last year, however, in the entire 
province, only 522 court cases occurred. The activity of local officers and the 
amount of their success are indicated by the comments made by school inspectors 
in their annual reports. Some of these comments follow: — 

"The regularity of attendance continues to improve." 

"The question of attendance, in past years our most serious weakness, is steadily improving." 

"The attendance has improved very noticeably under the 'present system of attendance 
officers." 

"The attendance in general during the year has been good. The school attendance officers 
are attending carefully to their duties." 

"The average school attendance for the urban centres has been high in every municipality. 
In the majority of the rural sections the attendance has been satisfactory." 

"There has been an improvement in the school attendance for the year. The School Attend- 
ance Acts are being better enforced." 

"The attendance of pupils was good; the increase in the proportion of the actual attendance 
to the possible being greater than the increase in registration of 1922 over 1921." 

"The attendance in both city and rural schools has been well maintained and a hearty co- 
operation exists between the attendance officers and teachers." 

"The chief difficulty is to get an attendance officer who will take action against a friend or 
neighbour. Usually, I might say invariably, he prefers to resign." 

"The new School Attendance Act is being enforced in the centres as required by law. Most 
attendance officers are most conscientious in the performance of duty." 

"During most of the year the attendance has been better than ever before. An effort has 
been made to be fair to both parents and children, and as far as possible attendance at school 
has been insisted on." 

"The full data for the year are not yet available, but it may be safely stated that the average 
is gratifying. There is an attendance officer in each municipality and the compulsory School 
Attendance Act is fairly well enforced." 

"The new compulsory Attendance Act is working well, owing chiefly to the fact that the 
attendance officer is appointed and paid by the school board and must get results. The Adoles- 
cent School Attendance Act has greatly strengthened the control of this officer over the parents 
of children under fourteen." 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 75 

"I suggest that there be more urgency put into the Attendance Act. There is, it appears to 
X me, in this inspectorate, a decided tendency on the part of the attendance officers and others to 
be very lenient about the attendance of pupils." 

"The daily attendance at the urban schools has been good throughout the year. In the 
(, rural schools there has been some improvement, but the irregularity of attendance is still a 
* problem that presses for solution. It is very difficult to secure efficient attendance officers, 
although a few are doing good work." 

"The School Attendance Act is fairly well observed, and not much fault can be found with 
its enforcement by the school attendance officers. Most of these officers show good judgment 
and a desire to fulfil the spirit of the Act in its administration, but there seems to be a tendency 
on the part of a few of them in rural sections to grant home permits on rather flimsy excuses." 

"The officers appointed to see to the proper working of The School Attendance Act have 
been doing fairly good work, and the attendance has improved in many places, but if nothing 
more is done than warning and advising, the effect will soon wear off. Only one officer that I 
know of has brought any delinquent before the magistrate. It had a good effect, and I think 
a few more officers should have done the same." 

"The added number of candidates at the High School Entrance seems to indicate that The 

School Attendance Act is making the pupils more regular and keeping them at school till they 

' pass the Entrance. On account of the high price and scarcity of labour and the lower prices of 

farm produce, parents in the country often keep their grown boys and girls at home where their 

help is often very much needed." 

"It is pleasing to be able to report an increase in the average attendance in rural schools 
since The School Attendance Act came into force. During the Fall term it was not~uTTusual to 
find, when visiting the school, that the average attendance had been 90 per cent, or over. This 
result is partly due to the activity of the school attendance officers and partly due to a quick- 
ening of the public conscience regarding the duty of parents to send their children to school 
regularly." 

"The attendance has been fairly good throughout the year. In our city schools it has been 
excellent. The credit for this is due mainly to the splendid work of the attendance officer. 
Regular attendance at rural schools cannot, at all seasons, be reasonably expected. Rush work, 
high wages, falling prices of farm produce, etc., necessitate taking the children out of school at 
times. I do not know that our rural attendance officers all discharge their duties without fear, 
favour, or partiality. It is often hard for them to do their duty, which means the incurring of 
the ill-will of their neighbours. I believe if strictly independent outsiders were appointed, one 
•/for, say, a dozen or more sections, and his salary paid by the sections or councils on a pro rata 
basis, the work would likely be more efficiently done." 

"The Adolescent School Attendance Act may be accountable for at least part of the enrol- 
ment of pupils beyond the age of fourteen years. But it is not to be given credit for all the 
enrolment of pupils beyond the age of fourteen. Section 3 of the Act came into force on Septem- 
ber 1st, 1921. Hence this report is the first one for a whole school year. My last report showed 
242 pupils fourteen years of age and older enrolled in 1921. For 1922 I have to report, in 84 
of the 86 rural schools, 2 schools have not yet reported, a total of 508 pupils who had passed 
the fourteenth birthday. Of these 224 were fourteen years of age and 194 were fifteen years of 
age; the remaining 90 had passed the sixteenth birthday and were not amendable to the Act. 
Of these 65 were sixteen years old, 17 were seventeen years old, 6 were eighteen years old, and 2 
were older. In all there were 49 in Fifth Classes. Hence we see that 459 of the 508 pupils who 
had passed the fourteenth birthday were in the classes below the fifth." 

Attendance in Rural Sections 

Fortunately not all country children have to carry, during the school age 
period of their childhood, the handicap of excessive farm labour, but unfortun- 
ately the excuse "kept at home to work" is seen too often on the Teachers' 
Reports of Irregular Attendance. As was indicated by one of the inspectors 
s/ quoted in this report, scarcity of farm labour and the low prices for farm produce 
are together a combination which sorely tempts the farmer to use the labour 
of little hands. Nevertheless, to debar farmers' children of eleven, twelve, and 
thirteen years of age from schooling for twenty, thirty, forty, or in some cases 
for even sixty days of the school year, as is done in not a few communities, is 
to defraud the state of much mental power. Indeed, one of the greatest difficulties 
of the officer in charge of attendance is to secure for the country child chances 
of schooling equal in length to those enjoyed by the child of town and city. 
Many a country child finds, as Hamlin Garland in "A Son of the Middle Border" 
found, that to plough all day like a hired hand is not a chore, but it is a job. 



76 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Part-Time Classes 

The Province of Ontario has kept well to the front educationally with 
nations and states which have, during the past few years, advanced the upper 
limit of compulsory attendance, as most of them have, to sixteen years of age. 

In the enforcement of compulsory attendance to this age it becomes apparent 
that hardships may be wrought upon certain families where children of four- 
teen and upwards are required to help in the maintenance of the homes. To 
provide for these cases, provisions have usually been made for exemption from 
full time attendance at school through the issuance of working papers. Realiz- 
ing that these young persons are as much entitled to some form of education 
at public expense as are those who attend school full time, the Legislators of 
the countries and states which have raised the school age have almost all enacted 
compulsory part-time laws, in accordance with which working boys and girls 
attend, for a fixed number of hours each year, courses specially designed to 
meet their needs. 

The Adolescent School Attendance Act of Ontario is recognized as being 
one of the most satisfactory and most carefully constructed statutes dealing 
with adolescent education to be found anywhere. The first part of this Act, 
that dealing with full time attendance, became operative with little difficulty. 
The well-filled upper forms of the elementary schools and lower forms of the 
secondary schools indicate this. There has not been, however, so complete 
enforcement of the provisions dealing with part-time education. The tardiness 
in carrying out the requirements of the Act is due largely to slowness in grasping 
the great possibilities presented in instruction of this kind, and to a reluctance on 
the part of school boards to interfere in the slightest degree at the present time 
with industry. 

Nevertheless, considerable progress in this department has been made- 
The aims and purposes of part-time instruction are becoming recognized- 
School boards, school officials and teachers are beginning to see that in this 
age young people must learn in school how to adjust themselves to the task 
of earning a living; that they must be taught that for the majority of them 
promotion in industry will be slow and is the result of merit; that steadiness 
and perseverance are more profitable than frequent changes of position; that 
trustworthiness, punctuality, industry, willing, cheerful service are the gate- 
ways to success. The purpose of requiring a youthful worker to spend part- 
time in school becomes apparent and the aims are plain. The part-time school 
aims to provide opportunity for review and drill on what has been taught already, 
but what is so likely to be lost by those who leave school at an early age. It 
aims to furnish advanced work on what is yet unknown, and to show how to 
apply that which is studied in school to the experiences of everyday. It strives 
to help the youth to analyze his present work and the work to which he looks 
forward, while giving him vocational counsel and guidance and some means of 
becoming acquainted with the practices of the shop and office. It aims to give 
the young person, in the most sane and practical way, training in personal 
hygiene, in the principles of safe living, and in those habits of life which will 
protect him in his hours of leisure. It aims to provide training in every way 
which makes for self-controlled and respectable citizenship. 

The need for such courses of instruction grows with the times. The days 
of articled apprenticeship, which once partially filled the need, are of the past. 
Industry proceeds in developing a more and more highly specialized and minutely 
organized system. It already finds difficulty in training men to fill its respon- 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 77 

sible positions. In the olden days a gifted youth had some opportunity to learn 
and develop and to rise. Under the modern system he is likely to be cramped 
and held by the monotony of an endless manipulative task, with the possibility 
of becoming a discontented, unstable citizen. 

The school is looked to for a remedy. The educational system can and does, 
in the manner indicated, provide opportunity for the vocational guidance, the 
work analysis, and for the mental stimulus needful. It can and does provide 
means for the creation of habits, for the broadening of the outlook, for the shaping 
of character, and for the increase of power necessary to fill positions of initiative 
and responsibility, and to assume all the duties that rest upon the citizens of a 
democratic nation. 

This report should not be concluded without mention being made of the 
admirable work done by the educational authorities of the City of London in 
regard to the carrying out of the provisions of The Adolescent School Attendance 
Act. The attendance officer of this city reported to his Board for the month of 
September, 1923: 

No difficulties have been met with in the application of The Adolescent Act. Co-operation 
is being maintained with the employers in the employments of adolescents. The part-time 
classes are working out very successfully, only one case of absence having been reported for the 
month. 



78 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



APPENDIX K 

REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL TRAINING 

To the Honourable G. H. Ferguson, B.A., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir — 

I have the honour to submit a report on the work of the Provincial Schools 
for the training of teachers for the year 1923. 

The year 1923 has given additional evidence of the wisdom ol the movement 
begun sixteen years ago by the government of the late Sir James Whitney to 
provide the Province, through the establishment of additional training schools 
of an advanced character, with a much larger body of adequately trained teachers. 
The progress made during the past year toward the attainment of the ideal 
then set is evidenced by the fact that there is an increase of fifty in the number 
of students enrolled at the College of Education to qualify as High School 
teachers, and an increase of 600 in the number enrolled at the Normal Schools 
to train as First or Second Class teachers. 

The College of Education 

The enrolment of teachers-in-training in the various courses at the College 
of Education for the present session is as follows: 

High School Assistants' Course 264 

High School Specialists' Courses 101 

Household Science Course 12 

Elementary Art Course 34 

Elementary Physical Culture Course 154 

First Class Course 46 

Pedagogy Courses 150 

The registration in the courses for degrees in Pedagogy, 150, is evidence of 
a rapidly growing interest in the scientific aspects of education. The most 
marked difference in the registration records appears in the courses for High 
School Assistants and Specialists, where the increase is about 25 per cent. 

The additional buildings and equipment of the College of Education, 
which include a general assembly hall, four lecture rooms, instructors' rooms, 
and accommodation for the special courses in Household Science, Manual 
Training, Physical Culture, and Art, are soon to be ready for occupancy. 

Several important changes have been made in the staff during the year. 
Mr. J. G. Althouse, M.A., headmaster of Oshawa High School, assumed the 
duties of headmastership of the University Schools in January. Mr. J. O. 
Carlisle, M.A., was appointed in October assistant professor in Methods in 
Classics to succeed Dr. D. E. Hamilton, who resigned to accept a professorship 
in Greek in University College. Mr. J. H. Mills, M.A., was appointed instructor 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



79 



in Classics in the University of Toronto Schools to succeed Mr. Carlisle. Mr. 
C. E. Phillips, M.A., was appointed as an additional instructor in the University 
of Toronto Schools. 

The Provincial Normal Schools 

The most noteworthy fact in connection with the Normal Schools for the 
present session is the unprecedented increase in the number of students enrolled, 
twenty-four hundred being registered, as compared with eighteen hundred for 
the last session. Thus the present session shows not only the largest enrolment 
in the history of the schools but also the largest single increase since the opening 
of the additional Normal Schools in 1908. The following table gives in detail 
the attendance in the various courses at these schools: 





Total 














School 


Attendance 


Male 


Female 


First Class 


Second Class 


Kindergarten 


-Primary 


Hamilton 


298 


38 


260 


65 


233 






London 


370 


54 


316 


101 


269 






North Bay 


283 


46 


237 




283 






Ottawa 


421 


61 


360 


56 


365 






Peterborough. . 


214 


26 


188 




214 






Stratford 


256 


43 


213 




256 






Toronto 


587 


80 


507 


i82 


355 " 


50 




Totals. . . . 


2,429 


348 


2,081 


404 


1,975 


50 



The following changes have been made in the staffs of the Normal Schools 
during the year: 

Mr. Gordon S. Apperley appointed an assistant at the Toronto Normal 
Model School in place of Mr. Frederick W. Schnick, resigned. 

Miss Marie V. Bibby, B.A., appointed an additional master at the Toronto 
Normal School. 

Miss Mable E. Hay, appointed instructor in Household Science at the 
Toronto Normal School in place of Miss Gladys M. Breed, resigned. 

Miss Carolyn Stockton appointed teacher of Physical Culture at the Toronto 
Normal Model School in place of Miss F. Uren, B.A., resigned. 

Mr. J. W. Westervelt, Jr., appointed instructor in Writing at the London 
Normal School in place of Mr. W. J. O'Brien, B.A., resigned. 

Miss D. Stephenson appointed instructor in Household Science at the 
North Bay Normal School in place of Miss M. C. Kay, resigned. 

In addition to the above, the following have been added temporarily to 
the staffs mentioned to provide for the large increase in the attendance at the 
present time: 

Miss Florence F. Halliday, B.A., to the staff of the Toronto Normal 
School. 

Mrs. Muriel G. Sinclair, B.A., to the staff of the Toronto Normal School. 
Mr. A. M. Patterson, B. A., B. Paed., to the staff of theToronto Normal School. 
Mr. Harry V. Clarke, B.A., to the staff of the Hamilton Normal School. 
Mr. Edward M. McKone, B.A., to the staff of the London Normal School. 
Mrs. Mina A. Acres, B.A., to the staff of the Ottawa Normal School. 

Lists of the present staffs of the Normal and Normal Model Schools are 
given in the register of Schools and Teachers for the Province of Ontario. 



80 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Model Schools 

The following tables show the number of students training for Third Class 
and District certificates at the various Model Schools: 

Summer Model Schools 

School District Third Class Academic Course Total 

Bracebridge 47 29 25 101 

Madoc 43 .. .. 43 

Gore Bay 10 8 11 29 

Port Arthur 8 1 2 11 

SharbotLake .. 31 40 71 

Totals 108 69 78 255 

Autumn Model Schools 

School Third Class 

Cornwall 25 

Kingston 30 

Orillia 23 

Renfrew 51 

Total 129 

Kindergarten-Primary Summer Course 

In addition to the fifty students in training at the Toronto Normal School 
for the Kindergarten-Primary certificate, 227 Public School teachers attended 
the Summer Courses of 1923 to qualify for the certificate, as follows: 

School Part I Part II Total 

Hamilton 24 24 48 

London 22 23 45 

Ottawa 22 17 39 

Toronto 54 41 95 



Totals 122 105 227 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

S. A. Morgan, 
Director of Professional Training. 

Toronto, December 31, 1923. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 81 



APPENDIX L 

STATISTICS OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY 

SCHOOLS 



Summary 

I.— ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

a. Public Schools 

Number of Public Schools in 1922 6,289 

Increase for the year 9 

Number of enrolled pupils of all ages in the Public Schools during the 

year (exclusive of Continuation and Night School pupils) 512,939 

Increase for the year 11,703 

Average daily attendance of pupils 360,121 

Increase for the year 14,375 

Percentage of average attendance to total enrolment 70 . 20 

Increase for the year 1.23 

Percentage of aggregate to possible aggregate attendance, i.e., per- 
centage of actual to possible attendance 87. 13 

Number of persons employed as teachers in the Public Schools, men, 

1,621; women, 11,293; total 12,914 

Increase for the year 358 

Number of teachers who attended Normal School 10,429 

Increase for the year 595 

Number of teachers who attended Normal College or Faculty or 

College of Education 1,113 

Number of teachers with a University degree 141 

Average annual salary for male teachers $1,644 

Increase for the year < $16 

Average annual salary for female teachers $1,117 

Increase for the year $38 

Average experience of male teachers 12.2 years 

Average experience of female teachers 8.5 years 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries $15,308,587 

Amount expended for public school houses (sites and buildings) $5,224,608 

Amount expended for all other purposes $7,728,970 

Total amount expended for Public Schools $28,262,165 

Increase for the year $1,911,992 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) $55 . 09 

Increase for the year W&It $2 • 52 

b. Roman Catholic Separate Schools 

Number of Roman Catholic Separate Schools in 1922 656 

Increase for the year 35 

Number of enrolled pupils for all ages 88,546 

Increase for the year 4,569 

Average daily attendance of pupils 64,897 

Increase for the year 4,818 

Percentage of average attendance to total enrolment 73 . 29 

Increase for the year 1.75 

Percentage of aggregate to possible aggregate attendance, i.e., per- 
centage of actual to possible attendance 84 98 

Number of teachers 1,958 

Increase for the year 110 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries $1,382,395 

Amount expended for school houses (sites and buildings) $1,059,531 

Amount expended for all other purposes $1,216,793 

Total amount expended on R. C. Separate Schools $3,658,719 

Increase for the year $294,099 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) $41 .32 

Increase for the year $1 .26 



82 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



c. Protestant Separate Schools 

Number of Protestant Separate Schools (included with Public Schools, 

a), in 1922 . 5 

Number of enrolled pupils " 443 

Increase for the year 9 

Average daily attendance of pupils 316 

Increase for the year 9 

d. Night Elementary Schools 

Number of Night Schools in 1922-23 21 

Decrease for the year 3 

Number of pupils enrolled 2,263 

Decrease for the year 270 

Number of teachers engaged 59 

Decrease for the year 11 



II.— SECONDARY SCHOOLS 



a. High Schools and Collegiate Institutes 



Number of High Schools (including 47 Collegiate Institutes), 1922-23 175 

Increase for the year 5 

Number of pupils enrolled in High Schools 44,631 

Increase for the year 5,226 

Average daily attendance of pupils 37,821 

Increase for the year 3,559 

Percentage of average attendance to total enrolment 84. 74 

Decrease for the year 2 . 20 

Number of teachers in High Schools 1,420 

Increase for the year 118 

Average annual salary, Principals $2,836 

Increase for the year $117 

Average annual salary, Assistants $2,182 

Increase for the year $54 

Average annual salary, all Teachers $2,262 

Increase for the year $57 

Highest salary paid $5,000 

Increase for the year $500 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries, 1922 $2,963,001 

Amount expended for school houses (sites and buildings) $2,673,842 

Amount expended for all other purposes $1,106,032 

Total amount expended on High Schools, 1922 $6,742,875 

Increase for the year $1,952,664 

Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance $151.08 

Increase for the year $29 . 52 

b. Continuation Schools 

Number of Continuation Schools, 1922-23 181 

Increase for the year 21 

Number of pupils in attendance 8,777 

Increase for the year 1,272 

Average daily attendance of pupils 7,234 

Increase for the year 925 

Percentage of average attendance to total enrolment 82.42 

Decrease for the year 1 . 64 

Number of teachers 323 

Increase for the year 37 

Average annual salary, Principals $1,754 

Increase for the year $12 

Average annual salary, Assistants $1,410 

Increase for the year $27 

Highest salary paid $3,200 

Increase for the year $200 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



S3 



Amount expended on teachers' salaries, 1922 $474,241 

Amount expended for school houses (sites and buildings) $243,630 

Amount expended for all other purposes $163,560 

Total amount expended on Continuation Schools, 1922 $881,431 

Increase for the year $231,957 

Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance $100.42 

Increase for the year $13 . 89 

c. Night High Schools 

Number of Night High Schools in 1922-23 9 

Decrease for the year 2 

Number of Pupils enrolled '. 1,709 

Increase for the year 74 

Number of teachers engaged 82 

Increase for the year 5 

d. Vocational Schools 

Number of Day Vocational Schools, 1922-23 16 

Increase for the year 2 

Number of full time pupils enrolled 6,987 

Increase for the year 1,643 

Average daily attendance of full time pupils 5,518 

Increase for the year 1,258 

Number of part time pupils in Day Schools 988 

Increase for the year 414 

Number of special pupils in Day Schools 1,427 

Decrease for the year 177 

Number of teachers engaged in Day Schools 286 

Increase for the year 74 

Number of Evening Vocational Schools, 1922-23 51 

Decrease for the year 4 

Number of pupils enrolled 33,511 

Increase for the year 966 

Number of teachers engaged 1,097 

Increase for the year 22 

Amount expended on teachers' salaries, day and evening schools, 1922 $787,370 

Amount expended on school houses (sites and buildings) $426,967 

Amount expended for all other purposes $657,277 

Total amount expended on Day and Evening Vocational Schools, 1922 $1,871,614 

Increase for the year . $286,528 

III.— GENERAL 

Elementary and Secondary Schools 

Pupils enrolled in Elementary Schools, 1922 601,485 

Pupils enrolled in Night Elementary Schools, 1922-23 2,263 

Pupils enrolled in Secondary Schools, 1922-23 62,810 

Pupils enrolled in Night High Schools, 1922-23 1,709 

Pupils enrolled in Evening Vocational Schools, 1922-23 33,511 

Total Enrolment, all schools 701,778 

Increase for the year 25,420 

Percentage of total population enrolled 23 . 9 

Total expenditure $41,416,804 

Increase for the year $4,677,240 



Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) in all Schools 





1902 


1907 


1912 


1917 


1921 


1922 


Teachers' salaries 

Sites and buildings 

All other expenses 


$7 63 
97 
2 80 


$10 44 
2 86 
4 40 


$14 26 
5 90 
5 34 


$17 97 
4 05 

7 72 


$28 14 
10 72 
15 45 


$29 80 
13 72 
15 49 


For all purposes 


11 40 


17 70 


25 50 


29 74 


54 31 


59 01 



84 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Comparative School Statistics, 1867-1922 

I. PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

These elementary school tables, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, for the purpose of comparison with previous 
years in which the Separate Schools were included with Public Schools, include Roman Catholic 
and Protestant Separate Schools. The tables A, B, C, D, and E give the statistics of the Public 
Schools, including Protestant Separate Schools; the statistics of the R. C. Separate Schools are 
given in Tables F and G; those of the Protestant Separate Schools appear in Table T; and 
the Night Schools in Table U. 





1 


. School Attendance 










T3 








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Perce 
tend 
ber] 


Perce 
Poss 
Perc 
Poss 


1867 


401,643 


213,019 


188,624 


163,974 
188,701 


40.82 




1872 


454,662 


238,848 


215,814 


41.50 




1877 


490,860 


261,070 


229,790 


217,184 


44.25 




1882 


471,512 


246,966 


224,546 


214,176 


45.42 




1887 


493,212 


259,083 


234,129 


245,152 


49.71 




1892 


485,670 


253,091 


232,579 


253,830 


52.26 




1897 


482,777 


251,677 


231,100 


273,544 


56.66 




1902 


454,088 


232,880 


221,208 


261,480 


57.58 




1907 


448,218 


229,794 


218,424 


266,503 


59.45 




1912 


467,022 


239,187 


227,835 


291,210 


62.35 




1917 


527,664 


266,255 


261,409 


342,571 


64.92 




1921. . . 


585,213 


296,942 


288,271 


405,825 


69.38 


86.18 


1922 


601,485 


306,225 


295,260 


425,018 


70.66 


86.80 







2. Classification of Pupils 



Year 







u. 


tJ-Ad 












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Oh U 


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<D 


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1867. 
1872. 
1877. 
1882. 
1887. 
1892. 
1897. 
1902. 
1907. 
1912. 
1917. 
1921. 
1922. 



16,515 
14,948 
13,233 



2,793 
11,011 
12,057 



115,657 
114,932 
110,567 
107,441 
112,552 
126,100 
125,321 
130,312 
121,634 



: 79,365 

160,828 

153,630 

165,834 

76,704 

73,015 

70,808 

69,062 

60,194 

67,368 

73,996 

80,132 

82,047 



98,184 

100,245 

108,678 

106,229 

100,533 

96,074 

91,330 

85,732 

84,622 

92,728 

106,034 

108,990 

112,409 



83,211 

96,481 

135,824 

117,352 

108,096 

99,345 

99,682 

90,630 

89,371 

88,811 

105,062 

120,511 

127,831 



68,896 
67,440 
72,871 
71,740 
81,984 
88,934 
89,314 
83,738 
85,752 
85,213 
91,989 
111,349 
123,214 



71,987 
29,668 
19,857 
10,357 
10,238 
13,370 
21,076 
17,485 
15,727 
t6,802 
t5,954 
t7,960 
f9,060 



Note. — Kindergarten attendance is not included for the years previous to 1917. 
*In 1st Reader. fExclusive of Continuation School Pupils. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



85 



The following table classifies the pupils in the various forms as to rural and urban 
schools: 

Rural Schools 



Year 


Kinder- 
garten 


Kinder- 
garten- 
Primary 


First 
Reader 
Part I 

or 
Primer 


First 
Reader 
Part II 
or First 

Book 


Second 
Book 


Third 
Book 


Fourth 
Book 


Fifth 
Book or 
Beyond 
Fourth 

Book 


Totals 


1904 






60,784 
60,470 
62,712 
58,290 
60,047 
56,217 


36,941 
31,538 
30,293 
30,657 
32,386 
32,701 


47,930 
46,219 
43,775 
44,407 
44,317 
45,621 


50,297 
48,247 
42,450 
43,834 
47,208 
49,657 


47,289 
46,815 
44,049 
41,321 
45,823 
49,976 


9,892 
8,958 
t3,984 
12,926 
t3,803 
f4,403 


253,133 


1907 






242,247 


1912 






227,263 


1917 .... 




75 
2,167 
2,511 


221,510 


1921 




235,751 


1922 .... 




241,086 



Urban Schools (cities, towns and incorporated villages.) 



1904 






1907 . . 






1912 .... 






1917.... 

1921 .... 

1922 .... 


16,515 
14,948 
13,233 


2,718 
8,844 
9,546 



44,456 
52,082 
63,388 
67,031 
70,265 
65,417 



27,800 
28,656 
37,075 
43,339 
47,746 
49,346 



37,299 
38,403 
48,953 
61,627 
64,673 
66,788 



39,814 
41,124 
46,361 
61,228 
73,303 
78,174 



35,815 


6,304 


38,937 


6,769 


41,164 


t2,818 


50,668 


t3,028 


65,526 


t4,157 


73,238 


f4,657 



191,488 
205,971 
239,759 
306,154 
349,462 
360,399 



tExclusive of Continuation School Pupils. 

The following table compares the enrolment and gives the percentages from 
rural and urban municipalities for several years: 





Year 


Enrolment in Rural 
Schools 


Enrolment in Urban 
Schools 


1903.... 




260,617 or 57.88% of total 
242,247 or 54.05% 
227,263 or 48.66% 
221,510 or 41.97% 
235,751 or 40.28% 
241,086 or 40.08% 


189,661 or 42.12% of total 
205,971 or 45.95% 
239,759 or 51.33% 


1907 


1912 


1917 


306,154 or 58.02% 
349,462 or 59.71% " 


1921 


1922 


360,399 or 59.91% 





Note. — Kindergarten attendance for years previous to 1916 not available for the above 
tables. 

3. Teachers' Certificates, Etc. 



u 

a 

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CO 

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too 


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CD 

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n 


Nor. Coll., F. of 
E. or College of 
Education 


1867.. 


4,890 

5,476 

6,468 

6,857 

7,594 

8,680 

9,351 

9,614 

10,170 

11,128 

12,762 

14,404 

14,872 


2,849 
2,626 
3,020 
3,062 
2,718 
2,770 
2,784 
2,294 
1,783 
1,511 
1,317 
1,641 
1,740 


2,041 

2,850 

3,448 

3,795 

4,876 

5,910 

6,567 

7,320 

8,387 

9,617 

11,445 

12,763 

13,132 


1,899 

1,337 

250 

246 

252 

261 

343 

608 

715 

674 

1,106 

1,276 

1,273 


2,454 
1,477 
1,304 
2,169 
2,553 
3,047 
3,386 
4,296 
3,887 
6,419 
8,784 
10,133 
10,825 


386 
2,084 
3,926 
3,471 
3,865 
4,299 
4,465 
3,432 
3,452 
1,804 
1,317 
1,146 
1,190 














151 

578 

988 

971 

924 

873 

934 

1,031 

1,336 

1,323 

603 

635 

409 


666 

828 

1,084 

1,873 

2,434 

3,038 

3,643 

4,774 

4,587 

6,705 

9,203 

10,763 

11,437 




1872.. 
















1877.. 
















1882.. 
















1887.. 
















1892.. 


"66 

258 
213 


200 
223 
247 
277 
371 
310 
196 
258 












1897.. 












1902 . . 












1907.. 






503 
317 
292 
419 
407 


'226 

213 

177 
156 




fl912.. 






614 


fl917.. 
11921.. 
fl922 . . 


33 
65 
63 


38 
99 

78 


1,053 
1,238 

1,188 



tExclusive of Continuation School Teachers. 



86 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



The men engaged in teaching in these schools in 1922 formed 11.69 per cent, of the whole 
number. In 1921 they formed 11.39 per cent. 

The number of teachers and the class of certificates, in the Public Schools alone, in each 
County and District of the Province, will be found in Table C of this Appendix. 

The following table classifies the teachers and certificates as to rural and urban 
schools: 



Teachers 



Total 



Male 



Female 



Certificates 



1st 
Class 



2nd 
Class 



3rd 
Class 



Rural Schools, 1904 

Rural Schools, 1907 

*Rural Schools, 1912 

♦Rural Schools, 1917 

*Rural Schools, 1921 

♦Rural Schools, 1922 

Urban (cities, towns and incorporated villages) 
Schools, 1904 

Urban, 1907 

♦Urban, 1912 

♦Urban, 1917 

♦Urban, 1921 

♦Urban, 1922 



5,974 
6,038 
6,143 
6,455 
6,871 
7,034 

3,580 
4,132 
4,985 
6,307 
7,533 
7,838 



1,469 
1,201 
894 
655 
717 
777 

606 
582 
617 
662 
924 
963 



4,505 
4,837 
5,249 
5,800 
6,154 
6,257 

2,974 
3,550 
4,368 
5,645 
6,609 
6,875 



152 
180 
165 
343 
292 
257 

483 
535 
509 
763 
984 
1,016 



1,944 
1,542 
3,002 
4,232 
4,768 
5,180 

2,248 
2,345 
3,417 
4,552 
5,365 
5,645 



3,107 
3,079 
1,463 
1,129 
904 
909 

289 
373 
341 
188 
242 
281 



In the rural schools in 1922 the men formed 11.04 per cent., and in the urban schools, 12.28 
per cent, of the number of teachers employed in each case. 

♦Exclusive of Continuation School Teachers. 



4. Teachers' Salaries and Experience 
Teachers' Salaries 









CU 




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$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 




$ $ 


$ 


! 


^ $ 


1867.... 


1,350 


346 


226 


532 


243 


464 


240 








261 


189 








1872... 


1,000 


360 


228 


628 


245 


507 


216 








305 


213 








1877.... 


1,100 


398 


264 


735 


307 


583 


269 








379 


251 








1882.... 


1,100 


415 


269 


742 


331 


576 


273 








385 


248 








1887.... 


1,450 


425 


292 


832 


382 


619 


289 








398 


271 








1892.... 


1,500 


421 


297 


894 


402 


648 


298 








383 


269 








1897... 


1,500 


391 


294 


892 


425 


621 


306 








347 


254 








1902.... 


1,600 


436 


313 


935 


479 


667 


317 








372 


271 








1907... 


1,900 


596 


420 


1,157 


592 


800 


406 


659 




372 458 


379 


( 


)07 453 


1912.... 


2,200 


788 


543 


1,320 


703 


977 


519 


779 




492 566 


493 


1, 


141 618 


1917... 


2,500 


1,038 


650 


1,637 


795 


1,166 


628 


908 




573 686 


580 


1/ 


125 731 


1921... 


3,500 


1,628 


1,079 


2,245 


1,310 


1,721 


1,005 


1,356 




940 1,125 


961 


2,( 


)53 1,203 


1922.... 


3,500 


1,644 


1,117 


2,269 


1,363 


1,767 


1,047 


1,303 




986 1,144 


987 


2,( 


)82 1,253 



♦ Incorporated villages included from 1867 to 1902 inclusive. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



87 



Increases in salaries in the cities, towns, villages and rural schools are shown in the above 
table. In Table C the average salaries for 1922 of the Public School teachers of the various 
Counties and Districts are given separately, and summarized for the cities, towns and villages. 
This table also states the salaries paid to teachers according to the grade of certificate held, and 
illustrates to what extent the teacher with the higher certificate commands the higher salary. 
The only noticeable decrease shown is in the case of male teachers of the third class. The 
average salaries for the Province are as follows: 







Male 






Female 






1912 


1917 


1921 


1922 


1912 


1917 


1921 


1922 


First Class Certificates 

Second Class Certificates . . . 

Third Class and District 
Certificates 


$1,340 

757 

524 


$1,548 
916 

562 


$2,236 
1,436 

928 


$2,290 
1,434 

911 


$634 

587 

458 


$728 
673 

507 


$1,180 
1,101 

845 


$1,226 
1,137 

855 







Teachers' Experience 

The length of service or experience of the teachers engaged in the Public Schools is also shown 
in Table C, where the numbers who have taught from less than one year up to forty years and over 
are given for each year. 

The average experience in the Public Schools at the end of 1922 was as follows: 
Male teachers, 12.2 years. 
Female teachers, 8.5 years. 
All teachers, 8.9 years. 

Rural teachers (male and female), 5.2 years. 
Urban teachers (male and female), 12.7 years. 



5. Receipts and Expenditures 



Receipts 



Ml 



►J 



O C 

o <u 

II 

U 

3 rt 



co u 

> s 

8 8 
h S3 fa 

u 5 O 
JJJ co 

u 



Expenditures 





u 

a 
a 


c 

CCJ 


co 


a . 


OX) 


a3 o 


3 « 


G 

— H CO 


co « 


"O <u 


Q- - 




T-1 CO 




e"8 

Qi 0) 


TD^ 


co a, 


C O 


CD 




aj O 


u co 


0) 


co-P, 

CD u 
4j CO 


rt 3 


+j*-G 


.Q cj 


O) ° 


CO 


J 


c* 



-a 

e 

a 



H 



1867, 
1872, 
1877 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1907 
1912 
1917 
1921, 
1922, 



$ 
187,153 
225,318 
251,962 
265,738 
268,722 
283,791 
366,538 
383,666 
655,239 
842,278 
907,846 
2,454,018 
2,976,712 



$ 

1,151,583 

1,763,492 

2,422,432 

2,447,214 

3,084,352 

3,300,512 

3,361,562 

3,959,912 

6,146,825 

9,478,887 

12,193,439 

21,195,263 

22,842,180 



$ 

331,599 

541,460 

730,687 

757,038 

978,283 

1,227,596 

1,260,055 

1,422,924 

2,455,864 

3,936,887 

4,168,000 

11,461,271 

12,805.773 



1,670,335 

2,530,270 

3,405,081 

3,469,990 

4,331,357 

4,811,899 

4,988,155 

5,766,502 

9,257,928 

14,258,052 

17,269,285 

35,110,552 

38,624,665 



$ 
1,093,517 
1,371,594 
2,038,099 
2,144,449 
2,458,540 
2,752,629 
2,886,061 
3,198,132 
4,389,524 
6,109,547 
8,398,450 
15,473,049 
16,690,982 



$ 

149,195 

456,043 

477,393 

341,918 

544,520 

427,321 

391,689 

432,753 

1,220,820 

2,777,960 

1,987,644 

5,605,341 

6,284,139 



$ 

31,354 

47,799 

47,539 

15,583 

27,509 

40,003 

60,585 

86,723 

213,096 

167,755 

290,207 

418,370 

480,483 



199,123 
331,928 
510,458 
525,025 
711,535 
833,965 
877,335 
107,552 
732,739 
218,698 
435,534 
218,033 
465,280 



$ 

1,473,189 

2,207,364 

3,073,489 

3,026,975 

3,742,104 

4,053,918 

4,215,670 

4,825,160 

7,556,179 

11,273,960 

14,111,835 

29,714,793 

31,920,884 



The increase for the year in the amount paid as teachers' salaries was $1,217,933. The total 
expenditure increased by $2,206,091. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



These tables show the expenditure per pupil for the years as given below: 
Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) 



Teachers' salaries 

Sites and buildings 
All other expenses 

For all purposes . 



1902 
$7 04 
95 
2 63 


1907 
$9 79 

2 72 
4 34 


1912 
$13 08 
5 95 
5 11 


1917 
$15 91 
3 77 
7 06 


1921 
$26 44 
9 58 
14 75 


1922 

$27 75 
10 45 
14 87 



10 62 



16 85 



24 14 



26 74 



50 77 



53 07 



Average cost per pupil (average attendance) 



1902 

Teachers' salaries $12 23 

Sites and buildings 1 65 

All other expenses 4 57 

For all purposes 18 45 



1907 
$16 47 
4 58 
7 30 


1912 
$20 98 
9 54 
8 19 


1917 

$24 52 

5 80 

10 87 


1921 

$38 13 

13 81 

21 28 


1922 

$39 27 

14 78 

21 05 



28 35 



38 71 



41 19 



73 22 



75 10 



The expenditure per pupil (enrolled attendance) for 1922 in the Public Schools alone will be 
found in Table E, and for the R. C. Separate Schools in Table F. The expenditure will there be 
shown as to rural schools, cities, towns, and villages separately. 



II. ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
1. Schools, Teachers and Attendance 



Year 



c 




<L> 




a 




o 


to 


en 


u 


O 


J3 


O 


y 


J3 


a) 






in 


H 



a 

3 
Oh 



O 

CQ 



o 



< 



i *o 
<u «j P 



a> •" — - 

ox) a) o Jri 

5« 

c i-. cd a 

& £ y 5 

O > C 3 

£ aJ rt C 



o cu i; 

° <u u o 

cu -m be c 
bfl rt b/0 «J 

aj b/) «}*o 

<u bo's +2 

£* cd en cd 



1867 
1872 
1877 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1907 
1912 
1917 
1921 
1922 



161 


210 


171 


254 


185 


334 


190 


390 


229 


491 


312 


662 


340 


752 


391 


870 


449 


1,034 


513 


1,237 


548 


1,488 


621 


1,848 


656 


1,958 



18,924 
21,406 
24,952 
26,148 
30,373 
37,466 
41,620 
45,964 
51,502 
61,297 
70,048 
83,977 
88,546 



15,376 
19,169 
21,342 
23,314 
26,420 
31,126 
35,036 
42,140 
44,728 



14,997 
18,297 
20,278 
22,650 
25,082 
30,171 
35,012 
41,837 
43,818 



8,606 
10,584 
12,549 
13,574 
16,866 
21,560 
24,996 
28,817 
33,500 
39,735 
46,919 
60,079 
64,897 



45.47 
49.44 
50.29 
51.91 
55.52 
57.54 
60.05 
62.69 
65.04 
64.82 
66.98 
71.54 
73.29 



85.90 

84.98 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



89 



2. Receipts and Expenditures 





Receipts 


1 




Expenditures 




Year 




school 
as- 
;s 


"C 

■§1 


CO 

■M 

a 




.5 CO 


co" 

a 

a m • 

S 3£ 


CO 

— . <u 

O) CO 

. a, 

co X 

.3. <u 


cu 
u 

3 

e 


a 

3 




> 

to ha 


unicipal 
ants and 
sessmeni 


alances, s 
ed and 
sources 


cu 

S3 

Ih 

+-> 



cu'C 

P 


si 


ibraries, 
apparati 
prizes, e 


a, <u 

« O 

cu C 


0) 

a 

X 
cu 

13 



a 

Ih 

CU 

a 

CO 






J 


S tuo 


CQ 


H 


H 


c/5 


J 


C* * 


H 


u 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ c. 


1867. 


9,993 
12,327 
13,607 


26,781 
41,134 
72,177 


11,854 
15,349 


48,628 


34,830 






t7,889 


42,719 


2 26 


1872. 


68,810 


45,824 






fl5,993 


61,817 


2 88 


1877. 


34,482 


120,266 


70,201 


24,510 


2,811 


17,284 


114,806 


4 60 


1882. 


14,382 


97,252 


55,105 


166,739 


84,095 


36,860 


1,303 


32,082 


154,340 


5 13 


1887. 


16,808 


147,639 


65,401 


229,848 


112,293 


48,937 


3,624 


46,369 


211,223 


6 95 


1892. 


21,043 


206,698 


98,293 


326,034 


149,707 


65,874 


2,922 


71,335 


289,838 


7 74 


1897. 


26,675 


224,617 


84,032 


335,324 


168,800 


41,233 


5,786 


86,350 


302,169 


7 26 


1902. 


30,472 


293,348 


161,683 


485,503 


210,199 


100,911 


6,158 


118,173 


435,441 


9 47 


1907. 


40,524 


442,316 


308,540 


791,380 


281,484 


186,908 


15,991 


229,793 


714,176 


13 86 


1912. 


51,846 


757,255 


377,713 


1,186,814 


456,800 


308,193 


15,207 


263,024 


1,043,224 


17 01 


1917. 


63,127 


1,066,253 


370,346 


1,499,726 


635,089 


262,103 


24,836 


391,695 


1,313,723 


18 75 


1921. 


196,283 


1,980,312 


1,552,246 


3,728,841 


1,236,961 


1,086,551 


40,225 


1,000,883 


3,364,620 


40 06 


1922. 


195,963 


2,154,985 


1,698,096 


4,049,044 


1,382,395 


1,059,531 


52,302 


1,164,491 


3,658,719 


41 32 



flncluding all expenditure except for teachers' salaries. 

An increase of 4,569 in the enrolment and of $294,099 in the expenditure in 1922 are noticed 
in the above tables. The expenditure per pupil of enrolled attendance increased from $40.06 
to $41.32. Detailed statistics in reference to these schools will be found in Tables F and G. 



III. PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

The following is a complete list of the Protestant Separate Schools of the Province: — No. 1 
Grattan, No. 2 Hagarty, L'Orignal and Penetanguishene (two schools). 

They were attended by 443 pupils in 1922. The whole amount expended for their main- 
tenance and permanent improvements was $18,511.79. Ten teachers held Second Class certi- 
ficates, and one held a Third Class certificate. 

More complete statistics for these schools will be found in Table T. 



90 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



IV. CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 

The following table gives statistics of the "Continuation Classes, Grade A," up to and in- 
cluding 1907. Thereafter they are known as "Continuation Schools." Formerly the statistics 
of these schools were included with the statistics of the Public and Separate Schools, consequently 
certain items for the years 1897-1907 cannot be given. 





CO 

15 

O 

o 

C/5 


jn 

"o 

O 

O 
co 
u 

<u 

o 
a 

<v 

1 

<u 

a 

O 


to 

15 

O 

u 
co 

<u 

o 

<u 

6 


15 

O 

-3 

o 
co 

Ih 

CU 

-a 

CJ 

03 

OJ 

cu 
u 
XI 

H 


co 
u 
<v 
J3 
o 

03 

CU 

O 

Ih 

0) 

s 

3 


Receipts 


Expenditure 




"a 

3 
Oh 

'o 

Ih 

CU 

6 

3 


aver- 
lce to 
ent 


Year 


0) 

# > 

"to G 

'53d g 
^ So 


co 

'53 

CJ 


"co 

<u a> 

■O^ 03 
Oh 


u 

3 

'•3 

c 


c o 

cu 53 u 

03 -m 0> 
+J ™ — 

g <u « 

V- Oj £> 
0) ™ ^ 

Oh 


1897 


27 
59 
91 
138 
137 
160 
181 


20 
46 
65 
54 
36 
46 
58 


7 
12 
24 
73 
99 
102 
104 


1 

2 
11 

2 
12 
19 


34 

73 

119 

226 

*241 

*286 

*323 


$ 
2,700 

8,350 

25,610 

64,081 

65,733 

127,770 
148,217 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1,275 

1,856 

3,993 

6,094 

*5,104 

*7,505 

*8,777 




1902.. . . 












1907.... 
1912.... 
1917.... 
1921.... 
1922.... 


295,261 

360,431 

723,426 

1,038,602 


73,325 
202,875 
228,362 
406,162 
474,241 


265,087 
324,621 
649,474 
881,431 


26,345 

75,556 

93,228 

134,714 

158,030 


61.97 

*73.15 
*84.06 

*82.42 



* For school year ended six months after the calendar year specified. 

Of the enrolled attendance for 1922-23, 6,316 pupils were in the Lower School and 2,461 in 
the Middle School. The total attendance was made up of 3,569 boys and 5,208 girls. 



Average Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance 

1917 1921 1922 

Teachers' salaries $44 74 $54 12 $54 03 

Sites and buildings 6 33 12 93 27 76 

All other expenses 12 53 19 48 18 63 

For all purposes 63 60 86 53 100 42 



Statistics in detail for 1922-23 in reference to the Continuation Schools will be found in 
Tables H, I, J and K. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



91 



V. COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND HIGH SCHOOLS 

The following table gives comparative statistics respecting Collegiate Institutes and High 
Schools from 1867 to 1922, inclusive: 

Receipts, Expenditure, Attendance, etc. 





cn 
O 

o 
o 


cn 
u 

.d 
o 

aJ 

H 


Receipts 


Expenditure 


cn 

"a 

3 

PL, 


0) 

fcuo 


Year 


a 

H 
Sfl 

<D 

% 
"tf5 

'53b 


cn 

.2* 
'53 
o 
a> 

"3 
o 

H 


"cn 
u 

<v 

y 

C3 
<V 
+J CO 

O u 

TJ"aS 
'rt w 


c 

aS 
cn 
2 cn 

OT3 

P 

Oh 


a> 

3 

"-5 
c 

0) 

a 
13 

■M 

o 
H 


cu aS 
<U 0) J , 

« U c 

CW as <u 


1867. 

1872 

1877 

1882 

1887 

1892 

1897 

1902 

1907 

1912 

1917 

1921 

1922 


102 
104 
104 
104 
112 
128 
130 
134 
143 
148 
162 
170 
175 


159 

239 

280 

332 

398 

522 

579 

593 

750 

917 

tl,051 

tl,302 

tl,420 


$ 

54,562 

79,543 

78,762 

84,304 

91,977 

100,000 

101,250 

112,650 

158,549 

209,956 

184,088 

223,165 

276,889 


$ 

139,579 

223,269 

357,521 

373,150 

529,323 

793,812 

767,487 

832,853 

1,611,553 

2,414,128 

3,051,684 

5,623,528 

7,993,999 


$ 

94,820 

141,812 

211,607 

253,864 

327,452 

472,029 

532,837 

547,402 

783,782 

1,232,537 

1,554,049 

2,531,069 

2,963,001 


♦19,190 

♦31,360 

♦51,417 

♦19,361 

♦73,061 

♦91,108 

♦46,627 

44,246 

193,975 

327,982 

277,544 

1,058,691 

2,673,842 


$ 

124,181 

210,005 

343,710 

343,720 

495,612 

696,114 

715,976 

769,680 

1,213,697 

1,953,061 

2,418,975 

4,790,211 

6,742,875 


5,696 

7,968 

9,229 

12,348 

17,459 

22,837 

24,390 

24,472 

30,331 

32,273 

f29,097 

t39,405 

f44,631 


55 

56 

56 

53 

59 

60 

61 

58.97 

60.94 

62.80 
t78.15 
f86.94 
t84.74 



* Expenses for repairs, etc., included. 

t For the school year ended six months after the calendar year specified. 



Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) 



Teachers' salaries 

Sites and buildings .... 
All other expenses 

For all purposes . 



1917 


1921 


1922 


$53 41 


$64 23 


$66 39 


9 54 


26 87 


59 91 


20 18 


30 46 


24 78 



83 13 



121 56 



151 08 



Number of Pupils in the three grades of schools in the Collegiate Institutes and 

High Schools 



Lower School 

Middle School 

Upper School 

Total enrolment 

Total number of boys. 
Total number of girls. 



" 1916-17 


1921-22 


1922-23 


20,190 
7,336 
1,571 


27,273 
9,794 

2,338 


29,219 

12,210 

3,202 


29,097 


39,405 


44,631 


12,353 
16,744 


18,328 
21,077 


21,139 
23,492 



The statistics in detail of the various Collegiate Institutes and High Schools of the Province 
for 1922-23 will be found in Tables L, M, N and O. 



92 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



VI. TEACHERS' INSTITUTES 
This table presents the work of the Teachers' Institutes for forty-six years: 





0) 
-t-> 

C 

*cn 
u 
0) 

JC 
o 
a 
<u 

H 

Vt-I 

o 

6 
J5 


C/2 
U 

<u 

S 

O 

d 


No. of Teachers in the 
Province (High School 
teachers not included) 


Receipts 


Expenditure 


Year 


*-> 

c 

^£ 
t > c 

'53 53 
a > 

£ o 
£ ^^ 

2 8^ 
< 


> a 
•53:3 
c 

<U 3 

U C 0) 

2 2 2 

< 


a> u 

£J5 

P CD 

3 E w 

O O <U 

2 S <u 

< 


c 

3 

2X3 

S g 

*- 

H 


u 

<S 

'aJ w 

< 


c 

O a> 

* s 

.2 x 
« 
H 


1877 

1882 

1887 

1892 

1897 

1902 

1907 

1912 

1917 

1921 

1922 


42 
62 
66 
69 
73 
77 
81 
83 
94 
96 
95 


1,181 

4,395 

6,781 

8,142 

7,627 

8,515 

9,319 

*8,976 

♦11,560 

♦12,546 

♦12,910 


6,468 

6,857 

7,594 

8,680 

9,351 

9,614 

10,170 

11,128 

12,762 

14,404 

14,872 


$ c. 
1,412 50 
2,900 00 
1,800 00 
1,950 00 
2,425 00 
2,515 00 
2,850 00 
3,800 00 
5,475 00 
6,275 00 
6,900 00 


$ c. 
100 00 
300 00 
1,879 45 
2,105 00 
2,017 45 
1,877 50 
1,920 00 
2,100 78 
3,701 62 
4,411 50 
4,459 27 


$ c. 

299 75 

1,088 84 

730 66 

875 76 

901 15 

1,171 80 

1,671 32 

1,961 10 

3,821 23 

6,244 00 

6,540 84 


$ c. 
2,769 44 
9,394 28 
10,405 95 
12,043 54 
12,446 20 
13,171 26 
14,824 09 
22,120 70 
27,712 01 
35,660 70 
39,759 89 


$ c. 

"453*62 

1,234 08 
1,472 41 
1,479 88 
1,437 18 
654 16 
1,359 24 
3,173 12 
5,807 92 
5,743 50 


$ c. 

1,127 63 

5,355 33 

4,975 50 

6,127 46 

6,598 84 

7,188 45 

7,487 41 

10,120 89 

13,977 20 

20,847 75 

25,810 37 



♦Registered attendance of members. 



See Appendix M for details for 1922. 



VII. DEPARTMENTAL EXAMINATIONS, Etc. 

1. Table showing the Number of Teachers in Training at Provincial Normal Schools, 
and the Pupils at the Normal Model Schools in connection 
therewith, etc., 1877-1924 



Year 


No. of Normal 
School teachers 


No. of Normal 
School students 


No. of Normal Model 
School and Kinder- 
garten teachers 


No. of Normal Model 
School and Kinder- 
garten pupils 


1877 


13 

16 

13 

12 

13 

16 

♦35 

*69 

♦78 

♦85 

*92 


257 

260 

441 

428 

• 407 

619 

428 

986 

1,514 

1,815 

2,429 


8 

15 

18 

22 

23 

31 

♦38 

*38 

♦43 

♦43 

♦43 


643 


1882 


799 


1887 


763 


1892 


842 


1897 


832 


1902 


958 


1907-08 

1912-13 

1917-18 

1922-23 

1923-24 


979 (1907) 

914 (1912) 

938 (1917) 

1,070 (1922) 

1,112 (1923) 



* Including those engaged in both a Normal and a Normal Model School. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



93 



2. High School Entrance Examinations, 1877-1923. 





u 

CD 








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:al numb 
mined ai 
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Principal 






Year 


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3"d 

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Year 


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7,383 


3,836 


51.95 


1907 


22,144 


15,430 


69.68 


1882 


9,607 


4,371 


45.49 


1912 


22,679 


13,977 


61.62 


1887 


16,248 


9,364 


57.63 


1917 


21,975 


15,751 


71.67 


1892 


16,409 


8,427 


51.35 


1922 


36,114 


27,560 


76.31 


1897 


16,384 


10,502 


64.09 


1923 


380,48 


29,889 


78.55 


1902 


18,087 


13,300 


73.53 











3. Lower School Examination, 1923 

Statistics of Results by Papers 





Total 
Number of 
Candidates 


Candidates 

Writing 
L.S. Exam. 


Number Successful 


Subjects 


Passed 
L.S. Exam. 


Teachers' 
Report 


Total 
Successful 


Per Cent. 


English Grammar. . . . 
Canadian History. . . . 
Geography 


9,366 
17,102 
13,955 
11,058 
11,015 
14,232 
12,314 

9,219 
899 
768 

2,223 


1,854 
3,535 
1,941 
1,254 
2,659 
1,921 
2,030 

856 
90 
62 

283 


577 

367 

627 

418 

554 

1,091 

1,089 

369 

24 

33 

144 


7,512 
13,568 
12,014 

9,807 

8,359 
12,311 
10,285 

8,363 
810 
709 

1,944 


8,089 
13,935 
12,641 
10,225 

8,913 
13,402 
11,374 

8,732 
834 
742 

2,088 


86.36 
81.48 
90.58 


Physiography 

Arithmetic 


92.46 
80.91 


Art 


94.16 


Botany 


92.36 


Zoology 


94 71 


Agric. & Hort. I 

Agric. &Hort. II 

Latin Grammar 


92.75 
96.61 
93.47 


Total 


102,151 


16,485 


5,293 


85,682 


90,975 









Total Number of Candidates writing Examination 30,344 

Total Number of Examination Centres 368 



94 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



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96 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
I. TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 




1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 

11 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland and Durham 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel 

28 Perth 

29i Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell 

31 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma 

42 Kenora 

43 Manitoulin 

44 Muskoka 

45 Nipissing 

46 Parry Sound 

47 Rainy River 

48 Sudbury 

49 Timiskaming 

50 Thunder Bay 

Totals 



3,430 


1,755 


1,675 


2,298 


87 


4,885 


2,567 


2,318 


3,433 


83 


7,025 


3,569 


3,456 


4,506 


85 


2,245 


1,207 


1,038 


1,454 


81 


2,460 


1,296 


1,164 


1,622 


84 


4,274 


2,232 


2,042 


2,817 


86 


5,528 


2,911 


2,617 


3,504 


88 


4,088 


2,101 


1,987 


2,434 


78 


2,688 


1,361 


1,327 


1,576 


78 


6,476 


3,374 


3,102 


4,373 


84 


2,565 


1,353 


1,212 


1,748 


85 


1,507 


754 


753 


845 


75 


2,309 


1,217 


1,092 


1,458 


82 


6,157 


3,196 


2,961 


3,840 


80 


5,479 


2,856 


2,623 


3,863 


86 


6,330 


3,245 


3,085 


4,094 


81 


5,091 


2,664 


2,427 


3,419 


85 


2,866 


1,461 


1,405 


1,908 


83 


5,592 


2,860 


2,732 


3,608 


82 


2,807 


1,445 


1,362 


1,828 


82 


3,814 


1,945 


1,869 


2,401 


85 


6,732 


3,557 


3,175 


4,533 


85 


3,689 


1,889 


1,800 


2,349 


82 


6,466 


3,406 


3,060 


4,238 


84 


5,118 


2,573 


2,545 


3,377 


84 


4,742 


2,468 


2,274 


3,240 


86 


2,979 


1,539 


1,440 


1,928 


84 


4,139 


2,218 


1,921 


2,902 


86 


3,196 


1,649 


1,547 


2,009 


81 


2,871 


1,492 


1,379 


1,677 


82 


2,079 


1,065 


1,014 


1,321 


84 


5,532 


2,814 


2,718 


3,317 


78 


8,463 


4,321 


4,142 


5,426 


83 


2,762 


1,461 


1,301 


1,762 


81 


3,161 


1,650 


1,511 


2,162 


80 


3,954 


2,100 


1,854 


2,796 


87 


5,267 


2,759 


2,508 


3,603 


86 


4,529 


2,360 


2,169 


3,128 


86 


6,229 


3,187 


3,042 


4,042 


87 


22,863 


11,720 


11,143 


15,001 


87 


3,595 


1,813 


1,782 


2,166 


80 


776 


430 


346 


430 


82 


1,682 


865 


817 


1,039 


82 


2,668 


1,427 


1,241 


1,507 


78 


2,011 


1,030 


981 


1,067 


76 


3,975 


1,995 


1,980 


2,516 


81 


1,842 


946 


896 


950 


74 


3,837 


1,966 


1,871 


2,569 


80 


4,757 


2,451 


2,306 


2,577 


80 


2,711 


1,342 


1,369 


1,571 


77 


220,241 


113,862 


106,379 


142,232 


83.39 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



97 



SCHOOLS 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. 

















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1 


655 


479 


618 


834 


804 


5 


361 


216 


191 


2 


942 


548 


937 


1,116 


1,255 


87 


448 


142 


119 


3 


1,328 


978 


1,309 


1,516 


1,522 


39 


774 


294 


266 


4 


398 


275 


437 


509 


590 


33 


230 


84 


83 


5 


570 


283 


492 


498 


604 


13 


296 


150 


111 


6 


776 


509 


741 


994 


1,129 


125 


429 


291 


220 


7 


1,272 


890 


1,079 


1,174 


954 


54 


533 


267 


234 


8 


1,030 


526 


730 


803 


989 


10 


431 


203 


186 


9 


781 


315 


606 


529 


430 


13 


343 


124 


132 


10 


1,263 


774 


1,115 


1,545 


1,640 


139 


663 


218 


219 


11 


522 


283 


500 


570 


636 


54 


264 


137 


110 


12 


382 


211 


299 


276 


245 


53 


163 


66 


68 


13 


516 


303 


391 


497 


577 


25 


275 


170 


126 


14 


1,409 


787 


1,221 


1,320 


1,237 


183 


641 


331 


305 


15 


775 


637 


1,088 


1,242 


1,425 


307 


529 


191 


179 


16 


1,502 


888 


1,133 


1,244 


1,387 


132 


744 


375 


277 


17 


926 


652 


838 


1,053 


1,431 


191 


551 


202 


217 


18 


634 


334 


520 


608 


747 


23 


282 


92 


98 


19 


1,196 


646 


964 


1,187 


1,520 


76 


537 


304 


258 


20 


624 


383 


477 


591 


697 


33 


264 


122 


94 


21 


814 


518 


714 


838 


852 


39 


436 


242 


279 


22 


1,156 


834 


1,470 


1,393 


1,788 


73 


713 


349 


305 


23 


838 


461 


734 


820 


774 


62 


341 


228 


208 


24 


1,234 


781 


1,359 


1,447 


1,451 


150 


640 


322 


278 


25 


1,156 


573 


1,002 


1,177 


1,146 


64 


556 


253 


135 


26 


903 


604 


874 


1,094 


1,192 


75 


490 


243 


224 


27 


620 


381 


533 


635 


804 


6 


315 


165 


132 


28 


695 


485 


663 


1,031 


1,157 


102 


470 


139 


122 


29 


745 


446 


597 


689 


683 


36 


310 


187 


179 


30 


677 


360 


438 


530 


615 


61 


306 


135 


101 


31 


420 


282 


358 


493 


465 


61 


215 


150 


129 


32 


1,420 


787 


1,054 


1,007 


1,109 


155 


532 


130 


124 


33 


1,790 


1,033 


1,849 


1,874 


1,804 


105 


750 


337 


337 


34 


656 


324 


526 


608 


586 


44 


270 


115 


109 


35 


629 


395 


625 


623 


787 


102 


288 


144 


89 


36 


793 


499 


806 


958 


861 


37 


450 


149 


137 


37 


1,301 


764 


917 


1,132 


980 


60 


539 


329 


287 


38 


806 


524 


727 


1,028 


1,302 


131 


458 


199 


151 


39 


1,338 


785 


1,110 


1,447 


1,388 


103 


639 


324 


359 


40 


5,419 


3,700 


5,096 


4,660 


3,273 


181 


2,909 


1,221 


1,135 


41 


1,069 


441 


644 


646 


725 


70 


420 


206 


185 


42 


200 


118 


174 


139 


120 


5 


93 


51 


39 


43 


423 


202 


293 


358 


368 


38 


140 


67 


59 


44 


651 


352 


499 


535 


551 


60 


330 


138 


131 


45 


622 


362 


330 


283 


254 


5 


255 


96 


78 


46 


1,074 


532 


725 


787 


708 


105 


507 


189 


170 


47 


511 


254 


339 


321 


304 


87 


202 


105 


91 


48 


1,441 


645 


686 


548 


457 


60 


447 


180 


160 


49 


1,525 


701 


815 


844 


728 


25 


583 


301 


284 


50 


806 


481 


508 


509 


392 


15 


266 


137 


100 


49,233 


29,325 


41,960 


46,560 


47,443 


3,712 


23,628 


10,810 


9,610 



4 D.E. 



98 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 

I. TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 



Rural Schools 



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1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey. 

1 1 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville , 

20 Lennox and Addington 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland and Durham 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell 

31 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont. 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma 

42 Kenora 

43 Manitoulin 

44 Muskoka 

45 Nipissing 

46 Parry Sound 

47 Rainy River 

48 Sudbury 

49 Timiskaming 

50 Thunder Bay 

Totals 



83 


81 






1 


82 


64 


5 


7 




145 


178 


1 




5 


41 


61 


4 






42 


58 


1 


4 


6 


90 


131 


11 


17 


8 


51 


82 






14 


54 


76 






1 


35 


61 






8 


89 


110 


6 


14 


7 


48 


58 


1 


5 


2 


1 


13 




2 


1 


48 


70 


1 


1 




47 


91 


10 


23 


i 


113 


104 


9 


17 


l 


91 


96 


18 


15 


3 


64 


81 


14 


22 


2 


56 


64 


2 


2 


1 


94 


120 


6 


/ 


4 


54 


48 


2 


2 


11 


74 


71 


4 


3 




174 


199 


4 


6 


i 


40 


51 


2 


3 


2 


119 


122 


10 


10 




55 


94 


6 


6 


4 


81 


117 


4 


8 


2 


71 


85 








56 


64 


ii 


8 


2 


30 


28 




2 


5 


49 


54 


4 


5 


9 


17 


27 




3 


2 


40 


53 


3 


21 


2 


136 


135 


1 


8 


3 


41 


61 


4 


2 




34 


52 


8 


18 


3 


46 


35 


1 


1 


2 


66 


34 




3 




91 


111 


4 


5 


4 


81 


113 


10 


14 


7 


243 


293 


13 


11 


24 


34 


27 


2 


3 


1 


2 


6 






4 


17 


39 




1 


4 


14 


19 




1 




6 


15 






5 


17 


38 


2 


6 


3 


19 


8 








25 


17 


5 


3 


2 


22 


36 




3 


5 


7 


5 


18 


17 


5 


3,035 


3,656 


207 


312 


177 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



99 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued; 



4J 

< 

s 

u 

1 

3 


a 

o 
O 


3 


g 

3 

03 
U 

1) 

3 


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a 
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o 
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5 

s 
2 

3 
3 
n) 
U 


3 
3 

O O) 


1 3,278 


2,867 


2,606 


2,996 


2,926 


942 


1,705 


336 


2,629 


2 4,662 


3,884 


4,070 


4,257 


3,723 


1,555 


1,631 


2,157 


3,771 


3 6,616 


5,222 


5,692 


5,170 


5,629 


2,167 


2,919 


3,499 


5,279 


4 2,105 


1,696 


1,385 


1,919 


1,866 


723 


885 


1,011 


1,791 


5 2,363 


1,937 


1,826 


2,173 


2,181 


672 


943 


1,065 


1,729 


6 4,169 


3,448 


4,035 


4,095 


4,113 


2,138 


2,661 


2,769 


3,406 


7 5,303 


4,015 


4,308 


4,710 


4,683 


2,046 


1,743 


1,969 


4,711 


8 4,088 


3,061 


3,082 


4,084 


4,084 


999 


1,856 


2,139 


4,081 


9 2,574 


1,955 


2,380 


2,237 


2,382 


640 


962 


1,090 


1,949 


10 6,233 


4,988 


4,283 


5,500 


5,124 


2,050 


2,302 


2,964 


5,385 


11 2,362 


1,967 


1,460 


2,220 


2,178 


794 


876 


1,137 


1,912 


12 1,358 


1,031 


949 


1,103 


1,223 


348 


354 


453 


1,188 


13 2,212 


1,704 


1,705 


2,010 


1,838 


793 


796 


1,056 


1,680 


14 6,059 


5,159 


4,907 


5,795 


5,733 


1,520 


1,939 


2,632 


5,715 


15 4,979 


4,207 


4,410 


4,695 


4,609 


2,123 


1,905 


2,594 


4,088 


16 6,021 


4,395 


4,134 


4,916 


5,051 


1,880 


2,290 


2,720 


4,564 


17 5,085 


4,151 


3,857 


5,091 


5,091 


1,612 


3,412 


3,479 


5,051 


18 2,764 


2,036 


2,080 


2,455 


2,349 


827 


1,079 


1,382 


2,118 


19 5,476 


4,215 


4,305 


4,396 


4,529 


1,895 


2,303 


2,930 


4,706 


20 2,749 


2,172 


2,141 


2,426 


2,432 


952 


1,183 


1,273 


2,346 


21 3,762 


2,864 


3,353 


3,270 


3,274 


912 


1,083 


1,459 


3,127 


22 6,732 


5,560 


5,387 


6,193 


6,260 


2,263 


3,060 


3,490 


5,977 


23 3,599 


2,883 


2,884 


3,261 


3,393 


892 


1,375 


1,685 


3,214 


24 5,930 


4,732 


4,327 


5,114 


5,121 


1,867 


1,969 


2,390 


4,839 


25 5,008 


3,688 


4,025 


3,925 


3,888 


1,203 


2,070 


2,059 


4,657 


26 4,683 


3,594 


3,053 


4,085 


4,113 


1,390 


1,742 


1,973 


4,530 


27 2,890 


2,348 


2,159 


2,634 


2,541 


930 


1,113 


1,246 


2,539 


28 4,106 


3,503 


3,930 


4,001 


3,806 


1,583 


1,443 


1,759 


3,733 


29 2,977 


2,352 


2,503 


2,475 


2,518 


847 


1,072 


1,160 


2,564 


30 2,600 


1,823 


2,258 


2,098 


2,332 


860 


970 


1,220 


1,868 


31 2.076 


1,578 


1,105 


1,957 


1,934 


572 


741 


842 


1,837 


32 5,412 


4,958 


4,299 


5,184 


5,029 


1,316 


2,510 


2,773 


4,987 


33 8,282 


7,436 


4,722 


7,691 


7,516 


2,069 


2,595 


3,157 


6,747 


34 2,524 


2,122 


2,100 


2,341 


2,401 


922 


1,142 


1,191 


1,944 


35 3,071 


2,437 


1,977 


2,746 


2,766 


919 


1,187 


1,358 


2,555 


36 3,868 


3,249 


3,627 


3,917 


3,920 


1,112 


1,099 


1,486 


3,581 


37 4,783 


3,613 


3,840 


3,988 


3,833 


1,485 


1,663 


2,047 


3,724 


38 4,232 


3,397 


3,309 


3,620 


3,549 


1,843 


1,759 


2,086 


3,655 


39 5,980 


4,851 


5,686 


5,374 


5,559 


1,609 


2,110 


2,540 


5,256 


40 22,293 


16,595 


21,874 


21,078 


21,210 


5,332 


5,926 


8,108 


20,894 


41 3,225 


2,458 


2,718 


2,785 


2,757 


804 


1,016 


1,431 


2,943 


42 618 


521 


593 


536 


543 


219 


167 


257 


478 


43 1,493 


1,237 


1,104 


1,231 


1,204 


411 


671 


759 


1,682 


44 2,484 


1,894 


1,617 


2,244 


2,223 


752 


919 


1,280 


2,015 


45 1,837 


1,332 


1,456 


1,719 


1,703 


314 


582 


872 


1,528 


46 3,940 


2,693 


3,333 


3,959 


3,612 


892 


1,223 


1,686 


3,693 


47 1,584 


1,178 


824 


1,288 


1,338 


629 


544 


705 


1,175 


48 3,751 


3,169 


3,704 


3,379 


3,386 


567 


946 


1,975 


3,481 


49 4,646 


3,246 


4,161 


4,105 


4,125 


961 


1,108 


1,966 


4,363 


50 2,654 


2,013 


2,203 


2,595 


2,542 


652 


765 


890 


2,590 


211,496 


167,434 


171,746 


191,041 


190,140 


62,807 


78,314 


94,505 


184,275 



100 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 

I. TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 



Rural Schools 





<u 














T3 




>> 






c 




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3 

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1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 

1 1 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

1 7 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland and Durham 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell 

31 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma 

42 Kenora 

43 Manitoulin 

44 Muskoka 

45 Nipissing 

46 Parry Sound 

47 Rainy River 

48 Sudbury 

49 Timiskaming 

50 Thunder Bay 

Totals 



3,026 


3,333 




3 


4 


3 


4,279 


4,404 


14 


31 


47 


4 


6,007 


6,870 




15 


15 


4 


1,967 


2,054 




14 


15 


4 


1,947 


2,460 




2 


2 


.... 


3,395 


4,143 




102 


88 


3 


4,596 


5,298 


21 


10 


5 


.... 


4,082 


4,088 




8 


9 




2,007 


2,495 


20 


4 


4 


.... 


5,677 


6,326 


17 


71 


77 


35 


2,096 


2,466 


.... 


24 


45 


12 


1,354 


1,373 


2 


41 


40 


17 


1,872 


2,208 


.... 


4 


4 




5,788 


6,088 


30 


117 


137 


32 


4,146 


4,945 


23 


214 


209 


79 


4,816 


6,037 




61 


73 


21 


5,054 


5,091 


19 


129 


148 


42 


2,357 


2,806 




6 


7 


4 


4,979 


5,370 




40 


51 


14 


2,434 


2,724 


1 


12 


16 


3 


3,446 


3,769 


20 


8 


17 


7 


5,345 


6,636 


707 


30 


49 


2 


3,149 


3,592 


21 


53 


42 


9 


5,345 


6,000 


14 


98 


112 


30 


4,584 


4,966 


18 


34 


38 


22 


4,426 


4,739 


22 


35 


57 


13 


2,601 


2,947 




1 


1 




3,858 


4,049 


6 


38 


43 


7 


2,794 


3,042 


2 


21 


20 


5 


2,045 


2,696 


1 


25 


47 


11 


1,870 


2,065 




29 


37 




5,082 


5,349 




124 


125 


51 


7,587 


8,100 


2 


22 


44 


14 


2,175 


2,701 




9 


5 


1 


2,691 


2,919 


49 


82 


74 


3 


3,871 


3,922 


4 


30 


31 


9 


4,042 


4,862 




47 


52 


13 


3,624 


4,325 


26 


62 


87 


12 


5,216 


5,754 


35 


70 


77 


13 


21,111 


22,687 


41 


148 


149 


9 


3,161 


3,407 


3 


39 


34 


22 


508 


652 




5 


5 




1,682 


1,682 




29 


27 




2,222 


2,309 


3 


25 


47 


4 


1,631 


1,840 


15 


5 






3,840 


3,775 


19 


74 


87 


26 


1,230 


1,304 




38 


65 


42 


3,486 


3,773 




56 


37 


28 


4,593 


4,650 


15 


2 


14 


2 


2,631 


2,609 




15 


14 


6 


191,725 


211,700 


1,170 


2,162 


2,433 


638 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



101 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 











JZ 






































A 


■* 


















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519 


135 


258 


2 


27 


"2 


11 


'"2 


"25 


"3 


1,191 


491 


403 


3 


8 




2 




4 




1,498 


227 


46 


4 


13 




8 








720 


278 


76 


5 














1,163 




52 


6 


"3 




"i 




ioo 




3,275 


l',157 


1,030 


7 


2 




5 


'733 






1,197 


466 




8 










"2 




103 


15 




9 


'"3 




'"4 


"84 






1,327 


157 


"43 


10 


23 




36 




"26 


"2 


1,109 


606 


187 


11 


35 




37 




45 


2 


476 




62 


12 


34 




25 


"3 


32 




7 


"ii 


4 


13 






2 




3 




688 


359 


23 


14 


"50 




43 




93 


"5 


1,372 


123 


294 


15 


128 


'"3 


101 




161 




2,327 


101 


75 


16 


31 




18 


195 


51 




3,094 


551 


61 


17 


15 




20 




128 


"54 


2,223 


1,149 


173 


18 


.... 








4 




926 


7 


22 


19 


36 




"ii 




12 


"i 


1,594 


196 


77 


20 


5 




1 




3 




71 






21 


7 




7 




13 




583 


io6 


'309 


22 


29 




22 




22 


"6 


2,773 


2,205 


821 


23 


1 




2 




9 




793 




46 


24 


43 




42 




34 


"ii 


2,478 


iio 


227 


25 


18 




18 




37 


1 


947 


77 


254 


26 


25 




6 




45 


3 


1,289 


179 


56 


27 


1 












982 


525 


179 


28 


29 




"i7 




"27 


"*4 


2,293 


307 


199 


29 


.... 




1 




6 


1 


473 


23 


275 


30 


46 




33 


'846 


44 


4 


378 


252 


47 


31 


6 




3 




8 


3 


621 


1,191 


205 


32 


62 




63 


"43 


94 


18 


762 


20 


95 


33 


3 




1 


244 


45 


11 


1,225 


135 


132 


34 


1 




1 




1 




1,198 


67 




35 


13 




8 




9 


"i 


269 


44 


"'7 


36 


15 




10 




6 


1 


827 


260 


33 


37 


40 




35 




35 




987 


210 


175 


38 


56 




32 


"l 


53 


"9 


1,495 


223 


195 


39 


66 


"i 


49 


1 


53 


2 


2,345 


1,680 


831 


40 


100 




66 


1 


116 


57 


4,817 


933 


929 


41 


11 




1 




30 




289 


126 


43 


42 














23 


12 


13 


43 










"is 




120 




112 


44 


"5 




"is 




28 




77 


*i25 




45 






31 


'543 


5 




138 


103 


"si 


46 


"27 




22 




68 


*6 


280 


87 


51 


47 


51 




57 




30 




172 






48 


9 






*939 


37 


"ii 


67 


"si 




49 


8 




"0 




6 


2 


457 


1,355 


'239 


50 






3 


'"3 


4 


5 


72 


37 


51 


1,088 


6 


897 


3,638 


1,572 


224 


54,110 


16,568 


8,491 



102 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 

I. TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 



Cities 





Attendance 




.5 


JD 










*Efi 


a 

Oh 






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3£ 


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< cadH 




II 


i,9b0 


981 


999 


1,403 


93 


1 


5,085 


2,603 


2,482 


3,908 


94 




2,397 


1,214 


1,183 


1,724 


89 


207 


3,885 


1,932 


1,953 


3,176 


93 


241 


2,499 


1,287 


1,212 


1,986 


93 




2,817 


1,348 


1,469 


2,222 


93 


128 


21,044 


10,598 


10,446 


16,053 


91 


1,382 


3,217 


1,575 


1,642 


2,485 


92 


137 


3,329 


1,665 


1,664 


2,576 


92 


191 


10,359 


5,145 


5,214 


8,234 


91 


826 


2,506 


1,284 


1,222 


1,872 


90 


• . 


12,343 


6,124 


6,219 


9,506 


91 




2,474 


1,257 


1,217 


1,930 


90 


220 


3,477 


1,820 


1,657 


2,699 


92 




2,899 


1,520 


1,379 


2,295 


94 




3,310 


1,679 


1,631 


2,549 


92 




2,873 


1,440 


1,433 


2,146 


91 


64 


2,504 


1,263 


1,241 


1,901 


96 




3,669 


1,842 


1,827 


2,805 


91 


333 


2,789 


1,451 


1,338 


2,184 


91 




89,885 
1,982 


45,244 


44,641 


65,151 


88 


8,384 


988 


994 


1,481 


92 


148 


6,066 


3,106 


2,960 


4,338 


92 


298 


1,575 


789 


786 


1,208 


90 




194,964 


98,155 


96,809 


145,832 


89.96 


12,559 


90 


34 


56 


57 


84 




263 


126 


137 


178 


89 




341 


175 


166 


259 


94 




292 


144 


148 


221 


80 




540 


285 


255 


395 


87 




403 


210 


193 


324 


90 




480 


269 


211 


356 


94 


24 


93 


43 


50 


63 


83 




1,500 


748 


752 


1,090 


90 


82 


333 


162 


171 


252 


92 




147 


61 


86 


108 


92 




43 


20 


23 


22 


86 




125 


62 


63 


80 


94 




614 


341 


273 


489 


94 




559 


296 


263 


415 


86 




845 


419 


426 


667 


92 




464 


258 


206 


335 


89 




1,376 


684 


692 


974 


86 




150 


72 


78 


117 


88 




626 


311 


315 


428 


90 




153 


79 


74 


116 


90 




505 


239 


266 


366 


87 




313 


150 


163 


218 


83 




780 


409 


371 


539 


94 




87 


47 


40 


52 


80 




342 


173 


169 


258 


94 




368 


184 


184 


270 


90 




1,078 


526 


552 


642 


90 




757 


394 


363 


623 


90 


42 


447 


222 


225 


281 


88 




1,235 


614 


621 


1,007 


94 


83 


679 


357 


322 


463 


93 1 





1 Belleville 

2 Brantford 

3 Chatham. . . 

4 Fort William 

5 Gait 

6 Guelph 

7 Hamilton 

8 Kingston 

9 Kitchener 

10 London 

1 1 Niagara Falls 

12 Ottawa 

13 Owen Sound 

14 Peterborough 

15 Port Arthur 

16 St. Catharines 

17 St. Thomas 

18 Sarnia 

19 Sault Ste. Marie... 

20 Stratford 

21 Toronto 

22 Welland 

23 Windsor 

24 Woodstock 

Totals 

Towns 

1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg 

5 Arnprior 

6 Aurora 

7 Aylmer 

8 Bala 

9 Barrie 

10 Blenheim 

11 Blind River 

12 Bonfield 

13 Bothwell 

14 Bowman ville 

15 Bracebridge 

16 Brampton 

17 Bridgeburg 

18 Brockville 

19 Bruce Mines 

20 Burlington 

21 Cache Bay 

22 Campbellford. . . . 

23 Capreol 

24 Carleton Place . . . 

25 Charlton 

26 Chesley 

27 Clinton 

28 Cobalt 

29 Cobourg 

30 Cochrane 

31 Collingwood. 

32 Copper Cliff 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



103 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 



















. u "H J. v 


co a> 1 fc. 


















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1 




465 


244 


438 


425 


408 




225 


89 


2 


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597 


804 


833 


1,329 


1,165 




534 


184 


3 


202 


287 


317 


350 


614 


420 




167 


89 


4 


132 


580 


660 


652 


911 


709 




449 


92 


5 


171 


483 


302 


503 


526 


514 




271 


77 


6 


176 


439 


394 


500 


561 


499 


'l20 


272 


66 


7 


142 


3,018 


2,828 


4,930 


4,553 


3,765 


426 


1,769 


567 


8 


112 


645 


444 


420 


722 


737 




344 


105 


9 


148 


444 


484 


713 


653 


696 




330 


110 


10 


91 


1,341 


1,194 


2,225 


2,183 


2,468 


"31 


1,011 


390 


11 




701 


369 


383 


625 


428 




486 


77 


12 


1,213 


1,752 


1,678 


1,609 


2,639 


2,884 


'568 


1,256 


400 


13 


33 


358 


294 


564 


547 


458 




244 


75 


14 


379 


642 


441 


631 


687 


697 




380 


66 


15 




582 


537 


781 


589 


410 




492 


89 


16 


'380 


544 


445 


496 


860 


585 




444 


80 


17 


230 


413 


356 


456 


645 


709 




290 


110 


18 


216 


223 


321 


522 


585 


637 




319 


86 


19 


115 


634 


470 


611 


741 


765 




471 


219 


20 


262 


375 


361 


394 


619 


778 




225 


80 


21 




15,084 


10,195 


15,856 


20,725 


18,783 


'858 


11,028 


2,488 


22 


"28 


423 


267 


330 


437 


349 




212 


108 


23 


789 


523 


853 


903 


1,348 


1,352 




867 


240 


24 


153 


181 


282 


263 


300 


396 




171 


52 


5,329 


30,734 


24,540 


35,363 


43,824 


40,612 


2,003 


22,257 


5,939 


1 




30 


13 


11 


18 


18 




10 


6 


2 




56 


47 


49 


44 


67 




20 


10 


3 




49 


38 


42 


145 


67 




34 


2 


4 




83 


43 


84 


49 


33 




45 


5 


5 




110 


72 


65 


125 


168 




46 


16 


6 




83 


46 


96 


96 


82 




37 


19 


7 


"36 


41 


43 


94 


93 


149 




46 


20 


8 




17 


14 


15 


16 


22 


'"9 


5 


1 


9 


"74 


268 


197 


301 


285 


293 




228 


20 


10 




53 


39 


93 


47 


101 




38 


2 


11 




37 


28 


17 


25 


40 




12 


3 


12 


"i 


10 


3 


8 


7 


11 








13 




43 


13 


16 


20 


33 




"l3 


"4 


14 




140 


100 


127 


118 


129 




34 


9 


15 




125 


76 


150 


146 


62 




59 


28 


16 




149 


130 


166 


231 


169 




89 


13 


17 


"42 


115 


68 


62 


79 


98 




70 




18 




328 


198 


174 


332 


344 




154 


"i'l 


19 




38 


20 


26 


38 


28 




21 


8 


20 


"<5i 


75 


126 


100 


96 


168 




68 


41 


21 




33 


25 


29 


25 


41 




24 


2 


22 




92 


83 


85 


128 


117 


.... 


40 


3 


23 




132 


39 


43 


55 


43 






12 


24 




181 


113 


121 


226 


139 




"75 


15 


25 




35 


8 


10 


15 


18 


"l 






26 




49 


46 


96 


76 


75 




**26 


"23 


27 




59 


58 


63 


95 


93 




44 


14 


28 




300 


119 


228 


202 


229 




134 


85 


29 


"42 


117 


108 


187 


129 


132 




81 


11 


30 




114 


96 


110 


73 


54 




59 


23 


31 




238 


150 


217 


279 


268 




69 




32 


"55 


' 149 


83 


128 


106 


158 




102 


"3 



104 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 

I. TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 



Cities 



o <y <u > u 

« O 0.4J 

01 m o 
W C 



M 



C C 



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" o 

a*d 
3 eg 
Ph£ 8 

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1 Belleville 

2 Brantford 

3 Chatham 

4 Fort William. . . 

5 Gait 

6 Guelph 

7 Hamilton 

8 Kingston 

9 Kitchener 

10 London 

1 1 Niagara Falls . . . 

12 Ottawa 

13 Owen Sound. . . 

14 Peterborough . . . 

15 Port Arthur 

16 St. Catharines. . 

17 St. Thomas. . . . 

18 Sarnia 

19 Sault Ste. Marie 

20 Stratford 

21 Toronto 

22 Welland 

23 Windsor 

24 Woodstock 

Totals 

Towns 

1 Alexandria. . . . 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg. . 

5 Arnprior 

6 Aurora 

7 Aylmer 

8 Bala 

9 Barrie 

10 Blenheim 

11 Blind River. .. 

12 Bonfield 

13 Bothwell 

14 Bowmanville . . 

15 Bracebridge. . . 

16 Brampton 

17 Bridgeburg 

18 Brockville 

19 Bruce Mines. . 

20 Burlington. . . . 

21 Cache Bay. . . . 

22 Campbellford. . 

23 Capreol 

24 Carleton Place. 

25 Charlton 

26 Chesley 

27 Clinton 

28 Cobalt 

29 Cobourg 

30 Cochrane 

31 Collingwood. . . 

32 Copper Cliff. . . 



104 

202 

81 

104 

74 

76 

537 

114 

108 

393 

72 

414 

68 

60 

80 

72 

131 

62 

202 

56 

2,450 

120 

249 

74 



5,903 



45 

113 

8 

81 

66 

61 

385 
84 
59 

319 
57 

300 
44 
98 
65 
64 
99 
92 

107 

97 

1,933 

28 

160 
56 



41 

114 
15 
87 
53 
75 

284 
S3 
57 

343 
55 

304 
56 
91 
70 
80 
97 

117 

113 

98 

1,981 

26 

167 
48 



12 



4.421 



4,455 



19 



28 



4 

'3 

2 

68 

1 
8 

20 
1 

55 



2 
3 

377 



556 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



105 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 





< 
■a 


>> 




V 


.2 


£ 


>> 

o 

09 

s 


>> 

o 

w 

s 


c 
>> 




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a 
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U 

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B 




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a 


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.2 5 




3 


O 


s 


3 


o 
U 


o 


g 


U 


-si? 


1 


1,980 


1,980 


1,9^0 


1,980 


1,980 


530 


370 


616 


1,980 


2 


5,085 


5,085 


5,085 


5,085 


5,085 


1,229 


1,305 


1,838 


5,085 


3 


2,178 


1,798 


2,397 


1,955 


2,261 


501 


689 


920 


2,069 


4 


3,644 


2,272 


3,885 


3,644 


3,644 


709 


1,620 


1,620 


3,644 


5 


2,499 


2,303 


2,499 


2,499 


2,499 


514 


567 


782 


2,499 


6 


2,492 


2,186 


2,492 


2,170 


2,326 


1,010 


1,217 


1,656 


2,075 


7 


19,472 


18,557 


19,880 


19,275 


19,562 


4,535 


8,791 


1,830 


19,546 


8 


3,091 


2,589 


3,182 


2,925 


2,957 


737 


1,313 


1,500 


3,101 


9 


3,256 


3,256 


3,256 


3,256 


3,256 


696 


3,069 


3,069 


3,256 


10 


9,565 


9,208 


9,802 


9,347 


9,295 


2,607 


4,185 


5,437 


9,660 


11 


2,506 


2,199 


2,506 


2,270 


2,270 


545 


731 


1,079 


2,506 


12 


12,343 


12,343 


12,343 


12,343 


2,884 


2,884 


2,884 


2,884 


12,343 


13 


2,454 


1,685 


2,338 


2,101 


2,101 


609 


623 


937 


2,140 


14 


3,477 


2,466 


3,477 


3,477 


3,477 


697 


2,015 


2,015 


3,477 


15 


2,899 


2,899 


2,899 


2,899 


2,899 


410 


999 


999 


2,899 


16 


3,310 


2,386 




1,941 


1,941 


585 


585 


1,445 


1,445 


17 


2,822 


2,058 


2*,338 


2,527 


2,527 


702 


838 


883 


2,414 


18 


'2,504 


2,164 


2,504 


2,112 


2,504 


1,124 


1,692 


1,830 


2,383 


19 


3,306 


3,218 


3,669 


3,306 


2,372 


805 


745 


909 


3,669 


20 


2,789 


2,789 


2,789 


2,789 


2,789 


860 


813 


1,147 


2,789 


21 


81,926 


77,894 


83,237 


81,360 


81,112 


25,976 


30,156 


40,072 


72,284 


22 


1,834 


1,360 


1,982 


1,834 


1,834 


763 


763 


763 


1,360 


23 


6,023 


5,817 


6,066 


5,745 


5,452 


1,392 


2,297 


2,905 


5,863 


24 


1,575 


1,110 


1,575 


969 


696 


396 


969 


969 


1,575 


183,030 


169,622 


182,181 


177,809 


167,723 


50,816 


69,236 


78,105 


170,062 


1 


90 


90 


90 


90 


90 


18 


36 


36 


90 


2 


263 


207 


263 


263 


263 


67 


89 


111 


263 


3 


341 


341 


341 


341 


341 


67 


254 


149 


341 


4 


292 


209 


211 


292 


292 


82 


82 


82 


292 


5 


540 


354 


540 


540 


540 


168 


308 


387 


540 


6 


403 


403 


403 


320 


320 


82 


82 


178 


403 


7 


450 


416 


480 


450 


450 


149 


189 


189 


480 


8 


93 


76 


93 


76 


76 


62 


53 


43 


76 


9 


1,344 


879 


1,418 


1,147 


1,147 


578 


293 


578 


879 


10 


280 


241 


333 


241 


241 


101 


202 


241 


241 


11 


147 


147 


147 


147 


147 


40 


147 


147 


147 


12 


43 


40 


43 


43 


43 


11 


5 


13 


40 


13 


125 


82 




82 


125 


32 


69 


69 


69 


14 


614 


474 


6ii 


374 


374 


177 


197 


374 


474 


15 


559 


559 


497 


559 


559 


117 


208 


84 


559 


16 


845 


601 


845 


726 


749 


177 


177 


359 


845 


17 


464 


235 


464 


464 


464 


98 


98 


235 


464 


18 


1,376 


1,376 


1,376 


1,376 


1,376 


344 


1,376 


1,376 


1,376 


19 


143 


110 


143 


143 


143 


26 


32 


40 


143 


20 


626 


538 




626 


538 


215 


344 


286 


626 


21 


153 


153 


* 153 


153 


153 


37 


59 


78 


153 


22 


505 


413 




505 


505 


117 


330 


330 


413 


23 


313 


142 




313 


99 


44 


44 


99 


313 


24 


599 


599 




599 


599 


' 139 


144 


318 


599 


25 


87 


87 


"87 


44 


87 


19 


62 


62 


87 


26 


342 


293 


259 


342 


293 


75 


221 


223 


342 


27 


368 


368 


368 


368 


368 


93 


120 


156 


368 


28 


1,078 


1,078 


1,078 


1,078 


1,078 


161 


175 


1,078 


1,078 


29 


610 


575 


158 


585 


600 


175 


258 


224 


399 


30 


447 


333 


338 


447 


447 


54 


54 


237 


447 


31 


1,152 


1,149 


1,149 


1,149 


1,150 


1,140 


1,140 


1,142 


1,147 


32 


679 


475 


679 


475 


475 


158 


158 


264 


475 



106 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 







<v 


















T3 














C 






Cities 


•a 

3 


3 

u 


60 

e 
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u 


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H 


U 








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52 


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a 




cd 


>, 
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Oh 


o 
o 
pq 


< 


o 




1 Belleville 

2 Brantford 

3 Chatham 

4 Fort William 

5 Gait 

6 Guelph 

7 Hamilton 

8 Kingston 

9 Kitchener 

10 London 

11 Niagara Falls 

12 Ottawa 

13 Owen Sound 

14 Peterborough 

15 Port Arthur 

16 St. Catharines 

17 St. Thomas 

18 Sarnia 

19 Sault Ste. Marie.. . 

20 Stratford 

21 Toronto 

22 Welland 

23 Windsor 

24 Woodstock 

Totals 

Towns 

1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg 

5 Arnprior 

6 Aurora 

7 Aylmer 

8 Bala 

9 Barrie 

10 Blenheim 

11 Blind River 

12 Bonfield 

13 Bothwell 

14 Bowmanville 

15 Bracebridge 

16 Brampton 

17 Bridgeburg 

18 Brockville 

19 Bruce Mines 

20 Burlington 

21 Cache Bay 

22 Campbellford. . . . 

23 Capreol 

24 Carleton Place . . . 

25 Charlton 

26 Chesley 

27 Clinton 

28 Cobalt 

29 Cobourg 

30 Cochrane 

31 Collingwood 

" 32 Copper Cliff 



i,Votr 


i,y60 












5,085 


5,085 












2,178 


2,338 












3,644 


3,644 












2,499 


2,499 












2,409 


2,754 




119 








19,522 


19,932 


426 


426 


373 




190 


3,154 


3,154 












3,256 


3,256 












9,080 


9,679 




31 


31 






2,506 


2,506 












12,343 


12,343 


100 


568 








2,140 


2,140 












3,477 


3,477 












2,899 


2,899 












3,310 


3,310 












2,296 


2,724 












2,504 


2,504 












3,669 


3,669 












2,789 


2,789 












81,824 


82,888 


1,296 


819 


723 




484 


1,982 


1,982 












5,900 


6,023 












1,575 


1,575 












182,021 


185,150 


1,822 


1,963 


1,127 


674 


90 


90 










263 


263 












341 


341 












292 


292 












540 


540 












225 














480 


480 












76 


93 




9 


9 






1,418 


1,500 












241 


333 












147 


147 












43 


43 












125 


125 












614 


614 












559 


559 












845 


845 












464 


464 












1,376 


1,376 












143 


143 












570 


626 












153 


153 












413 


505 












313 


313 


44 










599 


780 












87 


87 












342 


342 












368 


368 












1,078 


1,078 












558 


458 












447 


447 












1,148 


1,150 












679 


679 













1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



107 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 









.d 


































Xi 


■<* 


































Tt< 


o 
















■a 




c 






M 


c 






a 


















o 
>> 
u 

e 


.§1 


05 

>> 

h 

a! 


"3 

'0 


(U 


"3 
H 




c 


c 
S 

E 

01 


5 o 
E o 




C 

E 


B 
B 
o 


13 

U 

60 


3 

c 
cd 


O 

3 
o 


_) 


o 


fePQ 


feCQ 


w 


U 


< 


S 


K 



1 


















1,264 


234 


2 
















1,187 


895 


888 


3 


















1,027 


637 


4 
















"so 






5 
















214 


*259 


'227 


6 












11s 


I 64 


499 


668 


7 9 




'. '"l\ 






"22 


41j 




4,504 


4,527 


8 














.... 


3,028 


550 


9 
















62 


1,997 


1,979 


10 31 










"ii 






1,639 


1,923 


1,917 


11 
















89 






12 










'260 




*56£ 


1,329 


3,i83 


4,149 


13 
















103 


571 


667 


14 
















321 


317 


300 


15 






















16 


















*292 


'293 


17 
















*94i 


480 


483 


18 


















1,207 


855 


19 
















*373 


1,842 


1,827 


20 
















702 


550 


529 


21 




'. 'ice 






'523 




'85C 


735 


71,657 


39,154 


22 






















23 
















2408 


1,695 


1,667 


24 


















546 


1,575 


40 




328 




776 


1,954 


9,947 


97,736 


63,126 


1 












36 






2 






















3 






















4 






















5 






















6 
















*i78 






7 
















149 


"84 


"84 


8 9 




"9 






"9 












9 






















10 






















11 






















12 
















"46 


"43 




13 






















14 






















15 






















16 


















*845 


845 


17 






















18 
















2ii 


'322 


'354 


19 






















20 






















21 






















22 






















23 






















24 






















25 










"l 












26 






















27 






















28 


















1,078 




29 






















30 






















31 
















"82 


507 


'275 


32 























108 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 



Towns 



Attendance 










ij's 


of 

egate 
aggre- 
ance 


I* 

,Q CO 








u s 

bflJS 
rt *d co 


ntage 
1 aggr 
ssible 
attenc 




CO 

>> 
o 
pq 




3 


2 cn: 

4) Oi Q 


Perce 
actua 
to po 
gate 



33 Cornwall 

34 Deseronto. . . . 

35 Dresden 

36 Dryden 

37 Dundas 

38 Dunnville. . . 

39 Durham 

40 Eastview. 

41 Englehart. . . 

42 Essex 

43 Ford 

44 Forest 

45 Fort Frances. 

46 Frood Mine. . 

47 Gananoque. . 

48 Georgetown . . 

49 Goderich .... 

50 Gore Bay 

51 Gravenhurst. 

52 Grimsby. 

53 Haileybury. . 

54 Hanover 

55 Harriston 

56 Hawkesbury. , 

57 Hespeler , 

58 Huntsville 

59 Ingersoll 

60 Iroquois Falls 

61 Kearney , 

62 Keewatin 

63 Kenora 

64 Kincardine. . , 

65 Kingsville 

66 Latchford. . . 

67 Leamington. . 

68 Leaside 

69 Lindsay , 

70 Listowel 

71 Little Current 

72 Massey , 

73 Matheson 

74 Mattawa 

75 Meaford 

76 Merritton . . . 

77 Midland 

78 Milton 

79 Mimico 

80 Mitchell 

81 Mount Forest 

82 Napanee 

83 New Liskeard 

84 Newmarket . . , 

85 New Toronto. 

86 Niagara 

87 North Bay. . . 

88 Oakville 

89 Orangeville. . 

90 Orillia 

91 Oshawa 

92 Palmerston. . , 

93 Paris 



624 


327 


297 


429 


93 




395 


201 


194 


297 


92 




254 


128 


126 


212 


89 




335 


172 


163 


240 


85 




884 


436 


448 


679 


93 




629 


317 


312 


439 


90 




315 


167 


148 


256 


93 




476 


242 


234 


295 


85 




231 


106 


125 


154 


81 




361 


188 


173 


256 


78 




562 


280 


282 


363 


88 




248 


129 


119 


170 


95 




540 


281 


259 


365 


87 




23 


11 


12 


8 


95 




508 


262 


246 


380 


92 




422 


216 


206 


277 


93 




690 


344 


346 


521 


89 


24 


131 


66 


65 


115 


93 




413 


191 


222 


272 


86 




377 


197 


180 


298 


88 




562 


282 


280 


448 


94 




536 


269 


267 


429 


90 




265 


130 


135 


196 


90 




151 


78 


73 


107 


85 




564 


269 


295 


431 


93 




521 


260 


261 


383 


87 




978 


474 


504 


713 


87 


96 


293 


146 


147 


204 


92 




109 


54 


55 


80 


78 




292 


158 


134 


215 


88 




1,051 


533 


518 


822 


78 




297 


163 


134 


253 


91 




467 


239 


228 


314 


85 




105 


61 


44 


70 


83 




706 


340 


366 


498 


91 




86 


43 


43 


60 


86 




1,228 


622 


606 


961 


93 




401 


212 


189 


292 


73 




173 


88 


85 


140 


92 




93 


54 


39 


75 


92 




138 


80 


58 


89 


79 




54 


26 


28 


30 


77 




476 


235 


241 


415 


92 




381 


159 


222 


303 


89 


14 


1,664 


832 


832 


1,303 


88 




464 


234 


230 


357 


92 




949 


472 


477 


705 


90 




265 


151 


114 


205 


89 




215 


118 


97 


174 


91 




559 


293 


266 


403 


90 




565 


286 


279 


405 


88 




771 


397 


374 


548 


88 




770 


398 


372 


497 


89 




243 


124 


119 


182 


91 




1,653 


862 


791 


1,272 


87 


79 


695 


347 


348 


512 


89 




443 


232 


211 


338 


92 




1,457 


718 


739 


1,122 


93 




2,376 


1,219 


1,157 


1,757 


90 




275 


139 


136 


212 


94 




766 


390 


376 


575 


92 





1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



109 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 



















. u-^t J (U 


O <L) <U .1 1-. 




>> 

M 

a 

B 

g 

4J 

c3 

60 
i-i 
0) 

■a 


u 

6 


M 

O 
O 

PQ 


M 

O 
O 

pq 


M 



03 


O 
O 


M 
O 
O 

PQ 

A 

$ 

G 
O 


mber of Pupils ad- 
ted during the yea 
School for the fin 
s. (Pupils who pre 
usly attended som 
er School in Ontari 
counted) 


mber of Boys whi 
School during th 

r to attend som 

er Public or Separ 
School in anothe 

ool Section 




c 

2 


'u 
Ph 




T3 

a 






n 


Z S £ -a > c 


3 .*■" CoX! (L) -G 
Z3£S^ 


33 




105 


121 


90 


129 


179 




50 


39 


34 




82 


68 


84 


74 


87 




44 


13 


35 


"46 


39 


38 


46 


46 


45 




40 


4 


36 


47 


40 


56 


64 


62 


66 




11 


19 


37 


111 


116 


103 


172 


197 


185 




100 


6 


38 


43 


108 


115 


150 


115 


98 




43 


30 


39 




55 


59 


86 


59 


56 




20 


2 


40 


"74 


53 


110 


71 


106 


62 




36 


59 


41 


45 


46 


35 


46 


26 


28 


""5 


30 


9 


42 




77 


50 


67 


81 


86 




44 


5 


43 


'JL26 


73 


112 


126 


75 


50 




154 


64 


44 




31 


36 


46 


56 


79 




29 


12 


45 


"30 


109 


87 


96 


107 


111 




54 


18 


46 




10 


4 


3 


2 


4 




7 


2 


47 




111 


39 


116 


125 


117 




47 


17 


48 




62 


91 


92 


82 


95 




52 


20 


49 


"i7 


108 


61 


159 


152 


169 




79 


32 


50 


.... 


28 


13 


25 


36 


29 




17 


1 


51 




95 


51 


64 


104 


99 




50 


2 


52 


"22 


60 


50 


38 


124 


83 




43 


40 


53 


.... 


105 


89 


135 


146 


87 




76 


19 


54 


33 


35 


56 


124 


144 


144 




54 


13 


55 




38 


45 


58 


60 


64 




50 


8 


56 




17 


17 


44 


29 


44 




10 


12 


57 


"45 


115 


48 


139 


110 


107 




45 


18 


58 




135 


61 


140 


84 


101 




47 


37 


59 


.... 


141 


148 


111 


234 


248 




107 


27 


60 


63 


35 


58 


44 


44 


49 




42 


18 


61 




34 


7 


10 


23 


20 


"is 


2 


2 


62 




50 


40 


45 


75 


82 




32 


2 


63 




210 


193 


203 


220 


225 




111 


32 


64 




59 


48 


58 


61 


71 




46 


7 


65 


"37 


59 


86 


92 


71 


122 




52 


23 


66 




39 


6 


16 


20 


24 




9 


4 


67 


"% 


34 


136 


102 


183 


155 




90 


24 


68 


.... 


18 


23 


12 


15 


18 




9 


2 


69 




246 


152 


284 


280 


266 




132 


27 


70 




67 


66 


44 


109 


115 




15 


14 


71 




26 


34 


41 


24 


48 




26 


6 


72 




32 


11 


10 


19 


.21 




8 


6 


73 




47 


25 


16 


10 


40 




11 


9 


74 




7 


5 


10 


8 


17 




5 


3 


75 




79 


79 


87 


134 


97 




40 


13 


76 


"30 


68 


56 


45 


97 


71 




37 


23 


77 




353 


235 


451 


345 


280 




150 


14 


78 




113 


47 


108 


111 


85 




97 


16 


79 




191 


175 


161 


204 


218 




172 


23 


80 


.■ . . . 


42 


35 


33 


61 


94 




30 


2 


81 




29 


32 


46 


44 


64 




17 




82 


.... 


145 


57 


100 


127 


130 




70 


"23 


83 


35 


80 


88 


109 


153 


100 




35 


10 


84 




184 


100 


137 


189 


161 




87 


24 


85 




178 


188 


160 


150 


87 


"1 


110 


24 


86 




39 


33 


50 


53 


68 




31 


12 


87 




318 


220 


290 


330 


416 




75 




88 


"38 


93 


108 


147 


162 


147 




73 


"24 


89 




89 


84 


87 


80 


103 




65 


21 


90 




295 


194 


367 


344 


257 




270 


63 


91 




557 


393 


388 


506 


532 




306 


62 


92 


"27 


19 


34 


42 


86 


67 




26 


9 


93 


127 




109 


US 


189 


223 




102 


32 



110 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 

I. TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 



Towns 



O O <U ' •-> 

-a -as 

+j u .2 

°"o rt 2o| 



3 £ 3 „c cu-c 



•§ a o3 o 

?p. -.3.3 



ii _3 u rt oj 
u "*±i a; 3 s 

3n wco 



*> S £ o y 



£i^^> 



.3 o 
0,8 



.0.3 



O u 



OMol 


o M rt 


O <U ' 


42 3 


.3 3 


-5 B o 
£ oU 


►•C-g 


£'C*a 


3 3 


3 s 




cCO <U_« 


coTD 0J_ 




of Boy 

Class 

r to att 

ry Schoo 


of Girl 

th Class 
r to att 
ry Schoo 


1-2° 

3 3-3 

ft«j o 

o rt u 




\r ' ca a 


>i _ 






Numbe 
left tc 
Private 
lege 


6 o 


S^ o 




3,£ <U U 



3 U 



^•0.-3 
3 Vn 

ZB--3 



33 Cornwall 

34 Deseronto 

35 Dresden 

36 Dryden 

37 Dundas 

38 Dunnville 

39 Durham 

40 Eastview. . . . 

41 Englehart . . . 

42 Essex 

43 Ford 

44 Forest 

45 Fort Frances. 

46 Frood Mine. . 

47 Gananoque. . . 

48 Georgetown . . 

49 Goderich 

50 Gore Bay. . . . 

51 Gravenhurst. 

52 Grimsby 

53 Haileybury. . . 

54 Hanover 

55 Harriston 

56 Hawkesbury. 

57 Hespeler 

58 Huntsville. . . 

59 Ingersoll 

60 Iroquois Falls 

61 Kearney 

62 Keewatin .... 

63 Kenora 

64 Kincardine. . . 

65 Kingsville. . . . 

66 Latchford. . . . 

67 Leamington. . 

68 Leaside 

69 Lindsay 

70 Listowel 

71 Little Current 

72 Massey 

73 Matheson 

74 Mattawa. . . . 

75 Meaford 

76 Merritton 

77 Midland 

78 Milton 

79 Mimico 

80 Mitchell 

81 Mount Forest 

82 Napanee 

83 New Liskeard 

84 Newmarket. . 

85 New Toronto. 

86 Niagara 

87 North Bay... 

88 Oakville 

89 Orangeville. . . 

90 Orillia 

91 Oshawa 

92 Palmerston . . . 

93 Paris 



42 

2 

43 

9 

2 

60 

19 

17 

2 

14 

19 

30 

3 

8 

19 

12 

16 

8 

5 

18 
22 
14 
15 

'*4 

43 

6 

21 

4 

21 

4 

28 

7 

5 

9 

9 

1 

17 

22 

11 

13 

21 



27 

10 

7 

5 

31 

17 

9 

10 

12 

11 

8 

14 

*15 
25 
21 

5 
19 
18 
16 
14 
10 

7 
14 
15 
24 

4 

'l2 
30 

15 
21 

'l7 

2 
53 
14 

7 

5 

"l 
13 

46 
15 
29 
11 
11 
21 
23 
16 
3 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



111 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 







>. 










>. 


o 










O 






CO 


X 


u 


H 


c 


S 


^3 




a 


.2 


•a 


cl 


bO 


a 


u 


e 







W 


O 



624 
395 
254 
335 
884 
629 
295 
476 
231 
361 
562 
248 
301 
23 
508 
422 
690 
131 
413 
377 
457 
536 
265 
151 
564 
521 
882 
293 
109 
292 

1,051 
297 
467 
105 
706 
86 

1,169 
401 
173 
93 
138 
25 
476 
377 

1,664 
464 
949 
265 
195 
559 
565 
771 
770 
243 

1,604 
695 
443 

1,457 

2,376 
275 
766 



024 
297 
214 
248 
608 
440 
295 
350 
140 
284 
363 
217 
301 
23 
397 
360 
690 
103 
413 
377 
457 
536 
182 
151 
519 
377 
698 
153 
109 
242 

1,051 

238 

285 

105 

706 

45 

982 

334 

147 

93 

91 

42 

433 

377 

1,311 
353 
849 
188 
195 
559 
530 
771 
404 
243 
878 
598 
354 

1,457 

1,624 
275 
766 



624 


6^4 


624 


179 


139 


395 


333 


395 


87 


66 




254 


175 


129 




'335 


288 


288 


128 


'248 


884 


773 


884 


408 


485 


588 


586 


586 


98 


118 


295 


295 


295 


115 


56 


476 


350 


476 


122 


350 


231 


140 


140 


21 


72 


361 


361 


361 


167 


126 


562 


391 


391 


90 


90 


248 


248 


248 


79 


181 


301 


301 


301 


218 


111 




13 


13 


4 


4 


*508 


508 


508 


242 


358 


422 


269 


269 


95 


95 


690 


642 


678 


321 


321 


66 


131 


90 


29 


73 


413 


413 


413 


95 


135 


377 


377 


377 


83 


337 


562 


457 


457 


87 


87 


536 


536 


536 


167 


343 


141 


265 


265 


124 


124 


151 


151 


151 


44 


73 


564 


519 


519 


217 


217 


521 


432 


458 


134 


307 


745 


698 


882 


248 


405 


293 


293 


293 


49 


50 


109 


109 


109 


29 


60 


292 


242 


242 


82 


96 


1,051 


1,051 


1,051 


225 


138 


297 


297 


297 


71 


38 


467 


371 


371 


193 


111 


22 


105 


93 


42 


44 


706 


706 


706 


338 


220 


86 


45 


66 


18 


17 


1,228 


1,004 


1,004 


266 


421 


401 


334 


334 


166 


119 


173 


147 


113 


48 


72 


93 


93 


93 


18 


18 


138 


138 


138 


23 


23 




54 


54 


24 


11 


'476 


433 


476 


193 


147 


377 


377 


329 


99 


236 


1,664 


1,664 


1,664 


260 


90 


464 


464 


464 


196 


196 


949 


849 


849 


218 


458 


265 


188 


265 


155 


94 


195 


195 


195 


88 


134 


559 


559 


559 


130 


76 


565 


530 


530 


100 


251 


771 


587 


587 


161 


260 


770 


770 


770 


94 


112 




243 


243 


90 


59 


1,604 


1,604 


1,605 


416 


399 


695 


695 


695 


147 


147 


443 


354 


354 


103 


136 


1,457 


1,457 


1,457 


245 


968 


2,376 


1,575 


1,575 


476 


850 




275 


275 


173 


91 


'766 


766 


766 


223 


766 



263 

95 
129 
248 
443 
176 
115 
350 

85 
167 

90 
181 
218 
6 
358 
177 
321 

90 
207 
377 
281 
362 
182 
117 
217 
307 
557 
162 

69 
160 
510 
274 
158 

48 
231 

15 
346 
115 

72 

28 

36 

24 
206 
295 

99 
304 
499 
188 
134 
130 
361 
250 
131 

84 
533 
291 
183 
968 
992 
131 
766 



112 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 

I. TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 



Towns 



















T3 










c _ 




T3 

3 


3 

u 


a 






<u 


<J 


^ 


sg 






w 


^i 


5S 
<2 


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>> 


o 
o 


bO 
< 



33 Cornwall. . . . 

34 Deseronto . . . 

35 Dresden 

36 Dryden 

37 Dundas 

38 Dunnville. . . 

39 Durham 

40 Eastview. . . . 

41 Englehart. . . 

42 Essex 

43 Ford 

44 Forest 

45 Fort Frances. 

46 Frood Mine.. 

47 Gananoque. . 

48 Georgetown . . 

49 Goderich .... 

50 Gore Bay 

51 Gravenhurst. 

52 Grimsby 

53 Haileybury. . 

54 Hanover 

55 Harriston 

56 Hawkesbury. 

57 Hespeler 

58 Huntsville.. . 

59 Ingersoll 

60 Iroquois Falls 

61 Kearney 

62 Keewatin 

63 Kenora , 

64 Kincardine. . . 

65 Kingsville 

66 Latchford 

67 Leamington. . 

68 Leaside , 

69 Lindsay 

70 Listowel 

71 Little Current 

72 Massey , 

73 Matheson 

74 Mattawa 

75 Meaford 

76 Merritton 

77 Midland 

78 Milton 

79 Mimico 

80 Mitchell 

81 Mount Forest 

82 Napanee 

83 New Liskeard 

84 Newmarket . . . 

85 New Toronto. 

86 Niagara 

87 North Bay.... 

88 Oakville 

89 Orangeville. . , 

90 Orillia 

91 Oshawa 

92 Palmerston. . , 

93 Paris 



624 


624 
















395 


395 
















254 


254 
















273 


335 
















884 


884 
















629 


629 
















295 


295 
















402 


476 
















140 


231 










5 






361 


361 
















562 


562 
















248 


248 
















301 


540 
















23 


23 
















508 


508 
















422 


422 
















690 


690 
















131 


131 
















413 


373 
















377 


377 
















457 


562 
















536 


535 
















205 


58 
















151 


151 
















564 


564 
















521 


521 
















882 


882 
















293 


293 
















109 


109 








9 


15 




6 


242 


292 
















1,051 


1,051 
















297 


297 
















467 


467 
















105 


105 
















706 


706 
















86 


86 
















1,004 


1,228 
















401 


359 
















147 


173 
















93 


93 
















138 


138 
















54 


54 
















476 


476 
















345 


345 
















1,664 


1,664 
















464 


















949 


949 
















265 


265 
















195 


195 
















559 


559 
















530 


565 
















771 


500 
















527 


770 










7 






243 


243 
















1,604 


1,604 
















695 


695 
















443 


443 
















1,457 


1,457 
















2,376 


2,376 
















275 


275 
















766 


766 

















1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



113 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 







£ 


















XI 


* 


















■* 


o 


o 






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c 










o 
>> 


.§•1 


c/3 
>> 


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CJ 


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c 




i 


a 
o 




E 

s 


a 

o 

U 



72 
234 



14 



02 



67 



74 



217 



15 



248 

88 

6 



234 



69 

32 



224 



5o 



162 

58 



20 



125 



253 

243 

84 



80 
770 
,132 

36 



189 



114 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
I. TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 



Towns 







Attendance 






"ft 










4J £ u 


3 

a. 








~ o 




"o^ 








"O cj 


&Mi>s 


U U 

is 

Z o 


CO 






si 


rt MX) « 

S13 g rt 


>> 

O 




O 


<U 0) ft 


Perc 

actu 
to p 
gate 



Cu C 



94 Parkhill 


17C 
86S 

1,029 

1,002 
452 
576 
547 
828 
838 
167 
388 
899 
440 
578 
328 
60 
663 
653 
245 
796 
314 

1,254 
338 
206 
469 
237 

1,145 
476 
180 
618 
153 
621 
628 

1,178 
107 
221 
146 
288 

1,224 
716 
892 
145 
818 
469 
451 
353 


452 
538 
497 
230 
311 
269 
441 
416 

63 
189 
440 
239 
307 
159 

38 
323 
320 
102 
409 
146 
652 
173 
103 
216 
124 
563 
224 

87 
314 

80 
327 
306 
608 

64 
112 

68 
141 
663 
383 
437 

74 
410 
258 
238 
168 


64 

4ie 

491 
505 
222 
265 
278 
387 
422 
104 
199 
459 
201 
271 
169 

22 
340 
333 
143 
387 
168 
602 
165 
103 
253 
113 
582 
252 

93 
304 

73 
294 
322 
570 

43 
109 

78 
147 
561 
333 
455 

71 
408 
211 
213 
185 


122 

71 = 

755 

74/ 
372 
424 
381 

675 
671 

12C 
261 
693 
298 
434 
247 

36 
497 
443 
189 
580 
225 
973 
271 
149 
329 
160 
879 
335 
136 
457 
107 
463 
387 
860 

70 
177 
101 
215 
900 
513 
705 
112 
574 
384 
320 
290 


88 

85 

90 

90 

92 

74 

95 

94 

95 

93 

81 

93 

87 

91 

93 

61 

91 

91 

87 

93 

90 

83 

92 

92 

93 

86 

94 

88 

76 

87 

87 

90 

92 

93 

85 

90 

87 

94 

92 

89 

95 

89 

89 

89 

93 

92 




95 Parry Sound 




96 Pembroke 




97*Penetanguishene 




98 Perth 




99 Petrolia 




100 Picton 


4 


101 Port Colborne 




102 Port Hope 




103 Powassan 




104 Prescott 




105 Preston 




106 Rainy River 




107 Renfrew 


3 


108 Ridgetown 




109 Rockland 




110 St Mary's 




Ill Sandwich 




112 Seaforth 


2( 


1 13 Simcoe 




114 Sioux Lookout 




115 Smith's Falls 




116 Southampton 




117 Stayner 




118 Strathroy 




119 Sturgeon Falls 




120 Sudbury 




121 Thessalon 




122 Thornbury 




123 Thorold 




124 Tilbury 




125 Tillsonburg 


33 






127 Trenton 




128 Trout Creek 




129 Uxbridge 




130 Vankleek Hill 




131 Walkerton 




132 Walkerville 




133 Wallaceburg 




134 Waterloo 


77 


135 Webbwood 




136 Weston 




137 Whitby 


20 


138 Wiarton 




139 Wingham 








Totals 


73,677 


37,330 


36,347 


54,542 


89.49 


674 






1 Rural Schools 


220,241 

194,964 

73,677 

24,057 


113,862 
98,155 
37,330 
12,150 


106,379 
96,809 
36,347 
11,907 


142,232 

145,832 

54,542 

17,515 


83.39 
89.96 
89.49 
88.62 




2 Cities 


12,559 


3 Towns 


674 


4 Villages 








5 Grand Totals, 1922 

6 Grand Totals, 1921 


512,939 
501,236 


261,497 
254,802 


251,442 
246,434 


360,121 
345,746 


87.13 
86.23 


13,233 
14,948 


7 Increases 


11,703 


6,695 


5,008 


14,375 


.90 




8 Decreases 


1,715 






9 Percentages 




50.98 


49.01 


70.20 




2.58 



including Protestant Separate School. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



115 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 



















1 l-i •£> 1 <U O 


ov 4) v 1* 


















J^^n ft O a3 


> ■ s -w 




a 














« 11 ») O G 


a^Sg 



















PQ 


ft^l^O 


Wr a % 




C 

M 
U 

'V 

a 

s 


u 

<u 

a 

Z 
0. 


M 
O 
O 

PQ 


M 
O 
O 

PQ 

C 

CN 


M 



PQ 

•a 

l-i 

r»3 


M 



PQ 
Xi 


•a 
c 

>> 

PQ 


z h a « > c 


^ *j c Z 


94 




41 


14 


^y 


4U 


60 


21 


9 


95 




184 


161 


148 


252 


123 




139 


28 


96 


147 


134 


132 


170 


216 


230 




124 


13 


97 




232 


153 


226 


190 


201 




48 


8 


98 




83 


48 


108 


114 


99 




35 




99 




180 


82 


70 


140 


104 




75 


"io 


100 


"38 


82 


58 


104 


106 


118 




60 


29 


101 


104 


157 


131 


122 


175 


139 




108 


34 


102 




168 


133 


167 


195 


175 




87 


34 


103 




38 


29 


26 


32 


42 








104 


"54 


51 


49 


40 


87 


107 




"37 


"n 


105 


87 


133 


84 


235 


157 


203 




81 


32 


106 


48 


70 


46 


71 


78 


99 


"28 


30 


8 


107 


20 


57 


56 


95 


170 


141 




111 


12 


108 


45 


45 


33 


66 


61 


78 




24 


8 


109 




' 21 


6 


6 


10 


17 




10 


6 


110 




118 


87 


92 


171 


195 




68 


32 


111 


'l39 




106 


102 


171 


135 




74 


50 


112 


10 


"28 


30 


33 


89 


35 




12 


1 


113 


65 


123 


102 


209 


156 


141 




83 


51 


114 




64 


56 


83 


53 


40 


"l8 


51 


9 


115 




327 


159 


248 


212 


308 




175 


21 


116 


"si 


27 


58 


70 


69 


63 




32 


11 


117 




31 


26 


35 


51 


63 




15 


8 


118 




82 


78 


117 


88 


104 




60 


23 


119 




68 


36 


47 


36 


50 




53 


10 


120 




246 


204 


212 


271 


212 




148 


59 


121 




122 


58 


63 


125 


108 




73 


17 


122 




26 


15 


28 


30 


81 




15 


3 


123 




157 


103 


112 


130 


116 




75 


31 


124 


"i4 


11 


27 


22 


42 


37 




8 


7 


125 




99 


105 


93 


136 


155 




41 


29 


126 


"74 


140 


123 


103 


81 


107 




103 


28 


127 




229 


210 


194 


301 


244 




129 


65 


128 




27 


22 


8 


18 


25 


7 


11 




129 




57 


19 


51 


54 


40 




28 


io 


130 




42 


6 


33 


33 


32 




15 


8 


131 




49 


58 


65 


46 


70 




24 


14 


132 


i29 


168 


172 


203 


219 


333 




144 


77 


133 




161 


109 


101 


165 


180 




93 


31 


134 


"23 


126 


98 


196 


172 


200 


.... 


99 


37 


135 




22 


32 


20 


30 


28 


13 


10 


7 


136 




159 


105 


161 


181 


212 




106 


38 


137 


"26 


57 


67 


81 


110 


108 




50 


7 


138 




66 


80 


69 


103 


133 




64 


11 


139 




48 


63 


58 


81 


103 




12 


4 


2,474 


13,734 


10,791 


13,920 


15,958 


16,015 


111 


8,266 


2,488 


1 


2,008 


49,233 


29,325 


41,960 


46,560 


47,443 


3,712 


23,628 


10,810 


2 


5,329 


30,734 


24,540 


35,363 


43,824 


40,612 


2,00o 


22,257 


5,939 


3 


2,474 


13,734 


10,791 


13,920 


15,958 


16,015 


111 


8,266 


2,488 


4 


349 


4,801 


3,404 


4,502 


5,180 


5,573 


248 


2,538 


1,027 


5 


10,160 


98,502 


68,060 


95,745 


111,522 


109,643 


6,074 


56,689 


20,264 


6 


8,945 


106,863 


66,554 


93,713 


105,577 


99,501 


5,135 






7 
8 


1,215 


8,361 


1,506 


2,032 


5,945 


10,142 


939 






9 


1.9* 


19. 20 


13.271 


18.671 


21.74 


21.37 


1.18 


11.05 


3.95 



116 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 

I. TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 



Towns 



O <U <L> »> U 

sis! * 



° $ -i >> e 

lis 811 



'M^ 



oi <u (J 



o 



^ &• w. _ n 



° $ J) >> 

P Oo-o 

v v ^. _ 



O 60 c3 

>> 3 o 

O m cfl o 

° b& 

«^ ° 



5 o 

h< h (J 

••-J3 nJ <d 
=s£ £ c-F, 



Otltj 

-c S ° 
a-a § 
o rt 






97 
98 
99 



94 Parkhill 

95 Parry Sound 

96 Pembroke . . 

*Penetanguishene 

Perth 

Petrolia 

100 Picton 

101 Port Colborne 

102 Port Hope 

103 Powassan 

104 Prescott 

105 Preston 

106 Rainy River 

107 Renfrew 

108 Ridgetown 

109 Rockland 

110 St. Mary's 

111 Sandwich 

112 Seaforth 

113 Simcoe 

1 14 Sioux Lookout 

115 Smith's Falls 

116 Southampton 

117 Stayner 

118 Strathroy 

119 Sturgeon Falls 

120 Sudbury 

121 Thessalon 

122 Thornbury 

123 Thorold 

124 Tilbury 

125 Tillsonburg 

126 Timmins 

127 Trenton 

128 Trout Creek 

129 Uxbridge 

130 Vankleek Hiil 

131 Walkerton 

132 Walkerville 

133 Wallaceburg 

134 Waterloo 

135 Webbwood 

136 Weston 

137 Whitby 

138 Wiarton 

139 Wingham 



Totals 



1 Rural schools 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 

4 Villages 



5 Grand Totals, 

6 Grand Totals, 



1922 
1921. 



7 Increases . 

8 Decreases 



9 Percentages 



13 
19 
16 

7 

17 
27 
49 
26 

'l3 
32 

7 
12 
13 

2 
12 
37 

' 30 

11 

20 
9 

10 
15 

3 

68 

21 

5 

29 

6 
27 
37 
55 

1 

7 
14 

8 
52 
31 
25 

6 
33 

6 
17 

7 



2,310 



9,610 

5,903 

2,310 

989 



18.812 



3.67 



23 
25 
12 
14 
15 
16 
14 
23 

14 

22 
11 
19 

13 
2 

23 
12 
14 
21 

'51 

5 

6 

12 

9 

32 

11 

3 

12 

6 

14 

11 

31 

'4 

4 

11 

37 
18 
11 

18 
17 
12 
13 



1,812 



3,035 

4,421 

1,812 

701 



9,969 



1.94 



2 
28 
31 
16 
18 
19 
15 

7 
23 

U 

20 
9 

17 

15 

6 

27 
20 
15 
21 

40 
10 

3 
12 

6 
36 
20 

4 
20 

5 
12 

8 
21 

11 

7 
13 
21 
19 



14 



2,017 



3,656 

4,455 

2,017 

820 



10,948 



2.13 



14 



16 



207 
19 
16 
18 



260 



05 



16 



312 
28 
16 
43 



399 



.07 



70 



177 

556 

70 

24 



827 



16 



"Including Protestant Separate School. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



117 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 





< 

.0 




o 


H 


c 
o 

o 
ft 


H 

a 


O 

CO 

2 

si 

w 


u 



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s 

a 
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T3 


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c 
as 

>> 

b0 
O cu 




a 

3 


o 


3 


<u 


S 
o 


a 




c 


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g 


o 


£ 


3 


U 


6 


w 


U 


a<K 


94 


170 


129 


170 


170 


170 


36 


36 


36 


170 


95 


868 


688 


868 


868 


803 


123 


246 


211 


868 


96 


882 


882 


882 


882 


882 


230 


320 


288 


882 


97 


1,002 


706 


369 


865 


865 


224 


337 


476 


1,002 


98 


452 


369 


452 


369 


369 


99 


69 


213 


213 


99 


576 


396 


576 


576 


576 


104 


165 


165 


576 


100 


506 


506 


506 


506 


468 


118 


271 


190 


506 


101 


436 


436 


828 


436 


436 


180 


148 


166 


436 


102 


838 


838 


838 


838 


838 


370 


183 


286 


838 


103 


167 


129 


167 


167 


167 


74 


42 


74 


167 


104 


388 


234 


319 


283 


283 


107 


69 


107 


107 


105 


899 


595 


899 


812 


812 


360 


185 


285 


899 


106 


322 


262 


313 


276 


276 


113 


88 


109 


248 


107 


539 


462 


578 


539 


539 


141 


164 


311 


406 


108 


328 


328 


328 


328 


328 


78 


139 


205 


328 


109 


60 


60 


60 


60 


60 


27 


17 


27 


60 


110 


663 


663 


663 


663 


663 


195 


104 


366 


663 


111 


653 


514 


653 


653 


408 


135 


69 


408 


653 


112 


245 


187 


245 


215 


215 


87 


125 


125 


125 


113 


796 


796 


796 


796 


796 


141 


454 


648 


796 


114 


312 


296 


296 


314 


314 


56 


70 


78 


176 


115 


1,254 


1,254 


1,254 


1,051 


1,177 


416 


533 


648 


1,254 


116 


338 


324 


338 


338 


338 


68 


68 


71 


338 


117 


206 


175 


206 


175 


175 


63 


89 


114 


175 


118 


469 


309 


469 


422 


469 


104 


157 


192 


469 


119 


237 


169 


237 


237 


237 


50 


133 


133 


237 


120 


1,145 


883 


1,145 


1,145 


1,145 


212 


259 


366 


1,145 


121 


476 


354 


476 


354 


354 


108 


65 


43 


476 


122 


149 


108 


149 


108 


108 


50 


27 


50 


108 


123 


586 


427 


586 


427 


427 


135 


47 


214 


451 


124 


153 


139 


153 


139 


139 


79 


139 


139 


153 


125 


588 


489 




588 


588 


155 


94 


155 


588 


126 


628 


414 


'628 


628 


628 


107 


81 


210 


628 


127 


1,178 


1,080 


1,178 


1,178 


1,080 


380 


323 


932 


1,178 


128 


107 


107 


107 


107 


107 


31 


8 


40 


107 


129 


221 


221 


221 


221 


221 


40 


94 


145 


221 


130 


146 


104 


146 


146 


146 


32 


104 


104 


146 


131 


288 


239 


218 


239 


239 


70 


83 


116 


288 


132 


1,224 


1,047 


1,224 


1,087 


1,224 


333 


645 


743 


1,224 


133 


555 


446 


716 


446 


446 


180 


180 


345 


345 


134 


892 


892 


892 


815 


892 


372 


372 


372 


892 


135 


113 


122 


124 


114 


124 


40 


34 


70 


113 


136 


818 


554 


818 


554 


554 


212 


137 


115 


818 


137 


423 


366 


469 


366 


297 


107 


217 


217 


366 


138 


451 


385 


451 


451 


451 


133 


141 


194 


451 


139 


317 


210 


317 


317 


317 


317 


152 


152 


223 


71,289 


59,789 


66,646 


65,556 


65,685 


20,505 


26,318 


34,754 


66,628 


1 


211,496 


167,434 


171,746 


191,041 


190,140 


62,807 


78,314 


94,505 


184,275 


2 


183,030 


169,622 


182,181 


177,809 


167,723 


50,816 


69,236 


78,105 


170,062 


3 


71,289 


59,789 


66,646 


65,556 


65,685 


20,505 


26,318 


34,754 


66,628 


4 


23,591 


19,672 


19,530 


21,030 


21,442 


7,601 


9,896 


12,553 


21,439 


5 


489,406 


416,517 


440,103 


455,436 


444,990 


141,729 


183,764 


219,917 


442,404 


6 


477,123 


402,922 


425,945 


440,910 


438,849 


132,480 


176,565 


219,462 


429,942 


7 
8 


12,283 


13,595 


14,158 


14,526 


6,141 


9,249 


7,199 


455 


12,462 


9 


95.41 


81.20 


85.80 


88.79 


86.75 


27.63 


35.821 


42.87 


86.25 



118 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 



I- 


TABLE A- 


-ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 


• 


>> 




3 




T3 
3 






Towns 


3 




3 

u 


C 


aJ 3 
o.2 












"3 


a 

.3 


S3 


rt 






3 




to 

>. 


O 

o 
M 


5n 

.-h a; 

«2 


bfl 

< 


a 

o 




97 

98 



94 Parkhill 

95 Parry Sound 

96 Pembroke 

*Penetanguishene 
Perth 

99 Petrolia 

100 Picton 

101 Port Colborne.... 

102 Port Hope 

103 Powassan 

104 Prescott 

105 Preston 

106 Rainy River 

107 Renfrew 

108 Ridgetown 

109 Rockland 

110 St. Mary's 

111 Sandwich 

112 Seaforth 

113 Simcoe 

114 Sioux Lookout. . . 

115 Smith's Falls 

116 Southampton. . . . 

117 Stayner 

118 Strathroy 

119 Sturgeon Falls. . . 

120 Sudbury 

121 Thessalon 

122 Thornbury 

123 Thorold 

124 Tilbury 

125 Tillsonburg 

126 Timmins 

127 Trenton 

128 Trout Creek 

129 Uxbridge 

130 VankleekHill 

131 Walkerton 

132 Walkerville 

133 Wallaceburg 

134 Waterloo 

135 Webbwood 

136 Weston 

137 Whitby 

138 Wiarton 

139 Wingham 



Totah 



1 Rural Schools. 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 

4 Villages 



5 Grand Totals, 1922, 

6 Grand Totals, 1921 



7 Increases. 

8 Decreases. 



9 Percentages. 



170 
803 
882 

1,002 
452 
576 
506 
436 
838 
167 
388 
812 
117 
406 
328 
60 
663 
653 
245 
796 
296 

1,254 
338 
206 
433 
237 

1,145 
476 
108 
492 
153 
588 
628 

1,178 
107 
221 
146 
239 

1,224 
446 
892 
124 
818 
366 
451 
317 



69,265 



191,725 

182,021 

69,265 

21,715 



464,726 
447,171 



17,555 



90 . 60 



170 
868 

1,029 

1,002 
452 
576 
506 
828 
838 
167 
388 
899 
324 
539 
328 
60 
663 
653 
245 
796 
312 

1,254 
338 
206 
469 
237 

1,145 
476 
149 
553 
153 
588 
628 

1,178 
107 
221 
146 
288 

1,224 
716 
892 
124 
818 
469 
451 
317 



71,253 



211,700 

185,150 

71,253 

22,345 



490,448 
476,449 



13,999 



95.61 



36 



104 



14 



28 



15 



191 



1,170 

1,822 
191 
207 



3,390 
4,182 



792 



66 



14 



IS 



12 



74 



2,162 

1,963 

74 

154 



4,353 
5.094 



741 



.85 



13 



13 



92 



2,433 

1,127 

92 

130 



3,782 
3,008 



774 



7-1 



01 



638 

674 

61 

66 



1,439 
1,069 



370 



.28 



"•"Including Protestant Separate School. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



119 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Concluded) 









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JA 




<U 
































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a 

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3 


3 
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03 

3 
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o 


fem 


fo« 


W 


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s 


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94 

95 




























96 






















" iii 




344 


97 




















"68 








98 




























99 




























100 




















*224 


'28C 




i92 


101 




























102 




























103 




























104 




















'l07 








105 




























106 
















'.'.'. "28 




"i77 








107 




















185 








108 




























109 




















"27 


"33 






110 




















180 








111 




























112 




























113 




























114 




18 








9 




'.'.'. "12 












115 




























116 




















"82 


"93 




i70 


117 




























118 




















"36 








119 






















"68 






120 




























121 




























122 




























123 




























124 




























125 




























126 




























127 




















"65 






*29 


128 
















2 




107 








129 




























130 






















"42 






131 




























132 




















"83 


'875 




307 


133 




















289 








134 




















205 








135 




'5 








*6 




13 












136 




















"39 








137 




















217 








138 




















236 








139 




























41 




43 




85 




4,523 


7,308 


3,037 


1 


1,088 


6 


897 


3 


,638 1,572 


224 


54,110 


16,568 


8,491 


2 


4C 




328 




776 


1,954 


9,947 


97,736 


63,126 


3 


41 




43 




85 




4,523 


7,308 


3,037 


4 


60 


3 


80 




297 106 


"38 


3,238 


1,451 


610 


5 


1,229 


9 


1,348 


3 


,935 2,539 


2,216 


71,818 


123,063 


75,264 


6 


1,018 


21 


1,004 


4 


,158 2,156 


2,143 


63,285 


120,607 


73,237 


7 


211 




344 




383 


73 


8,533 


2,456 


2,027 


8 




"l2 






223 










9 




24 








26 




.77 .49 


.43 


14.0 


23.99 


14 


.67 



120 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 





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^£ 

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1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



121 



en 
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thco 
CO LO 

co co 


O tH 
CM <M_ 


f-~ LO 

J>Tvo" 


CO OO 
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co"*co" 


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t-~ O0 


ON ON 

r* vo 
CO'* 


On CM 

vO On 


co vO 










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00 
CO 
CO 

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co vo 

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co"co" 


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00 
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u 

vo 


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oa 

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co"co" 


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u 

LO 


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CO vo 
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LO CO 


CO 




tn tn 

mo 


tn tn 

cqO 


tn tn 

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en" en 

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en tn 

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en en 

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en tn 

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tn en 

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122 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 





3 




C 








-m 




C 




o 




U 




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a 


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hJ 




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s 


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CO 

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on cm 
CO o 

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cm" cm" 


CM CM 1 

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r-~ vo 


CM O 
"* to 

^o_ 


ON-H 
CM 00 
CM O 


CM ■* 

r- oo 

CO CM 


co ■^ 
CM O 
CM CO 


ON 

'-lO 


t^ to 

VO co 
CM ^ 


lO CO 

tooo 


ON -H 

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2 

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ON —1 






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rjn to 


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u 






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cm 




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co" * 

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jo • 

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Si 

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1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



123 





o <o 


O CM 


00 H 


cm ro 


NO CM 


NO ^H 


00 -^ 


ror— 


HTi* 


rt<0 


^ "«f 


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T-H NO 


r— 




rt 1 ON 


r— 00 


CO CO 


OO lO 


LO LO 


■^ CO 


CN CO 


O ON 


O CN 


T-H 1— 1 


LO CM 


Or- 


** o 




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o 


no""nO~ 


1°l 
■^"co" 


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no'co" 


00 00_ 

oT oo" 


T-H LO 

cn"cm~ 


00 CM 


r^ On 
1>TnO~ 


ON_CO_ 

tjTlo" 


cn"co" 


o_o_ 
po"^t 


tHH H 


es LO 


LO_ON 

cm"o" 

x* x* 


ro 
00 


H 


























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CN 


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i-H 


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oo 






























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I— r^i 


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ro CM 


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00 CN 


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>> 






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CNN 








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124 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 





-o 




a 




•a 




3 








u 




G 




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w 


3 


cu 

m 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



125 





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126 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 

III. TABLE C— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 





Teachers 


Salaries 


Rural Schools 




73 


73 

S 


a 

.sra 

Kg 


u 

n 
73 

en 

Mg 


M a; 
< o 


73 


1 Brant 


6Z 

172 

165 

91 

80 

123 

134 

148 

80 

226 

80 

64 

64 

192 

199 

147 

175 

127 

230 

120 

92 

206 

106 

215 

142 

127 

91 

117 

101 

97 

71 

168 

233 

83 

114 

103 

122 

153 

138 

481 

97 

24 

52 

105 

62 

137 

63 

107 

123 

74 


6 

21 

12 

9 

11 

10 

19 

10 

2 

24 

11 

9 

6 

22 

30 

10 

15 

9 

18 

5 

16 

23 

11 

28 

16 

17 

9 

19 

16 

6 

9 

7 

28 

4 

8 

24 

17 

14 

12 

70 

9 

4 

14 

15 

6 

19 

12 

22 

29 

12 


/4 

151 
153 

82 

69 

113 

115 

138 

78 

202 

69 

55 

58 

170 

169 

137 

160 

118 

212 

115 

76 

183 

95 

. 187 

126 

110 

82 

98 

85 

91 

62 

161 

205 

79 

106 

79 

105 

139 

126 

411 

88 

20 

38 

90 

56 

118 

51 

85 

94 

62 


1,400 
1,700 
1,200 
1,300 
1,400 
1,800 
950 
1,000 
1,300 
1,750 
1,200 
1,300 
1,850 
1,650 
1,400 
1,200 
1,100 
1,600 
1,000 
1,500 
1,600 
1,300 
1,200 
1,350 
1,500 
2,000 
1,700 
1,400 
1,300 
1,000 
1,200 
1,500 
1,200 
1,300 
1,500 
2,350 
1,800 
1,800 
2,600 
1,350 
1,500 
1,500 
1,200 
1,500 
2,000 
1,800 
1,900 
2,200 
1,900 


1,200 
2,400 
1,200 
1,200 
1,300 
1,500 
1,300 
1,200 
1,200 
1,500 
1,100 
1,500 
1,400 
1,435 
1,500 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,250 
1,300 
1,250 
1,500 
1,250 
1,200 
1,320 
1,300 
1,250 
1,400 
1,400 
1,300 
1,900 
1,800 
1,200 
1,250 
1,300 
1,400 
1,300 
1,650 
2,000 
1,400 
1,100 
1,100 
1,300 
1,000 
1,400 
1,500 
1,800 
2,100 
1,400 


¥1,128 

1,102 
1,288 
1,008 
1,045 
1,095 
1,128 

835 
1,000 
1,066 
1,134 

922 
1,058 
1,023 
1,170 
1,135 
1,043 

961 
1,036 

830 
1,175 
1,079 
1,091 
1,053 
1,131 
1,182 
1,300 
1,198 
1,031 
1,050 

983 
1,039 
1,089 
1,075 
1,112 
1,162 
1,300 
1,157 
1,333 
1,494 
1,022 
1,175 
1,034 

753 
1,042 
1,154 
1,093 
1,145 
1,366 
1,129 


$1,060 
999 


2 Bruce 


3 Carleton 


1,017 
1 004 


4 Dufferin 


5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 


946 
1,025 
1,060 

843 






9 Glengarry 


954 


10 Grey 


982 


11 Haldimand 


1,023 


12 Haliburton 


825 


13 Halton 


1,034 


14 Hastings 

15 Huron 


955 
1,031 


16 Kent 


1.063 


17 Lambton 


1,018 




929 


19 Leeds and Grenville 


927 


20 Lennox and Addington 


894 




1,021 


22 Middlesex 


1,015 


23 Norfolk 


978 


24 Northumberland and Durham 

25 Ontario 


986 
985 


26 Oxford 


1,047 


27 Peel 


1,023 


28 Perth 


1,033 


29 Peterborough 


936 




902 


3 1 Prince Edward 


983 


32 Renfrew 


965 


33 Simcoe 


1,006 




968 




966 


36 Waterloo 


1,035 


37 Welland 


1,058 


38 Wellington 


1,007 


39 Wentworth 


1,064 


40 York 


1,090 


41 Algoma 


901 


42 Kenora 


939 


43 Manitoulin 


844 


44 Muskoka 


754 


45 Nipissing 


870 


46 Parry Sound 


880 


47 Rainy River 


904 


48 Sudbury 


958 


49 Timiskaming 


1,048 


50 Thunder Bay 


969 






1 Totals Rural Schools 


6,503 
4,310 

1,575 
526 


757 

611 

161 

92 


5,746 

3,699 

1,414 

434 


2,600 
3,500 
3,000 
2,000 


2,100 
3,425 
2,300 
1,500 


1,144 
2,269 
1,767 
1,393 


987 


2 Totals, Cities 


1,363 


3 Totals Towns 


1,047 


4 Totals, Villages 


986 






5 Grand Totals 1922 


12,914 
12,556 


1,621 
1,528 


11,293 
11,028 


3,500 
3,500 


3,425 
3,225 


1,644 
1,628 


1,117 


6 Grand Totals, 1921- 


1,079 








358 


93 


265 




200 


16 


38 


8 Decreases 








9 Percentages 




12.55 


87.44 











1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



127 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 
CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC. 



Salaries (Continued) 



a! cc! 

Si? 8 



>;£ 


>> „ 




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$ 1,000 


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2 


1,350 


1,110 


1,110 


1,016 


900 


881 








3 


1,200 


800 


1,305 


1,027 




900 


1,008 


1,200 




4 




1,050 


1,022 


1,003 


900 










5 




1,000 


1,045 


942 












6 


i,i66 


1,080 


1,094 


1,020 












7 


1,300 


1,028 


1,152 


1,075 


1,666 


962 


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987 


863 


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982 




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11 




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1,134 


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12 




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878 


620 


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1,070 


1,034 












14 


1,450 


l,i44 


1,078 


1,005 


910 


877 








15 


1,175 


1,067 


1,170 


1,030 












16 


1,300 


1,100 


1,131 


1,061 


1,666 


1,113 








17 




1,075 


1,054 


1,017 


900 


800 








18 




1,025 


1,030 


987 


875 


823 








19 


1,500 


1,020 


1,008 


956 


886 


831 








20 




967 


1,000 


968 


775 


805 








21 


1,500 


1,033 


1,167 


1,020 












22 
23 


1,600 


1,095 
1,025 


1,051 
1,091 


1,012 
992 




"892 








24 


1,200 


1,020 


1,057 


995 


800 


869 








25 


1,000 


1,000 


1,146 


993 


1,200 


863 








26 


1,500 


1,133 


1,163 


1,039 












27 


1,400 


1,050 


1,288 


1,021 












28 


1,650 


1,050 


1,180 


1,031 


1,050 










29 




1,070 


1,100 


987 


875 


843 








30 
31 


1,666 


1,350 
1,150 


1,133 
983 


994 
999 


1,000 


815 
856 








32 




1,350 


1,071 


1,016 


850 


889 








33 
34 


1,000 


1,108 
1,100 


1,104 
1,075 


1,014 
973 


1,033 


944 

812 








35 




1,075 


1,128 


994 


1,666 


832 








36 


1,050 


1,083 


1,178 


1,032 












37 




1,100 


1,300 


1,058 




1,666 


1,025 






38 
39 


1,500 


1,050 
1,108 


1,200 
1,333 


1,010 
1,060 


1,000 


936 


V,000 






40 
41 

42 


1,783 


1,100 
800 


1,468 
1,043 


1,092 
961 
981 


1,250 


900 

879 
942 


1,033 




1,400 


43 


1,400 




1,006 


1,033 


956 


810 








44 






966 


1,000 


575 


741 








45 






890 


968 


800 


850 








46 




1,050 


1,296 


956 


911 


843 








47 


1,200 


1,350 


1,133 


1,045 


950 


898 








48 


1,500 


1,525 


1,258 


1,115 


936 


848 








49 


2,200 


1,550 


1,392 


1,094 


1,080 


922 








50 


1,000 


1,090 


1,250 


1,125 


1,079 


906 








1 


1,391 


1,092 


1,178 


1,020 


911 


851 


1,050 


1,200 


1,400 


2 


2,434 


1,328 


2,005 


1,384 




1,189 


1,186 


1,266 


2,193 


3 


2,052 


1,040 


1,715 


1,049 




990 


1,048 


973 


2,033 


4 


1,450 


1,061 


1,388 


992 




718 


1,000 






5 


2,290 


1,226 


1,434 


1,137 


911 


855 


1,149 


1,251 


2,172 


6 


2,236 


1,180 


1,436 


1,101 


928 


845 


1,156 


1,229 


2,132 


7 


54 


46 




36 




10 




22 


40 


8 






2 




17 




7 



























128 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



III. 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE C— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 



Rural Schools 



Salaries (Continued) 



03^5 <U 

2 jq c 

01 3 (U 

Sag 



"I 



> 2 



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1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 

11 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton.. 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland and Durham. 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell 

31 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

York 

Algoma 



725 



800 



800 



900 
900 



40 

41 

42 Kenora, 

43 

44 

45 



Manitoulin . . 
Muskoka. . . . 
Nipissing. . . . 

46 Parry Sound. 

47 Rainy River. 

48 Sudbury 

49 Timiskaming. 

50 Thunder Bay, 



1 Totals, Rural Schools. 

2 Totals, Cities 

3 Totals, Towns , 

4 Totals, Villages , 



5 Grand Totals, 1922, 

6 Grand Totals, 1921 



7 Increases. 

8 Decreases. 



9 Percentages, 



1,200 



1,200 
1,502 
1,500 



1,498 
1,440 



58 



950 
1,600 



658 



844 
800 



857 



857 
856 



925 



659 
900 

725 



733 
860 



750 
800 
800 



900 
600 



750 
701 



762 



650 
1,150 



1,000 



1,000 
712 

887 
750 
573 
710 
783 
769 
775 
850 
833 



738 
1,000 

850 



742 
749 



1C 


77 


7 


160 


17 


158 


1 


90 




78 


ic 


114 


23 


113 


80 


50 


31 


62 


19 


200 


6 


76 


26 


34 


2 


63 


77 


112 


7 


192 


3 


139 


9 


168 


24 


85 


54 


172 


40 


72 


12 


86 


2 


200 


20 


99 


16 


199 


8 


130 


11 


117 


3 


84 


3 


111 


20 


74 


28 


64 


8 


63 


74 


96 


20 


202 


20 


77 


13 


97 


9 


99 


7 


115 


9 


139 


4 


126 


69 


454 


35 


42 


13 


6 


39 


13 


50 


17 


32 


27 


76 


54 


22 


15 


60 


40 


33 


83 


31 


26 



1,199 

1,472 

354 

92 



3,117 
3,146 



29 



24.13 



5,170 

3,378 

1,401 

480 



10,429 
9,834 



595 



80.75 



1 
5 
7 
5 
8 
2 
4 
3 
7 
6 
2 
6 
4 

10 
6 
5 
2 
2 
1 
2 

10 
2 
2 
4 
4 
9 

10 

26 
1 



214 

747 

119 

33 



1,113 
1,165 



52 



8.61 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



129 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC. (Continued) 





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0) 

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a> 

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113 


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38 




9 


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40 


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447 


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28 


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39 










21 


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26 


15 


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42 


37 










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13 


14 


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48 




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35 


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84 


17 


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22 


21 


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6 


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236 


5,009 


732 


321 


14 


1 


1 


1 


188 


2 


130 


805 


2,966 


9 




150 


244 


59 


75 


2 


3 


5 


119 


1,378 


22 




37 


13 


3 


2 


1 


4 


2 


25 


485 


14 




2 










5 


141 


1,185 


9,838 


777 


321 


203 


258 


63 


78 


191 


6 


138 


1,201 


9,227 


780 


330 


253 


196 


65 


99 


405 


7 


3 




611 








62 








8 




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"9 


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2 


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214 


9 


1.09 


9.17 


76.18 


6.01 


2.48 


1.57 


2-.0 


.49 


.60 


1.48 



5 D.E. 



130 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
III. TABLE C— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 





Number of 
teachers who 
at end of 
year had 
taught less 
than one 
year 


One year, 
but less than 
two years 


2 years, but 
less than 3 
years 


3 years, but 
less than 4 
years 


4 years, but 
less than 5 
years 


5 years, but 
less than 6 
years 


1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities 


Male 
165 

12 
6 

3 


Female 
1,027 

88 
51 

24 


M. 

87 

11 

6 

1 


F. 
943 

128 
103 

37 


M. 

110 
46 
12 
10 


F. 

748 

149 

108 

39 


M. 

56 

37 

8 

6 


F. 
630 
232 
139 
51 


M. 

32 

28 

1 

3 


F. 
596 
199 
127 
46 


M. 

38 
25 
10 

7 


F. 

414 

194 


3 Towns 


116 


4 Villages 


39 






5 Grand Totals, 1922. . 


186 


1,190 


105 


1,211 


178 


1,044 


107 


1,052 


64 


968 


80 


763 


6 Percentages, Male . . . 

7 Percentages, Female. 


11.47 


10 '. 53 


6.47 


10'72 


10.98 


9 '24 


6.60 


9^31 


3.94 


8*57 


4.93 


6*75 





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Male 


Female 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


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F. 


1 Rural Schools 


7 


36 


10 


2? 


5 


27 


8 


23 


3 


23 


3 


19 


2 Cities 


17 

3 
2 


99 

22 
6 


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97 

18 

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79 

27 

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70 
24 

5 


10 

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61 

24 

4 


6 

3 
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74 


3 Towns 


11 


4 Villages 


8 






5 Grand Totals, 1922. . 


29 


163 


24 


149 


29 


139 


21 


122 


15 


112 


13 


112 


6 Percentages, Male . . . 


1.78 




1.48 




1.78 




1.2S 




.92 




.80 




7 Percentages, Female. 




1.44 




1.31 




1.23 




1.08 




.99 




.99 





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Male 


Female 


M. 




F. 


M. F. 


M. 




F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


1 Rural Schools 


6 


7 


5 




4 


11 


11 


6 




11 


2 


5 


5 


4 


2 Cities 


10 
4 
2 


31 

7 
3 


11 

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48 
8 


12 
1 


41 
6 


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31 

7 
1 


6 

5 
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35 
11 

2 


7 
2 
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30 


3 Towns .... 


11 


4 Villages ... . 


1 






5 Grand Totals, 1922. . 


22 


48 


24 


60 


24 


58 


16 


50 


15 


53 


15 


46 


6 Percentages, Male. . . 


1.35 




1.48 






1.48 




.98 






.92 




.92 




7 Percentages, Female. 




.42 






.53 




.51 






.44 




.46 


... .40 



Average experience: Male teachers, 12. 2 years; female teachers, 8. 5 years; all teachers, 8.' 
years. Average experience, rural teachers, 5.2 years; urban teachers, 12.7 years. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



131 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC. (Concluded) 





4J *>. 




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M. 


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M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


1 


25 


292 


20 


206 


20 


170 


9 


109 


8 


95 


7 


65 


8 


69 


5 


48 


2 


33 


184 


29 


202 


23 


212 


27 


154 


22 


163 


21 


131 


12 


144 


13 


115 


3 


4 


103 


7 


72 


4 


61 


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39 


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36 


2 


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41 


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23 


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24 


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15 


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8 


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69 


602 


61 


504 


51 


455 


44 


336 


39 


312 


37 


238 


26 


259 


18 


212 


6 


4.25 




3.76 




3.14 




2.71 




2.40 




2.28 




1.60 




1.11 




7 




5.33 




4.46 




4.02 




2.97 




2.76 




2.10 




2.29 




1.87 



20 years, but 
less than 21 
years 


21 years, but 
less than 22 
years 


22 years, but 
less than 23 
years 


23 years, but 
less than 24 
years 


24 years, but 
less than 25 
years 


25 years, but 
less than 26 
years 


26 years, but 
less than 27 
years 


27 years, but 
less than 28 
years 


M. 

1 9 

2 4 

3 1 
4 


F. 

24 

84 

9 

5 


M. 
6 

16 
4 


F. 

22 

82 

14 

4 


M. 

6 

19 

6 


F. 
20 
65 
14 

4 


M. 

7 

11 
8 


F. 

13 
54 
11 

5 


M. 

6 

10 

6 

2 


F. 

12 
59 
16 

7 


M. 

8 
9 
6 
1 


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13 
58 
17 

2 


M. 

7 

12 

2 

2 


F. 

5 
36 
13 

6 


M. 

6 

7 
3 
2 


F. 

9 
31 

7 
2 


5 14 


122 


26 


122 


31 


103 


26 


83 


24 


94 


24 


90 


23 


60 


18 


49 


6 .86 

7 


l'08 


1.60 


l'08 


1.91 


.91 


1.60 


!73 


1.48 


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1.48 


^79 


1.41 


^53 


1.11 


^43 



34 years, but 
less than 35 
years 


35 years, but 
less than 36 
years 


36 years, but 
less than 37 
years 


37 years, but 
less than 38 
years 


38 years, but 
less than 39 
years 


39 years, but 
less than 40 
years 


CO 

cd o> 

^ o 

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CO 

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H 


M. 

1 7 

2 7 

3 3 

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F. 

3 

28 
7 
1 


M. 

' i 
1 


F. 

3 

33 

3 

3 


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4 
6 
2 
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2 

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8 
6 

5 
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8 


M. 
4 
6 
1 


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3 

32 

2 


M. 
11 
17 

5 

7 


F. 

3 
50 

18 

5 


M. 

757 

611 

161 

92 


F. 

5,746 

3,699 

1,414 

434 


5 18 


36 


15 


39 


5 


42 


13 


46 


21 


35 


11 


38 


40 


76 


1,621 


11,293 


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7 ... 


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'aq 


1.29 


'30 


.67 


'.33 


2.46 


:<57 







132 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
IV. TABLE D— SCHOOL HOUSES, MEDICAL 



Rural Schools 



School Houses 



^J 


<u 


o 


a 


u 


o 

■M 


W 


m 


48 


2 


119 


14 


41 


14 


62 


6 


7 


9 


85 




46 


3 


13 


20 


4 




127 


52 


63 




4 


2 


31 


13 


61 


13 


121 


8 


105 




95 


1 


21 


12 


62 


73 


23 


7 


37 


7 


146 




69 


5 


141 


11 


82 


1 


92 


4 


56 


3 


95 


4 


48 


3 


10 




37 


13 


52 


1 


149 


2 


4 




75 


4 


60 


17 


51 


5 


99 


36 


57 


13 



b£ 

o 

-J 



Free Text 
Books 



43 — 
o o 

CD O 
Oc/3 



o 5 



s ° 

£"8 



Medical and Dental 



o a 

O en 



Cfl£ 



cu 

a 

a 3 a> 
oco o 

« <U ,„ 



f — 



O) C 3 >- 



O m a) to 



S-H.S2 

O 3-£ > 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 

11 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville. 

20 Lennox and Adding- 

ton 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland and 

Durham 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell . 

31 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 



61 

166 

122 

92 

75 

106 

110 

143 

75 

220 

74 

61 

58 

176 

183 

135 

169 

122 

221 

111 
67 

184 
99 

203 

121 

108 

76 

112 

97 

82 

71 

156 

212 

75 

103 

82 

81 

143 

79 



10 
31 

57 
23 
58 
21 
54 
106 
68 
39 

9 
51 

8 
99 
52 
29 
71 
80 
84 

77 
22 
38 
18 

47 
37 
11 
12 
13 
38 
61 
21 
89 
45 
69 
24 
5 
20 
3 
8 



13 



71 



14 



14 
12 

5 

26 
1 



12 

48 
14 



30 
16 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



133 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND DENTAL INSPECTION, LIBRARIES, ETC. 



Inspection 








O uj 






U "« 






<L> 






J3 C 






£.2 




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cn 


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force 






o a) 




£Q.S 





Religious Exercises 



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o s .ti •£ 

Z £.22 s.s 



Rural School Libraries 



o 
o 

-G 

o 

U !_ 

o.tJ 

z £ 



cn 

^ s 



10 



56 


22 


6! 


163 


107 


166 


112 


32 


122 


86 


17 


91 


75 




75 


103 


89 


105 


104 


75 


110 


124 


55 


143 


35 


4 


75 


212 


73 


214 


71 


10 


73 


52 


17 


55 


58 


21 


58 


144 


34 


176 


183 


54 


183 


130 


69 


142 


159 


69 


154 


106 


28 


119 


194 


31 


219 


104 


24 


111 


65 


30 


65 


180 


106 


183 


99 


25 


99 


192 


51 


200 


114 


15 


121 


106 


7 


108 


63 


18 


73 


108 


65 


110 


79 


20 


94 


46 


14 


81 


71 


5 


71 


106 


25 


143 


184 


49 


204 


73 


18 


73 


89 


34 


99 


79 


25 


82 


76 


22 


76 


142 


50 


143 


76 


32 


78 



11 

15 
56 
13 

20 
2X 
40 
8 
50 

'66 
40 

"22 

31 

1 

29 

23 

43 

26 

22 

31 

2 
34 

4 
48 
87 

2 
37 

1 
10 
28 
22 



61 

165 

117 

90 

70 

104 

106 

143 

75 

220 

74 

57 

58 

176 

183 

137 

168 

122 

214 

110 
65 

184 
99 

201 

118 

106 
74 

112 
95 
81 
71 

153 

209 
75 

103 
82 
77 

138 
78 



17,761 
40,627 
21,427 
10,335 
20,927 
34,026 
20,497 
20,034 
12,914 
33,901 
16,374 
7,379 
12,542 
45,342 
36,267 
30,232 
38,762 
18,568 
39,079 

10,964 

22,066 

142,020 

22,584 

32,543 
23,297 

25,228 
12,372 
21,922 
17,942 
14,812 
11,467 
28,170 
34,012 
12,585 
25,832 
19,454 
15,226 
24,403 
34,263 



134 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
IV. TABLE D— SCHOOL HOUSES, MEDICAL 





School Houses 


Free Text 
Books 


Medical and Dental 


Rural Schools 


*o 

O 

"o 

B 
53 


.2 
'u 


0) 

c 
o 

4-> 

co 


D 
U 
O 

C 

O 
O 


0) 

g 
u 


bfl 

O 


<y 
55 J3 


s ° 

a +j 

CO X 
0) 

"St 

^"6 


No. of Schools where 
Medical Inspection is 
in force 


No. of Schools where 
Nurse Inspection 
with Medical Super- 
vision is in force 


No. of Schools where 
Nurse Inspection only 
(without Medical Sup- 
ervision) is in force 


40 York 

41 Algoma 


174 
89 
24 
50 

102 
61 

122 
58 
81 

102 
74 


139 
10 

1 
3 

26 
5 

14 
7 
5 
7 
9 


1 
1 

"2 

2 

'3 
1 


3 

3 

2 

11 

'5 
1 


31 
70 
16 
32 
67 
44 
88 
32 
73 
89 
49 


"5 

5 

2 

7 

12 

12 

17 

3 

6 

16 

126 


24 
2 
1 

1 

2 

10 
1 
6 

5 


21 
2 
1 

10 

6 
24 


8 
'3 

'3 
2 
8 
3 
1 
4 

26 


3 

1 

*6 

'2 
2 
1 
1 

26 


18 
1 


42 Kenora 

43 Manitoulin 

44 Muskoka 

45 Nipissing 


3 


46 Parry Sound 

47 Rainy River 

48 Sudbury 


*3 


49 Timiskaming 

50 Thunder Bay 


15 


Totals 

1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities 


5,568 
315 
253 
153 


2,724 
288 
195 
135 


388 
18 
13 

7 


131 

4 

3 


2,199 

9 

41 

8 


72 

200 

8 


173 

206 

15 

6 


379 

161 

36 

14 


90 
161 

23 
3 


259 
132 


3 Towns 


87 


4 Villages 


17 






5 Grand Totals, 1922. . 

6 Grand Totals, 1921. . 


6,289 
6,280 


3,342 
3,302 


426 
441 


138 
136 


2,257 
2,271 


126 
130 


280 
260 


400 

348 


590 

325 


277 
206 


495 
389 


7 Increases 


9 


40 


15 


2 


14 


'4 


20 


52 


165 


71 


6 


8 Decreases 








9 Percentages 




53.14 


6.77 


2.19 


35.88 


2.00 


4.45 


6.36 


9.38 


4.40 


7.87 







1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



135 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND DENTAL INSPECTION, LIBRARIES, ETC. (Concluded) 



Inspection 


Religious Exercises 


Rural School Libraries 


cn 

0) 
cn 
u 

a 
6 e 


No. of Schools where 
Dental Inspection is 
in force 


No. of Schools where 
Bible or selections 
therefrom used 


No. of Schools where 
passages are mem- 
orized 


No. of Schools opened 
and closed with 
prayer 


No, of Schools where 
religious instruction 
is imparted as per- 
mitted by the regu- 
lations 


cn 

15 

O 

u 

j_ 03 
3 *-« 

fa 

"o* 

.X! 

o.ti 


cn 

o a 

. 3 

z > 


O CD 

*»** — . 


40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 


6 

11 


4 

1 

"l 

"i 

i 


170 
82 
20 
47 
90 
31 

113 
58 
35 
88 
70 


69 
11 

6 
15 
19 

8 
31 
16 

2 
16 
25 


156 
83 
24 
48 

102 
59 

121 
58 
79 
98 
71 


44 
8 

10 
16 
28 
18 
23 
13 
2 
29 
8 


166 
70 
19 
39 

100 
50 

117 
42 
49 
77 
54 


43,027 
8,615 
2,567 
4,570 

12,357 
3,658 

15,516 
5,540 
7,021 

10,811 
5,248 


16,991 
3,619 
1,318 
2,061 
4,989 
1,716 
6,591 
2,703 
3,068 
4,944 
1,930 


1 62 

2 48 

3 46 

4 16 


69 
207 

32 
8 


5,023 
306 
114 

138 


1,660 

277 
97 
44 


5,454 
306 
248 
150 


1,121 

113 

31 

21 


5,354 


1,147,086 


401,562 


5 172 

6 187 


316 
399 


5,581 
5,440 


2,078 
1,610 


6,158 
6,010 


1,286 
459 








7 

8 15 


'83 


141 


468 


148 


827 








9 2 


73 


5.02 


88.75 


33.04 


97.91 


20.44 









136 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
V. TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



Rural Schools 



Receipts 



bit) rt 

JO 



a >> 

C C 3 
3 03 O 



£o: 



—i a 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 

11 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

1 7 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland and Durham 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell 

31 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma 

42 Kenora 

43 Manitoulin 

44 Muskoka 

45 Nipissing 

46 Parry Sound 

47 Rainy River 

48 Sudbury 

49 Timiskaming 

50 Thunder Bay 

Totals 



% 
22,120 12 

55.093 92 
48,866 02 
27,935 59 
30,641 22 
33,271 41 
32,962 14 
63,035 98 
22,974 14 
64,334 21 
23,244 88 
32,999 06 
15,360 48 
83,423 14 
50,993 16 
42,842 02 
46,130 04 
43,801 34 
83,259 64 
36,930 41 
27,718 76 
54,688 40 
35,038 86 
65,540 01 
39,577 25 
35,420 31 
25,893 43 
31,021 09 
41,414 03 
19,929 83 
20,774 64 
75,761 75 

66.094 32 
29,751 25 
36,398 84 
28,698 87 
40,224 01 
39,596 89 
41,858 45 

154,080 17 
49,778 93 
13,899 75 
47,169 19 
48,442 18 
30,625 15 
78,238 43 
32,941 16 
54,243 23 
93,274 69 
50,061 16 



2,268,373 95 



$ c. 

872 78 

2,722 96 

1.611 71 



796 00 
1,382 71 
1,347 83 
1,413 91 

869 87 
2,802 73 
1,276 05 

406 03 

692 19 
3,151 23 
4,162 71 
1,685 92 

846 57 
1,240 41 
2,224 93 
1,966 46 

960 52 
2,184 23 

997 95 
1,629 01 
1,446 81 
1,286 61 

904 48 
1,256 78 

998 97 
1,337 39 

728 94 
2,200 04 
2,224 00 

787 18 
1,118 98 
1,141 16 
1,252 08 

797 36 
1,030 75 
3,569 26 



59,325 50 



$ c. 
42,601 50 
91,800 00 
83,936 46 
50,900 00 
38,950 00 
68,752 50 

72.059 47 
46,926 11 
38,809 11 

122,849 65 
45,800 00 
16,585 47 
36,600 00 
76,989 69 

116,200 00 
83,400 00 
91,600 00 
58,121 53 

108,298 71 
49,895 53 
48,800 00 

118,800 00 
61,398 10 

115,500 00 
78,410 00 

72.060 00 
50,120 00 
68,800 00 
39,738 64 
38,975 60 
39,827 00 
68,154 50 

131,033 34 

40,295 00 

59,876 92 

56,266 00 

96,860 00 

89,315 94 

68,246 67 

209,675 00 

6,351 28 

1,473 00 

5,900 00 

19,290 52 

4,248 89 

17,852 41 

3,291 10 

14,750 35 

4,600 00 

5,302 50 



2,976,288 49 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



137 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 
STATEMENT 



Receipts 







en 


11 

(L) G 


en 




C c O £ 








"c3 






Q 


o5 Stj 3 

'—' 3 e 






$ c. 


$ c. 


% c. 


$ c. 


1 


54,561 30 


2,471 96 


85,161 84 


207,789 50 


2 


81,815 18 


6,988 05 


155,244 96 


393,665 07 


3 


79,821 19 


126,117 98 


98,327 94 


438,681 30 


4 


44,824 81 




72,536 77 


196,197 17 


5 


39,627 94 


' 37,867 '82 


68,229 51 


216,112 49 


6 


71,238 98 


12,881 94 


152,606 01 


340,133 55 


7 


110,341 79 


10,003 65 


116,544 32 


343,259 20 


8 


41,315 52 


2,046 78 


103,848 15 


258,586 45 


9 


30,988 06 


1,647 62 


41,016 70 


136,305 50 


10 


119,280 04 


2,166 60 


153,736 70 


465,169 93 


11 


41,192 85 




90,011 86 


201,525 64 


12 


9,072 74 


"2,796 00 


32,642 56 


94,501 86 


13 


43,512 18 


9,412 68 


55,972 24 


161,549 77 


14 


70,943 30 


21,404 37 


172,071 04 


427,982 77 


15 


102,705 23 


6,250 00 


173,702 66 


454,013 76 


16 


95,151 15 


14,020 52 


188,763 47 


425,863 08 


17 


100,480 53 


6,279 26 


110,674 08 


356,010 48 


18 


31,413 96 


324 00 


60,073 02 


194,974 26 


19 


74,532 24 


850 12 


159,927 24 


429,092 88 


20 


36,697 38 




75,674 66 


201,164 44 


21 


68,190 13 


102,989 37 


103,176 10 


351,834 88 


22 


130,283 63 


926 66 


168,087 93 


474,970 85 


23 


54,733 83 




112,348 10 


264,516 84 


24 


99,137 31 


" 3,192 '66 


129,315 24 


414,313 57 


25 


73,437 94 


847 29 


89,672 44 


283,391 73 


26 


92,507 66 


5,815 26 


158,141 70 


365,231 54 


27 


67,430 34 


88,975 69 


100,183 01 


333,506 95 


28 


77,785 91 


3,135 11 


109,878 76 


291,877 65 


29 


38,916 74 




68,596 74 


189,665 12 


30 


37,919 54 


"12606 


59,513 99 


157,796 35 


31 


28,867 97 


407 61 


52,529 07 


143,135 23 


32 


51,115 40 


2,081 34 


120,012 11 


319,325 14 


33 


120,224 10 


948 28 


199,869 09 


520,393 13 


34 


31,007 03 




54,435 53 


156,275 99 


35 


45,987 18 


""7,614 08 


63,041 74 


214,037 74 


36 


74,885 40 


2,518 63 


126,958 74 


290,468 80 


37 


101,102 94 


33,370 97 


126,071 50 


398,881 50 


38 


90,001 63 


12,043 47 


144,074 14 


375,829 43 


39 


115,992 85 


219,409 78 


163,041 16 


609,579 66 


40 


508,936 88 


882,727 20 


822,160 02 


2,581,148 53 


41 


65,032 25 


12,345 40 


42,197 52 


. 175,705 38 


42 


17,326 89 


11,845 58 


22,627 89 


67,173 11 


43 


24,161 41 


17,428 86 


51,848 33 


146,507 79 


44 


30,883 67 




43,371 93 


141,988 30 


45 


24,460 24 


10 29 


20,352 80 


79,697 37 


46 


55,738 62 


5,519 86 


59,357 43 


216,706 75 


47 


44,754 66 


18,109 09 


31,603 14 


130,699 15 


48 


71,188 97 


82,153 45 


53,619 15 


275,955 15 


49 


139,495 32 


31,593 52 


77,547 99 


346,511 52 


50 


66,426 83 


14,874 50 


41,627 33 


178,292 32 


3,727,449 64 


1,824,332 64 


5,582,026 35 


16,437,996 57 



138 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
V. TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



Rural Schools 



Expenditure 



J3.g 



3 

"Is 

wCQw 



tn N o 

~ 12 o 
to 5 o 



Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Elgin 

Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 

1 1 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland and Durham 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell 

31 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma 

42 Kenora 

43 Manitoulin 

44 Muskoka 

45 Nipissing 

46 Parry Sound 

47 Rainy River 

48 Sudbury 

49 Timiskaming 

50 Thunder Bay 



Totals. 



85,562 07 

170,237 98 

166,227 74 

88,565 37 

77,856 23 

124,756 99 

136,391 87 

120,012 75 

73,415 00 

221,623 32 

80,648 00 

46,670 71 

62,990 57 

180,912 33 

203,515 00 

154,408 26 

178,118 66 

115,085 73 

212,937 91 

101,184 71 

93,997 27 

207,079 21 

104,760 64 

209,285 91 

140,808 53 

131,187 62 

91,684 90 

119,959 76 

93,681 12 

84,916 30 

68,439 76 

158,380 74 

229,428 26 

78,642 94 

109,954 94 

106,173 69 

129,845 97 

150,373 30 

141,707 08 

544,943 35 

86,191 15 

22,397 11 

45,202 70 

74,391 57 

47,114 97 

116,357 24 

51,884 74 

95,985 86 

131,471 71 

71,084 05 



6,338,453 59 



$ c.l 

8,463 70 

21,988 13 

81,490 97 

6,193 72 

40,666 36 

21,264 89 

25,345 65 

8,138 49 

4,229 39 

12,828 61 

5,483 33 

7,575 34 

19,539 60 

47,854 67 

21,696 02 

40,500 79 

17,443 96 

4,842 92 

13,752 38 

3,924 79 

93,006 19 

15,737 32 

7,575 84 

13,139 52 

10,073 60 

18,499 55 

74,803 28 

16,102 89 

6,530 50 

3,206 46 

3,466 98 

15,134 31 

18,248 93 

6,822 39 

12,216 63 

10,714 

43,674 20 

27,245 11 

166,661 51 

1,023,844 81 

19,970 30 

19,255 05 

36,442 06 

3,373 89 

1,925 40 

14,994 41 

43,399 15 

80,635 27 

74,116 16 

41,027 35 



2,335,067 35 



$ c. 
1,317 24 
2,890 13 
2,884 49 
2,189 28 

953 01 
3,199 99 
2,247 06 

937 97 

965 07 
2,338 13 

604 32 

481 13 
1,560 26 
3,065 37 
2,364 82 
3,617 27 
1,763 30 
1,651 06 
3,882 35 
1,363 70 
3,110 03 
3,648 43 

730 19 
3,098 47 
2,067 74 
3,103 67 

791 55 
1,322 17 
1,142 30 

430 28 
1,085 54 
1,300 00 
4,614 95 

616 79 
1,366 91 
1,336 30 
3,411 58 
2,231 74 
3,395 41 
31,400 53 
1,476 47 

709 29 
1,135 13 
1,164 64 

529 61 
1,458 05 
3,189 43 
2,047 78 
4,060 80 
5,782 18 



132,033 91 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



139 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 



Q, V 
CD ^G 

*££ 
■*-> — , <u 
C <u G. 
<U 3 X 



-a 

c 

<v 

a 



03 



bfl 



o 
o 

<U -Ex, 

>c/i ca 



e 
o S 

4) CX 





$ c 


1 


39,297 85 


2 


53,033 07 


3 


58,883 90 


4 


21,337 44 


5 


37,988 48 


6 


59,277 52 


7 


60,128 32 


8 


28,792 02 


9 


21,046 39 


10 


69,843 74 


11 


17,212 12 


12 


15,304 80 


13 


21,627 39 


14 


43,024 81 


15 


70,298 18 


16 


45,312 25 


17 


• 52,173 74 


18 


19,285 62 


19 


47,428 48 


20 


36,573 52 


21 


41,666 10 


22 


72,838 26 


23 


26,252 05 


24 


38,853 46 


25 


. 39,305 07 


26 


63,260 22 


27 


41,280 43 


28 


38,038 56 


29 


17,944 87 


30 


19.044 67 


31 


12,722 87 


32 


36,311 44 


33 


66,565 21 


34 


17,258 07 


35 


36,481 17 


36 


36,993 53 


37 


68,821 21 


38 


58,497 30 


39 


59,636 69 


40 


594,122 61 


41 


34,243 77 


42 


18,822 00 


43 


42,509 02 


44 


25,910 08 


45 


17,674 21 


46 


42,877 31 


47 


22,766 20 


48 


53,919 46 


49 


106,171 93 


50 


41,372 03 



2,610,029 42 



$ c. 
134,640 86 
248,149 31 
309,487 10 
118,285 81 
157,464 08 
208,499 39 
224,112 90 
157,881 23 

99,655 85 
306,633 80 
103,947 77 

70,031 98 
105,717 82 
274,857 18 
297,874 02 
243,838 55 
249,499 66 
140,865 33 
278,001 12 
143,046 72 
231,779 59 
299,303 22 
139,318 72 
264,377 36 
192,254 94 
216,051 06 
208,560 16 
175,423 38 
119,298 79 
107,597 71 

85,715 15 
211,126 49 
318,857 35 
103,340 19 
160,019 65 
155,218 10 
245,752 96 
238,347 45 
371,400 69 



2,194,311 
141,881 

61,183 45 
125,288 91 
104,840 18 

67,244 19 
175,687 01 
121,239 52 
232,588 3 
315,820 60 
159.265 61 



11.415.584 27 



429,920 
424,451 
663,678 
146,215 
187,400 
405,654 
628,931 
200,490 
135,176 
494,588 
197,650 

48,279 
196,150 
383,588 
394,500 
622,950 
403,225 
171,798 
431,175 
168,903 
508,738 
575,634 
270,645 
460,080 
411,306 
391,133 
308,903 
323,100 
134,620 
167,52 

94,950 
351,740 
524,250 
157,615 
214,200 
277,080 
761,150 
393,345 
856,028 
4,272,835 
195,590 

65,501 
112,050 
133,021 

73,322 
203,578 
229,604 
322,762 
419,909 
166.970 



20.111,903 



15,003 
40,960 
19,259 
29,470 
15,775 
28,752 
25,260 
19,316 
10,053 
31,742 
14,030 

7,244 
11,570 
29,384 
29,242 
24,730 
28,327 
16,744 
38,736 
12,864 
23,218 
29,385 
14,900 
31,933 
21,988 
21,700 
15,080 
26,240 
11,424 
12,009 
11,167 
42,353 
37,477 
13,532 
14,573 
13,658 
15,563 
41,357 
28,078 
90,039 
12,216 

2,562 

6,191 
12,034 

5,551 
15,622 

7,330 
11,320 
23,364 
11,863 



1,072,188 



140 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
V. TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



Receipts 



Cities 



JO 









rt 




^— s 


U, 




>> 


U 


to 


c 


C 


c 


3 


s 


cd 


O 


§ 





U 



CTJ 

ads 
is-g-sa 

3 ctixJ 






feoOg 



1 Belleville 

2 Brantford .... 

3 Chatham 

4 Fort William. . 

5 Gait 

6 Guelph 

7 Hamilton 

8 Kingston 

9 Kitchener. . . . 

10 London 

11 Niagara Falls. 

12 Ottawa 

13 Owen Sound . . 

14 Peterborough . 

15 Port Arthur.. . 

16 St. Catharines. 

17 St. Thomas. . . 

18 Sarnia 

19 SaultSte. Marie 

20 Stratford 

21 Toronto 

22 Welland 

23 Windsor 

24 Woodstock . . . 

Totals 

Towns 

1 Alexandria. . . . 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg. . 

5 Arnprior 

6 Aurora 

7 Aylmer 

8 Bala 

9 Barrie 

10 Blenheim 

11 Blind River... 

12 Bonfield 

13 Bothwell 

14 Bowmanville. . 

15 Bracebridge. . . 

16 Brampton .... 

17 Bridgeburg. . . 

18 Brockville.... 

19 Bruce Mines. . 

20 Burlington.. . . 

21 Cache Bay.. . . 

22 Campbellford . 

23 Capreol 

24 Carleton Place 

25 Charlton 

26 Chesley 

27 Clinton 

28 Cobalt 

29 Cobourg 

30 Cochrane 

31 Collingwood. . 

32 Copper Cliff. . 

33 Cornwall 



$ c. 
1,594 01 
6,006 71 
2,497 98 
4,165 45 
1,884 20 
2,969 23 

24,525 30 
4,083 20 
3,397 99 

10,848 68 
1,965 96 

16,181 70 
2,279 21 
4,947 07 
3,679 87 
3,402 94 
3,791 55 
2,368 04 
6,006 33 
3,890 05 

75,524 48 
1,273 33 
6,240 14 
1,772 21 



195,295 63 



45 

1,519 

233 

178 

309 

271 

473 

910 

1,286 

2,538 

1,513 

815 

1,140 

413 

533 

516 

354 

1,234 

1,810 

305 

1,585 

347 

3,248 

472 

1,170 

1,656 

2,559 

872 

545 

381 

777 

799 

1,695 



19 55 



26 21 
40 00 



$ 

55,992 
275,097 

95,302 
160,177 

86,000 00 

94,945 00 

1,108,171 00 

108,816 00 

156,898 34 

587,019 67 

92,000 00 
665,054 86 

77,315 48 
140,000 00 
152,476 98 
167,445 09 
155,639 65 

96,830 49 

155,000 00 

103,590 28 

5,811,061 28 

74,355 27 
386,482 69 

55.853 66 



10,861,525 45 



2,747 81 

3,900 00 

9,536 94 
12,669 46 
17,283 58 
13,400 00 
12,789 66 

3,000 00 
43,085 21 

7,834 01 

2,169 69 
555 88 

3,000 00 
16,200 00 
13,064 47 
26,204 70 
19,030 90 
54,400 00 

4,300 00 
17,500 00 

3,600 00 
14,900 00 

9,662 22 
18,099 00 

1,143 75 
11,182 86 

6,800 00 
35,134 80 
18,243 70 
15,550 00 
41,216 14 
25,018 96 
22,000 00 



$ c 
55,000 00 



104,856 59 



8,359 93 

438,139 83 

1,696 63 

78,800 00 



360,000 00 
13,385*30 

48,666 oo 

20,000 00 



80,909 72 
65,474' 17 



1,274,622 17 



3,600 00 
14,875 '50 



9,833 00 



70.000 00 



$ c 

19,684 74 

270 59 

1,824 74 

2,490 59 

2,937 49 

1,278 97 

144,096 37 

11,098 34 

61,925 81 

135,686 76 

11,009 73 

89,722 37 

984 20 

6,020 81 

1,373 85 

12,891 67 

5,584 83 

5,920 42 

26,567 68 

2,004 36 

101,512 59 

1,872 41 

95,140 83 

4,783 21 



69 
13 
50 



11 
69 



746,683 36 



397 65 

1,757 95 

4,762 90 

1,672 47 
749 04 

1,965 43 
485 51 
448 58 
112 81 
172 28 
955 37 
390 76 
119 85 
381 32 

1,244 27 

58 01 

315 54 

1,262 91 
670 32 
100 99 
145 09 

2,917 41 
206 42 
232 32 

2,977 19 
620 74 
400 38 

2,904 25 
32 05 

2,178 71 

124 85 

121,891 90 

1,177 88 



$ c. 
132,271 41 
281,374 91 

99,624 82 
271,689 97 

90,821 
107,553 
1,714,932 
125,694 17 
301,022 14 
733,555 
104,975 
1,130,958 93 

80,578 89 
164,353 18 
157,530 70 
231,739 70 
185,016 03 
105,118 95 
187,574 01 
190,394 41 
5,988,098 35 
. 77,501 01 
553,337 83 

62,409 08 



13,078,126 61 



3,190 49 

7,197 05 
14,533 05 
14,520 90 
18,341 74 
15,637 01 
13,748 54 

4,358 58 
44,484 22 
10,544 79 

4,638 06 

1,761 64 

4,259 85 
16,995 20 
18,442 45 
26,779 33 
34,576 36 
56,897 67 

6,780 32 
17,906 59 

5,330 09 
18,165 31 
13,116 64 
28,636 37 

5,290 94 
13,486 03 

9,799 47 
38,911 74 
18,820 98 
18,110 23 
42,118 22 
147,710 16 
94,873 72 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



141 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 
STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 



S 8 

"S'S 

« ctf 

He/} 



ti 3 o ° 

c/)PQc/)E 



N O 






2*^ £ 

J2 aO S cam 






0) 

u 

3 

O X 



<L) «Uh 
3 en 

>C0 03 



c 
rt cr 



1 
2 
3 

4 
5 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 



$ c. 

42,473 68 
143,830 64 

69,527 81 
125,266 00 

64,740 66 

69,759 23 
676,794 65 

85,164 50 

99,046 24 
351,344 44 

69,084 92 
505,484 94 

58,096 90 
102,317 02 

79,838 31 

85,613 15 
126,899- 45 

66,073 58 
113,955 20 

65,500 69 
3,346,805 16 

44,610 63 
254,793 66 

42,325 50 



6,689,346 96 



2,079 00 

5,150 00 

7,822 50 

9,748 00 

12,216 97 

9,880 00 

10,203 25 

2,382 35 

33,313 84 

7,300 26 

3,320 00 

1,009 37 

2,000 00 

12,621 00 

10,322 62 

17,917 50 

13,675 00 

39,530 13 

3,755 00 

12,640 95 

3,276 00 

11,142 50 

8,570 00 

14,434 42 

1,715 96 

7,641 50 

7,000 00 

22,953 04 

14,603 58 

10,390 16 

28,020 22 

20,901 24 

16.360 00 



$ c. 

41,887 87 

71,847 37 

4,966 41 

105,555 85 

2,000 00 

14,579 95 

495,663 22 

5,277 94 

127,476 62 

76,932 07 

4,361 83 

406,373 83 

674 53 



7,614 27 

743 15 

46,666 79 

20,096 84 



3,185 12 

80,449 27 

51,932 36 

4,993 58 

136,422 10 

751 85 



1,710,452 82 



100 75 
396 48 
474 50 


3,294 


84 


657 
1,387 


85 
81 





37 19 

1,200 39 

942 24 

4,005 35 

697 60 

14,893 55 

532 88 

39 00 

627 31 

558 14 



888 80 
10,034 41 



562 77 



1,307 48 

1,254 25 

110,662 99 

72,607 03 



204 93 
2,158 57 
9,519 71 



1,378 08 

34,035 30 

1,848 02 

3,566 83 

904 94 

369 33 

4,906 60 

505 33 

6,754 33 

5,281 22 

7,734 16 

255 52 

486 56 

1,059 98 



135,262 30 

919 31 

38,995 32 

1,617 22 



257,763 56 



22 60 



68 39 
138 00 



95 32 
626 61 



23 25 



60 22 



1,011 83 

284 62 

1,923 82 

46 35 

216 34 

43 81 

97 23 

355 50 

57 37 



9 02 



5 50 

930 64 

848 37 

49 50 

494 66 



$ c. 
38,272 84 
64,640 11 
22,972 03 
30,743 40 
20,697 56 
21,835 87 

389,449 38 
33,403 71 
69,840 14 

226,049 23 
31,159 61 

178,791 01 
21,302 13 
44,237 64 
66,852 94 
82,158 87 
36,573 05 
32,933 38 
62,016 46 
35,722 61 
2,157,996 20 
26,324 78 
96,990 01 
12,104 94 



3.803.067 90 



673 59 

1,775 14 

2,610 76 

2,842 65 

4,128 60 

1,865 47 

3,545 29 

671 83 

7,855 18 

2,697 75 

866 26 

49 80 

812 30 

3,370 88 

4,051 98 

6,994 87 

5,723 19 

14,240 82 

1,086 04 

4,311 29 

552 91 

2,875 27 

3,302 34 

3,748 38 

414 12 

2,772 31 

1,761 73 

13,540 61 

2,990 55 

4,786 54 

12,528 98 

12,268 21 

3,909 10 



$ c. 
122,634 39 
280,523 05 

99,624 82 
271,084 96 

87,438 22 
107,553 13 
1,595,942 55 
125,694 17 
299,929 83 
655,230 68 
104,975 69 
1,095,556 38 

80,578 89 
160,923 26 
152,715 62 
222,172 97 
183,824 86 

99,493 52 

180,216 76 

181,672 57 

5,691,996 02 

76,848 30 
527,201 09 

56,799 51 



12,460,631 24 



2,775 19 

7,025 89 

10,829 74 

13,065 15 

16,413 96 

15,178 31 

13,748 54 

3,807 35 

43,183 44 

9,998 01 

4,186 26 

1,119 61 

4,012 69 

16,994 34 

18,379 95 

26,621 80 

34,576 36 

56,227 65 

4,926 39 

17,795 89 

4,430 86 

14.115 00 

13.116 64 
28,274 58 

2,130 08 
10,985 60 

8,761 73 
36,499 15 
18,524 77 
17,332 55 
41,852 95 
144,327 10 
92,876 13 



600,000 
535,350 
400,000 
868,043 
350,000 
465,000 

3,458,171 
550,000 
646,000 

2,437,265 
401,000 

2,300,000 
200,000 
542,000 
505,1 
726,000 
620,800 
428,400 

1,116,500 

450,300 

13,559,439 

226,893 

1,943,700 
300,000 



33,629,972 



6,000 

50,000 

15,255 

50,000 

26,700 

45,000 

25,000 

10,000 

205,900 

35,000 

12,000 

212 

20,000 

60,000 

30,300 

125,000 

140,000 

140,000 

25,000 

100,000 

4,000 

50,000 

55,000 

66,500 



35,500 

45,000 

71,000 

112,000 

40,000 

162,800 

100,000 

170,000 



$ 
10,000 
21,600 
10,120 
39,815 
10,000 

9,500 
89,701 
19,000 
23,250 
71,695 

7,060 

150,000 

15,500 

20,000 

2,830 

7,200 
32,980 

4,649 

10,500 

12,500 

339,023 

8,752 
50,000 
10,000 



975,675 



350 
188 
350 
500 
496 

1,500 
400 
300 
753 

3,300 

450 

59 

2,400 
753 
550 

2,500 
600 

5,200 
172 
700 

1,500 

2,500 

5,000 
500 

"320 

2,000 

10,500 

4,300 

3,000 

13,000 

10,000 

4.500 



142 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



V. 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



Towns 



Receipts 



rt <n 
.2 c 

QJ J-H 

JO 







nj 




a 


>> 


o 


2 £ 


c 


C 3 


3 


aj O 


£o^ 



~ 9 <n 

Oh CO 

•rt en en 

c c ~ 

S 



SO 






44 
45 



34 Deseronto .... 

35 Dresden 

36 Dryden 

37 Dundas 

38 Dunnville .... 

39 Durham 

40 Eastview 

41 Englehart. . . . 

42 Essex 

43 Ford 

Forest 

Fort Frances. . 

46 Frood Mine.. . 

47 Gananoque . . . 

48 Georgetown . . . 

49 Goderich 

50 Gore Bay 

51 Gravenhurst . . 

52 Grimsby 

53 Haileybury . . . 

54 Hanover 

55 Harriston 

56 Hawkesbury. . 

57 Hespeler 

58 Huntsville 

59 Ingersoll 

60 Iroquois Falls. 

61 Kearney 

Keewatin,. . . . 

Kenora 

Kincardine. . . . 
Kingsville . . . . 
Latchford 

67 Leamington. . . 

68 Leaside 

69 Lindsay 

70 Listowel 

71 Little Current 

72 Massey 

73 Matheson 

74 Mattawa 

75 Meaford 

76 Merritton 

77 Midland 

Milton 

Mimico 



62 
63 
64 
65 
66 



79 

80 Mitchell 



Mount Forest. 

Napanee 

New Liskeard 
Newmarket . . . 
New Toronto. 



86 Niagara. . . , 

87 North Bay. 

88 Oakville... 

89 Orangeville. 

90 Orillia 

91 Oshawa. . . . 

92 Palmerston 

93 Paris 



$ c. 

1,895 07 

2,030 00 

2,930 00 

706 77 

420 48 

1,221 83 

236 18 



2,027 50 

2,371 18 

302 55 

1,986 23 

613 42 



360 

300 

538 

1,922 

2,983 

1,705 

486 

339 

888 

73 

412 

469 

2,027 

3.227 

1,085 

3,515 

1,117 

246 

3,620 

1,240 

442 

810 

847 

428 

2,460 

1,376 

1,710 

590 

377 

249 

1,130 

1,341 

538 

1,568 

912 

410 

5,764 

406 

479 

1,362 

1,671 

384 

413 

2,119 

1,487 

790 

504 



23 08 



201 54 



590 70 
26 05 



60 62 



21,000 00 

7,956 22 

4,978 48 

25,875 00 

21,000 00 

8,060 41 

15,895 58 

4,568 48 

12,604 56 

28,085 79 

7,200 00 

29,000 00 

1,384 16 

14,604 60 

12,175 99 

19,984 78 

2,960 49 

8,312 23 

8,500 00 

12,250 00 

14,729 12 

4,547 76 

5,216 53 

25,954 75 

10,116 35 

26,154 00 

19,494 18 

1,656 00 

9,307 17 

35,000 00 

11,243 25 

17,000 00 

3,867 19 

25,503 22 

3,240 00 

40,470 01 

12,200 00 

5,977 40 

2,125 00 

3,960 00 

969 7 

20,000 00 

11,520 09 

64,124 40 

10,478 97 

39,591 12 

8,400 00 

5,525 00 

15,270 00 

12,500 00 

20.000 00 

31.001 54 
8,643 29 

71,664 70 
74,397 35 
13,850 04 
44,315 18 
74,451 15 
6,291 60 
21,000 00 



$ 



51,465 77 
3,965 ' 64 



133,885 58 
79,274* 77 



5,500 00 



7,000 00 



28.200 00 



8,000 00 



,500 00 



65,000 00 



57,000 00 



$ 


c. 


318 


57 


618 


50 


2,419 


87 


489 


65 


536 


55 


2 


80 


645 


14 


121 


31 


480 


03 


844 94 


1,492 


53 


1,827 


12 


378 


92 


651 


01 


335 


02 


667 


31 


428 


67 


776 


37 


4,775 


26 


34 


93 


862 


93 


4,839 


30 


3,625 


73 


488 


17 


1,764 


68 


2,523 


24 


164 


16 


1,339 


69 


1,149 


14 


342 


05 


846 


76 


437 


79 


3,553 


46 


617 


13 


772 


83 


41 


02 


753 


07 


40 


74 


25 


65 


1,910 


17 


345 


62 


6,732 


06 


95 


35 


37 


49 


1,668 


27 


186 


53 


280 


60 


183 


52 


6,540 


24 


3,342 


45 


565 


44 


512 


71 


9,403 


33 


800 


94 


637 


33 


39,860 


34 


71 


10 


80 


30 


1,731 


54 



61 
13 



$ c. 
23,213 64 
10,604 72 
61,794 12 
27,071 42 
25,922 67 
9,308 12 
16,776 90 

6.717 29 
15,455 77 

163,118 86 
10,678 76 

110,715 31 

1,763 08 

15,616 58 

12,476 69 

20.857 98 
5,549 80 

11,724 03 
10,981 44 
23,011 
15,103 

6,299 32 
10,129 42 
29,993 23 
11,074 39 
36,945 71 
25,244 42 

2,905 16 
14,161 86 
65,466 68 
11,832 23 

29.668 30 
5,544 98 

29,499 25 

4,667 13 

43,589 87 

12.669 33 
9,190 47 
3,542 36 
5,695 65 
3,469 89 

20,723 44 
18,501 24 
65,350 13 

11.858 07 
107,388 99 

10,180 78 

6.718 10 
15,864 11 
24,804 24 
23,748 54 
32,046 55 
10,578 62 
82,739 32 
75,583 26 
14,900 84 
86,295 42 

133,009 50 

7,161 90 

23,236 11 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



143 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 
STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 


School 
ildings 
liture 










dT-r) 

a, c • 

2 cfl 3 N o 


"a3 

3 


<v 
u 

3 


3 




"cfl 


"° M 


m - 3 &•£ O 


T3 a) w 




**- 3 £ 


<v 






G ouO 

«3 c— ?, 


.8 3WCU-5 


SbSS 


'-a 


°ffl 3 


s 






• " n & 

,tJ3-gO 


.o a +3 g £ o 


3 &T3 a 
aj <u x x 


X 


3 «> 


a> a 




He/) 


COCQC/5K 


j<o £ km 


(*(* §W 


HU 


>C/) aj 


>W 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ 


$ 


34 


7,942 26 


11,792 00 


85 93 


1,529 11 


21,349 30 


42,225 


1,775 


35 


6,112 50 


2,800 00 


25 00 


1,547 84 


10,485 34 


35,000 


2,000 


36 


6,590 25 


51,106 07 


514 71 


2,612 79 


60,823 82 


62,275 


2,728 


37 


19,568 43 


925 67 


130 00 


6,355 20 


26,979 30 


117,115 


16,325 


38 


12,286 66 


5,839 75 




7,390 95 


25,517 36 


70,000 


350 


39 


6,445 40 


231 27 


' 4 25 


1,506 04 


8,186 96 


12,000 


500 


40 


10,200 30 


375 86 




4,695 43 


15,271 59 


35,000 


260 


41 


4,352 00 


193 70 


' '31674 


1,845 02 


6,707 46 


9,500 


750 


42 


8,647 08 


1,260 74 




2,217 57 


12,125 39 


16,000 


1,000 
500 


43 


17,498 72 


66,496 46 


"1,881' 05 


9,330 27 


95,206 50 


206,000 


44 


6,758 75 




55 00 


2,291 15 


9,104 90 


55,000 


350 


45 


18,048 65 


77,849 47 


1,629 93 


9,164 16 


106,692 21 


175,000 


5,000 


46 


623 50 


43 77 


30 65 


601 00 


1,298 92 




30 


47 


10,880 00 


11 70 




3,886 65 


14,778 35 


30,000 


3,000 


48 


8,575 00 


1,631 48 




2,270 21 


12,476 69 


20,000 


2,500 


49 


13,618 75 






7,160 83 


20,779 58 


45,000 


1,200 
450 


50 


3,993 00 






1,242 34 


5,235 34 


6,000 


51 


8,043 79 


370 00 




2,510 65 


10,924 44 


18,000 


510 


52 


8,210 60 


14 00 


"ll0'44 


2,169 64 


10,504 68 


40,000 


400 


53 


11,332 34 


7,250 00 


250 00 


4,179 27 


23,011 61 






54 


11,856 70 


79 51 


276 23 


2,253 49 


14,465 93 


33,960 


1,700 


55 


4,510 00 


675 87 




973 35 


6,159 22 


14,000 


2,500 


56 


3,944 34 






1,006 21 


4,950 55 


24,700 


300 


57 


14,290 62 


1 ,446 26 




" 10,528 90 


26,265 78 


120,000 


3,000 


58 


8,819 83 


459 46 




1,795 10 


11,074 39 


50,000 


5,000 


59 


18,705 00 


8,191 94 


"l03'21 


9,757 46 


36,757 61 


250,000 


2,500 


60 


10,703 56 




128 20 


6,827 97 


17,659 73 


133,314 


2,186 


61 


2,125 52 


"ibi'ii 




531 70 


2,759 63 


10,000 


378 


62 


8,086 35 




'3306 


4,098 64 


12,218 05 


30,000 


1,200 


63 


26,819 75 


25,875 04 


215 00 


12,556 89 


65,466 68 


78,000 


4,700 


64 


7,202 50 






2,774 59 


9,977 09 


20,000 


567 


65 


12,532 00 


7,750*19 


"247 '86 


5,211 20 


25,741 25 


150,000 


370 


66 


2,903 22 


73 62 




1,211 83 


4,188 67 


8,000 


202 


67 


17,763 84 


5,732 30 




6,003 11 


29,499 25 


180,000 


14,000 


68 


2,740 00 


82 60 


"387'58 


843 50 


4,053 68 


16,800 


2,000 


69 


28,104 00 


1,602 37 




9,472 46 


39,178 83 


230,000 


1,000 


70 


8,766 00 


462 16 


"95'59 


3,307 88 


12,631 63 


40,000 


4,000 


71 


4,790 00 




73 65 


786 06 


5,649 71 


11,400 


600 


72 


2,875 00 






503 57 


3,378 57 


3,800 


275 


73 


3,249 00 


* '6725 


" 105 62 


1,939 11 


5,360 98 


35,000 


166 


74 


1,404 00 
12,618 24 


"547'34 




385 85 
3,143 56 


1,789 85 
16,451 87 


2,600 
25,000 


300 


75 


142 73 


8,000 


76 


10,136 41 


1,846 25 




5,742 96 


17,725 62 


49,300 


450 


77 


36,984 20 


41 15 




27,291 10 


64,316 45 


260,000 


20,000 


78 


8,319 93 




"31000 


2,996 99 


11,626 92 


30,000 


350 


79 


24,879 82 


52,25 i 37 




10,075 65 


87,206 84 


255,000 


3,200 


80 


7,858 02 


30 00 




2,147 46 


10,035 48 


50,000 


600 


81 


4,585 20 




"27725 


1,678 21 


6,540 66 


25,000 


2,000 


82 


12,014 00 






2,494 77 


14,508 77 


37,000 


3,000 


83 


14,004 52 


1,344' 54 


3750 


9,207 15 


24,593 71 


80,000 


634 


84 


15,432 50 


3,190 53 


134 84 


4,990 67 


23,748 54 


120,000 


3,500 


85 


20,295 57 




248 27 


10,998 14 


31,541 98 


120,000 


1,700 


86 


5,315 00 


V, 607* 48 


19 00 


1,829 54 


8,771 02 


17,500 


3,500 


87 


45,598 05 


8,738 25 


2,118 06 


25,490 35 


. 81,944 71 


255,000 


18,000 


88 


15,233 86 


52,839 47 


280 20 


7,229 73 


75,583 26 


125,000 


1,000 


89 


10,474 00 


1,362 91 


260 90 


1,845 22 


13,943 03 


45,000 


4,000 


90 


30,706 52 


4,524 29 


273 21 


12,913 39 


48,417 41 


132,000 


3,000 


91 


50,630 95 


59,682 50 


1,868 24 


20,227 32 


132,409 01 


300,000 


17,500 


92 


5,320 00 


78 49 


35 93 


1,454 32 


6,888 74 


35,000 


2,000 


93 


17,260 00 


225 79 




5,411 13 


22,896 92 


125,000 


2,000 



144 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



Towns 



Receipts 



.52 c 



4-> c 

a 3 
rt o 
U 



^O^ 



c3 

— 9 CO 



*n co "3 



SoSe 



> CD 
C CJ 

co c3 

fctfSg 

— ' 3 c o 

UPl, ctfC/) 



94 Parkhill 

95 Parry Sound. . . 

96 Pembroke 

97*Penetanguish'e, 

98 Perth 

99 Petrolia 

100 Picton 

101 Port Colborne. 

102 Port Hope 

103 Powassan 

104 Prescott 

105 Preston 

106 Rainy River. . . 

107 Renfrew 

108 Ridgetown 

109 Rockland 

110 St. Mary's 

111 Sandwich. 

112 Seaforth 

113 Simcoe 

114 Sioux Lookout 

115 Smith's Falls., 

116 Southampton. 

117 Stayner 

118 Strathroy 

119 Sturgeon Falls 

120 Sudbury 

121 Thessalon. . . . 

122 Thornbury. . . 

123 Thorold 

124 Tilbury 

125 Tillsonburg. . . 

126 Timmins 

127 Trenton 

128 Trout Creek.. 

129 Uxbridge 

130 Vankleek Hill. 

131 Walkerton... . 

132 Walkerville... 

133 Wallaceburg. . 

134 Waterloo 

135 Webbwood. . . 

136 Weston 

137 Whitby 

138 Wiarton 

139 Wingham. . . . 



Totals 

Totals 
Rural Schools. 

Cities 

Towns 

Villages 



5 Grand T'tls, 1922 

6 Grand T'tls, 1921 



7 Increases. 

8 Decreases 



9 Percentages. 



$ c. 
749 38 
1,002 55 
729 74 
500 34 
331 68 
390 44 
487 54 
456 26 

609 70 
1,479 00 

305 75 

628 30 

5,061 00 

1,634 30 

265 77 

30 71 

614 48 

442 15 

1,374 95 

452 32 

3,680 00 

903 19 

1,271 78 

632 83 

354 39 

224 12 

1,367 48 

3,675 00 

1,270 00 

413 22 

610 00 
427 03 
390 99 
811 40 
870 00 

1,394 59 
698 09 
174 19 

1,659 52 
431 60 
620 60 

2,186 00 
474 90 
390 70 

1,322 06 
265 31 

150,454 70 



$ c. 
16 88 



50 00 



2,268,373 95 
195,295 63 
150,454 70 
166,624 30 



2,780,748 5F 
2,257,735 58 



523,013 00 



8.04 



36 00 



30 00 
33 84 
17 83 



49 73 



24 59 
27 05 



22 05 



1,295 72 



59,325 50 



1,295 72 
3,660 58 



64;281 80 
80,904 59 



16,622 79 



18 



$ c. 

3,600 00 
25,431 50 
35,561 38 
26,354 60 
18,625 32 
16,500 00 
16,125 57 
26,600 00 
18,032 50 

4,420 00 
11,813 41 
31,391 87 
11,496 29 
17,983 78 

9,650 00 

2,234 74 
21,189 55 
45,164 46 

8.599 86 
18,194 73 

8,795 82 

38.450 40 
6,757 40 
.5,500 00 

12,500 00 

8,166 66 

49.451 43 
9,488 70 
5,302 18 

22,800 00 
3,220 45 
19,000 00 
32,109 86 
28,500 00 

1.600 00 
8,000 00 
5,146 04 
7,883 63 

71,800 00 

23,587 91 

36,344 41 

4,139 75 

29,725 79 

14,700 00 

8,493 46 

9,521 85 



2,443,331 89 



6,703,738 13 

10,861,525 45 

2,443,331 89 

614,317 76 



20,622,913 23 
19,134,046 17 



1,488,867 06 



59 . 64 



$ c. 
504 06 



7,998 35 



313,212 17 
35,666 66 



763 22 



1,296 91 



[271 96 



26,566 00 



18,838 69 



943,425 62 



1,824,532 64 

1,274,622 17 

943,425 62 

94,201 91 



4.136.782 34 

3.837.783 45 



298,998 89 



11.96 



$ c. 

346 49 

309 05 

1,315 53 

1,105 27 

524 67 

892 35 

145 74 

4,211 35 

1,282 63 

330 02 

32 40 

30,206 67 

60 29 

3,136 30 

685 76 

58 74 

3,743 86 

8,856 94 

729 22 

744 55 



1,247 29 

3,750 70 

118 78 

78 

3,904 40 

970 56 

4 98 

373 61 

1,243 24 

664 32 
2,253 

8,158 35 

1,142 65 

55 34 

2,452 77 

331 80 

8,947 03 

2,660 53 

651 71 

626 79 

839 53 

840 37 
91 33 

613 68 



371,590 88 



5,582,026 35 
746,683 36 
371,590 
270,594 16 



6,970,894 75 
6,071,241 56 



899,653 19 



20.16 



84 
58 
38 
53 
19 
89 
72 



$ c. 

5,216 81 
26,743 10 
45,605 00 
27,960 21 
19,481 67 
17,782 79 
16,758 85 
31,267 61 
19,974 83 

6,229 02 
12,151 56 
62,226 
16,617 
22,754 
10,601 

2,324 
25,547 
367,675 
10,740 03 
19,391 60 
47,475 82 
39,383 59 

9,310 31 

9,901 36 
12,973 17 

8,469 67 
55,426 53 
14,134 26 

6,626 89 
23,586 83 

6,370 60 
20,091 35 
34,754 73 
37,469 75 

3,612 65 

9,474 52 

8,323 95 

8,661 58 
82,406 55 
53,180 04 
37,616 72 

6,952 54 
31,040 22 
34,769 76 

9,928 90 
10,400 84 



3,910,098 81 



16,437,996 57 

13,078,126 61 

3,910,098 81 

1,149,398 71 



34,575,620 70 
31,381,711 35 



3,193,909 35 



*Including Protestant Separate School. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



145 



SCHOOLS (Concluded) 

STATEMENT (Concluded) 



Expenditure 



Hc/3 



o 
o 

o 

g bo 
«».S 8 

55 rG 3 



i-" h! u -r~ OT 

cd g 5 -m U} j* 

u aj- a -a o 

.a at3 <y a o 
rtCQ 






.— .-*.*-. = c O 

j<0 6 



Pi rt G 

_ v 

G 3 * 

+-> 03 O) 



— G 

4-> O, 

O X 



O 03 

O &0 0) 

J2 G u 

<L> -^ 

3 03 

TO "H rH 






94 

95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 



$ c. 

3,256 98 

20,100 35 

24,668 00 

18,283 88 

12,503 94 

12,902 98 

12,049 00 

21,700 00 

14,605 69 

3,820 00 

7,750 00 

23,053 92 

11,364 84 

14,839 44 

7,327 95 

1,936 71 

15,037 37 

22,772 72 

6,359 70 

15,472 60 

8,242 37 

27,138 75 

6,893 88 

3,760 05 

9,681 38 

6,066 63 

32,363 03 

8,618 00 

4,090 00 

15,400 15 

3,020 00 

14,784 68 

17,307 44 

25,062 12 

1,969 54 

7,050 00 

3,240 00 

5,902 25 

51,512 64 

16,621 10 

24,143 

4,613 

21,641 

9,985 

3,213 



$ c. 
504 06 



355 95 
2,035 60 
1,270 00 

304 00 



1.700 53 



2,607 65 

26,912 90 

460 47 



570 65 



2,484 18 

128,540 66 

219 89 



35,000 00 
394 28 
506 89 



677 45 
200 00 

77 82 
919 00 
228 72 
826 74 
2,998 63 
296 45 

50 10 



$ c. 
51 50 



203 29 
1.234 21 



57 50 
1,212 03 



20 00 



84 00 
974 10 

75 14 



17 50 



113 95 



88 27 
124 00 

25 82 



7.790 48 



1,738,399 91 



1 6,338,453 59 

2 6,689,346 96 

3 1,738,399 91 

4 542,386 47 



6,846 40 

29,074 12 

1,660 42 

209 91 



17,967 59 
"33209 



962,500 04 



5 15,308,586 93 

6 14,236,088 51 



1,072,498 42 



54.16 



2,335,067 35 

1,710,452 82 

962,500 04 

216,587 96 



137 34 
464 58 
111 07 
177 43 
5 03 



27 55 

12 85 

2,865 90 



1,250 87 
36 24 
583 68 
104 05 
121 75 
136 13 



30,430 56 



5,224,608 
4,518,789 



705,818 42 



18.48 



132,033 91 

257,763 56 

30,430 56 

7,953 34 



428,181 37 
378,144 72 



50,036 65 



1.51 



$ c. 
1,316 12 
6,529 08 
18,112 83 
7,985 24 
4,601 79 
2,643 53 
4,172 09 
8,709 60 
3,668 61 

596 74 
1,696 69 
6,498 14 
4,791 52 
7,611 16 
2,010 12 

277 49 

5,671 00 

25,293 82 

913 82 
3,919 00 
4,215 95 
11,266 43 
1,447 54 
1,576 42 
3,103 19 
2,300 28 
13,974 62 
3,450 52 
1,872 54 
6,904 94 
1,968 10 
3,344 59 
9,863 16 
11,933 75 
1,587 98 
1,414 82 
1,763 88 
2,450 85 
18,807 24 

5.592 98 
10,073 93 

1,676 23 
7,803 52 
4,991 89 

1.593 64 
1,984 64 



704,049 41 



2,610,029 42 

3,803,067 90 

704,049 41 

183,641 97 



7,300,788 70 
7,217,149 90 



83,638 80 



25.83 



$ c. 

5,128 66 
26,629 43 
42,984 12 
27,859 28 
19,141 S3 
16,816 51 
16,525 09 
30,409 60 
19,974 83 

4,416 74 
12,111 84 
57,676 99 
16,616 83 
22,470 60 

9,908 72 

2,214 20 

23,276 55 

177,581 30 

7,568 55 

19.391 60 
47,475 82 
38,799 46 

8,962 26 
5,336 47 

12,784 57 
8,366 91 

47,103 37 

12.392 52 
6,066 18 

23,224 09 
5,354 16 

19,420 59 

30,280 30 

37,469 75 
3,612 65 
8,464 82 
5,031 43 
8,365 95 

80,032 18 

51,288 

37,128 
6,535 

30,028 59 

33,048 53 
9,928 90 

10,243 34 



3,435,379 92 



11,415,584 27 

12,460,631 24 

3,435,379 92 

950,569 74 



28,262,165 17 
26,350,172 88 



1,911,992 29 



15,000 

125,000 

200,000 

65,000 

53,000 
43,000 
22,000 

130,000 

63,600 

8,000 

40,000 

180,000 
25,000 

100,000 

35,000 

2,850 

75,000 

200,000 
20,000 
55,000 
54,580 

200,000 
20,000 
30,000 
22,000 
35,000 

273,233 
29,000 
33,000 
84,000 
21,000 
50,000 
55,000 

101,500 

3,500 

20,000 

16,000 

20,000 

550,000 
70,000 
50,500 
16,000 

144,000 
95,000 
19,000 
20.000 



10,044,359 



20,111,903 

33,629,972 

10,044,359 

2,631,059 



66,417,293 
59,367,243 



7,050,050 



$ 

168 

5,000 

2,710 

1,250 

2,500 

750 

4,692 

1,200 

2,000 

242 

10,000 

7,000 

5,000 

800 

3,300 

86 

1,500 

1,000 

500 

609 

1,000 

26,000 

509 

242 

537 

559 

1,672 

460 

800 

500 

300 

500 

6,000 

4,800 

250 

600 

200 

2,700 

15,000 

900 

5,600 

472 

950 

3,500 

569 

178 



384,752 



1,072,188 
975,675 
384,752 
106,436 



2,539,051 
2,430,152 



108,899 



Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance: Rural Schools, $51.83; Cities, $63.91; Towns, $46.62; 
Villages, $39.51 ; Province, $55.09. 



146 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
I. TABLE F— FINANCIAL 





Receipts 


Rural Schools 


> 

'So tf 
oj — 

JO 


en 

O g 
8.8 

:§< 

3T3 

S 03 


0J 
Ui 

3 
C 

<L> 
,Q 

<U 

Q 


•§ 8 

.. C 3 
en o3 O 

S^ 

C. <D )-i 

Max 

ca *-j +3 

PQ mO 


c 

3 

o 

< £ 
3 '8 

O 4) 


1 Bruce 


tf c. 
4,547 40 
3,160 30 
6,587 14 
4,822 21 
2,808 03 
2,399 93 
3,562 59 
2,119 40 

250 10 
1,347 32 

726 00 

968 28 
1,448 88 

290 10 

2,020 99 

897 14 

90 11 

4,425 34 

1,891 71 

6,165 55 

10,017 34 

1,065 53 

9,717 53 

782 70 

4,048 15 

1,613 65 

56,354 48 


$ c. 

11,418 88 

17,065 85 

42,993 40 

5,435 87 

6,423 03 

2,920 29 

8,942 24 

9,245 10 

2,510 38 

1,962 82 

303 71 

855 37 

5,374 34 

1,243 00 

3,337 44 

1,107 99 

1,164 57 

10,470 35 

3,277 50 

90,895 18 

14,113 44 

8,106 67 

19.792 99 
1,927 35 
7,280 41 
5,347 03 

86.793 46 


% c. 

"19990 
174 26 

14,445 85 
"l810 

13,29 i 80 
30,957 05 


$ c 

15,807 57 

12,809 75 

21,916 52 

9,976 34 

5,795 11 

4,975 85 

9,612 31 

10,100 43 

2,301 15 

1,767 99 

1,342 43 

1,425 92 

4,334 43 

1,246 75 

2,025 01 

1,975 54 

675 98 

10,764 78 

2,931 93 
41,594 43 
22,323 86 

3,536 33 

27,940 59 
1,877 55 

10,658 54 
4,368 89 

69,043 50 


$ c. 
31,773 85 


2 Carleton 

3 Essex 


33,235 80 
71,671 32 
20,234 42 




15,026 17 




10,296 07 
22,117 14 




8 Kent 


35,910 78 
5,061 63 
5,078 13 
2,390 24 
3,249 57 

11,157 65 
2,779 85 

7,383 44 


10 Lanark 

11 Leeds and Grenville. . . 

12 Lennox and Addington. 

13 Middlesex 


14 Norfolk ^ 

15 Northumberland and 

Durham 


16 Ontario 


3,980 67 


17 Peel . 


1,930 66 


18 Perth 


25,660 47 

8,101 14 

151,946 96 

46,454 64 

12,708 53 

57,451 11 

4,587 60 

21,987 10 

11,329 57 

243,148 49 


19 Peterborough 

20 Prescott and Russell.. . 

21 Renfrew 


23 Stormont, Dundas and 

Glengarry 

24 Victoria 

25 Waterloo 

26 Wellington 

27 Districts 


Totals 


134,127 90 


370,308 66 


59,086 96 


303,129 48 


866,653 00 


Cities 

1 Belleville 

2 Brantford 


211 36 
448 88 
306 64 

1,442 34 
120 66 
383 69 

3,406 13 
596 23 
792 78 

1,640 60 
272 68 

'8991 

887 12 

690 68 

366 80 

218 27 

315 20 

1,605 42 

358 51 

7,795 84 

1,457 84 

105 60 


6,122 43 
14,463 91 
16,052 95 
33,968 99 

4,179 89 
17,403 31 
116,047 11 
24,361 34 
32,496 40 
43,067 90 
11,005 80 
232,030 56 

3,267 56 
25,254 18 
17,280 10 
23,826 95 

8,529 59 

9,478 26 

57,811 36 

14,840 87 

484,358 28 

115,859 18 

2,782 33 


10,009 26 
4,000 00 

11,760 '66 

15,666 00 

"442'38 

68,853 15 

491,054 38 


1,164 61 

4,630 55 

32,970 78 

4,301 81 

2,398 ' 76 
67,914 85 
3,189 89 
7,651 57 
2,721 48 
4,467 40 
11,297 88 
1,332 10 

"5133 
59,177 73 

7,448 51 

9,268 23 
15,751 77 

1,199 70 
52,076 98 

1,738 97 
490 43 


7,498 40 
29,552 60 
53,330 37 
39,713 14 

4,300 55 
31,945 76 
187,368 09 
28,147 46 
40,940 75 
47,429 98 
15,745 88 
243,328 44 

4,689 57 
26,141 30 
33,022 11 


4 Fort William 


5 Gait 

6 Guelph 

7 Hamilton 

8 Kingston 

9 Kitchener 


10 London 

11 Niagara Falls 

12 Ottawa 

13 Owen Sound 

14 Peterborough 

15 Port Arthur 


16 St. Catharines 

17 St. Thomas 

18 Sarnia 


83,371 48 

16,196 37 

19,061 69 

75,610 93 

85,252 23 

1,035,285 48 

119,055 99 

3,378 36 


19 Sault Ste. Marie 

20 Stratford 

21 Toronto 

22 Windsor. . . 




Totals 


23,513 18 


1,314,489 25 


601,119 17 


291,245 33 


2,230,366 93 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



147 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
STATEMENT, ETC. 



Expenditure 


of School 
Buildings 
urniture 






*C/2 

o3 8 


.2 

is « 
1* 


rt in 


Is 


g 

3 
O 

G <y 


G 

o £ 






w O 


§ « 8 8 


u 
— 3 


O X 


3 in^ 

><f) «J 


<u a 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


% 


$ 


1 


14,207 50 


5,073 10 


260 72 


4,325 80 


23,867 12 


39,365 


2,908 


2 


18,373 05 


2,163 04 


200 37 


6,402 04 


27,138 50 


39,703 


2,080 


3 


32,491 37 


3,162 52 


518 47 


21,480 46 


. 57,652 82 


152,275 


6,039 


4 


10,883 03 


438 89 


126 49 


2,969 22 


14,417 63 


16,750 


1,305 


5 


7,299 54 


947 02 


87 04 


1,338 83 


9,672 43 


12,800 


1,330 


6 


5,771 55 


250 57 


111 69 


471 81 


6,605 62 


10,900 


739 


7 


10,322 02 


4,229 15 


371 38 


4,459 48 


19,382 03 


24,900 


2,829 


8 


8,533 00 


14,748 57 


104 40 


4,325 78 


27,711 75 


39.416 


1,949 


9 


1,000 00 


31 95 


14 50 


1.855 85 


2,902 30 


9,000 


212 


10 


3,075 34 


133 32 


18 17 


391 57 


3,618 40 


4,600 


175 


11 


1,292 42 




10 00 


62 59 


1,365 01 


1,475 


90 


12 


1,870 41 


' 38*25 


16 50 


690 19 


2,615 35 


3,700 


225 


13 


5,297 83 


976 77 


95 69 


2,851 04 


9,221 33 


11,100 


838 


14 


1,000 00 


25 35 


8 00 


186 92 


1,220 27 


4,000 


300 


15 


5,623 11 


108 12 


61 19 


366 50 


6,158 92 


18,650 


880 


16 


2,084 38 


95 90 


125 15 


361 00 


2,666 43 


4,500 


295 


17 


920 00 


48 01 




376 70 


1,344 71 


2,500 


200 


18 


13,480 00 


1,133 14 


' 17686 


6,415 26 


21,205 26 


78,550 


3,182 


19 


5,279 38 


332 61 


154 70 


1,274 67 


7,041 36 


19,400 


1,413 


20 


68,271 73 


20,004 32 


1,321 14 


24,159 72 


113,756 91 


209,872 


7,179 


21 


23,126 60 


4,271 53 


601 01 


8,378 84 


36,377 98 


90,525 


3,748 


22 


6,125 53 


529 18 


72 74 


3,959 19 


10,686 64 


34,800 


1,580 


23 


29,004 08 


1,473 56 


200 23 


17,624 68 


48,302 55 


105,796 


4,223 


24 


2,619 25 


485 77 


51 28 


699 81 


3,856 11 


7,000 


650 


25 


11,912 50 


1,007 64 


478 74 


2,334 84 


15,733 72 


39,300 


2,065 


26 


5,928 75 


400 79 


72 72 


2,316 81 


8,719 07 


11,600 


997 


27 


100,838 50 


40,074 73 


2,201 54 


85,730 16 


228,844 93 


249,882 


8,157 




396,630 87 


102,183 80 


7,460 72 


205,809 76 


712,085 15 


1,242,359 


55,588 


1 


3,200 00 






3,523 19 


6,723 19 


117,000 


500 


2 


9,003 25 


5,195 75 


io 66 


15,343 60 


29,552 60 


60,000 


1,100 


3 


5,870 00 


38,054 01 


19 00 


4,386 48 


48,329 49 


80,000 


2,200 


4 


21,101 50 


545 47 




18,066 17 


39,713 14 


250,000 


810 


5 


3,300 00 




22 66 


978 55 


4,300 55 


9,800 


250 


6 


8,521 77 


11,847 99 


678 01 


6,818 66 


27,866 43 


90,000 


1,000 


7 


57,928 00 


69,473 67 


6.232 46 


51,117 96 


184,752 09 


800,000 


7,000 


8 


10,750 00 


8,739 00 


630 00 


8,028 46 


28,147 46 


90,000 


3,500 


9 


14,390 00 


12,962 09 


388 11 


9,941 84 


37,682 04 


180,000 


2,000 


10 


21,516 75 


5,958 99 


3,593 72 


14,895 18 


45,964 64 


280,000 


7,400 


11 


6,887 50 


1.249 24 


54 50 


1,995 46 


10,186 70 


60,000 


783 


12 


139,357 61 


8,480 84 


5,760 05 


* 89,729 94 


243,328 44 


855,102 


18,655 


13 


2,397 50 


374 43 


89 42 


1,579 50 


4,440 85 


10,000 


475 


14 


12,511 30 


708 00 




12,922 00 


26,141 30 


140,160 


6,350 


15 


8,630 00 


5,394 25 


' 145 50 


18,800 37 


32,970 12 


102,000 


751 


16 


11,552 00 


13,005 25 


1,767 58 


53,431 34 


79,756 17 


125,000 


2,922 


17 


3,223 75 


803 27 


217 33 


3,031 38 


7,275 73 


34,000 


1,335 


18 


4,156 0C 


851 42 


54 95 


4,762 95 


9,825 32 


33,000 


1,300 


19 


26,540 85 


1,365 38 


1,181 28 


27,168 96 


56,256 47 


275,000 


1.000 


20 


5,168 5C 


56,183 25 




12,232 82 


73,584 57 


90,000 


1,500 


21 


274,558 0C 


448,243 36 


6,188' 15 


239,068 13 


968,057 64 


2,863,595 


19,310 


22 


30,327 2C 


14,817 4C 


5,859 14 


66,654 06 


117,657 80 


1,250,000 


9,578 


23 


1,691 25 






1,662 59 


3,353 84 


20,000 


1,265 




682,582 n 


704,253 06 


32,891 2f 


666,139 59 


2,085.866 58 


7,814,657 


90,984 



148 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 

I. TABLE F.— FINANCIAL 



Towns 



Receipts 



#2 

JO 



2S 



3^ 



C/)T3 £ 

.. C 3 
m (d O 

C l) u 

Mai 

M &0 



3 
O 

< £ 

"c3'S 

+-> u 

o <l> 



1 Alexandria. . . , 

2 Almonte 

Amherstburg. 

Arnprior 

Barrie 

Blind River. . 
Bonfield 

8 Brockville.... 

9 Cache Bay. . . 

10 Campbellford. 

11 Charlton 

12 Chelmsford... 

13 Cobalt 

14 Cobourg 

15 Cochrane 

16 Collingwood. . 

17 Cornwall 

18 Dundas 

19 Eastview 

20 Ford 

21 Fort Frances. . 

22 Gananoque. . . . 

23 Goderich 

24 Hanover 

25 Haileybury. . . . 

26 Hawkesbury. . 

27 Hespeler 

28 Ingersoll 

29 Iroquois Falls. 

30 Kearney 

31 Keewatin 

32 Kenora , 

33 Lindsay 

34 Little Current 

35 Massey 

36 Mattawa 

37 Merritton 

38 Mount Forest. 

39 New Liskeard . 

40 Newmarket . . , 

41 North Bay 

42 Oakville 

43 Orillia 

44 Oshawa 

45 Paris 

46 Parkhill 

47 Pembroke 

48 Perth 

49 Picton 

50 Prescott 

5 1 Preston 

52 Rainy River.. . 

53 Renfrew 

54*Rocklanrl 



$ c. 
267 51 
101 08 
319 88 
267 03 

77 05 
935 00 
995 00 
220 98 
448 10 

64 94 
695 00 
745 00 
707 33 
232 44 



87 44 
612 05 
104 40 



349 93 
84 59 
90 83 
76 09 
52 05 

246 12 



36 45 
128 00 
,286 00 
710 00 
330 00 
182 20 
266 59 
755 00 
535 00 
,471 80 

60 78 
472 52 
320 00 

38 38 
877 21 

48 48 
134 22 
133 77 

65 74 
373 91 
420 96 
148 79 

29 51 
113 98 
184 72 
252 00 
322 57 



$ 
8,654 
1,613 
6,382 
8,920 
3,863 
4,000 
633 
7,044 
1,646 
1,350 
1,658 
2,684 

15,166 
4,050 
3,728 
3,200 

14,369 
2,591 

11,987 

15,487 
4,120 
2,300 
1,799 
2,346 
5,125 

18,045 
1,081 
2,612 

16,020 

834 

800 

2,890 

8,411 

300 

1,470 

4,244 

3,363 

1,288 

1,825 

1,353 

18,440 

1,343 

5,151 

4,269' 

945 

832 

15,219 
5,269 
1,053 
3,072 
6,385 
868 

11,457 
7,777 



$■ c. 



5,961 00 



3,000 00 
76,000 00 



600 00 



$ c. 
186 11 

2,534 64 
415 70 

3,102 78 
378 52 
174 19 

1,434 61 

1,516 00 
299 63 
485 06 
248 36 
278 21 

1,413 74 

579 42 

17,590 70 

377 30 

900 00 

1,948 84 
834 02 

6,506 72 

1,184 40 

47,849 71 

421 25 



11,442 39 

10,204 42 

983 02 

1,597 71 

2,810 56 

21 26 

114 81 

3,888 94 

3,065 60 

678 00 

355 48 

1,581 42 

1,612 25 

1,414 81 

124 90 

1,459 12 

13,624 63 

812 83 

3,634 98 

147 35 
1,181 96 

168 22 
549 48 
673 11 
576 83 
5,021 70 
968 25 

148 37 
780 30 



$ c. 

9,108 05 

4,249 36 

7,118 54 

18,251 74 
4,318 
5,109 



92 
19 
3,063 33 



72 
IS 



8,781 

2,394 

1,900 00 

2,601 47 

3,707 30 
17,288 06 

4,861 86 
21,319 35 

3,664 74 
15,881 59 

4,644 77 
15,821 66 
98,344 15 

5,389 31 
50,240 54 

2.296 54 
2,398 60 

16,813 51 

28,850 33 
2,100 59 
4,338 61 

21,117 42 
1,565 29 
1,244 81 
6,961 88 

11,743 69 
1,733 
2,361 

8.297 99 
5,036 79 
3,175 43 
2,269 90 
2,850 89 

32,942 41 
2,205 13 
8,920 81 
4,550 76 
2,193 16 
1,374 

16,190 
6,091 
1,659 34 
8,207 74 
7,538 55 
1,268 67 

12,560 41 
7.777 25 



00 
12 



19 
16 

86 



*No report for 1922 received; figures of a former year. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



149 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 
STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 


of School 
Buildings 
urniture 








fclfl 
2 to 

■3 j 


c/f 

a 

<3 tn 

. 2 -o 8 

.2 3 «™ 


J 8 

J3 tn 


c 

3 

<T3 


c 
g 




<-> b 
He/) 


CO o 

c/5c/) 


* b b m 

_J<0- 1 c/} 




4-> On 
O X 

hid 


►*•- G 


0) ex 
a 0* 




$ c. 


1 $ c. 


$ c. 


% C. 


J> c. 


$ 


$ 


1 


4,720 00 


382 37 


171 33 


3,465 64 


8,739 34 


24,000 


600 


2 


2,146 08 


27 00 


13 35 


425 23 


2.611 66 


6,000 


500 


3 


2,410 00 


357 86 


87 02 


3,408 45 


6,263 33 


38,000 


1,500 


4 


5,698 75 


6,182 72 


1,112 31 


3,873 80 


16,867 58 


43,000 


1,000 


5 


1,950 00 




25 00 


1,494 01 


3,469 01 


10,500 


800 


6 


3,820 00 


' '7574 


55 00 


627 10 


4,577 84 


15,000 


150 


7 


1,497 50 






431 98 


1,929 48 


1,500 


120 


8 


2,510 00 


1,549*27 


"75'00 


3,266 88 


7,401 15 


38,000 


561 


9 


1,243 14 


758 16 




375 08 


2,376 38 


3,000 


125 


10 


1,500 00 






400 00 


1,900 00 


2,500 


50 


11 


930 00 


"75 '66 




175 00 


1,180 00 






12 


2,320 00 


339 20 




923 97 


3,583 17 


' 4,000 


"l50 


13 


8,676 04 




2,765 28 


4,520 35 


15,961 67 


62,000 


621 


14 


2,800 00 


1,112' 11 




887 74 


4,799 85 


17,500 


350 


15 


3,945 00 


15,003 38 




1,855 79 


20,804 17 


40.000 


500 


16 


1,900 00 




"79 04 


1,317 44 


3,296 48 


21,500 


500 


17 


10,535 50 


"375'66 




4,301 41 


15,211 91 


35,000 


1,000 


18 


2,004 75 


1,095 16 


"28 84 


521 00 


3,649 75 


5,000 


300 


19 


6,505 00 


2,385 59 


184 55 


6,589 08 


15,664 22 


55,500 


147 


20 


5,200 00 


85,461 04 


136 12 


7,201 50 


97,998 66 


105,750 


850 


21 


2,444 54 


12 86 




1,220 84 


3,678 24 


45,000 


100 


22 


2,356 25 


18 00 




44.868 58 


47,242 83 


40,000 


500 


23 


750 00 


7 50 


"5*60 


1,449 94 


2,213 04 


8,300 


385 


24 


1,375 00 


83 85 


65 07 


403 05 


1,926 97 


500 


119 


25 


5,213 55 


1,005 48 


8 79 


9,073 81 


15,301 63 






26 


9,860 00 


1,272 42 


604 75 


16,676 45 


28,413 62 


87,800 


' *543 


27 


1,260 00 


321 S3 


57 35 


461 41 


2,100 59 


5,700 


120 


28 


1,617 92 


1,667 67 




559 30 


3,844 89 


14,000 


424 


29 


5,330 00 


6,664 43 


"46982 


5,316 24 


17,780 49 


50,000 


484 


30 


1,060 00 


105 56 


10 00 


197 00 


1,372 56 


1,500 


150 


31 


824 75 






328 35 


1,153 10 


3,000 


200 


32 


2,268 75 


"200' 00 




2,459 57 


4,928 32 


40,000 


190 


33 


5,520 00 


1,887 67 


"l45'00 


944 38 


8,497 05 


40,000 


1,200 


34 


1,217 50 




111 50 


404 00 


1,733 00 


5,000 


1,000 


35 


1,618 00 


"4846 




514 53 


2,180 99 


2,000 


250 


36 


5,037 50 


724 76 


' Hl'97 


1,541 30 


7,415 53 


17,100 


870 


37 


1,850 00 


325 65 


16 80 


448 12 


2,640 57 


25,000 


226 


38 


1,400 00 


56 32 


30 50 


476 92 


1,963 74 


4,500 


257 


39 


909 64 


9 90 


11 15 


1,262 53 


2,193 22 


2,300 


153 


40 


1,220 00 


763 57 




271 46 


2,255 03 


5,000 


300 


41 


15,487 58 


9,985 19 


"207*63 


7,262 01 


32,942 41 


90,000 


663 


42 


900 00 


619 42 




410 12 


1,929 54 


3,000 


100 


43 


2,000 00 


360 13 


"3861 


1,639 21 


4,037 95 


11,000 


1,100 


44 


3,325 00 


98 20 


131 82 


990 72 


4,545 74 


50,000 


1,000 


45 


1,230 00 


187 75 




667 97 


2,085 72 


15,000 


253 


46 


973 75 






100 17 


1,073 92 


3,000 


100 


47 


10,527 00 


"652 '44 


'43*87 


4,170 62 


15,393 93 


48,000 


2,000 


48 


2,461 75 


2,000 00 




679 73 


5,141 48 


4,500 


620 


49 


800 00 


13 50 


"24 '85 


155 49 


993 84 


4,300 


150 


50 


2,637 96 




104 95 


1,421 41 


4,164 32 


20,000 


1,500 


51 


2,068 75 


"384'47 


272 01 


2,090 76 


4,815 99 


45,000 


1,500 


52 


816 75 


139 13 


50 00 


188 38 


1,194 26 


5,000 


100 


53 


5,669 03 


917 54 


101 75 


5,601 74 


12,290 06 


60,000 


568 


54 


5.200 00 


425 OOl 


450 00 


1,702 25 


7,777 25 


75,000 


600 



150 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
I. TABLE F.— FINANCIAL 





Receipts 


Towns 


0) 

> 

a to 

S C 

JO 


C -M 

C< en 


CO 

CD 

u 

3 

-t-> 
G 

CO 

Q 


u 

CO 

J3 

■S© 

. C 
to d 

C 0L» O 

w r! 


a 


< £ 
3*8 

O CO 

HC4 


55 St. Mary's 


$ c. 

55 56 

882 79 

636 42 

173 84 

5,311 94 

1,264 08 

272 00 

340 71 

190 00 

379 74 

159 15 

194 13 

207 81 

143 93 

230 40 

283 42 

48 85 

40 36 


$ c. 
1,323 11 

15,997 99 
2,037 90 
3,544 72 

20,361 00 

33,486 59 

7,367 98 

9,300 00 

630 10 

28,492 02 
6,200 00 
2,563 37 
3,125 05 
3,373 87 
6,858 17 
8,454 16 
5,034 42 
1,162 42 


$ c. 

25,080 95 
40,265 21 

26,774 41 


$ c. 

2,526 87 

5,884 61 

2,352 59 

4,859 02 

16,302 88 

11,685 10 

1,572 24 

55 95 

4,145 27 

1,973 36 

1,333 33 

551 46 

2,721 83 

1,242 63 

4,224 54 

726 80 

53 34 

1,168 67 


$ c. 
3,905 54 


56 Sandwich 

57 Seaforth 

58 Smith's Falls 

59 Sturgeon Falls 

60 Sudbury 


22,765 39 

5,026 91 

8,577 58 

67,056 77 

86,700 98 


61 Tecumseh 


9,212 22 


62 Thorold. . . . 


9,696 66 


63 Tilbury 


4,965 37 


64 Timmins 


57,619 53 


65 Trenton 


7,692 48 


66 VankleekHill 

67 Walkerton 


3,308 96 
6,054 69 


68 Walkerville 


4,760 43 


69 Wallaceburg 


11,313 11 


70 Waterloo 


• 9,464 38 


71 Weston ! 


5,136 61 


72 Whitby.. . . 


2,371 45 






Totals 


30,293 55 


440,667 50 


177,681 57 


223,683 10 


872,325 72 






Totals 

1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities 


134,127 90 

23,513 18 

30,293 55 

8,027 91 


370,308 66 

1,314,489 25 

440,667 50 

29,519 20 


59,086 96 
601,119 17 
177,681 57 

12,000 00 


303,129 48 

291,245 33 

223,683 10 

30,150 96 


866,653 00 
2,230,366 93 


3 Towns 


872,325 72 


4 Villages 


79,698 07 






5 Grand Totals, 1922... . 

6 Grand Totals, 1921.. . . 


195,962 54 
196,283 29 


2,154,984 61 
1,980,311 72 


849,887 70 
771,474 11 


848,208 87 
780,771 58 


4,049,043 72 
3,728,840 70 


7 Increases 


320 '75 


174,672 89 


78,413 59 


67,437 29 


320,203 02 


8 Decreases 








9 Percentages 


4.83 


53.22 


20.99 


20.95 









1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



151 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

STATEMENT, ETC. (Concluded) 



Expenditure 




+j 






bo 








<1> 




<u 


c 


_ 








<p. 




u 

a 

"3 

CO 


2 w 


co 




c 

§T3 


111 


a, 

'3 

cr 
W 




eo 


■§E 


£ 5 G DQ 


.G co 


eld 

<T3 


OpQ £ 


"o 




■9 


co O 


S ^ ^ 8 


oR 




3 to 1 ^ 1 


3 






fiJa 


r£ Co. u o 


Im 

S3 3 


O X 




*cd 




H 


CO CO 


hJ<DhCO 


<&H 


hU 


>CO at 


> 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ 


$ 


55 


1,027 50 


1,770 00 


30 00 


565 40 


3,392 90 


5,000 


172 


56 


6,460 00 


129 43 




15,906 80 


22,496 23 


169,019 


700 


57 


1,992 00 




35 57 


637 64 


2,665 21 


6,900 


460 


58 


3,414 30 




23 22 


4,341 46 


7,778 98 


50,000 


1,862 


59 


13,544 20 






51,270 89 


64,815 09 


80,000 


1,500 


60 


25,755 30 


42,571 81 


2,042 61 


15,670 38 


86,040 10 


180,000 


2,000 


61 


3,600 00 


858 04 


66 31 


3,334 21 


7,858 56 


8,000 


510 


62 


6,193 50 


185 74 


47 03 


2,774 69 


9,200 96 


31,000 


1,513 


63 


2,450 00 


393 48 




1,007 18 


3,850 66 


12,000 


334 


64 


11.196 22 


33,332 31 




10,478 49 


55,007 02 


81,000 


1,000 


65 


2,910 00 


929 13 


32 05 


2,050 74 


5,921 92 


10,235 


765 


66 


1,906 25 




179 51 


250 00 


2,335 76 


20,000 


307 


67 


3,250 00 


1,033 20 


56 40 


1,183 25 


5,522 85 


20,000 


1,120 


68 


1,740 00 


152 83 


550 62 


1,470 20 


3,913 65 


15,000 


638 


69 


2,882 50 


4,095 25 


119 43 


2,246 63 


9,343 81 


30,000 


997 


70 


3,682 50 


539 08 


168 70 


2,002 59 


6,392 87 


25,000 


1,000 


71 


1,945 40 


914 62 


114 60 


630 50 


3,605 12 


29,200 


310 


72 


1,124 50 


114 02 


23 20 


780 34 


2,042 06 


3,500 


125 


274,616 90 


233,157 24 


11,295 88 


278,621 20 


797,691 22 


2,134,104 


42,862 


1 


396,630 87 


102,183 80 


7,460 72 


205,809 76 


712,085 15 


1,242,359 


55,588 


2 


682,582 73 


704,253 06 


32,891 20 


666,139 59 


2.085,866 58 


7,814,657 


90,984 


3 


274,616 90 


233,157 24 


11,295 88 


278,621 20 


797,691 22 


2,134,104 


42,862 


4 


28,564 03 


19,937 08 


654 12 


13,920 44 


63,075 67 


164,125 


6,645 


5 1,382,394 53 


1,059,531 18 


52,301 92 


1,164,490 99 


3,658,718 62 


11,355,245 


196,079 


6 1,236,960 97 


1,086,551 26 


40,224 4C 


1,000,883 11 


3,364,619 74 


9,670,626 


308,507 


7 


145,433 St 





12,077 52 


163,607 88 


294,098 88 


1,684,619 




8 




27,020 0$ 










112,428 


9 


37.78 


28.96 


1.43 


31.83 









Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance: Rural Schools, $34.16; Cities, $48.53 
$34.89; Villages, $33.83; Province, $41.32. 



152 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE G.— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 



Rural Schools 

















Teachers 


























•o o 


-a o 


J 






























ii"E 


«'C 


»3 






























T3 pj 


12 cd 


O . 




























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C ■!-> 


CJ-O 

^u 

T)S 
cu o 

c° 

So 

o-= 

•§3 


>> 










>> 

s 

e 
11 

1* 

03 
M 

Ih 

CJ 

•a 

e 






co 

"o 
o 

j3 
cj 

V) 

d 


co 

cu 

JS 

o 
rt 

d 


a) 
3 


S 
to 


4> 

13 

S 

>i 

J2 
"3 

CU 
60 

aj 


a 

cu 

>; 

u 
.3 

*c3 

u 

60 
cfl 

H 

(LI 


u— « 

>•* 

CD o 

£•§ 
^ <-> 


SO 
go 

<"« 

> o 

cu o 
<VXl 

> o 
cocfl 

Si S 

62 


'3 

cu 
> 

'2 


a) 
O 

O ai 

CO ** 

cs6 


co 

CO 

u 

o c 

(OfN 
(O 

Ji 

c c 

CN —i 


CO 

O 
•d 




cu 
•d 

2 

60 

c 
c 

CD 

a 

p 


2 

O 

a 
S 


£ 


£ 


£ 


<. 


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£ CU 


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ro 


s 


£ 


Oh 


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13 

14 



Bruce 

Carleton. . . . 

Essex 

Frontenac . . 

Grey 

Hastings. . . . 
Huron 

8 Kent 

9 Lambton . . . 

10 Lanark 

11 Leeds and 

Grenville . . 

12 Lennox and 
Addington . 

Middlesex. . 
Norfolk 

15 Northumberl'd 

and Durham. 

16 Ontario 

17 Peel 

18. Perth 

19 Peterborough . 

20 Prescott and 

Russell 

21 Renfrew 

22 Simcoe 

23 Stormont, Dun- 

das, Glengarry 

24 Victoria . . . 

25 Waterloo . . 

26 Wellington. 

27 Districts.. . 



Totals 

Cities 

1 Belleville 

2 Brantford. .. . 

3 Chatham .... 

4 Fort William 

5 Gait 

6 Guelph 

7 Hamilton .... 

8 Kingston .... 

9 Kitchener. . . . 

10 London 

11 Niagara Falls . 

12 Ottawa 

13 Owen Sound . . 

14 Peterborough . 

15 Port Arthur.. . 

16 St. Catharines. 

17 St. Thomas. . . 

18 Sarnia 

19 S. Ste. Marie.. 

20 Stratford . . 

21 Toronto. . . 

22 Windsor . . . 

23 Woodstock. 



9 

21 

28 

11 

7 

6 

8 

8 

1 

3 

2 

2 
5 
1 

6 
1 

1 

7 

5 

101 

16 

4 

23 

2 

7 

6 

98 

389 

1 

2 
2 
6 
1 
3 

17 
3 
3 
9 
1 

30 
1 
5 

2 
5 
1 
2 
6 
2 
34 


14 

28 

40 

11 

7 

6 

10 
9 
1 
3 

2 

2 
5 
1 

6 

2 

1 

13 

5 

138 
26 

8 

35 
3 

13 

6 

136 


1 

i 

i 

i 

2 

3 

1 
10 


14 

28 

40 

10 

7 

6 

9 

8 

1 

2 

2 

2 
5 
1 

6 

2 

1 

13 

5 

136 
26 

8 

32 
3 

12 

6 

126 


1000 

1,050 
1,100 

1,200 

900 

792 
1,200 
1,005 


$1011 
698 
870 
965 
957 
975 

1,044 
944 

1,000 
900 

750 

925 
1,060 
1,000 

942 
1,050 
1,100 

708 
1,075 

513 
912 

800 

886 
1,133 
1,079 

975 
830 


13 

23 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 

1 

92 
6 

2 

15 

"85 


7 
11 
16 
9 
6 
5 

10 
5 
1 
3 

1 

1 

4 
1 

6 

2 

1 

11 

5 

4 

20 

5 

16 
2 

11 
6 

13 


1 


1 


1 


9 

10 
15 
9 
6 
5 
7 
4 
1 
3 

1 

1 
4 

1 

6 

2 

1 

10 

5 

4 

18 

5 

14 

2 
10 

5 
13 








4 

i 


"9 

1 


7 

22 

1 


2 




1 
1 
1 




1 

1 

1 










1 
1 
4 










1 


- 1 


2 
1 




























































1 








1 








1 




1 




































































3 


1 


3 






















1 




1 
2 


73 
5 
2 

12 


18 

1 




3 


39 










1 
3 


"i 


1 


3 

1 
1 
1 
1 






3 








2 














1 




48 


25 






49 


531 


20 


511 


989 


780 


246 


182 


12 


A 


21 


171 


177 


46 




13 


103 


8 
15 
10 
27 

4 

14 
90 
19 
27 
36 

8 
227 

4 
32 
13 
15 

6 

9 

32 

10 

262 


5 

1 

"l 
11 

26 


8 
15 
10 
27 

4 
14 
85 
18 
27 
29 

8 
186 

4 
32 
13 
15 

6 

9 

32 

10 

236 


1,300 
2,000 

' 960 

"757 


594 
695 

575 
791 
825 
579 
621 
500 
585 
524 
862 
567 
587 
435 
723 
843 
533 
556 
812 
500 
1,000 
608 
550 


1 

18 

"l 
167 

' A 
3 

2 

' 8 

2 

28 


7 

6 

10 

25 

4 

9 

59 

14 

19 

27 

8 

59 

3 








7 
6 

10 

24 

4 

9 

58 

14 

19 

27 

7 

59 

3 

25 

11 

10 

4 

6 

24 

7 

200 








1 
6 


3 




3 




















1 


1 




1 
















1 
3 






4 
16 

3 
4 
1 

16 

1 

"2 
4 
2 
2 

"i 

33 


"3 
25 

1 


10 

2 
4 

8 


7 


10 
2 
4 

8 














119 


'5 


1 




2 


3 


25 

11 

11 

4 

6 

24 

6 

198 


4 


2 


4 






3 


1,090 


1 




1 














1 




1 








5 

1 

5 


2 


'5 


1 
19 


10 


1 
19 


8 
1 

145 


49 
3 


49 
3 




44 
3 








43 
3 


3 




1 


2 


























920 


80 


840 


S933 


$719 


234 


582 


53 


22 


56 


580 


138 


8 


10 


99 


29 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



153 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. 



o 



Z-6 


C 












E 

a 




m rt 


M 




bg 








T3 




la 

rt to 


S 


c3 


.g« 


<n 






a 


T3 


Mo 


3 


cd >-. 


ri~ 






£2S 


PJ0 




S o 






ta o 



O 



294 

634 

897 

134 

76 

85 

171 

178 

20 

34 

14 

13 
64 
13 

55 

42 

16 

229 

123 

20 2,923 

21 503 

22 184 

654 
57 

229 

82 

2,816 



274 

545 

846 

120 

84 

69 

166 

191 

20 

35 

7 

18 
36 
21 

49 
56 

7 

275 

90 

2,863 
481 
200 

706 

50 

234 

89 

2,773 



439 

747 

1,176 

162 

106 

98 

249 

247 

30 

51 

11 

19 
79 
29 

68 

63 

12 

391 

149 

3,988 
665 
270 

870 

78 

353 

116 

3,515 



80 
80 

77 
70 
77 
81 
$2 
73 
86 
83 

60 

65 
90 

94 

72 
70 
04 
88 
76 

82 
91 

80 

85 
9o 
83 
82 
80 



148 



355 



80 

443 

501 

53 

24 

32 

51 

90 

4 

12 



18 
13 

7 
71 
35 

2,284 
204 
109 

359 

9 

62 

37 

2,459 



75 

209 

269 

9 

17 

18 

29 

67 

5 

4 

2 

2 
13 

5 

10 
16 



98 

226 

341 

42 

28 

34 

55 

63 

6 

10 



21 



66 

24 

1,065 
144 

50 

219 
12 
72 
15 

959 



60 
53 

1,087 
164 

80 

213 
16 
90 
24 

911 



156 
158 
348 
63 
41 
26 
65 
85 
15 
22 

2 



25 



22 
15 
5 
92 
34 

767 
170 

75 

180 
11 

121 
44 

539 



141 

132 

263 

83 

47 

35 

103 

62 

10 

18 



10 



36 


1 


10 




33 




12 


33 


7 


4 


101 


114 


67 




365 


70 


175 


127 


70 





216 
29 
98 
51 

353 



173 
30 
20 



13 



568 

1,175 

1,732 

254 

160 

154 

320 

369 

40 

69 

21 

31 

100 

34 

104 

98 

23 

437 

213 

4,980 
881 

384 

1,261 
107 

463 
171 

5,572 



486 

784 

1,163 

254 

137 

154 

282 

227 

36 

69 

21 

31 
99 
34 

104 

98 

16 

364 

213 

3,637 
724 
384 

998 
107 
401 
134 
4,958 



10,540 



10,305 



13,981 



81.44 



503 



6,984 



3,376 



3,661 



3,097 



2,533 



691 



19,721 



15,915 



163 
402 
245 
756 
97 
392 

2,058 
376 
627 
734 
199 

5,156 
88 
694 
334 
360 
121 
183 
846 
252 

6,384 
- 22 1,407 
23 55 



183 
399 
199 
741 
110 
299 

1,891 
403 
653 
681 
189 

5,096 
88 
759 
320 
389 
126 
168 
819 
227 

5,99-1 

1,247 
64 



271 
630 
349 

1,202 
158 
546 

2,960 
66 
982 

1,035 
250 

8,66 
128 

1,247 
490 
532 
195 
299 

1,206 
372 

8,798 

1,736 
91 



40 



4> 



157 

190 
49 



83 
165 

94 
451 

40 
170 
1,002 
142 
210 
324 

45 
2,609 

30 
245 

62 
141 

44 

93 
354 

78 

2,615 

696 

20 



55 
207 

90 
196 

32 
106 
685 
124 
190 
186 

81 
1,627 

22 
201 
103 
142 

35 

52 
268 

84 

1,713 

435 

20 



51 

73 

85 
323 

39 
113 
620 
119 
261 
211 

67 
2,217 

38 
239 
143 
166 

36 

63 
300 

92 

2,245 

639 

14 



78 
217 

85 
349 

50 
156 
775 
196 
292 
299 

92 
1,870 

40 
293 
163 
161 

79 

66 

271 

113 

2,496 

502 

39 



79 
139 

90 
178 

46 
146 
533 
198 
262 
228 

63 
1,524 

46 
234 
135 
139 

53 

53 

307 

112 

2,279 

333 

26 



334 



65 
167 



405 
241 



840 



346 

801 

• 444 

1,497 
207 
691 

3,765 
779 

1,280 

1,415 

388 

10,252 

176 

1,453 
654 
749 
247 
351 

1,665 
479 
378 

2,654 
119 



12 



346 
636 
350 

1,046 
167 
521 

3,949 
779 

1,070 

1,415 
388 

8,574 
146 

1,453 
654 
749 
247 
258 

1,056 

401 

12,378 

2,654 
119 



21,929 21,045 32,808 85.42 484 9,713 6,654 8,154 8,682 7,203 2,084 42,790 39,356 42,974 



154 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 

II. TABLE G— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 



Rural Schools 



































a 












































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a 


















>> 


o 


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■o 












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3 


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CU 


« 


< 



Bruce 

Carleton 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Hastings 

Huron 

8 Kent 

9 Lambton 

10 Lanark 

11 Leeds and 

Grenville. . . . 

12 Lennox and 

Addington . . . 

13 Middlesex 

14 Norfolk 

15 Northumberl'd 

and Durham. 

16 Ontario 

17 Peel 

18 Perth 



19 Peterborough.. 

20 Prescott and 

Russell 

21 Renfrew 

22 Simcoe 

23 Stormont, Dun- 

das&Glengarry 

24 Victoria 

25 Waterloo 

26 Wellington. . . . 

27 Districts 



Totals 

Cities 

1 Belleville 

2 Brantford 

3 Chatham 

Fort William . . 

Gait 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Kingston 

Kitchener 

10 London 

11 Niagara Falls. . 

12 Ottawa 

13 Owen Sound.. . 

14 Peterborough.. 

15 Port Arthur. . . 

16 St. Catharines. 

17 .St. Thomas. . . 

18 Sarnia 

19 S. Ste. Marie.. 

20 Stratford 

21 Toronto 

22 Windsor 

23 Woodstock. . . . 



568 

1,111 

1,499 

254 

160 

154 

337 

279 

40 

69 

21 

31 

100 

34 

104 

98 

23 

504 

213 

3,407 

768 
384 

1,117 
107 

•463 
171 

4,988 



17,004 



346 
801 
444 

1,497 
207 
691 

3,949 
779 

1,280 

1,415 
388 

8,574 
176 

1,453 
654 
749 
247 
351 

1,098 

479 

12,378 

2,654 
119 



568 

1,134 

1,613 

254 

160 

154 

337 

290 

40 

69 

21 

31 

100 

34 

104 

98 

23 

504 

213 

4,129 

773 
384 

1,195 
107 
463 
171 

5,016 



17,985 



156 

123 

522 

87 

48 

58 

122 

95 

10 

21 



15 
37 
10 

33 
39 
11 
134 
68 



308 
119 

367 

29 

98 

51 

544 



4,998 



346 
801 
444 

1,497 
207 
691 

3,949 
779 

1,280 

1,415 

388 

10,252 

176 

1,453 
654 
749 
247 
351 

1,144 

479 

12,378 

2,654 
119 



220 

187 

451 

150 

67 

70 

133 

76 

16 

43 



13 
60 

18 

61 
52 
11 
170 
97 

842 
371 
160 

329 

37 

153 

66 

845 



4,707 



95 
139 

90 
178 

46 
146 
867 
198 
327 
395 

63 
8,574 

46 
514 
135 
139 

53 

77 

249 

112 

3,119 

333 

26 



413 

490 

775 

156 

119 

84 

225 

182 

31 

43 



19 

54 
18 

61 

64 

16 

264 

106 

3,296 

475 
193 

468 

56 

329 

119 

3,872 



11,937 



246 
222 
131 
527 
69 
214 

1,642 
175 
394 
529 
155 

8,574 
64 
949 
233 
300 
132 
61 
599 
166 

5,615 

456 

65 



246 
429 
260 
850 
135 
415 

1,642 
338 
880 
696 
155 

8,574 
124 
949 
441 
300 
132 
206 
599 
317 

5,615 
570 
6 



568 

1,076 

1,200 

254 

160 

154 

337 

221 

40 

69 

21 

31 
99 
34 

104 

98 

23 

504 

213 

4,347 
706 

384 

874 
107 
463 
171 
5,082 



17,340 



568 

1,081 

1,234 

254 

160 

154 

337 

244 

40 

69 

21 

31 
99 
34 

104 

98 

23 

416 

213 

3,697 

755 
384 

860 
107 
443 
171 
5,161 



16,758 



Totals |40,729 42,453 15,921 21,518 23,938 40,788 40,795 42,974 461 1608 1841 1690 



346 
801 
444 

1,497 
207 
691 

3,615 
779 

1,280 

1,241 
388 

8,574 
176 

1,453 
654 
749 
247 
351 

1,665 

479 

12,378 

2,654 
119 



5681. 

1,119 

1,743 

254 

160 

154 

337 

369 

40 

69 



21 

31 
99 
34 

104 

98 

23 

504 

213 

5,324 
903 

384 

1,230 
107 
463 
171 

5,576 



20,098 



346 
801 
444 

1,497 
207 
691 

3,615 
779 

1,280 

1,248 
388 

8,574 
176 

1,453 
654 
749 
247 
351 

1,665 

479 

12,378 

2,654 
119 



21 



26 



346 
801 
444 
497 
207 
691 
,949 
779 
,280 
,415 
3 

,252 
176 
,453 
654 
749 
247 
351 
,665 
479 
,378 
,654 
119 



54 



152 



365 



334 



119 
17 
20 



394 



310 



65 65 

77 112 



549 



100 



250 



475 



332 



150 



840 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



155 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 





a, 
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1 13 


7 






10 
11 

15 
1 
3 
6 

18 
2 


"2 


247 


74 










9 

17 

27 

11 

7 

6 

8 

8 

1 

3 

2 

2 
5 
1 

6 
1 
1 
6 

5 

39 

16 

4 

16 

2 

7 

6 

62 


3,729 
1,758 
3,411 
1,771 
1,944 
1,367 
3,159 
1,498 
300 
256 

248 

191 
844 
340 

1,003 

143 

129 

3,266 

1,093 

2,866 
3,626 
1,166 

3,294 

598 

2,620 

1,230 

2,582 


$1,510 

772 

1,520 

919 


2 ... 
3 


10 
12 


871 
1,321 


151 

190 

112 

88 

45 

121 

120 

25 

42 

8 

13 

38 


279 




1 




1 


1 




4 






5 










5 2 




2 






14 










663 


6 


3 










488 


7 13 




10 


"239 




30 




1 


1 




1,207 
492 


8 






9 




















90 


10 3 




3 
1 




















1 


122 


11 1 




1 








1 

1 








61 


12 






1 






2 


90 


13 




















396 


14 


























107 


15 












55 

39 

16 

196 

110 






1 










461 


16 33 




33 
4 

73 




33 
















62 


17 4 
















115 


18 74 




70 






107 












881 


19 












375 


20 


20 


70 
74 

241 

28 


5,509 

77 
322 

527 


70 
76 


6 
















1,554 


21 71 


89 

37 

288 
40 

239 
81 
16 


54 




3 
2 










1,479 


22 




1 






480 


23 144 


109 

28 












1,937 


24 28 






2 










218 


25 20 


171 


128 
16 










1,017 
465 


26 




















27 1 




13 


5,095 


1 




1 










1,348 














407 


27 


574 


13961 


454 


8 


2,406 


504 


369 


20 


1 


3 


2 


3 


278 


44,432 


18,829 


1 




























1 

2 
1 
3 
1 
3 

17 
3 
3 
9 
1 

30 
1 
4 
2 
4 
1 
2 
6 
1 

34 
5 
1 


898 

819 
1,777 
1,497 

205 
1,000 
5,279 

999 
2,300 
3,814 
1,194 
9,461 

371 
3,500 

789 
2,103 
1,488 

808 

879 

2,797 

19,345 

3,596 

745 


412 


2 












139 
















396 


3 
















1 










825 


4 












324 
46 
90 

459 














1,230 

75 


5 
















1 


1 




1 




6 














26 


600 


7 280 




304 




86 


54 




17 

1 




1 
1 


17 

3 


2,352 
507 


8 ... 






3 


9 65 




65 

138 








538 

270 

155 

29 






597 


10 152 
11 




162 


5 




271 


9 


9 




1 




1,994 
421 


12 188 
13 




565 


4,154 


259 


51 


2715 


673 


30 


30 


1 


9 

1 


30 


7,227 
202 


14 241 


1 


150 




110 




333 
130 




113 






1,193 
1,158 
1,126 


15 












16 


























17 












93 

22 

261 

140 

475 
54 
74 
















782 


18 24 




24 

8 


"380 


24 

8 


















735 


19 8 


401 
93 

132 














890 


20 


74 
865 






1 

"8 


1 

11 

1 


1 

34 
8 


768 


21 520 
22 




475 


' 300 


380 


275 


34 


34 


12,348 
2,027 


23 












541 






























1,478 


1 


1,729 


4,834 


1029 


385 


3632 


3341 


2022 


78 


92 


10 


27 


93 


135 


65,664 


38,406 



156 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



II. 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
TABLE G— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 



Towns 



Teachers 



JJO 



II 



•o o 

SO 
> o 






rt cs ti 

J=gO 



III 

If! 



°l 

a "g 






.a a 



1 Alexandria.. . 

2 Almonte 

3 Amherstburg. 

4 Arnprior 

5 Barrie 

6 Blind River. . 

7 Bonfield 

8 Brockville 

9 Cache Bay.. . 

10 Campbellford , 

11 Charlton . . . . 

12 Chelmsford. . 

13 Cobalt 

14 Cobourg 

15 Cochrane. . . . 

16 Collingwood. , 

17 Cornwall 

18 Dundas 

19 Eastview 

20 Ford 

21 Fort Frances. , 

22 Gananoque. . . 

23 Goderich 

24 Hanover 

25 Haileybury . . . 

26 Hawkesbury. . 

27 Hespeler 

28 Ingersoll 

29 Iroquois Falls 

30 Kearney 

31 Keewatin 

32 Kenora 

S3 Lindsay 

34 Little Current 

35 Massey 

36 Mattawa 

37 Merritton. . . 

38 Mount Forest 

39 New Liskeard 

40 Newmarket. . 

41 North Bay.. . . 

42 Oakville 

43 Orillia 

44 Oshawa 

45 Paris 

46 Parkhill 

47 Pembroke 

48 Perth 

49 Picton 

50 Prescott 

5 1 Preston 

52 Rainy River. 

53 Renfrew 

54*Rockland.... 



10 



13$. 
3 . . 



1,100 



540 



1,500 



450 



1.600 



1,500 



$ 377 
700 
287 
590 
650 
500 
700 
356 
750 
533 

1,200 

1,125 
742 
700 
468 
950 
553 
483 
469 
506 
500 
525 
375 
750 
683 
294 
900 
575 

1.450 



,150 
900 
500 
629 
,100 
875 
583 
925 
700 
400 
850 
710 
900 
500 
750 
600 
950 
667 
612 
800 
562 
550 
900 
527 
308 



4 
1 
4 

"5 
2 

"2 

' 3 

5 

"l 

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2 
8 
4 


5 

2 

4 

10 

2 








5 
2 
4 
9 
2 


1 






3 
1 
4 
1 
1 

"2 


4 
"1 


















































3 
2 


2 














6 








6 








1 


1 




3 
1 
1 
6 
4 








3 
1 
1 
6 
4 
























1 




1 


1 


2 
4 












3 














1 








6 


2 

10 

1 








2 

10 

1 














4 






3 
2 

"l 


3 

"5 
1 
4 














8 
6 
1 


1 
1 




7 








7 








' 6 

"l 

"l 

3 


3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
4 
1 
1 








3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
4 
1 
1 






1 
1 








































2 
21 








4 


2 




"i 






















































... 














1 


2 






2 


8 
1 
1 
3 

2 

2 








8 
1 
1 
3 

2 
























1 
1 










1 




1 








2 








1 




1 








1 


"2 










"4 


2 
11 








2 
11 
















5 








5 


1 




1 








.... 

'"3 

"l 

"3 
10 


3 
4 
1 
1 
12 
4 
1 
3 
2 
1 
8 


3 
4 
1 

1 
12 

4 
1 
3 
2 








1 
1 

1 














































2 






1 








































1 








1 


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2 












1 


7 






3 

2 


"5 






6 


4 















*No report rereivcd;. figures of a former yeir. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



157 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 











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157 


91 


95 


151 


112 


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606 


606 


606 


2 


56 


58 


96 


97 




19 


20 


21 


29 


25 




114 


96 


114 


3 


168 


194 


280 


85 




71 


49 


53 


88 


71 


30 


349 


191 


362 


4 


210 


219 


361 


95 




115 


76 


83 


95 


60 




429 


314 


429 


5 


80 


61 


94 


93 




29 


19 


25 


35 


33 




141 


112 


141 


6 


143 


179 


251 


92 




108 


60 


60 


55 


39 




322 


322 


322 


7 


59 


54 


69 


84 


27 


7 


7 


34 


21 


17 




113 


72 


113 


8 


184 


160 


249 


86 




59 


50 


73 


81 


• 81 




344 


344 


344 


9 


71 


50 


91 


96 




84 


3 


14 


10 


10 




121 


121 


121 


10 


39 


38 


58 


95 




22 


6 


12 


15 


22 




77 


77 


77 


11 


21 


23 


29 


89 




16 


4 


9 


9 


6 




44 


28 


44 


12 


95 


110 


146 


72 




40 


39 


43 


39 


35 


9 


205 


205 


205 


13 


423 


326 


463 


85 


141 


147 


109 


136 


139 


71 


6 


749 


704 


749 


14 


75 


90 


110 


87 




39 


19 


24 


32 


51 




165 


165 


165 


15 


220 


153 


245 


80 


105 


80 


17 


105 


42 


24 




373 


268 


373 


16 


42 


35 


53 


92 




15 


11 


12 


15 


24 




77 


62 


77 


17 


564 


584 


998 


90 




365 


259 


266 


178 


80 




1,148 


783 


1,1.48 


18 


70 


85 


119 


88 




30 


37 


21 


35 


32 




155 


155 


155 


19 


307 


412 


531 


78 




314 


145 


173 


66 


21 




719 


405 


719 


20 


378 


425 


562 


82 




298 


112 


163 


159 


71 




803 


405 


803 


21 


103 


121 


168 


92 


50 


20 


39 


37 


39 


39 




224 


115 


224 


22 


92 


89 


167 


92 




28 


20 


49 


45 


39 




181 


181 


181 


23 


44 


45 


66 


78 




22 


11 


12 


20 


24 




89 


67 


89 


24 


55 


43 


72 


86 




18 


14 


15 


23 


28 




98 


80 


98 


25 


177 


151 


288 


76 


62 


63 


51 


72 


49 


3'1 




328 


266 


328 


26 


589 


631 


971 


93 




395 


217 


341 


154 


70 


43 


1,062 


1,062 


859 


27 


31 


26 


43 


77 




15 




11 


19 


12 




57 


42 


57 


28 


73 


65 


114 


93 




31 


9 


25 


35 


38 




138 


138 


138 


29 


61 


74 


96 


92 




44 


29 


20 


27 


15 




135 


91 


135 


30 


25 


18 


30 


96 




13 


4 


7 


5 


12 


2 


43 


30 


43 


31 


17 


19 


21 


72 




23 


6 


3 


1 


3 




16 


8 


16 


32 


138 


128 


187 


93 




65 


46 


57 


55 


43 




266 


201 


266 


33 


174 


170 


264 


91 




60 


39 


70 


81 


94 




344 


344 


344 


34 


30 


31 


34 


95 




22 


7 


18 


12 


2 




61 


39 


61 


35 


44 


62 


77 


76 




37 


13 


27 


17 


12 




106 


106 


106 


36 


132 


204 


247 


97 




118 


39 


54 


56 


49 


20 


336 


336 


336 


37 


43 


39 


56 


83 




29 


21 


4 


12 


16 




82 


82 


82 


38 


43 


48 


67 


73 




16 


9 


16 


25 


25 




91 


75 


91 


39 


61 


58 


70 


92 




29 


29 


23 


29 


9 




119 


90 


119 


40 


52 


37 


66 


91 




29 


6 


14 


19 


21 




89 


60 


89 


41 


544 


667 


853 


91 




289 


225 


217 


214 


266 




1,211 


1,211 


1,211 


42 


29 


30 


36 


88 




14 


9 


4 


15 


17 




59 


45 


59 


43 


104 


111 


159 


91 




47 


25 


48 


50 


45 




215 


215 


215 


44 


158 


148 


208 


91 




80 


48 


57 


58 


63 




306 


306 


306 


45 


38 


35 


62 


90 




16 


13 


11 


26 


7 




73 


73 


73 


46. 


19 


12 


19 


80 




8 


7 


5 


7 


4 




31 


23 


31 


47 


385 


314 


492 


98 




176 


87 


117 


165 


154 




699 


699 


699 


48 


104 


99 


166 


98 




28 


25 


45 


46 


59 




203 


203 


203 


49 


10 


19 


18 


93 




10 


1 


7 


7 


4 




29 


29 


29 


50 


•85 


56 


113 


89 




23 


19 


26 


35 


38 




141 


141 


141 


51 


134 


138 


217 


80 




50 


49 


61 


51 


61 




272 


222 


272 


52 


23 
252 


26 
243 


32 
416 


71 
98 




30 
117 


7 
66 


8 
86 


4 
117 






49 
495 


10 

378 


49 


53 


109 




495 


54 


401 


458 


637 






254 


180 


202 


172 


51 




859 


859 


859 



158 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE G— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 



Towns 





c 






o 




01 

3 




c3 

E 


*i 


o 


v 


p. 

s 


a 




o 


1-1 


J 


u 


o 



w 



<u 












a 












<u 
























bo 












>. 












K 




<u 








T3 








TD 




C 


>> 






C 




>> 

M 


T3 

3 

0) 


3 

U 
o 


C 

Si 




2 








^ 


5c 
■c,s 


43 




ctf 


>> 


o 
o 


M 


eu 


z 


Oh 


M 


< 



1 Alexandria . . . 

2 Almonte 

3 Amherstburg. . 

4 Arnprior 

5 Barrie 

6 Blind River . . 

7 Bonfield 

8 Brockville 

9 Cache Bay. . . . 

10 Campbellford . 

11 Charlton 

12 Chelmsford. . . 

13 Cobalt 

14 Cobourg 

15 Cochrane 

16 Collingwood . . 

17 Cornwall 

18 Dundas 

19 Eastview 

20 Ford 

21 Fort Frances. 

22 Gananoque. . . 

23 Goderich 

24 Hanover 

25 Haileybury . . 

26 Hawkesbury. 

27 Hespeler 

28 Ingersoll 

29 Iroquois Falls 

30 Kearney 

31 Keewatin 

32 Kenora 

33 Lindsay 

34 Little Current 

35 Massey 

36 Mattawa 

37 Merritton. ... 

38 Mount Forest 

39 New Liskeard 

40 Newmarket . . 

41 North Bay... 

42 Oakville 

43 Orillia 

44 Oshawa 

45 Paris 

46 Parkhill 

47 Pembroke . . . 

48 Perth 

49 Picton 

50 Prescott 

51 Preston 

52 Rainy River. 

53 Renfrew 

54 Rockland 



606 


606 


112 


114 


114 


35 


362 


362 


71 


429 


429 


60 


141 


141 


33 


322 


322 


39 


92 


113 


17 


344 


344 


81 


121 


121 


10 


77 


77 


22 


44 


28 


6 


205 


205 


44 


749 


749 


135 


165 


165 


83 


171 


268 


24 


77 


77 


24 


1,148 


1,148 


80 


155 


155 


32 


719 


719 


21 


426 


803 


150 


115 


115 


78 


181 


181 


39 


89 


89 


24 


98 


98 


28 


328 


328 


31 


821 


886 


794 


57 


57 


12 


138 


138 


38 


135 


135 


42 


43 


43 


19 


16 


16 




266 


266 


43 


344 


344 


94 


39 


39 


14 


106 


106 


12 


336 


336 


50 


82 


82 


16 


91 


91 


25 


90 


90 


9 


89 


89 


21 


1,211 


1,211 


266 


59 


59 


17 


215 


215 


45 


306 


306 


63 


73 


73 


7 


31 


31 


4 


699 


699 


227 


203 


203 


59 


29 


29 


5 


141 


141 


38 


272 


272 


61 


10 


10 


10 


495 


495 


109 


859 


859 


223 



485 
35 

109 

348 
46 
39 

113 

121 

121 
37 
15 
44 

442 
65 

124 
29 

783 
67 
21 
71 
39 
59 
36 
39 

152 
44 
20 
73 
15 
19 
1 

155 
94 
10 
12 
50 
28 
33 
18 
29 

266 
25 
45 

178 
33 
11 

319 

175 
18 
73 
88 
8 
68 
51 



485 

75 

242 

238 

93 

322 

113 

259 

121 

59 

25 

205 

639 

110 

178 

51 

783 

67 

260 

393 

78 

63 

56 

66 

201 

755 

42 

73 

42 

26 

4 

155 

175 

22 

106 

91 

28 

66 

18 

54 

480 

36 

95 

178 

33 

16 

319 

175 

18 

141 

173 

8 

117 

859 



606 
114 
362 
238 
141 
322 
113 
344 
121 

77 

44 
205 
749 
165 
373 

77 
783 
155 
719 
405 
224 
181 

89 

98 
328 
800 

57 
138 
135 

30 

16 
266- 
344 

61 
106 
336 

82 

91 
119 

89 
1,211 

59 
215 
306 

73 

31 
629 
203 

29 
141 
272 

49 
495 
859 



606 

114 

332 

238 

141 

322 

113 

344 

121 

77 

44 

205 

749 

165 

373 

77 

1,148 

155 

719 

803 

224 

181 

89 

98 

328 

783 

57 

138 

135 

30 

16 

266 

344 

61 

106 

336 

82 

91 

90 

89 

1,211 

59 

215 

306 

73 

31 

629 

203 

29 

141 

272 

49 

495 

859 



606 
114 
362 
429 
141 
322 
113 



121 

77 

44 
205 
749 
165 
373 

77 
1,148 
155 
719 
803 
224 
181 

89 

98 
328 
855 

57 
138 
135 

43 

16 
266 
344 

61 
106 
336 

82 

91 
119 

89 
1,211 

59 
215 
306 

73 

31 
629 
203 

29 
141 
272 

49 
495 
859 



38 



15 



61 



30 



17 



14 



14 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



159 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 





o 
>» 
o> 

i o 
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3 £•£ 
3 bu3 


O 
%% 

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n 

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o 

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& 

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B 

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CO 

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01 

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3 

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o 
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3 
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u 

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M 

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8 

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o 


Miscellaneous 


c 

c 

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3 c! 


.J. c 
co "5 

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en ca o 
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A si c 
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m.S 

3 co 

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lis 


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*c3 ** 
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1 

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6 2 
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S 

> 
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6 


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13 

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1 


























2 


300 

132 

1,519 

811 

492 

237 

24 

1,10C 

67 


$ 400 


2 


























129 


3 16 


14 


100 


23 


5 


94 
















691 


4 
















187 


5 .... 




















1 


1 
1 


1 


468 


6 




301 
113 












1 


1 


132 


7 














7 


8 








31 
















638 


9 




121 




















26 


io 








37 


















Ll 






























12 


9 

6 


196 

378 


9 
6 










1 
1 












11C 
355 
1,222 
143 
586 
950 
305 


137 


13 6 












1 
1 


1 
1 




203 


U .... 








24 


753 


15 




302 














66 


16 








39 


23 


16 












254 


17 




395 
















200 


18 
























137 


19 




719 

547 
52 
























20 








71 












1 






500 

225 


302 


21 


















182 


22 














1 












23 


















1 


1 






432 
139 


162 


24 




















71 


25 . . . . 




164 
1,147 
























26 16 . 


61 


23 


38 




















1,356 
150 
311 
154 
153 
158 
510 

2, IOC 
318 
166 

1,062 
143 
294 
42 
277 
464 
7? 
405 
677 
282 
124 

1,642 
642 
11C 
885 

1,335 

60 

608 


787 


27 ... 


31 

38 










1 


1 




50 


28 


















252 


29 




45 










1 










135 


30 ... 


2 






30 
5 














72 


31 . . . . 
























29 


32 . . . . 




104 




















498 


33 . . . . 
























1,800 


34 . . . . 










10 






1 


1 




1 


1 


808 


35 . . . . 




65 
17 










36 


36 17 1 


7 


316 


15 


70 
















361 


37 
















74 


38 


























85 


39 ... 




116 






















41 


40 ... 
























160 


41 ... 










144 
32 
9 = 










3 

1 


1 
1 


"l 


242 


42 ... 


















22 


43 ... 


















394 


44 ... 














1 


1 




1 




308 


45 ... 


















46 ... 










11 
















39 


47 ... 




162 




















564 


48 ... 
























288 


49 ... 




















1 


1 




40 


50 ... 










io; 


5 








860 


51 ... 
























900 


52 ... 




42 






















60 


53 ... 


















1 




1 


343 


54 ... 




85c 








85S 







































160 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE G— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 





co 

'o 
o 
.5 

W 

"8 

d 


Teachers 




Towns 


tn 

u 
a 
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o 

41 

H 

d 
Z. 


3 


4> 

I 


S 
>I 

Ih 

73 

CO 

0) 

oo 

CO 
<D 
> 
< 


"c3 
£ 

13 

co 
<u 
bo 

03 
V 

> 

< 


tj O 

"SiS 
<U C 

SO 
»-.5 

CI— 1 

So 

«w 

2« 

■gt) 

S3 

Zca 


-a 
£ 

£.5 

o_ 

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*a 

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-a 
-a 
£ o-o 

ca c3 u 


> 

°| 

(u ca 
g-o 
I 2 


CI 


u 

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CO 

J 

J-T3 
tii CN 

Je 

c c 


CO 

c3 

"2 


# CJ 

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co 

s 


ca 

a 

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pf 

c 

V 

C 

ca 

M 

3 


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ID 

2 

60 
C 



a 

CJ 

C 
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6 


>» 

2 

a 
S 
<u 
H 


+3 

fi 


CO 

a 

3 

Ph 

"o 

U 

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s 

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55 St Mary's . 


1 

4 

4 

103 

389 

145 

103 

19 

656 

621 

35 


2 

10 

2 

6 

20 

30 

5 

8 

6 

16 

5 

6 

5 

5 

6 

7 

2 

1 




2 

10 
2 
6 
20 
30 
5 
8 
6 
16 
5 
6 
5 
5 
6 
7 
2 
1 


$..- 


$500 
555 
995 
458 
655 
863 
720 
750 
417 
850 
530 
321 
650 
350 
400 
600 
800 
900 


' 3 

"l6 

17 

4 

1 

3 

5 

4 
1 


2 
7 
2 
6 
1 
13 
1 
6 
1 
4 
4 








2 

7 
2 
6 
1 
13 
1 
7 
1 
4 
4 












53 










3 










545 


















92 


58 Smith's Falls 


















256 


59 SturgeonFalls 

60 Sudbury 








9 

10 
4 


7 

2 






3 

5 


1,036 
1 393 


















264 


62 Thorold . 


1 




1 










472 


63 Tilbury 


3 
5 


2 








327 












7 


808 














1 


260 


66 Vankleek Hil! 








6 

1 






208 


67 Walkerton 


4 
4 
6 
3 

1 
1 


1 


2 


1 


1 

4 
6 
3 
1 
1 






2 




247 


68 Walkerville 


1 




270 


69 Wallaceburg . 

70 Waterloo 














337 














4 




354 




1 




1 








117 


7.2 Whitby 












72 




















Totals 


464 

531 

920 

464 

43 


19 


445 


679 


603 


135 


219 


7 


2 


8 


212 


90 


32 




40 


82 


22863 


Totals 

1 Rural Schools . 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 

4 Villages 


20 
80 
19 


511 

840 

445 

43 


989 
933 
679 


780 
719 
603 

727 


246 

234 

135 

10 


182 
582 
219 

25 


12 

53 
7 
3 


4 

22 

2 

1 


21 

56 
8 
3 


171 

580 
212 

24 


177 

138 

90 

8 


46 

8 

32 


10 


13 
99 
40 

4 


103 
29 

82 
4 


20845 
42974 
22863 
1,864 


5 Grand Totals, 

1922 

6 Grand Totals, 

1921 


1958 
1848 


119 
113 


1839 
1735 


902 
885 


708 
686 


625 
646 


1008 
929 


75 
73 


29 
26 


88 

75 


987 
906 


413 
366 


86 
89 


10 

5 


156 
177 


218 
230 


88546 
83977 




110 


6 


104 


17 


22 


"21 


79 


2 


3 


13 


81 


47 


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5 






4,569 




21 


12 


































6.0 


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31.9 


51.4 


3.8 


1.4 


1.5 


50.4. 


21.1' 


L4 


.5 


L9 


LI. 1 



















1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



161 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 







%* 


c 






















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o 
3 



55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 



22 
308 

54 
123 
530 
708 
139 
242 
167 
396 
132 

98 
135 
141 
163 
165 

58 

32 



11,369 



1 10,540 

2 21,929 

3 11,369 

4 890 



5 44,728 

6 42,140 

7 2,588 

8 

9 50.51 



31 
237 

38 
133 
506 
685 
125 
230 
160 
412 
128 
110 
112 
129 
174 
189 

59 

40 



11,494 



10,305 

21,045 

11,494 

974 



43,818 

41,837 

1,981 

49.48 



38 
369 

78 
217 
704 
990 
182 
334 
260 
419 
185 
176 
174 
179 
231 
268 

75 

53 



16,719 



13,981 

32,808 

16,719 

1,389 



64,897 

60,079 

4,818 

73.29 



91 . 

88 
92 
86 

87 
95 

72 
92 
98 
70 
72 
85 
81 
90 
88 
76 
87 
87 



87.16 



81.44 
85.42 
87.16 
87.05 



84.98 
85.90 

.92 



368 
157 



910 



503 
484 
910 



1897 
2066 

169 
2.14 



10 

215 

9 

46 

172 

283 

91 

81 

110 

270 

73 

78 

34 

63 

98 

57 

28 

26 



5,978 



6,984 

9,713 

5,978 

457 



23132 
23449 

"317 
26.12 



12 
58 
15 
43 

163 

193 
38 

117 
60 

200 
53 
30 
30 
38 
60 
56 
24 
15 



3,708 



3,376 

6,654 

3,708 

249 



13987 

13578 

409 

15.79 



10 
88 
23 
52 

115 

316 
52 

108 
62 

148 
40 
46 
50 
68 
65 
53 
18 
9 



4,514 



3,661 

8,154 

4,514 

335 



16664 
15277 
1,387 

18.81 



11 
85 
15 
45 
78 

263 
40 

100 
47 

113 
44 
34 
52 
51 
57 
88 
26 



4,141 



3,097 

8,682 

4,141 

389 



16309 
14934 
1,375 

18.41 



10 
99 

30 
70 
140 
181 
43 
66 
48 
77 
50 
20 
46 
50 
57 
100 
21 
14 



3,467 



2,533 

7,203 

3,467 

368 



13571 
11848 
1,723 

15.32 



35 



145 



691 

2,084 

145 

66 



2,986 

2,825 

161 

3.37 



53 
545 

92 
256 
1,036 
1,393 
264 
472 
327 
808 
260 
208 
247 
270 
337 
354 
117 

72 



22,672 



19,721 

42,790 

22,672 

1,849 



87,032 

80,842 

6,190 

98.29 



43 
330 

83 
256 
936 
1,393 
264 
472 
327 
538 
260 
208 
178 
270 
239 
297 

89 

72 



19,517 



15,915 

39,356 

19,517 

1,606 



76,394 

72,021 

4,373 

86.28 



53 

545 

92 

256 

1,036 

1,393 

264 

472 

327 

808 

260 

208 

247 

270 

337 

354 

117 

72 



22,482 



18,326 

42,974 

22,482 

1,864 



85,646 
80,424 

5,222 

96.72 



6 D.E. 



162 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE G— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 



Towns 


3 


a 
.2 

1 
a 
S 
o 
U 


a 
s 

o 


o 

co 

2 

.— 

"So 

c 
W 


§ 

s 

a 

.5 

TJ 

rt 
3 
a) 
O 


V 

g 

•o 
a 

1 

>> 

.3 

a. 


>> 

•o 

3 

8 

3 

1 


2 

3 

"3 
u 

"c3 

Xi 
Pu 


bt 

c 

a 
oj 

M 

o 
o 

CQ 


? 

C4 c 

o.2 

cu 2 

5c 


C8 

M 

< 


>> 

B 

J 


55 St. Mary's 


53 
330 

92 
256 
678 
1,393 
135 
472 
327 
538 
260 
128 
247 
270 
337 
354 
117 

72 


53 

330 

92 

256 

1,036 

1,393 

135 

472 

327 

538 

260 

208 

247 

270 

337 

354 

117 

72 


10 
99 
30 
70 
140 
185 
83 
66 
48 
77 
50 
20 
81 
50 
57 
100 
21 
22 


14 

54 

35 

210 

328 

542 

43 

166 

95 

190 

134 

54 

70 

50 

114 

135 

27 

31 


31 
330 

68 
120 
678 
572 

83 
166 

95 
313 
134 
100 
183 
270 
179 
241 

65 

31 


53 
545 

92 

256 

1,036 

1,393 

264 

472 

95 
808 
260 
208 
247 
270 
337 
354 
117 

72 


53 
545 

92 
256 
1,036 
1,393 
264 
472 
327 
808 
260 
208 
212 
270 
337 
354 
117 

72 


53 
545 

92 
256 
1,036 
1,393 
264 
472 
327 
808 
260 
208 
247 
270 
337 
354 
117 

72 










56 Sandwich 










57 Seaforth 










58 Simth's Falls 










59 Sturgeon Falls. . . 










60 Sudbury 










61 Tecumseh 










62 Thorold 










63 Tilbury 










64 Timmins 










65 Trenton 










66 Vankleek Hill . . . 










67 Walkerton 

68 Walkerville 




35 


35 


35 


69 Wallaceburg. . . . 

70 Waterloo 


















71 Weston 










72 Whitby 


















Totals 


20,593 


21,575 


4,811 


7,691 


13,236 


21,154 


22,038 


22,064 


. 38 


126 


113 


64 


Totals 

1 Rural Schools .... 

2 Cities 


17,004 

40,729 

20,593 

1,599 


17,985 

42,453 

21,575 

1,838 


4,998 

15,921 

4,811 

539 


4,707 

21,518 

7,691 

732 


11,937 

23,938 

13,236 

1,052 


17,340 

40,788 

21,154 

1,598 


16,758 

40,795 

22,038 

1,628 


20,098 

42,974 

22,064 

1,777 


26 

461 

38 


365 

1608 

126 

25 


394 

1841 

113 

49 


287 
1690 


3 Towns 


64 


4 Villages 


27 






5 Grand Totals, 

1922 


79,925 
76,425 


83,851 
79,632 


26,269 
23,473 


34,648 
31,941 


50,163 
46,368 


80,880 

77,879 


81,219 
77,919 


86,913 
81,770 


525 
2449 


2124 
2088 


2397 
2394 


2068 


6 Grand Totals, 
1921 


2005 


7 Increases 

8 Decreases 


3,500 


4,219 


2,796 


2,707 


3,795 


3,001 


3,300 


5,143 


1924 


36 


3 


63 


























9 Percentages 


90.26 


94.70 


29.67 


39.13 


56.65 


91.34 


91.72 


98.16 


.59 


2.40 


2.71 


2.33 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



163 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Concluded) 





c 

s 
5 




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3 
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M 
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c 

2 
H 

9 
C 

3 

s 


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o 

c 
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W 

"3 

en 

3 
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Miscellaneous 


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8 a 

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8 

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11 

CI £ 


11 

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Q s 

>-. to 

11 
11 


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12 a 


CO 

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I 

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6 


co 
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> 


55 






















1 


1 

1 




3 


125 
500 
212 
207 
750 

1,919 
718 

1,224 

450 

98 

356 

315 

809 

161 

859 

974 

98 

8 


$ 77 


56 






487 












2 


2 


302 


57 










45 






264 


58 


























249 


59 






907 

886 
233 
















1 


1 




510 


60 










68 
43 
66 










761 


61 
























255 


62 


















1 


1 




757 


63 






310 
642 














177 


64 
















1 




1 






131 


65 




















304 


66 






208 






















204 


67 35 




35 


35 




87 

37 

57 

188 

47 
















856 


68 














1 


190 


69 
























511 


70 


















1 


"i 


1 
1 




803 


71 


















16 


72 




















10 
































90 


19 


125 


9,618 


612 


58 


1479 


882 


40 


10 


6 


16 


18 


5 


77 


33,932 


20929 


1 407 

2 1,478 

3 90 

4 66 


27 

1 

19 

36 


574 

125 
14 


13961 

9,618 
529 


454 

1029 

612 

25 


8 

385 

58 

24 


2406 

1479 
337 


504 

882 


369 

2022 

40 

109 


20 

78 

10 

3 


1 

92 

6 

1 


3 

10 
16 


2 
27 
18 

1 


3 

93 

5 

3 


278 
135 

77 
16 


44,432 

65,664 

33,932 

3,849 


18829 
38406. 
20927 
2,422- 


5 2,041 

6 1,529 


83 

55 


2,442 
2,266 


28942 
29445 


2120 
1386 


475 
303 


7854 
7415 


4727 
2794 


2540 
2194 


111 

73 


100 
100 


29 

28 


48 
51 


104 
83 


506 
523 


147877 
131827 


80589 
65912 


7 512 
8 


28 


176 


"503 


734 


172 


439 


1933 


346 


38 




1 


'"3 


21 


.17 


16,050 


14677 




























9 2.30 


.09 


2.76 


32.69 


2.39 


.54 


8.87 


5.34 


2.87 


.12 


.11 


.03 




.11 


.57 













164 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



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1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



165 





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T-l T-l 


T-t T-t 












O On 


O 


O 
























■^ 


CN 


■<— i 






























CN co 


OO CN 


OnO 


CN ro 


rN t— 


"* LO 


LO OO 


CN -*f 








«?F CN 


O 


en 


lO co 


lO T-t 


co co 


On tH 


CO LO 


o t- 


T-l 










Tf ^ 


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co <~0 


CO co 


H CN 


















CN 


>^ 
























th"t-T 


CN 


On 






























tH 'JO 


LO CN 


H CN 


oo t— 


o o 


cn On 


• ^cH 


T-t 








•^i oo 


CN 


to 


so <o 


00 t^- 


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T-t T-t 












O On 


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CN O 


ro 


>> 
























T-4T-* 


CN 


00 






























On <* 


O Os 


ro .O. 


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CN CO 


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oo t— ■ 


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o o 


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r— 






























o <o 


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go r- 


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CN co 


















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00 GO 


NO 


>> 




























NO 






























t— i r~~ 


T-t CA 




















c-a o 


GO 


to 


CN CN 


CN vO 




















tJH On 


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CO cc 




















ro co 


r— 


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ftfl 


co co 


CO CO 


co co 


CO co 


co to 


co in 


CO CO 


to co 


co* co 


CO CO 










>^t: 


>%*i: 


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^"£ 




^"^ 










o -3 


O -3 


O .3 


O .3 


O -3 


O -3 


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PQO 


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A 


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£ 






O 


O 


M 


M 


o 


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cn 




ho 




■ OX 






o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


CO 






jj 




Oh 
c 






PQ 


PQ 


o 

CQ 


o 
CQ 


pq 


PQ 


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U 


to 


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(-J H 

O co" 

f-"3 


3 




J4 

o 
o 
PQ 


C 

o 
o 

<D 
CO 


C 
O 

o 

D 

CO 


T3 




O 


o 


1 


-C 
£ 


V 

in 
S 


£ 




p 


(_, 


Ih 


u 


Ih 


u, 


J_ 


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CO 


-o 3 




-o 


CO 


o 


O 


t o 


o 


.o 


o 


O 


o 


a 


S "o 




c 


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c 


c 


a 


C 


a 


c 


3 


gj 


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& 


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£ 


3 


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T^ 


CO 


T^ 


O 
CO 


3 


CU 

CO 


o 





166 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 

I. TABLE H.— FINAN 



Continuation 
Schools 



Receipts 



O 






o 



c a 

is. 



"53 
u 



1 Aberfoyle 

2 Acton 

3 Agincourt 

4 Ailsa Craig 

5 Alvinston 

6 Arkona 

7 Avr 

8 Bancroft 

9 Bath 

10 Beachburg 

1 1 Beaverton 

12 Beeton 

13 Belmont 

14 Blackstock 

15 Blenheim 

16 Blind River 

17 Blyth 

18 Bobcaygeon 

19 Bolton 

20 Bothwell 

21 Bowesville 

22 Bridgeburg 

23 Brownsville 

24 Bruce Mines 

25 Brussels 

26 Burk's Falls 

27 Caledon East .... 

28 Cannington 

29 Cardinal 

30 Carp 

31 Claremont 

32 Clifford 

33 Cobden 

34 Cochrane 

35 Coldwater 

36 Comber 

37 Cookstown 

38 Copetown 

39 Creemore 

40 Danforth Park. . . 

41 Delaware 

42 Delhi 

43 Denbigh 

44 Devizes 

45 Dorchester 

46 Drayton 

47 Dresden 

48 Drumbo 

49 Dryden 

50 Eganville 

51 Eganville (r.c.s.s) 

52 Elm vale 

53 Ennismore 

54 Erin 

55 Esnanola 



$ c 
426 98 
886 28 
655 76 
425 89 
860 95 
443 29 
882 15 
2,866 69 
866 90 



894 78 
840 99 
888 00 



898 64 

1,757 40 

880 44 



453 63 
869 15 
417 83 
908 66 



3,304 96 
862 79 

1,803 20 



872 27 
894 70 
867 45 
832 80 
902 10 
407 75 
878 98 
886 89 
857 70 
892 29 



882 15 



870 68 
452 28 
720 75 
418 50 
828 78 

2,125 82 
769 58 
628 61 

2,213 82 
880 65 
676 23 
906 47 
696 95 



918 28 



$ 


c. 


426 


98 


886 


28 


1,403 


15 


1,364 


50 


2,217 


34 


806 


87 


2,467 


99 


1,166 


26 


1,292 


85 


1,740 00 


1,747 


21 


2,581 


95 


898 


64 


3,059 


84 


453 


63 


1,027 


30 


417 


83 


3,647 


34 




1,725 


58 




1,748 


96 


1,294 


70 


867 


45 


1,561 


81 


1,247 


53 


650 


85 


3,154 


79 


852 


15 


1,508 


02 


1,263 


97 


4,399 


84 


960 90 


662 


74 


418 


50 


1,450 


36 


3,682 


81 


628 


61 


2,249 


95 


1,387 


04 


2,419 


47 


1,477 


37 


449 


02 



$ c. 

750 00 

2,500 00 

1,175 00 

2,144 75 

1,687 60 

800 00 

1,747 01 



900 00 



2,037 14 

1,750 00 

1,311 25 

1,100 00 

3,369 07 

2,150 00 

600 00 

790 02 

1,210 02 

2,200 00 

600 00 

952 35 



2,700 00 
1,950 00 
2,098 47 



1,337 43 

1,880 16 

1,700 00 

1,181 25 

2,630 29 

1,077 13 

2,200 00 



1,800 00 
500 00 
750 00 

2,636 41 
879 81 

1,000 00 

17,909 69 

385 00 

600 00 

4,500 01 

1,586 07 



4,120 
1,837 
1,661 
1,808 

505 
1,000 00 

800 00 
1,444 88 

767 00 



9,000 00 



14,875 50 
474 85 



559 44 



1,269 56 



$ 


c. 


61 


78 


163 


20 


710 


17 


261 


16 


109 


00 


18 


76 


521 


13 


514 


08 


241 


56 


1,592 


23 


105 


00 


4,153 


45 


1,527 


73 


76 00 


854 


87 


8 


35 


13 


00 


240 


25 


968 


39 


38 


19 


1,367 


05 


1,397 


32 


813 


47 


2,717 


19 


150 


00 


1,354 


30 


1,836 


88 


934 


86 


56 


40 


60 


40 


61 


72 


295 


57 


710 


65 


1,045 


96 


733 


66 


101 


00 


428 


59 


76 


30 


301 


81 


555 


15 


570 


66 


363 


47 


279 


15 


963 


00 


300 


73 


1,407 


82 


1,788 


43 


276 


30 


306 


10 


1,162 


26 



03 
31 



1,665 74 
4,435 76 
3,944 08 
4,196 30 

4.874 89 

2.068 92 
5,618 28 
4,547 
3,301 
1,592 23 
4,776 92 

17,491 65 
6,308 93 
1,100 00 
5,242 35 
4,762 27 
4,548 63 
803 02 
2,357 53 
5,064 84 
1,473 85 

21,750 90 
1,872 17 
6,818 43 
7,255 56 
4,051 67 
1,354 30 
6,354 98 

4.069 56 
4,369 76 
3,632 26 
4,840 32 
2,135 73 
3,140 70 
4,337 25 
4,220 50 
3,946 27 
1,483 66 
4,883 53 

879 81 
, 7,968 67 
19,399 17 

2.070 30 
1,992 15 
7,349 81 
7,758 17 
5,168 73 
4,058 05 

3.875 34 
5,239 49 
3,976 09 
6,114 37 
3,250 62 
2,200 00 
2,847 54 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



167 



SCHOOLS 

CIAL STATEMENT 









Expendit 


ure 










T3 




aj^atf 


G a x 








C 




a +3.S-a.y 


o a a> 




• 


(A 

'S 

a 

2 

-G 
1 

H 


cd 

co S c 

G d> 

bog g 

a u > 

•a a, 

3 :G G 

CQ 73.S 


"o «> 

O G 

JS O 

o*o 
2 S 
11 


'3 2 £ 5 u 
tn S3 ™ o 

.-9 £ £ o a3 4s 

^ S >> C G G 

*_ i a, -> g c o 


rt G ■- 
«> XXI 

J3 ° 

111 

"G «> 

8 «« 


2i 

3 

c 
<y 
a 

X 

W 

o 

H 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c 


$ c. 


$ c. 


1 


1,270 00 


50 00 




194 96 


142 70 


1,657 66 


2 


3,220 00 


105 00 


195 99 


89 41 


738 33 


4,348 73 


3 


1,908 94 


240 57 


21 00 


14 75 


1,224 71 


3,409 97 


4 


2,860 00 


28 50 




452 24 


324 95 


3,665 69 


5 


3,440 00 


205 90 


232 52 


352 16 


644 31 


4,874 89 


6 


1,430 00 


75 00 




150 00 


269 09 


1,924 09 


7 


3,120 00 


216 38 


i25 66 


100 00 


389 74 


3,951 12 


8 


2,671 01 






256 47 


591 86 


3,519 34 


9 


2,740 00 






65 95 


378 41 


3,184 36 


10 


1,000 00 


486 05 




31 18 


75 00 


1,592 23 


11 


3,200 00 


312 35 


83 87 


198 36 


982 34 


4,776 92 


12 


3,040 00 


10,935 14 






706 69 


14,681 83 


13 


3,504 25 


110 20 






225 75 


3,840 20 


14 


520 00 




6 50 




40 32 


566 82 


15 


3,500 00 


406 75 


57 50 


39 45 


1,238 65 


5,242 35 


16 


3,140 00 








818 45 


3,958 45 


17 


3,000 00 






109 42 


486 05 


3,595 47 


18 


520 00 


57 50 




183 02 


42 50 


803 02 


19 


1,420 00 




ii 75 




876 55 


2,311 30 


20 


2,798 00 


1,200 ii 


79 00 


141 54 


750 34 


4,969 29 


21 


1,200 00 


57 18 


42 15 


86 25 


79 35 


1,464 93 


22 


5,940 00 


13,168 27 


29 42 


774 48 


1,838 73 


21,750 90 


23 


640 00 


280 40 




150 57 


636 26 


1,707 23 


24 


2,896 75 


39 00 


38 25 


73 62 


753 23 


3,800 85 


25 


3,162 00 


576 36 


26 00 


185 80 


887 95 


4,838 11 


26 


3,260 00 




35 80 


62 03 


693 84 


4,051 67 


27 


560 00 


342 30 


173 59 


196 41 


82 00 


3,154 30 


28 


2,820 00 




5 50 


87 55 


1,238 27 


4,151 32 


29 


3,000 00 








1,069 56 


4,069 56 


30 


3,260 00 






106 66 


617 08 


3,983 74 


31 


3,080 00 




28 i8 


27 67 


496 41 


3,632 26 


32 


2,703 00 




95 09 


231 21 


811 02 


3,840 32 


33 


1,500 00 


394 26 


22 14 


38 33 


181 00 


2,135 73 


34 


2,648 00 


51 52 


35 70 


84 18 


242 40 


3,061 80 


35 


3,140 00 




51 81 


186 00 


534 60 


3,912 41 


36 


2,980 00 






174 54 


670 38 


3,824 92 


37 


3,000 00 


62 80 






738 52 


3,801 32 


38 


600 00 


318 15 




346 86 


218 65 


1,483 66 


39 


3,740 00 


232 56 


45 00 


86 10 


779 87 


4,883 53 


40 


770 00 








109 81 


879 81 


41 


2,980 00 


128 31 


22 00 


120 05 


1,395 44 


4,645 80 


42 


2,305 00 


16,432 54 


39 47 


191 91 


413 45 


19,382 37 


43 


1,421 00 


49 68 


1 73 


22 93 


282 91 


1,778 25 


44 


1,300 00 


135 44 


153 58 


13 75 


212 27 


1,815 04 


45 


3,480 00 


1,122 65 


20 30 


275 30 


2,414 63 


7,312 88 


46 


5,040 00 


195 90 


445 37 


540 92 


1,535 98 


7,758 17 


47 


3,043 50 


968 50 


39 00 


50 00 


1,033 38 


5,134 38 


48 


2,040 00 


378 80 




42 94 


525 92 


2,987 66 


49 


3,202 75 


100 00 


25 32 


181 13 


366 14 


3,875 34 


50 


3,220 00 


383 61 







567 54 


4,171 15 


51 


1,600 00 


293 38 


6 00 


il 95 


1,020 59 


2,931 92 


52 


3,300 00 


116 33 




219 76 


900 01 


4,536 10 


53 


2,770 00 


20 00 


25 00 


41 00 


369 00 


3,225 00 


54 


2,100 00 






15 00 


85 00 


2,200 00 


55 


2,380 00 


1 279 54 




29 99 


57 54 


2,747 07 



168 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 

I. TABLE H.— FINAN 



Continuation 
Schools 



Receipts 



"8~ 



ll 



o 



££ 



56 Fenelon Falls. . . 

57 Fenwick 

58 Feversham 

59 Finch 

60 Fingal 

61 Florence 

62 Frankford 

63 Gore Bay 

64 Grand Valley . . . 

65 Hallville 

66 Hanover 

67 Harrow 

68 Havelock 

69 Hepworth 

70 Highgate 

71 Holstein 

72 Huntsville 

73 Ilderton 

74 Inglewood 

75 Iroquois Falls.. 

76 Islington 

77 Jarvis 

78 Jockvale 

79 Kars 

80 Keewatin 

81 Kenmore 

82 Kinburn 

83 Lakefield 

84 Lambeth 

85 Lanark 

86 Lansdowne .... 

87 Laurel 

88 Lion's Head . . . 

89 Little Current. . 

90 Lobo 

91 Long Branch. . . 

92 Lucknow 

93 Lyndhurst 

94 Manitowaning. , 

95 Manotick 

96 Marmora 

97 Massey 

98 Maxville 

99 Melbourne 

100 Merlin 

101 Merrickville. . . 

102 Metcalfe 

103 Millbrook 

104 Milverton 

105 Mimico 

106 Mindemoya.. . . 

107 Minden 

108 Morriston 

109 Mount Albert.. 

110 Mount Brydges 



» c. 
882 12 



412 62 
897 56 
889 91 



852 60 

2,328 46 

888 10 

1,977 50 

907 82 

863 00 

887 41 

436 12 

863 89 

419 59 

1,802 30 

803 45 



874 04 
432 35 
455 05 
431 79 
868 30 
1,767 40 

877 40 
652 00 
889 75 
417 60 
868 84 

878 70 



429 97 
1,163 00 

843 89 



888 34 



1,430 97 

624 70 

1,922 32 

1,525 07 

885 30 

865 55 

873 49 
859 55 

874 20 
905 83 
861 57 
850 10 
500 00 
715 30 
390 69 
890 00 
869 95 



# c. 
882 12 



1,169 96 
1,717 52 
2,224 78 



2,140 27 



2,354 44 



1,642 10 

861 80 

1,047 50 

2,239 87 

1,672 27 

.629 38 



1,519 93 



526 35 

1,144 05 

431 79 

868 30 



1,349 69 
1,308 43 
889 75 
417 60 
1,822 14 
2,547 90 



1,074 92 
1,57971 
2,65019 



624 70 
617 65 



3,530 42 
1,935 00 
1,886 91 
1,356 16 
1,878 43 
1,722 94 
4,303 01 



415 30 

555 69 

2,145 02 

1,707 97 



$ c. 
2,045 92 

175 87 

840 00 
4,998 72 
1,000 00 
1,025 00 
2,050 00 
2,077 44 
3,567 91 
1,775 00 
4,020 88 
3,870 77 
3,056 90 

123 66 
1,997 39 
1,354 78 
4,040 08 
1,830 36 
1,284 62 
2,497 18 
1,223 24 

287 06 

800 00 
1,675 00 
3,690 23 
1,528 98 
1,223 20 
4,300 00 
2,506 04 
2,000 00 
2,179 71 

238 80 



1,022 60 
1,500 00 
1,003 04 
1,500 00 
1,450 00 

650 00 
1,173 19 
3,000 00 

350 00 
1,504 15 
3,748 00 
1,000 00 
1,198 83 
2,000 00 
1,500 00 
2,170 00 
1,314 12 
1,120 00 

860 00 
1,456 87 
1,000 00 
2.200 00 



372 22 
16,738 79 



499 13 
3,000 00 



$ 


c. 


169 


20 


6 


59 


328 


91 


833 


83 


187 


50 


1,006 


16 


9,123 


58 


77 


42 


3,250 40 


81 


80 


4 


00 


3,728 


19 


793 


39 


268 


73 


182 


22 


112 


26 


47 


80 


77 


55 


56 


50 


93 


90 


144 


95 


316 


72 


311 


73 


1,736 


64 


2,014 


21 


750 


17 


223 


79 


297 


00 


552 


70 


247 


60 


1,017 


10 


97 


10 


656 42 


529 


91 


30 


00 


2,221 


21 


24,469 


03 


382 


48 


24 


00 


140 44 


1,633 


39 


266 


96 


105 


61 


22,536 


75 


859 


83 


962 


51 


514 41 


725 


28 



61 
65 
74 
14 
11 



22 
20 
96 
13 
60 
13 



$ c. 
3,979 36 

175 87 
2,429 17 
7,942 71 
4,948 52 
1,025 00 
5,230 37 
4,405 90 
8,188 83 
29,614 87 
6,648 22 
8,845 97 
5,073 
2,803 
8,261 
3,197 
6,111 
4,335 96 
1,284 62 
3,371 
2,294 
1,933 
1,741 
3,411 
5,514 

3.849 97 
3,328 58 
6,396 22 
3,652 97 
6,427 62 
7,620 52 

988 97 
1,728 68 
2,482 60 
4,476 30 
1,003 04 
5,286 13 
2,467 10 
2,178 07 
3,079 01 
6,569 01 
1,905 07 
7,610 66 

32,613 00 
4,190 97 
3,969 29 
4,370 80 
5,917 65 
5,021 47 
6,572 84 

24.156 75 

2.850 43 
3,365 76 
4,549 43 
5,503 20 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



169 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

CIAL STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 



bog g> 

a u > 

2 ft*- 



O <o 

o a 

43 o 

<° ta 

i! 
11 



r to 



c c 



Oh (J _ 

<U TO 4) 

Cfl u )i CJ 



2 2 & 

<D 43 
(/) 3 ft) 



3 

c 

a 
x 



56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 



$ c. 
3,040 00 

158 99 
1,254 00 
5,238 62 
3,120 00 

600 00 
3,180 00 
3,170 00 
3,700 00 
1,560 00 
4,958 48 
3,790 00 
3,640 00 
1,369 70 
3,140 00 
1,540 00 
5,248 72 
2,920 00 

560 00 
3,075 00 
1,639 00 
1,520 00 
1,500 00 
3,140 00 
4,000 00 
3,240 00 
2,460 00 
4,800 00 
1,815 39 
4,140 00 
2,840 00 

480 00 
1,300 00 
2,060 00 
3,200 50 

450 00 
3,700 00 

600 00 

1.834 90 
2,144 00 
4,480 00 
1,540 00 

3.835 00 
3,040 00 
3,100 00 
3,060 00 
3,040 00 
3,380 00 
3,410 00 
5,058 00 
1,120 00 
1,512 34 
1,237 40 
3,180 00 
3,100 00 



$ 


c. 


32 


90 


59 33 


216 


85 


539 


70 


275 00 


525 


00 


376 00 


446 


25 


974 


17 


3,765 


46 


100 


60 


48 


50 


155 


99 


100 


00 


475 


62 




135 


96 




50 00 


50 


17 



187 02 
185 00 
711 78 



144 89 
238 71 

50 00 
115 00 

46 50 
509 04 
185 00 
473 10 



141 30 

222 29 



2,596 54 

19,409 95 

100 00 



47 00 
2l6'86 

23,666 66 

197*59 

379*66 



7 25 
466 75 



30 00 
153 98 
140 27 

39 51 



628 


73 


60 00 


97 
12 


39 

50 






45 
8 


94 

75 


50 00 

2 40 


60 


00 


43 
41 

8 


40 

35 
11 




22 


60 


158 


00 


13 


41 


96 


26 


50 


10 


842 


57 


20 
707 


00 

22 






4 


35 





$ c. 
66 50 



88 58 
283 26 
233 26 
57 30 
19 92 
130 90 
178 21 
218 40 
169 61 
120 50 



81 11 
150 25 
124 10 

90 00 
374 80 



296 22 
149 79 
142 38 
25 00 
33 65 
159 25 

7 

30 40 
200 00 
844 11 



163 
262 15 



75 27 
258 80 

44 00 
130 00 
206 79 

70 01 

63 49 
419 32 



936 67 



31 00 



156 65 

573 70 

33 37 

36 75 

184 74 

127 81 

88 68 

274 73 



$ c. 

839 96 

16 88 

158 41 

1,737 23 

677 46 

50 00 

1,429 81 

475 00 

3,183 60 

2,208 14 

1,045 12 

1,170 01 

704 28 

436 22 

818 52 

1,299 05 

575 00 

436 61 

162 25 



369 45 
225 64 
194 02 
187 95 

1,254 71 
599 97 
651 16 

1,021 40 
281 69 

1,051 97 
508 67 



378 68 
232 33 
515 42 



560 00 
134 36 
248 81 
556 48 

1,340 17 
164 96 

1,123 70 
779 71 
148 40 
331 92 

1,257 76 

1,152 00 
610 52 
210 12 



1,144 42 
512 56 
396 09 
658 11 



14 
11 



ft c 
3,979 36 

175 87 
1,567 57 
7,942 71 
4,570 42 

982 30 
5,154 73 
4,181 90 
7,662 04 
5,100 98 
6,212 72 
8,845 97 
5,073 61 
1,887 03 
4,217 27 
3,119 
6,111 
4,219 53 

722 25 
3,371 22 
2,294 20 
1,933 96 

1.727 77 
3,411 60 
5,514 13 
3,849 97 
3,328 58 
6,266 40 
3,652 97 
5,235 37 
3,698 79 

988 97 

1.728 68 
2,482 60 
4,043 82 
1,003 04 
4,733 00 
1,414 25 
2,167 13 
2,905 27 
6,558 04 
1,704 96 
7,605 34 

24,166 33 
4,190 97 
3,391 92 
4,364 76 
5,395 87 
4,805 08 
5,301 49 

24,156 75 
2,845 85 
2,075 36 
3,664 77 
4,443 50 



170 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 

I. TABLE H.— FINAN 



Continuation 
Schools 



Receipts 



O 



on 

•J 



c 

o 

c § 
3 o 
3.8 



II 






CQ 



C^ 



111 Mount Elgin 

112 Navan 

113 New Dundee 

114 New Hamburg. . . 

115 New Liskeard .... 

116 North Augusta... 

117 North Gower 

118 Odessa 

119 Oil Springs 

120 Onondaga 

121 Orono 

122 Paisley 

123 Pakenham 

124 Palmerston 

125 Pickering 

126 Pierce's Corners . . 

127 Plattsville 

128 Port Burwell 

129 Port Colborne.. . . 

130 Port Credit 

131 Powassan 

132 Princeton 

133 Rainy River 

134 Richard's Landing 

135 Richmond 

136 Ridgeway 

137 Ripley 

138 Rockwood 

139 Rodney 

140 Russell 

141 St. George 

142 Schomberg 

143 Schreiber 

144 Scotland 

145 Southampton. . . . 

146 South Mountain.. 

147 South Porcupine. . 

148 South River 

149 Spencerville 

150 Springfield 

151 Sprucedale 

152 Stayner 

153 Stella 

154 Stevensville 

155 Stouffville 

156 Sturgeon Falls. . .. 

157 Sunderland 

158 Sutton 

159 Tarn worth 

160 Tara 

161 Tavistock 

162 Teeswater 

163 Thamesford .... 

164 Thamesville 

165 Thcssalon 



601 03 



875 55 
1,904 74 
872 45 
875 40 
857 45 
867 61 



881 27 
902 16 

873 40 

874 00 



669 52 

881 46 
874 36 
920 62 

882 94 
2,149 35 

644 93 
500 00 



1,041 35 

962 87 

904 56 

421 80 

899 10 

873 42 

886 61 

445 65 



861 00 
942 92 
879 34 
902 54 



853 19 
873 85 
4,051 51 
852 76 
842 92 



876 53 

2,545 65 

845 10 

881 87 
876 50 

882 15 
898 63 
892 29 
420 51 
861 47 

2,751 18 



1,610 83 



2,164 61 



2,706 19 

1,062 09 

1,133 17 

1,117 00 



3,167 47 
2,255 40 
1,398 84 
1,469 60 



707 
1,280 83 
2,185 90 
3,254 96 
3,493 83 



713 33 



1,293 89 

8,616 71 

4,489 65 

421 80 

2,247 75 

2,143 33 

944 82 

487 81 



1,356 00 

2,232 30 

560 00 



2,019 99 
2,184 63 



1,643 26 
1,176 69 



1,700 94 



1,335 75 

915 67 

2,680 98 

2,205 37 

1,689 28 

2,105 72 

420 51 

1,758 47 



2,100 
1,179 
1,705 
1,666 
3,800 

850 
1,710 

850 
2,405 
1,501 
2,663 

752 
2,010 
1,588 
2,000 
1,506 
1,629 

800 
12,000 
4,000 
2,000 
3,006 
3,464 
1,100 
1,044 
4,764 
1,500 
1,513 
1,000 
1,850 
3,664 

800 
1,273 
1,608 
1,243 
1,689 
2,226 
1,007 
2,649 
1,300 

874 
2,500 

600 

810 
1,468 
2,833 
1,000 
1,500 
1,000 

835 
1,450 
4,000 
1,164 
2,400 
1.845 



14,991 27 



2,000 00 



16.000 00 



3,246 63 
1,788 22 



70 88 

73 50 

11 44 

618 45 

2,642 19 

46 50 

845 72 

1,158 73 

137 90 

2,329 73 

69 95 

15 00 

1,040 79 

75 

2,640 08 

435 07 

6,217 00 

565 55 

3,153 05 



1,835 57 



205 48 
157 47 
223 28 
733 39 
903 86 
1,965 74 
951 00 



3,328 29 

860 63 

1,531 88 

189 14 

15 00 

1,106 99 

259 85 

200 00 

1,176 84 

1,720 72 

12 00 

128 40 

44 96 

1,608 33 

1,442 05 

1,598 97 

79 55 

1,419 37 

2,848 13 

2,490 63 

801 50 

2 00 



20,337 90 
5,179 76 
1,705 11 

4.777 05 

5.778 24 
4,440 08 
4,265 94 
5,482 81 
4,436 61 
2,347 24 
7,871 30 
4,048 18 
6,612 19 
4,002 32 
2,015 00 
3,925 08 
3,792 53 
6,500 34 

16,610 65 

14,593 77 
4,714 90 
7,517 64 
3,964 00 
2,935 57 
3,379 44 

14,549 61 
7,051 68 
2,580 73 
4,880 24 
5,770 61 
7,461 53 
2,684 46 
1,273 01 
7,153 84 
5,279 34 
4,660 55 
3,318 42 
1,022 26 
6,629 75 
4,618 74 
7,125 86 
6,172 86 
4,340 33 
822 14 
4,174 00 
5,423 95 
4,789 18 
4,739 59 
6,156 45 
4,002 35 
5,457 46 

25,846 14 
4,495 85 
5,821 44 
4,598 18 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



171 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

GIAL STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 



0) 



en 

;g g -^ 

W D C 
C <L> 

C u. > 

_2 Oh !-. 

•-• Q« 

3 = G 
PQ 13.5 



O «i 

o e 

_g o 

m « 

o-u 

+-. o 

■M 
S.I 







ad c c 


£ c 


aj -m -G a) a) 


o o 


tific 
s, e 
draw 
uipm 
ultur 


to ct 55 


eg. cro 


- C CL 


(U TO QJ 

"o G c/T-rj "c3 
W «-c G O 


ooks 
exa 
r ex 


. .v e) n 


•a— •" £ 


brary 
ratus 
pewri 
3dels 
r phy 


0) -G 


hool 
y, fu 
d ot 


3 a^££ 


<-> i_ c 

C/J 0) TO 



c 

O) 

a. 
x 

W 



111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
163 
164 
165 



$ c. 

680 00 
2,153 66 

560 00 
3,370 00 
3,760 00 
3,000 00 
3,020 00 
2,850 00 
2,850 00 

480 00 
3,178 30 
3,100 00 
3,050 00 
3,200 00 

600 00 
2,060 00 
3,080 00 
3,010 00 
6,779 00 
4,020 00 
2,840 00 
2,940 00 
1,360 00 
1,785 50 
2,800 00 
4,906 40 
3,354 62 
1,293 50 
3,080 00 
3,270 00 
4,200 00 
1,440 00 

800 00 
2,820 00 
3,181 00 
3,000 00 
2,150 00 

600 00 
3,140 00 
3,180 00 
1,500 00 
3,300 00 
2,800 00 

492 00 
3,300 00 
3,160 00 
3,020 00 
3,100 00 
3,380 00 
3,260 00 
2,855 00 
2,921 64 
1,900 00 
3,099 79 
3,280 00 



$ 


c. 


17,780 05 


56 


00 


726 


93 


124 


36 


15 


54 


92 


84 


142 


50 


1,256 


77 


147 


84 


54 


63 


40 35 


172 


00 


220 


26 


231 


07 


28 


75 


10 00 


4,836 


73 


1,622 


42 


130 


00 


1,661 


55 


100 


00 


1,251 


88 


267 


98 


638 


86 


880 35 


21 


02 


2,417 


59 




325 


00 


392 


89 


119 


97 


403 


64 


203 


91 




3,434 


•56 


161 


00 


11 


00 




180 


00 


70 


50 


479 


00 


49 


00 


200 


00 


6,400 


00 


1,205 


56 


138 
489 


47 
00 



150 00 
110 29 



44 06 


70 


70 


17 


80 


107 


10 


110 


48 




155 


23 


562 


45 


194 


86 



129 87 

47 08 

16 25 

2 75 



5 50 



39 46 
4 95 



1 00 
3 40 



91 24 



47 50 
182 95 
195 05 



$ 


c. 


145 


22 


133 


03 


287 


02 


117 


69 


267 


84 


75 


00 


11 


00 


117 


68 


25 


11 


334 


14 


99 


41 


76 


85 


33 


40 


123 


85 


73 


35 


220 


10 


258 


67 


509 


17 


60 


00 


105 


57 


727 


83 


54 


52 


128 


33 


187 


94 


249 


72 


140 


85 


55 


58 


93 


01 


83 


91 


194 40 


273 


09 


218 


20 


125 


44 


22 


82 


317 


79 


58 


93 


130 


14 


262 


67 


86 


23 


74 40 


180 


00 


186 


49 


196 


20 


276 


15 


969 


56 


73 


18 



$ c. 

310 22 

360 95 

131 16 

1,015 00 

1,503 93 

1,330 46 

647 63 

374 00 

1,417 00 

126 99 

708 84 

745 91 

556 15 

523 22 

102 64 

561 52 

463 68 

385 58 

3,093 31 

300 00 

390 00 

637 63 

214 62 

129 25 

449 57 

6,758 25 

1,631 63 

393 18 

717 75 

371 37 

843 94 

271 43 

380 00 

744 89 

815 05 

1,267 49 

505 23 
87 96 

1,231 91 
781 87 
227 26 
764 77 

. 460 07 
200 00 
544 16 

1,697 80 

1,769 18 
824 16 

1,324 00 

506 86 
630 02 
604 35 
505 38 
640 55 
561 25 



$ c. 

18,915 49 
2,703 64 
1,705 11 
4,777 05 
5,657 60 
4,405 46 
3,771 47 
3,484 18 
4,292 11 
2,197 90 
4,178 45 
4,048 18 
3,697 70 
4,002 32 
1,157 23 
2,925 94 
3,792 53 
3,819 48 

15,780 66 
6,137 28 
3,420 00 
3,683 20 
3,964 00 
2,069 27 
3,379 44 

13,091 94 
5,458 42 
2,578 01 
4,678 10 
3,803 24 
7,461 53 
1,767 01 
1,273 01 
3,979 30 
4,583 34 
4,660 55 
3,316 53 
1,022 26 
4,394 73 
3,961 87 
5,479 61 
4,226 77 
3,333 40 
822 14 
4,106 85 
5,124 03: 
4,789 18 
4,069 06 
5,363 00 
4,002 35 
3,972 46 

19,925 99 
3,934 59 
5,031 32 
4,598 48 



172 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 

I. TABLE H— FINAN 





Receipts 


Continuation 
Schools 


to 

C 
cd 

o 

CD 
# > 

tjj 

"o5 
'So 

V 


CO 

c 

03 
u 

o 

I* 

11 

11 


CO 

-t-> 
G 
03 
u 

o 

.9* 


CO 
CD 

3 

C 

<v 

Q 


u 

CD 

O 

c 

03 

CO 

■a § 


CO 

*S3 

cu 

"c3 

•4-1 

e2 


166 Thornbury 

167 Thorndale 

168 Tilbury 

169 Timmins 

170 Tottenham 

171 Warkworth 

172 Wellington 

173 West Lome 

174 Westmeath 

175 Westport 

176 Westport (r.c.s.s) 

177 Wheatley 

178 Winona 

179 Wolfe Island 

180 Woodville 

181 Wroxeter 


$ c. 
891 95 

866 63 

1,750 30 

873 91 

907 75 

887 93 
442 65 
664 45 
602 30 
859 80 
389 75 

87099 


$ c. 

2,176 60 

766 20 

81 00 

3,692 40 
3,065 27 

145 00 
2,219 82 

871 93 
1,064 45 
1,249 94 
1,430 28 

389 75 

1,75714 


$ c. 
1,735 57 
2,500 54 
2,050 87 
4,000 00 

929 86 
1,262 82 
1,621 05 
1,131 18 

600 00 
1,169 18 
1,000 00 
2,500 00 
1,398 36 

120 00 

797 31 


$ c. 
1,29191 

30,292 19 
18,067 74 


$ c. 

238 00 

1,328 24 

1,132 01 

526 72 

128 65 

125 05 

34,619 78 

105 28 

31 60 

25 

1,126 18 

110 66 

287 63 

664 08 

91564 


$ c. 
5,042 12 
4,594 98 
5,422 42 
6,277 02 
5,624 82 
5,360 89 

36,385 83 
4,344 21 
1,946 18 
2,898 33 
3,978 42 

35,192 93 

2,465 49 

784 08 

18,865 05 
3,543 77 


1 Totals, 1922 

2 Totals, 1921 


148,217 22 
127,770 38 


218,323 36 
143,615 10 


325,548 63 
267,055 75 


129,432 60 


217,080 29 
184,985 39 


1,038,602 10 
723,426 62 


3 Increases 

4 Decrease 


20,446 84 


74,708 26 


58,492 88 




32,094 90 


315,175 48 


5 Percentages 


14.27 


21.02 


31.34 


12.46 


20.90 





1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



173 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

CIAL STATEMENT (Concluded) 



Expenditure 



is 

o 

s 


Buildings, Sites, and 
all permanent 
improvements 


■SI 

+■» o 

■si 


Library, scientific ap- 
paratus, maps, etc., 
typewriters, drawing 
models and equipment 
for physical culture 


School books, station- 
ery, fuel, examinations 
and other expenses 


2 

3 

'•& 

C 

a 

X 

W 
It 

o 

H 


166 
167 
168 


$ c. 
3,707 80 
2,840 00 
2,800 00 
4,913 62 
4,060 00 
3,150 00 

987 50 
3,150 00 
1,339 50 
2,848 78 
2,290 00 

2.779 25 
1,480 00 

600 00 
600 00 

2.780 00 


$ c. 

50 00 

342 00 

157 71 

290 ' 00 

34,16475 

41695 

iio 98 
29,688 65 

'28*54 
11,152 75 


$ 

23 
45 


c. 

85 
00 


$ c. 
156 44 
123 34 
232 09 
255 24 
198 79 

565*35 

278 38 

'4188 

56 38 

346 05 

190 81 

44 75 

'29*44 


$ c. 
1,104 03 

965 89 
2,232 62 

954 97 

854 37 
2,210 89 

626 74 

758 83 

189 73 
7 67 

590 00 
1,097 45 

328 55 
70 36 
76 20 

473 49 


$ c. 
5,042 12 
4,316 23 
5,422 42 


169 




6,123 83 


170 
171 


221 


66 


5,624 82 
5,360 89 


172 




36,344 34 


173 
174 


157 


00 


4,344 21 
1,946 18 


175 




2,898 33 


176 




3,047 36 


177 
178 
179 
180 
181 


15 56 

177 29 

40 43 

33 63 


33,926 96 

2,176 65 

784 08 

11,862 58 
3,282 93 








1 
2 


474,241 10 
406,162 00 


243,630 06 
97,077 07 


9,068 
12,118 


85 
43 


26,376 13 
23,970 50 


128,114 98 
110,146 40 


881,431 12 
649,474 40 


3 


68,079 10 


146,552 99 




2,405 63 


17,968 58 


231,956 72 


4 


3,049 


58 




5 


53.80 


27.64 


1.02 




2.99 


14.53 





Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance: $100.42. 



174 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 

II. TABLE I— SCHOOLS UNDER PUBLIC SCHOOL 





Schools under Pub- 
lic or Separate 
School Board 


Value of General 


Continuation Schools 


u 

03 
u 


'05 


en 

a 

o3 en 
« O 

So 


en 

"3 

*o 
o 

+-> 
< 


en 

u 
<v 


•£>£ 
•2 & 


cU 
<u — . 
£ «i 
• *n cn 


o 

a 

B +. 

03.S £ 

co a, 

o.sw 


£ 

3 
<v 
cn 

3 


u 

o 

£ E 

■N 

03 _Q 

3 )Z 
a* a; 


1 Aberfoyle 




179 
410 
241 
166 
297 
264 
381 
316 
221 
198 
359 
261 
300 

57 
499 
562 
369 

46 
398 
296 
203 
449 
207 
216 
425 
302 

78 
314 
300 
310 
338 
422 

89 
188 
363 
296 
391 
204 
356 

99 
304 
291 

99 
139 
113 
453 
341 
270 
390 
(Equi 
515 
388 
301 
292 
249 
266 


$ 

118 
510 
319 
504 
407 
195 
370 
323 
320 
106 
654 
515 
626 
9 
559 
546 
445 

97 
231 
411 
144 
1,000 
215 
475 
333 
369 

52 
706 
300 
436 
413 
330 
100 
188 
489 
288 
741 
127 
360 

24 
402 
634 
152 
105 
433 
553 
578 
250 
130 
pment 
401 
552 
340 
345 
412 
315 


$ 

85 
50 

106 
50 
91 
81 
70 
95 
71 
22 

111 
66 
38 
44 
71 
54 
99 
53 
59 
43 
54 
84 
20 
87 

102 

115 
54 
34 
69 
72 
68 
80 
38 
23 
56 
66 
31 

134 
42 

114 
61 
95 
45 
28 
66 

109 
30 
54 
69 
dcstro 
93 
66 
30 
34 
86 
53 


$ 

44 
36 
15 
27 
44 
35 
55 
57 
33 
29 
48 
34 
29 


$ 


64 
56 
73 
60 

107 
57 
44 
99 
61 
4 
92 
40 
40 
28 
52 
61 
62 
9 
62 
27 
23 

138 
57 
68 
55 
76 
29 
41 
66 
65 
39 
69 
13 
54 
60 
52 
40 
33 
66 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


2 Acton 




51 
26 








3 Agincourt 








4 Ailsa Craig 








5 Alvinston 


65 

9 

15 








•6 Arkona 








7 Ayr 








8 Bancroft . . 










9 Bath 










10 Beachburg 










11 Beavcrton 


72 








12 Beeton 


















14 Blackstock. . 


30 
16 
59 








15 Blenheim 




61 
39 
72 
10 
61 
29 
36 
69 
59 
48 
53 
91 
18 
59 
60 
40 
39 
58 
28 
49 
49 
42 
70 
20 
62 
38 
51 
74 
16 
38 


"70 
100 








16 Blind River 








17 Blyth. . 






6 


18 Bobcavgeon . . 










19 Bolton . . 










20 Bothwell . . 


40 
4 

20 
30 
40 

54 
45 








2 1 Bowesville . . . 








22 Bridgeburg . . 








23 Brownsville . . . 








24 Bruce Mines. . 








25 Brussels 








26 Burk's Falls 
















28 Cannington .... 


86 
30 








29 Cardinal . . 








30 Carp 








31 Claremont . 


20 
15 








32 Clifford 








33 Cobden. . 






52 








35 Coldwater . 










10 
9 
























39 Creemore .... 












40 Danforth Park 










41 Delaware. 




39 
44 
30 
69 
45 
52 
58 
37 
30 
e.) 
66 
65 
11 
51 
78 
53 


32 
45 
23 






70 


42 Delhi. . . 






1 


43 Denbigh 




16 










19 

5 
45 








46 Drayton 

47 Dresden . 




71 
51 
57 
25 
yed b 
68 
78 
42 
57 
47 
31 


y fir 






3 
















49 Drvden. .. . 


15 

305 
70 
30 
23 

5 
29 








50 Eganville 


3,000 


18 




51 Eganville (R.C.S.S.) . 


3 

7 










54 Erin . . 






10 










56 Fenelon Falls 


i 









1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



175 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BOARD, VALUE OF EQUIPMENT, ETC. 



Equipment 


Religious and other Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 


s 

3 

■M 
O 


J s 

>^ s 

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o <y cr 
HOW 


> <v a 


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1 « 

3 *^ 

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<-> & ^ 


to £* tn Ji 

-.8 -5 .§■£ 

CJ-r| u-r; 


e 
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s £ 

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u 

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$ 

490 
1,113 

788 
817 

1,022 
641 
950 
890 
706 
359 

1,556 
926 

1,038 
168 

1,268 

1,321 

1,071 
215 
837 
846 
464 

1,850 
588 
934 

1,062 
998 
231 

1,388 
825 
923 
935 

1,074 
272 
573 

1,017 
754 

1,282 
518 
886 
275 
936 
• 1,184 
381 
379 
676 

1,276 

1,103 
683 
659 


l 
l 
l 






















5 
8 
7 


1 


? 






4 


2 
1 
2 






5 


2 
2 


1 


3 8 












4 10 




1 
1 


1 










5 11 


1 

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1 










6 




5 
2 

7 








4 
1 
6 

1 


1 


7 15 






4 






1 


5 




8 










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1 
3 
1 
3 
3 


3 


9 


l 

l 
l 
l 
















10 . 


1 








"2 
4 


1 
2 
2 




11 220 

12 10 


1 




2 
2 
2 


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4 
3 


7 


13 5 








2 


14 .... 


l 
l 
l 
l 
l 

1 
















15 10 






5 
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4 

2 




3 


4 

2 
4 


2 
3 


4 
3 
4 


2 


16 




1 


? 


17 18 




4 


6 


18 .... 


1 










19 26 




1 

5 


5 
1 






1 

1 


2 
3 
1 
3 


5 
3 
3 
8 




20 .... 








1 




21 .... 




1 




22 20 






2 








3 


4 


23 .... 


l 




1 












24 .... 












1 

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2 
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25 40 


l 
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2 
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5 

7 


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26 .... 




1 


9 


27 .... 








28 148 




1 


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2 
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2 
4 

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6 
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2 
3 
4 
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29 .... 


1 






30 .... 








31 18 








1 


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32 .... 












33 4 


l 
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1 


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3 

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34 19 














35 .... 






2 
1 
1 


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2 




3 


36 .... 


l 






1 


1 


37 .... 


2 




1 


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l 

l 
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1 










39 .... 




1 


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1 


2 




2 


4 


4 


40 .... 








41 27 


1 


1 


1 


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1 

2 


3 








6 
4 
4 
6 

2 
7 
9 
4 
2 




42 .... 


l 
l 
l 
l 
l 
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l 
l 
l 
l 


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1 


43 .... 

44 .... 


1 


1 






3 




2 


' 2 


45 .... 














2 
1 


1 
2 

2 


1 


46 30 

47 .... 

48 15 




1 
1 


3 
6 

2 


12 

4 
1 


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7 
1 
2 
4 
1 
4 


3 

8 
2 


49 .... 


1 




1 


4 




50 .... 








1 

2 


1 


51 29 

52 13 


4,498 
1,239 
762 
822 
912 
778 


1 

1 
1 


1 
1 


4 
1 


1 
2 




3 
1 


2 
9 
2 
3 
1 
3 


2 


53 8 








7 
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54 10 


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1 


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4 


55 35 


1 


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7 




56 31 








2 


ll 


2l 


21 


4 



176 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 

II. TABLE I— SCHOOLS UNDER PUBLIC SCHOOL 



Continuation Schools 



57 Fenwick 

58 Feversham 

59 Finch 

60 Fingal 

61 Florence 

62 Frankford 

63 Gore Bay 

64 Grand Valley . . 

65 Hallville ...... . 

66 Hanover 

67 Harrow 

68 Havelock 

69 Hepworth 

70 Highgate 

71 Holstein 

72 Huntsville 

73 Ilderton 

74 Inglewood 

75 Iroquois Falls. . 

76 Islington 

77 Jarvis 

78 Jockvale 

79 Kars... 

Keewatin 

Ken more 

Kinburn 

Lakefield 

84 Lambeth 

85 Lanark 

86 Lansdowne 

87 Laurel 

88 Lion's Head 

89 Little Current . . 

90 Lobo 

91 Long Branch . . . 

92 Lucknow 

93 Lyndhurst 

94 Manitowaning. . 

95 Manotick 

96 Marmora 

97 Massey 

98 Maxville 

99 Melbourne 

100 Merlin 

101 Merrickville. . . 

102 Metcalfe 

103 Millbrook 

104 Milverton 

105 Mimico 

106 Mindemoya 

107 Minden 

108 Morriston 

109 Mount Albert.. 

110 Mount Brydges 

111 Mount Elgin... 

1 1 2 Navan 



80 
81 
82 
83 



0) 

cuCQ 

o 2 



Value of General 



u 

a 
u 
X> 

_3 

$ 

108 
185 
475 
245 
134 
230 
309 
401 

39 
476 
312 
475 
173 
355 
114 
422 
173 
100 
236 
210 
284 
168 
233 
380 
291 
232 
378 
269 
300 
284 

71 
137 
261 
313 
110 
•342 

71 
160 
151 
447 
237 
222 
232 
245 
318 
373 
457 
381 
432 
181 

79 

42 
397 
363 
134 
203 



s§t3 

CD Oh 

•CO. 



101 
153 
597 

512 
252 
370 
452 
640 
1.27 
577 
542 
352 
206 
309 
148 
725 
302 

37 
333 
152 
232 
210 
294 
491 
500 
360 
942 
408 
426 
384 

89 
216 
309 
429 
135 
676 
105 
402 
215 
941 
169 
423 
487 
370 

478 
422 
461 
442 
791 
229 
145 
454 
441 
59 
253 



££ 
. O 

So 



35 
46 

117 
81 
78 
64 
49 
75 

122 
69 
49 
89 
50 
78 
80 

116 
90 
55 

166 
78 
38 
72 
68 

101 
30 
77 

116 
84 
62 
57 
51 
47 
91 

116 
17 
70 
25 
85 
38 
85 
35 
38 
83 
50 
50 
57 
88 
54 

136 
85 
48 
23 

108 
62 
92 
43 



35 



300 



70 



O CD 

'So £ 
S'o 



CD 






u 


o 




fe 3 


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$ $ 



25 
40 
34 
14 
8 
52 

*37 

100 
12 

*32 

4C 

108 



15 

10 
60 

5 

42 

24 

25 
77 
27 
11 

14 

72 

2 

21 

23 
20 



27 
18 



50 
110 



84 



64 



15 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



177 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BOARD, VALUE OF EQUIPMENT, ETC. (Continued) 



Equipment 


Religious and other Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 




<4-l 

o 

o <l> cr 
HOW 


J3 a 4) 

■POM 

lis 

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$ 

57 .... 


$ 

321 

478 

1,397 

981 

618 

783 

914 

1,302 

347 

1,352 

1,112 

1,041 

614 

844 

435 

1,541 

657 

265 

794 

513 

657 

516 

764 

1,345 

1,007 

712 

1,571 

941 

920 

818 

270 

503 

804 

971 

331 

1,246 

229 

758 

494 

1,590 

536 

791 

934 

799 

483 

1,025 

1,104 

1,077 

1,480 

1,158 

416 

286 

1,047 

1,077 

360 

606 




























58 8 
















2 

2 


2 
4 
4 




59 35 

60 


i 




.... 


8 
4 




5 

2 




4 
1 


61 .... 








1 








62 6 


4 

1 


2 


1 


4 
6 

2 


3 

2 


"3 

5 


1 
4 
9 


3 


63 .... 






l 




1 


64 7 


6 






65 30 










66 67 

67 .... 

68 20 


l 
l 


1 


4 


4 

8 
2 


2 


2 

2 
2 


'"2 
1 
2 


4 
1 

2 

"2 
2 
6 


9 

2 
3 
7 
3 
4 
3 
1 


1 

2 
1 


69 52 










70 30 






1 


11 




1 


2 


71 .... 












72 40 

73 .... 


l 




5 


1 

5 




7 
3 


2 
1 


2 
1 


74 12 




1 
1 






75 .... 


l 














1 
1 






76 .... 


3 

3 


2 
1 
1 

1 






2 


6 

14 

6 

4 


1 


77 .... 














1 


78 .... 






l 












2 


79 10 








3 
3 
4 
1 
9 


i 


1 
6 

i 

1 


1 


80 .... 






1 




81 10 










1 

2 
3 


2 


82 12 












4 
5 
2 

14 
2 






83 .... 

84 .... 


l 
l 


"i 


1 
1 


8 


85 5 




3 




5 
1 


4 
6 


5 


86 10 






4 


87 .... 


l 














88 6 














3 
1 

2 


5 
"■4 


1 


89 .... 






1 
1 


1 

8 


"i 


1 

1 




1 


90 .... 

91 .... 




l 




92 20 

93 .... 








l 


1 


2 


l 


4 


1 


10 


6 


2 


94 .... 








2 
5 
3 
1 
8 
11 
5 


"i 


.. 4 
2 
4 




1 


2 
1 
5 
5 
4 
11 




95 .... 






1 
4 
3 
4 




96 .... 








2 
3 
1 

'"4 
.... 

2 


5 


97 25 






"l 


l 




98 .... 

99 .... 


3 

7 


1 

3 

.... 




100 .... 






4 

2 




101 .... 






4 
2 
3 
6 

22 


4 


102 .... 












103 .... 






1 
4 
5 


2 




3 




7 


104 .... 








105 33 




1 












3 


2 


4 


106 20 




l 










107 .... 


1 
1 


2 
3 










2 
6 
6 
8 


2 


108 .... 










1 






109 .... 










3 


110 24 

111 .... 


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l 


2 


4 




1 




2 




112 .... 


l 



















178 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 

II. TABLE I— SCHOOLS UNDER PUBLIC SCHOOL 



Continuation Schools 



a>CQ 
u O 
o a 



Value of Genera 



u 
u 



G £ 
C/3< 



a 

rt en 

« O 






«} G 

u <u 
'be £ 

.2 & 



gU 
u — . 
S ?! 






•=< bo a) 

rt.S £ 

gtd a 

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O.SW 



3 u 



113 New Dundee 

114 New Hamburg. . . 

115 New Liskeard .... 

116 North Augusta.. . 

117 North Gower 

118 Odessa 

119 Oil Springs 

120 Onondaga 

121 Orono 

122 Paisley 

123 Pakenham 

124 Palmerston 

125 Pickering 

126 Pierce's Corners. . 

127 Plattsville 

128 Port Burwell 

129 Port Colborne 

130 Port Credit 

131 Powassan 

132 Princeton 

133 Rainy River 

134 Richard's Landing 

135 Richmond 

136 Ridgewav 

137 Ripley. 

138 Rockwood 

139 Rodney 

140 Russell 

141 St. George 

142 Schomberg 

143 Schreiber 

144 Scotland 

145 Southampton 

146 South Mountain . . , 

147 South Porcupine. . . 

148 South River 

149 Spencerville 

150 Springfield 

151 Sprucedale 

152 Stayner 

153 Stella. . 

154 Stevensville 

155 Stouffville 

156 Sturgeon Falls 

157 Sunderland 

158 Sutton 

159 Tamworth 

160 Tara 

161 Tavistock 

162 Teeswater 

163 Thamesford 

164 Thamesville 

165 Thessalon 

166 Thornbury 

167 Thorndale 

168 Tilburv 



88 
408 
422 
306 
431 
296 
352 
109 
208 
319 
256 
423 
5 
189 
397 
383 
505 
384 
134 
331 
208 
230 
237 
345 
426 
142 
257 
284 
389 
178 

80 
305 
401 
310 
273 

81 
212 
497 
126 
253 
226 
129 
246 
453 
236 
312 
308 
297 
435 
441 
216 
468 
343 
470 
365 
238 



$ 

84 
419 
466 
294 
264 
282 
443 

75 
351 
500 
476 
317 
124 
316 
430 
561 
1,250 
450 
597 
264 
670 
141 
234 
697 
469 
120 
349 
404 
463 
166 
150 
334 
655 
621 
358 

87 
334 
591 
146 
430 
409 
169 
399 
1,107 
238 
441 
320 
466 
417 
516 
354 
429 
604 
672 
398 
337 



47 
63 

101 
61 
57 
69 
36 
88 

100 
71 
30 
79 



53 
67 
93 

110 

88 

94 

38 

1 

108 
43 
55 
63 
61 
57 
50 
63 
66 
38 
74 
84 
69 
60 
76 
39 
86 
S3 
54 
58 

102 

116 
88 

101 
82 
55 
75 
63 
65 
69 
79 

100 
75 

110 
94 



31 

55 
41 
90 
64 

34 
17 
16 

24 

40 

40 

58 

47 

53 

57 

57 

37 

17 

87 

56 

73 

44 

20 

52 

79 

44 

62 

27 

50 

18 

64 

39 

35 

35 

60 

43 

46 

33 

70 

2 ( ) 

46 

51 

37 



37 
82 

107 
35 
51 
37 
56 
53 
48 

107 
53 
56 



60 



47 
58 
36 

121 
83 
51 
57 
29 
95 
33 
31 
67 

107 
41 
72 
74 
61 
12 
59 
86 
64 
57 



16 



31 



10 

35 
889 



54 
114 
69 
63 
59 
3 

60 
73 
30 
31 
66 
45 
40 
75 
52 
35 
53 
48 
44 
37 



30 



76 



20 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



179 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BOARD, VALUE OF EQUIPMENT, ETC. (Continued) 



Equipment 


Religious and other Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 


to 

<u 

u 
3 
m 

o 


o « cr 
HOW 


CD to -n 

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113 


$ 

274 

1,039 

1,182 

784 

874 

768 

973 

327 

758 

1,091 

868 

941 

129 

636 

1,062 

1,174 

2,965 

1,114 

910 

737 

929 

598 

608 

1,191 

1,088 

477 

833 

867 

1,046 

517 

297 

879 

1,351 

1,217 

854 

264 

696 

1,387 

468 

880 

788 

492 

938 

1,858 

644 

901 

814 

943 

1,013 

1,143 

766 

1,149 

1,129 

1,340 

981 

743 


1 

1 
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1 
1 
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114 








2 






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115 . 






2 




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116 8 




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117 10 








118 5 








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119 15 






2 


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120 .... 












121 6 


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4 
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122 


7 

4 

12 


1 


123 


1 


10 

8 




124 


1 










125 












126 .... 


1 
1 
1 
























127 45 








2 
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4 
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128 25 

129 .... 


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6 
3 
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2 
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130 45 








3 
3 
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131 .... 

132 


1 
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133 5 








134 .... 


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135 .... 




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8 
3 
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136 10 












137 .... 

138 .... 


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139 .... 












140 .... 








3 




5 
2 
2 






141 .... 


3 
3 


8 
1 




5 
11 

4 
1 




142 9 


1 
1 

1 
1 














2 


143 .... 












3 


144 .... 






1 

2 


1 

"4 








3 
1 




145 .... 






2 


"3 


3 
1 




146 53 






1 


2 


147 27 














148 .... 


1 
1 
























149 5 






4 
5 
1 


3 
3 

2 


1 
"l 


1 
1 
1 

2 

2 


1 
2 
1 


1 

" 1 

1 


3 
1 
4 
5 
1 
4 
4 
4 
5 


2 


150 .... 








151 .... 


1 








2 


152 .... 






2 


153 .... 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




1 









1 


154 11 


1 

5 


1 
16 






155 25 








5 
3 
2 
3 
8 
4 
2 
5 


.... 


1 
3 


1 


156 .... 








157 .... 






3 
2 
3 
1 


1 




2 


158 .... 






3 
1 




2 


159 30 






5 
3 
1 
2 


3 








160 .... 








5 
3 
2 




161 15 






"i 


2 
2 


4 


162 .... 






1 


1 


163 .... 


1 
1 




1 






164 .... 










3 
1 
4 

5 
1 










165 .... 












"4 


7 

"2 
5 


7 
7 
3 
4 


2 


166 .... 












6 

2 






167 9 


1 

1 












168 .... 








3 



180 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



II. 



CONTINUATION 

TABLE I— SCHOOLS UNDER PUBLIC SCHOOL 





Schools under Pub- 
lic or Separate 
School Board 


Value of General 


Continuation Schools 


u 

u 

jo 


CO 
<U Oh 


to 

Oh 

^5 JO 
- o 

So 

US 


jn 

-v 

O 
< 


(A 
u 

<v 

'u 

4) 

a 
>. 

H 


o a> 
'3b £ 
.S'O 

•2 & 


0) 

u 


Gymnasium, not 

including 

Equipment 


£ 

3 
QJ 
to 

3 


Li 

is 

cr cu 


169 Timmins 




$ 

308 
497 
483 
193 
361 
205 
367 
323 
435 
197 
76 
136 
378 


$ 

288 
442 
522 
325 
417 
244 
389 
307 
313 
328 
71 
106 
400 


$ 
71 
78 
54 
68 
63 
53 
38 
50 

188 
66 
47 
59 
80 


$ 
44 
93 
96 

"68 
30 
25 
39 
69 
28 
35 
43 
52 


$ 

"i( 


$ 
21 
) 54 
68 
74 
55 
58 
71 
60 
35 
99 
8 
56 
25 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


170 Tottenham 


52 
21 
*600 
36 
10 
18 
37 








171 Warkworth 








172 Wellington 








173 West Lome 








174 Westmeath 








175 Westport 








176 Westport (R.C.S.S.) . 

177 Wheatley 














178 Winona 










179 Wolfe Island 










180 Woodville 










181 Wroxeter 


13 
















1 Totals, 1922-23 

2 Totals, 1921-22 


163 
146 


50,453 
42,978 


67,042 
58,337 


12,412 
9,760 


8,011 
7,091 


74i 
68( 


5 9,361 

) 7,557 


5,090 
3,564 


3,064 
3,050 


34 
27 


86 

74 


3 Increases 


17 


7,475 


8,705 


2,652 


920 


6< 


5 1,804 


l',526 


14 


7 


1? 


4 Decrease 




























5 Percentages 


90 


31.92 


42.42 


7.85 


5.06 


.4' 


1 5.92 


3.22 


1.93 


.02 


OS 







including Equipment of Gymnasium. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



181 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BOARD, VALUE OF EQUIPMENT, ETC. (Concluded) 



Equipment 


Religious 


and Other Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 






43 C CJ 

4-> O W 

43 \m 3 


43 




"O 




4-> 






-43 
Q 3 






en 

d 

o 






C/3 

<V 

u 

3 

y 


o 

0) 

> rt 6 
3S"t 

04JO 1 

HOW 


> CD 03 

J3J2 a) 


43 

.5 

"o 

o 

o 

en 


en N 

S 6 


c 

cu u 

Q. CD 

43 4-> 


T3 

^0? 

en w, 

43^ 


<D 

s 

CD 

C A) 

CD w 

B*S 

£ cu 
O X 


(J 

s 

o 
U 


u 

3 

So 

< 


s ° 

cj en 


bo 

c 

43 
O 
o3 
0) 


en 
0) 

43 
H 


o3 

a 

3 
O 

u 

O 

In 

CD 

43 
+-> 

c 


2^ 
s ° 

-D43 

g£ 

U43 
43E 


C 

O 

4->"+J 

3 03 

a 

43 3 
. tl <-> 

S <-> 


$ 


$ 






























169 


732 
1,226 
1,244 










1 




2 
7 






1 
1 


1 


3 


3 

25 




170 .... 




3 






171 .... 












1 


1 




3 




6 




3 


172 


1,260 

1,030 

605 

908 

858 

1,040 




























173 30 














6 






3 




5 


1 


174 5 












2 
1 
1 
7 


1 
1 
2 
2 








1 
1 


3 
1 
2 
1 




175 .... 








1 


1 
2 
2 






176 42 


1 


1 
1 




1 


177 .... 


1 


2 




178 10 


728 
237 
400 
973 






















4 


8 




179 .... 






















180 .... 
























181 25 








2 






3 


3 


6 


5 


















1 1,732 


158,030 


137 




6 


181 


32 


35 


196 


344 


46 


290 


116 


281 


589 


218 


2 1,596 


134,714 


111 




3 


159 


23 


26 


121 


242 


60 


249 


91 


247 


376 


212 


3 136 


23,316 


26 




3 


22 


9 


9 


75 


102 




41 


25 


34 


213 


6 


4 .... 




















14 








































5 1.09 




75.69 


3 


.31 


100 


17.68 


19.34 


9.42 


16.54 


2.21 


13.94 


5.57 


13.51 


28.32 


10.48 



182 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 

III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Attendance 


Number of 
Pupils in — 


Number of 
Pupils from — 




CO <U 








-a <u _: 








§ _ G 


•M 






Continuation Schools 


Oh £ 






>> 


dmitte 
st Tim 
d'y Sch 


*o 
o 


's 
o 


o 
o 

o 


r Sect'i 
e Cont 
trict 


o) 'C 

3 W 

c . 

3 3 


c 

3 
O 
r ) to 


CO 




OT3 






Q y 


<.13C 


rC 


.3 


O J5 « 


o 
u 




imber 

theR< 

ar 


CO 


CO 




mber 
theF 
a Seco 




(J 




Sch. Sec. 
forming t 
School D 


c c 

0) 3 




^ - O) 

Z o> 


O 


6 


> iJ 

<< 


-> *- _ 
2 o o 


o o 

_j Li- 


O O 


s 


o o 

UU 


< o 


O 



1 Aberfoyle 

2 Acton 

3 Agincourt 

4 Ailsa Craig. . . . 

5 Alvinston 

6 Arkona 

7 Ayr 

8 Bancroft 

9 Bath 

10 Beachburg 

11 Beaverton 

12 Beeton 

13 Belmont 

14 Blackstock 

15 Blenheim 

16 Blind River... . 

17 Blyth 

18 Bobcaygeon . . . 

19 Bolton 

20 Bothwell 

21 Bowesville 

22 Bridgeburg 

23 Brownsville. . . . 

24 Bruce Mines. . . 

25 Brussels 

26 Burk's Falls. . . 

27 Caledon East . . 

28 Cannington. . . . 

29 Cardinal 

30 Carp 

31 Claremont 

32 Clifford 

33 Cobden 

34 Cochrane 

35 Coldwater 

36 Comber 

37 Cookstown. . . . 

38 Copetown 

39 Creemore 

40 Danforth Park. 

41 Delaware 

42 Delhi 

43 Denbigh 

44 Devizes 

45 Dorchester 

46 Drayton 

47 Dresden 

48 Drumbo 

49 Dryden 

50 Eganville 

51 Eganville (r.C.S.s) 

52 Elmvale 

53 Ennismore. . . 

54 Erin 

55 Espanola .... 

56 Fenelon Falls 



12 


7 


71 


30 


44 


22 


42 


16 


85 


33 


27 


16 


55 


28 


44 


18 


35 


15 


40 


14 


72 


35 


42 


19 


72 


32 


26 


11 


79 


30 


42 


8 


56 


23 


21 


6 


19 


4 


48 


20 


16 


6 


90 


47 


14 


9 


43 


13 


73 


30 


49 


16 


19 


8 


50 


17 


40 


17 


63 


21 


44 


15 


37 


19 


31 


8 


19 


8 


41 


26 


30 


6 


76 


23 


18 


4 


85 


35 


20 


7 


47 


18 


51 


20 


18 


4 


7 


5 


49 


16 


105 


50 


98 


43 


35 


19 


31 


13 


48 


18 


70 


38 


63 


29 


42 


17 


43 


14 


39 


18 


70 


31 



5 
41 
22 
20 
52 
11 
27 
26 
20 
2o 
3 1 
23 
40 
15 
49 
34 
33 
15 
15 
2<S 
10 
43 

5 
30 
43 
33 
11 
33 
23 
42 
29 
18 
23 
11 
15 
24 
53 
14 
50 
13 
29 
31 
14 

2 
33 
55 
55 
16 
18 
30 
32 
34 
25 
29 
21 
39 



/ 
59 

27 
38 
82 
22 
51 
36 
28 
37 
58 
31 
62 
21 
54 
27 
48 
20 
16 
36 
12 
71 
12 
38 
69 
36 
15 
42 
33 
59 
3 7 
33 
26 
13 
35 
20 
67 
16 
73 
14 
41 
43 
13 
6 
40 
82 
78 
30 
19 
45 
53 
51 
35 
36 
31 
56 



5 
20 
20 
16 
31 
14 
20 
20 

8 
40 
29 
10 
15 
17 
31 
17 

9 
14 
13 
15 

8 
42 
10 
18 
30 
19 
15 
22 
11 
25 
18 
12 
21 
12 
14 
12 
30 
14 
36 
19 

8 
23 

6 

1 
19 
39 
29 
11 
17 
18 
18 
33 
10 
24 
17 
30 



5 
27 
20 
10 
31 
14 
22 
18 

8 

5 
30 
11 
18 
16 
34 
17 

9 
14 
13 
19 

8 
42 
10 
18 
32 
19 
15 
23 
11 
20 
18 
13 
20 
13 
15 
12 
32 
15 
38 
20 
11 
24 

8 

3 

19 
39 
29 
17 
17 
18 
19 
34 
11 
21 
18 
32 



18 



19 



6 




7 


19 


11 


7 


22 


22 


3 




23 


24 


14 


22 


13 


14 


10 




4 





11 

51 

44 
20 

31 
24 
38 
25 
16 
35 
35 
14 
32 
22 
58 
42 
27 
12 

8 
28 
16 
63 

8 

15 
71 
86 
13 
32 
33 
46 
14 
24 
25 
10 
23 
26 
40 
14 
31 
20 
10 
24 
18 

2 
46 
22 
48 
16 
25 
29 
45 
31 
15 
23 
39 
42 



1 

15 






5 




21 
36 

3 

3 

18 
17 

5 
32 
23 
40 

4 
21 


1 

18 




14 

1 

2 




2 
5 


3 














28 

9 

10 

15 




1 


1 
8 




29 

4 
28 

2 
13 

5 
17 

7 
17 
30 
13 

6 






1 


1 










1 
1 
























18 
1 

36 
4 

38 


















16 




31 

25 

5 
3 






2 
1 


1 






81 
38 
19 
3 
19 


2 
12 




3 




24 
32 
24 
18 




1 


3 

2 





1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



183 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. 



Number of Pupils from Families whose 
Head is occupied as below 


Nc 


►. of Pupils in the Various Subjects 




0) 

u 
u 

CD 

S 

£ 


e 

3 

"a 

# o 


<U-G 

G " M 


CO 

-a 
H 

0) 


tn 

bo § 
G •£ 

2 a 

X> 


w 

G 
.2 
o3 

a 
3 


O 

Ih 

<v 
p£! 


G 
O 

3 '"3 

a 

-G G 


u 

£ 

6 

O 


.JL, O 
cg'C 

as 

"m g 


e 

+-) 

03 
u 
0) 

,d 

jm 

"bfl 


u 



s 

G 

'•& 

a 

G 


>> 

u 



10 

£ 


u 



(0 

£ 

G 
.Si 




o 


be 


cd^-c 


J3 


cd 




^O 


G 


G O 


G 


oj 


u 


c 




U 


< 


JQU 


H 


JO 





W 


W+5 


w 


u 


CQ 


< 


t 


9 


9 
18 






1 

28 


2 
6 


' 4 


6 

7 


12 
71 


12 
71 


7 
27 






2 


2 


4 


11 


21 


3 


3 
4 


32 
23 


3 






6 

2 




10 
9 


44 
42 


43 

42 


21 
16 


8 
10 


8 


4 


5 


8 


10 


5 


5 


59 


8 




10 


2 


1 


31 


85 


85 


30 


19 


19 


6 


"8 

12 

1 


26 
28 
20 
18 


3 

3 

2 


1 

3 

7 
6 








13 

9 

12 

16 


27 
56 
41 
34 


27 
56 
43 
34 


14 
24 

20 
13 






7 


13 
2 

4 






13 

8 
9 


10 


8 






8 


9 


4 




2 


10 


6 
10 


33 
40 


1 
1 










26 
30 


40 
70 


40 
71 


26 
30 


13 
18 




11 


7 


2 


6 


6 


19 


12 


1 
3 


31 
54 


1 
1 


8 
6 


1 

3 






16 

24 


35 
72 


42 

72 


11 

23 


9 
12 


11 


13 


5 




18 


14 


3 
16 


18 

28 






2 
14 


1 
8 


2 
3 


21 

21 


25 
79 


25 
79 


18 

35 






15 


1 


9 


22 


21 


16 




8 




8 




20 


6 


1 


39 


39 


17 


6 


3 


17 


4 


31 


1 


8 


1 


6 


5 


20 


56 


56 


23 


21 


21 


18 


1 
18 


11 
13 
31 
16 
15 


1 

"2 


3 
4 

5 


2 
' "2 


3 
2 






21 
19 
48 
16 
90 


21 
19 
48 
16 
90 


15 
13 
20 

8 
48 






19 










20 




22 
8 
6 


13 


10 


21 








22 




20 


20 


13 


4 


6 


12 


23 


*4 

10 

7 


12 

25 

40 

9 






1 

5 

2 

14 




1 


11 
29 
16 
16 


14 
43 
73 
49 


14 
43 
73 
49 


11 
18 
34 

25 






24 


1 
1 

5 


8 
2 

5 


14 


13 


25 


12 

2 


6 

7 




26 


13 


15 


27 


4 
15 


12 
21 


1 

4 


1 
2 


1 
4 






2 

27 


19 
50 


19 
50 


15 
23 






28 


3 


1 


14 


17 


29 




13 


1 


5 


19 


2 




13 


40 


40 


14 


9 


3 


30 




29 


2 


8 


13 


6 


5 


21 


63 


63 


25 


17 


5 


31 




34 


1 


4 


2 


2 


1 


11 


44 


44 


18 


10 


8 


32 


9 


24 


2 





1 


1 




12 


37 


37 


16 


11 


10 


33 




11 


2 


7 
1 


5 

16 
1 
3 


4 
2 
7 
1 
10 


2 

"i 


6 
6 

8 


31 
19 
41 
30 
76 


31 
19 
41 
30 
76 


20 
13 
18 
17 
35 






34 






35 


9 

6 

7 


23 
16 

55 




15 

6 

11 


16 


36 




4 
4 


5 


37 




8 


12 


38 


1 
11 


16 
51 


3 


1 
6 










18 

85 


18 

85 


15 

38 






39 


3 


8 


3 


22 


9 


12 


40 








4 

1 
6 

2 


16 
3 

4 








20 
47 
51 
18 
7 
49 
105 


20 
47 
51 
18 
7 
49 
105 


20 
12 
26 
9 
4 
19 
39 






41 


4 
6 

"i 

8 


37 

26 
16 

7 
27 
84 


2 

3 


"(5 






14 
14 


17 


42 






12 


43 




3 

7 

8 

27 




44 












45 


3 


10 
10 


5 






8 
21 


5 


46 


2 


1 


17 


47 


30 


43 


1 


2 


13 


4 


5 


39 


98 




35 


54 


31 


48 


7 


21 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


5 


35 


35 


14 


4 


4 


49 


"ii 


6 
21 






25 
10 






12 
12 


24 

47 


28 
47 


21 

23 






50 




1 


4 




14 


15 


51 


9 


32 


4 


6 


4 


15 




18 


70 


70 


19 


29 


22 


52 


6 


38 




5 


4 


8 


2 


38 


63 


63 


37 


8 


8 


53 


' 9 


42 
24 












1 
9 


42 
43 


42 
43 


12 

23 


17 
9 


18 


54 


5 


2 


2 




1 


6 


55 


3 






32 


1 


3 





14 


39 


39 


24 


7 


3 


56 


20 


23 


3 


10 


'3 


10 


ii 


15 


70 


701 


32 


10 


12 



184 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 

Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 



Continuation Schools 







T3 














>. 


C 














43 


a c 












>% 


a. 


o.2 












43 

a, 


2 

bfi 


"§ 2 


rt 


>> 




G 




aJ 


o 


£ 3 


2 


a> 


43 


CJ 




bb 

o 


CO 

43 






e 

o 


c 


g 


.s 


O 


0-. 


< 


o 


fa 


o 


J 



1 Aberfoyle 

2 Acton 

3 Agincourt 

4 Ailsa Craig 

5 Alvinston 

6 Arkona 

7 Ayr 

8 Bancroft 

9 Bath 

10 Beachburg 

11 Beaverton 

12 Beeton 

13 Belmont 

14 Blackstock 

15 Blenheim 

16 Blind River 

17 Blyth 

18 Bobcaygeon 

19 Bolton 

20 Bothwell 

21 Bowesville 

22 Bridgeburg 

23 Brownsville 

24 Bruce Mines 

25 Brussels 

26 Burk's Falls 

27 Caledon East 

28 Cannington 

29 Cardinal 

30 Carp 

31 Claremont 

32 Clifford 

33 Cobden 

34 Cochrane 

35 Coldwater 

36 Comber 

37 Cookstown 

38 Copetown 

39 Creemore 

40 Danforth Park 

41 Delaware 

42 Delhi 

43 Denbigh 

44 Devizes 

45 Dorchester 

46 Drayton 

47 Dresden 

48 Drumbo 

49 Dryden 

50 Eganville 

51 Eganville (R.C.Sep.Sch.) 

52 Elmvale 

53 Ennismore 

54 Erin 

55 Espanola 

56 Fenelon Falls 



6 
27 
21 
16 
31 
14 
22 
18 

8 
20 
30 
11 
27 
17 
35 
16 
11 
14 
13 
17 

8 
42 
11 

1 
33 
20 
16 
23 
11 
25 
18 
13 
20 
13 
15 
12 
32 
15 
38 
13 
11 
24 
17 

3 

19 
39 
30 
13 
20 
18 
18 
34 
12 
24 
.20 
32 



12 
38 
37 
25 
62 
14 
56 
29 
17 
13 
50 
20 
60 
17 
79 
33 
20 
15 
13 
35 

8 
54 
10 
11 
50 
32 
15 
50 
20 
42 
28 
25 
20 
13 
30 
23 
46 
17 
60 
20 
18 
23 
16 

3 
29 
77 
54 
27 
22 
32 
45 
41 
14 
31 
27 
47 



6 
36 
18 

22 
37 
13 
22 
24 
25 
26 
39 
29 
40 

8 
45 
33 
35 

7 

6 
23 

8 
40 

4 
42 
36 
28 

4 
27 
26 
3S 
25 
24 
11 

6 
22 
15 
35 

3 
43 



25 
34 
19 
29 
20 
49 
19 
53 
24 
64 
25 
41 
21 
19 
29 
12 
71 
10 
24 
56 
37 
18 
26 
40 
45 
36 
20 
15 
19 
31 
22 
50 
18 
63 
18 
37 
48 



17 
34 
12 
24 
20 
48 
24 
51 
19 
45 
21 
41 
21 
18 
31 
14 
64 
11 
24 
58 
33 
14 
28 
31 
30 
34 
20 
14 
18 
28 
19 
42 
18 
69 
9 
36 
36 

4 
41 
89 
60 
25 
27 
28 
38 
45 
21 
30 
30 
51 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



185 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 







Number of Pupils 


in the Various Subjects (Continued) 






>> 

c 

O 

P3 


u 

CO 

g 

43 

u 


'55 

>> 

43 


c 
'a 

<L> 

4d 
O 
O 

PQ 


43 
a, 

u 

hJO 
O 
C 
a> 


c 
'C 

a 


< 


4) 

U 

"3 



13 

# a 
'53 
>% 

Oh 


u 
"3 

*£ 
< 


* 

!s 

u 

H 

3 
C 

2 



a 
.<y 
'0 
OT 

"0 

-G 

a> 
O 


1 


12 
29 
20 

"'31 
14 












12 
27 
23 
16 
27 
18 
23 
24 

8 
39 
20 
14 
22 

7 
65 

9 
11 
20 
16 

9 

8 
42 

1 
21 
37 
19 
15 
24 
16 
28 
19 
19 
26 
14 
15 
13 
34 
16 
40 
15 
25 
39 

9 


12 
71 
44 
42 
85 
27 
56 
44 
35 
40 
72 
42 
72 
26 
79 
42 
56 
21 
19 
48 
16 
90 
14 
43 
73 
49 
19 
50 
40 
63 
44 
37 
31 
19 
41 
24 
76 
18 
85 
20 
47 
51 
18 
7 
49 
105 
98 
35 
31 
46 
69 
61 








2 


18 

10 

8 

19 


8 
10 

8 
19 














3 














4 














5 








59 






6 












7 




14 

9 

10 














8 


21 
9 

""28 
11 
24 
2 
23 
16 

"20 
14 
16 

8 
68 
11 

2 
32 
17 


10 
9 
13 
17 
11 
26 














9 














10 








26 






11 


18 

9 

13 












12 














13 














14 














15 


21 

8 

15 


15 

7 
14 














16 














17 














18 














19 


















20 


6 


11 














21 














22 


14 


15 














23 














24 


11 
19 
13 


13 
12 
13 














25 














26 














27 














28 


20 
1 
26 
20 
18 
20 
13 
14 
21 
38 


23 
1 
5 
8 

10 


20 
8 
5 
9 

10 














29 














30 














31 














32 














33 














34 


















35 


16 

2 

10 


14 

4 

8 














36 














37 














38 














39 


61 

14 
12 
24 

7 


16 


20 














40 


13 












41 


10 
11 


15 

13 












42 














43 














44 












3 






45 


19 


10 


9 








19 

41 
36 
16 
23 
19 
25 
16 
17 
24 
14 
32 






46 








96 






47 


36 

"l4 
18 
24 
34 
13 
25 
7 
47 


23 

9 

8 

8 

20 

11 

17 

8 


25 

7 












48 














49 














50 


11 

28 
6 

15 

12 
7 

11 














51 












22 


52 














53 














54 








43 
39 
70 








55 














56 















186 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



III. 



CONTINUATION 

TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Attendance 


Number of 
Pupils in — 


Number of 
Pupils from — 




en <u 








T3 <1> ^ 








c- c 


+-> 








SrC 


















o 


>• 




Continuation Schools 








>> 


*o 
o 


"o 

o 


o 
o 

o 


r Sect 
e Con 
trict 


0) u 

c . 

3 C 


c 

O 

.Si 


(A 

0) 




OT5 






Q § 


<.* C 


.£ 


.4 


o.c.w 






imber 
theR 
ar 




en 


c 

biOx) 

« ft 


imber 
theF 
a Seco 


U 


o 




i. Sec. 
ming t 
100I D 


c c 

0) 3 


u 
J! 




-J - (U 

2 o>< 


O 


o 


> +3 
<< 


Z.22 


O O 


o o 


s 


ago 


o o 


< o 


O 



57 Fenwick 

58 Feversham 

59 Finch 

60 Fingal 

61 Florence 

62 Frankford 

63 Gore Bay 

64 Grand Valley. . . . 

65 Hallville 

66 Hanover 

67 Harrow 

68 Havelock 

69 Hepworth 

70 Highgate 

71 Holstein 

72 Huntsville 

73 Ilderton 

74 Ingle wood 

75 Iroquois Falls. . . . 

76 Islington 

77 Jarvis 

78 Jockvale 

79 Kars...^ 

80 Keewatin 

81 Kenmore 

82 Kinburn 

83 Lakefield 

84 Lambeth 

85 Lanark 

86 Lansdowne 

87 Laurel 

88 Lion's Head 

89 Little Current. . . . 

90 Lobo 

91 Long Branch 

92 Lucknow 

93 Lyndhurst 

94 Manito waning. . . 

95 Manotick 

96 Marmora 

97 Massey 

98 Maxville 

99 Melbourne 

100 Merlin 

101 Merrickville 

102 Metcalfe 

103 Millbrook 

104 Milverton 

105 Mimico 

106 Mindemoya 

107 Minden 

108 Morriston 

109 Mount Albert.. . 

110 Mount Brydges. . 

111 Mount Elgin 

112 Navan 



19 
20 
92 
40 
19 
56 
73 
88 
31 
92 
52 
50 
17 
60 
21 
102 
33 
18 
27 
27 
17 

7 
47 
45 
45 
55 
93 
48 
86 
55 

9 

8 
37 
50 
24 
79 
31 
38 
25 
85 
24 
100 
51 
61 
62 
34 
81 
69 
127 
39 
27 
21 
47 
51 

16 
40 



6 
33 
19 
10 
23 
26 
34 
14 
40 
23 
24 

9 
25 

8 
38 
14 

9 
15 
16 

8 

3 

14 
21 
17 
24 
34 
20 
35 
13 

7 

3 
13 
26 
13 
30 
13 
14 

5 
32 
10 
37 
20 
30 
17 
12 
34 
29 
49 
15 

7 

5 

18 
16 

7 
12 



11 
14 
59 
21 

9 
33 
47 
54 
17 
52 
29 
26 

8 
35 
13 
64 
19 

9 
12 
11 

9 

4 
33 
24 
28 
31 
59 
2S 
51 
42 

2 

5 
24 
24 
11 
49 
18 
24 
20 
53 
14 
63 
31 
31 
45 
22 
47 
40 
78 
24 
20 
16 
29 
35 

9 
28 



11 

18 
66 
36 
15 
41 
59 
78 
28 
85 
35 
40 
14 
49 
16 
88 
30 
17 
24 
24 
13 
5 
41 
34 
39 
45 
74 
40 
56 
43 
6 
7 
30 
37 
22 
68 
26 
33 
22 
74 
21 
79 
41 
51 
49 
33 
66 
61 
104 
34 
21 
16 
36 
40 
13 
35 



14 
15 
35 
19 
18 
24 
30 
39 
12 
33 
23 
16 
10 
25 

8 
47 
16 
18 
15 
18 

7 

4 
20 
26 
11 
14 
28 
20 
34 
22 

9 

5 

11 
20 
13 
30 
18 
12 

6 
22 
15 
35 
23 
16 
15 
12 
29 
28 
53 
16 

3 

10 
14 
16 
15 
10 



15 
13 
40 
17 
9 
24 
32 
40 
14 
35 
23 
4 
12 
30 
8 
50 
16 
15 
15 
19 
8 
4 
20 
27 
13 
19 
30 
21 
34 
22 
9 
5 
16 
21 
20 
23 
21 
16 
10 
23 
16 
35 
23 
1 

19 
12 
31 
33 
63 
16 
3 
11 
17 
16 
12 
10 



30 



17 



28 



11 



38 



37 



11 



10 
4 

28 
12 

9 
22 
39 
21 
26 
62 
52 
36 

5 

19 
12 
72 
21 
10 
19 
21 

6 

5 
20 
45 
16 
18 
61 
23 
43 
55 

3 

8 
21 
43 
22 
34 
18 
15 
14 
26 
24 
37 
11 
21 
2Q 
14 
37 
39 
72 
13 

7 
20 
34 
40 

7 
16 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



187 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 



Number of Pupils from Families whose 
Head is occupied as below 


No. 


of Pup 


Is in the Various Subjects 


£ 
E 
o 
U 


u 

3 

*3 
# o 
*C 
bo 
< 


a ^ 


(1) 
u 

H 

<u 

H 


(A 

W) § 
"C as 

2 3 
JO 


en 

3 

.2 

cti 

a 



O 

u 

<u 
,3 

O 


3 
.2 

3 la 
a 

-3 3 
.tJ <-> 

^O 


u 

e 

6 

!_ 

O 

.3 
en 

"bi> 

3 

w 


2 ° 

"3d c 

3 
W+5 


<v 
u 

3 

-M 

a 

u 

CD 
| 

'bo 

3 

w 


>> 
u 



tn 

£ 

3 

*5 

c3 

3 

a 
U 


u 

to 

X 

.2 
+j 
"C 


u 



% 

'£ 

3 

*o 

3 
< 


57 


5 
2 


12 
18 
61 






1 


1 




2 

18 
22 


19 
20 

92 


19 

20 
92 


16 
13 
40 






58 










59 


5 


5 


4 


17 




34 


9 


60 


4 


28 


5 


1 


1 




1 


4 


40 


40 


18 


10 


10 


61 


3 


12 
39 
46 


2 
2 
4 


2 

9 

15 








9 
15 
14 


18 
56 
73 


18 
56 

73 


9 

41 
35 






62 


6 
4 






17 
15 


15 


63 


4 




9 


64 


7 

2 

18 


71 

23 
22 


2 

6 


6 

6 

24 


2 






42 

9 

36 


88 
31 
92 


88 
92 


40 
17 

37 


13 

7 
21 


11 


65 






4 


66 


8 


10 


4 


10 


67 


8 


29 


1 


6 


4 


4 




20 


52 


52 


24 


10 


10 


68 


2 


13 


1 


3 


14 


15 


2 




50 


50 


16 


10 


10 


69 


"i 


14 
50 


i 


1 

2 


2 
4 






5 
32 


17 
30 


17 
60 


13 
31 






70 


2 




11 


11 


71 


13 


'"28 


4 

3 


1 
11 


16 
19 






10 

57 


21 
97 


21 
94 


9 
49 






72 


18 


10 


20 


15 


73 


"i 
"2 
"(5 


31 

18 
1 
5 

13 
7 

31 


1 








1 


13 


33 
18 
27 
27 
17 
7 
47 


33 
18 

27 
27 
17 

7 

47 


19 
15 

15 
19 

8 

5 
25 


2 


2 


74 










75 


"4 


12 
4 
2 


1 
1 


9 
13 










76 




5 
8 
2 
6 






77 






78 












79 




5 


3 


2 




7 


5 


80 




1 




10 


22 


12 




26 


45 


45 


27 


5 


4 


81 


"i 

9 


23 
47 
44 


2 

1 
5 


10 

6 

11 


10 






15 
16 

25 


45 
55 
93 


45 
55 
93 


12 
19 

32 


16 
16 

24 


16 


82 






9 


83 


16 


8 




22 


84 


4 


41 




1 


1 




1 


13 


44 


44 


20 




6 


85 


4 


47 


2 


6 


8 


is 


4 


36 


82 


82 


36 


17 


14 


86 


2 
"4 


35 
9 
4 

10 


3 


6 


1 


8 






55 
9 
8 

37 


55 
9 
8 

37 


28 
9 
8 

19 


13 


5 


87 








88 


i 


2 
4 


2 
9 












89 


7 


2 


14 


8 


8 


90 


2 


44 


1 


1 




2 




17 


50 


50 


23 


10 


7 


91 


3 
11 


1 

42 


"5 


7 
6 


"u 


13 

3 




24 
17 


24 
79 


24 
79 


20 

26 






92 


21 


25 


93 


2 
3 


26 
20 


3 


1 


1 
2 


1 

8 


■'"2 


5 
14 


31 

38 


31 
38 


21 
21 






94 


8 


9 


95 


2 
21 


14 
36 


"4 


6 
11 


3 

8 






5 
24 


22 
81 


24 
81 


13 

24 


6 

22 


6 


96 


1 


4 


26 


97 


3 
20 


5 
55 


2 

6 


7 
2 


2 
1 


5 
2 


"l4 


6 

28 


24 
89 


24 
100 


16 

41 






98 


17 


24 


99 


6 
3 


41 
42 


1 


3 
5 










51 
61 


51 
61 


26 
17 


10 
13 


16 


100 


6 


5 




20 


19 


101 


3 
1 

5 


40 
31 
51 


3 


7 


8 


1 
1 

5 






62 

34 
81 


62 

34 
81 


19 

18 
31 


18 

9 

11 


8 


102 


1 
3 


9 

25 


11 


103 


4 


3 


10 


13 


104 


8 
35 


31 
19 


3 

8 


12 

25 


14 

32 


1 

8 






69 

127 


69 
127 


33 

68 


20 
20 


15 


105 




40 


10 


106 


3 


29 


2 


1 


2 




2 


23 


35 


36 


24 


7 


6 


107 


?, 


21 


1 


2 


1 






16 


27 


27 


8 


9 


10 


108 


"3 


15 
29 


' 2 


2 
2 


1 
6 


3 

5 




10 

17 


21 

47 


21 
47 


11 
17 






109 


17 




110 


3 


40 


1 


2 


3 




2 


6 


51 


51 


16 


13 


14 


111 


*3 


16 

37 














16 
40 


16 

40 


13 
13 






112 














io 


3 



188 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 

III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued). 


Continuation Schools 


>> 


>-> 

X 


*0 
G 

o.2 
















xi 


03 




c<3 


>> 
u 




c 




>^ 






o 


S 3 


Ih 


<L> 


43 


Ctj 




bo 




o 
O 


en 

X 
Dl, 


43 g 


J3 
bo 
< 


E 
o 

o 


o 

a 

0) 


S 

U 
CD 

o 




J2 
*o 
o 
N 



62 
63 



66 
67 
68 
69 



57 Fenwick 

58 Feversham. . . . 

59 Finch 

60 Fingal 

61 Florence 

Frankford 

Gore Bay 

64 Grand Valley . . 

65 Hallville 

Hanover 

Harrow 

Havelock 

Hepworth 

70 Highgate 

71 Holstein 

72 Huntsville 

73 Ilderton 

74 Inglewood 

75 Iroquois Falls. . 

76 Islington 

77 Jarvis 

78 Jockvale 

79 Kars 

80 Keewatin 

81 Kenmore 

Kinburn 

Lakefield 

Lambeth 

Lanark 

Lansdowne 

Laurel 

Lion's Head . . . 
Little Current . 
Lobo 

91 Long Branch . . 

92 Lucknow 

93 Lyndhurst 

94 Manitowaning 

95 Manotick 

Marmora 

Massey 



82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 



96 
97 



98 Maxville 

99 Melbourne 

100 Merlin... 

101 Merrickville.. . . 

102 Metcalfe 

103 Millbrook 

104 Milverton 

105 Mimico 

106 Mindemoya. . . . 

107 Minden 

108 Morriston 

109 Mount Albert. . 

110 Mount Brydges 

111 Mount Elgin. . . 

112 Navan 



15 
13 
40 
17 
9 
24 
34 
40 
16 
37 
24 
lo 
12 
28 
9 
49 
16 
15 
12 
20 
8 
6 
25 
21 
12 
17 
30 
20 
34) 
22 
9 
8 
16 
21 



10 
13 
70 
28 
9 
41 
32 
57 
19 
52 
34 
40 
12 
39 
9 
72 
20 
15 
15 
19 
8 
4 
34 
32 
28 
39 
54 
27 
18 
35 
9 
8 
23 
31 
20 
55 
21 
20 
14 
48 
19 
53 
11 
13 
34 
16 
56 
52 
92 
20 
27 
1 ! 
31 
29 
16 



17 
13 

73 
26 
18 
54 
29 
56 
17 
63 
48 
31 
13 
37 
18 
46 
20 
18 
27 
25 
14 

7 
35 
35 

5 
46 
56 
33 
19 
30 

9 

8 
27 
39 
24 
34 
27 

7 

11 
51 
20 
56 
28 
34 
40 
20 
70 
50 
122 
21 
11 
21 
37 
41 
15 
25 



18 


3 


17 


7 


71 


21 


26 


27 


18 


3 


52 


15 


31 


19 


56 


27 


19 


13 


63 


35 


45 


20 


44 


35 


13 


5 


35 


13 


20 


2.1 


45 


24 


20 


13 


18 


18 


27 


27 


19 


8 


13 


9 


/ 


7 


33 


16 


32 


7 


34 


15 


47 


15 


55 


25 


32 


35 


9 


25 


31 


15 


9 




8 


8 


20 


13 


42 


17 


24 


22 


43 


17 


29 


10 


10 


15 


12 


18 


40 


25 


16 


4 


57 


29 


37 


10 


41 


23 


51 


21 


18 


9 


71 


25 


68 


13 


111 


11 


17 


21 


8 


16 


21 


21 


37 


18 


29 


29 


15 


4 


29 


25 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



189 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 



e 

+-> 

o 


u 

CO 

"9 
u 


CO 
.CJ 

'55 

0m 


to 
g 
'a 

a> 
<u 
M 
M 
o 
o 


a, 
a 

u 

o 

3 

CU 


bfl 

.5 
'£ 

cu 

a 


< 


<v 

u 

3 

U 

,<j 

'55 
>> 

^5 

a* 


u 

"3 

'C 
< 


.5 
'2 

u 

H 

a 


0) 

o 
c 

CD 

3 

*o 
S 

3 
O 


57 


9 

16 
41 

"is 

24 
34 
40 
18 
36 
24 
2 
12 
32 












10 

7 
43 
23 

9 
24 
35 
27 
22 
35 
24 

1 
12 
19 
11 
25 
13 
15 
27 
27 
17 

7 
37 

2 
12 


19 
20 
92 
40 
18 
56 
72 
86 
31 
91 
52 
50 
17 
60 
21 
102 
33 
18 
27 
27 
17 
7 
46 
45 
45 
55 
93 
44 
51 
55 
9 
8 
37 
50 
24 
78 








58 


















59 


39 
10 


38 
9 














60 














61 














62 


12 

11 

10 

3 

14 
10 
15 


12 
16 
10 
3 
22 
10 














63 














64 














65 














66 














67 














68 














69 
















70 


12 


12 














71 














72 


52 
16 


13 

2 


20 

4 














73 














74 














75 








15 












76 


27 
8 
1 
21 
29 
12 
23 
30 

""40 

23 

9 
















77 


















78 


















79 


7 
5 

17 

14 

26 

6 

8 

5 


7 

6 

17 

16 

28 














80 






30 








81 












82 














S3 








30 
19 
25 
36 
9 
6 

18 
17 
20 
30 
31 
16 
18 
26 
16 
39 
24 
23 
20 
13 
43 
46 
10 
7 
7 

12 
13 
18 
16 
21 








84 












21 


85 


15 
11 














86 














87 














88 


















89 


20 
21 


8 
8 


6 

8 














90 














91 














92 


24 
21 
17 

"*23 
17 
48 
24 
21 
25 
15 
31 
33 
61 
15 
5 


28 


29 














93 














94 


9 

5 
25 


9 

4 
29 








38 
25 
85 
24 
97 
51 
61 
62 
34 
81 
69 
126 
39 
27 
21 
47 
51 
16 
40 








95 














96 














97 














98 


15 
16 
18 
22 
9 
20 
17 


16 
11 
18 
12 
11 
19 
16 














99 














100 














101 














102 














103 














104 














105 


52 












106 


5 
10 


5 
10 












107 




1 










108 








109 


12 

3 
13 

22 


11 
13 
















110 


19 














111 














112 


13 


13 















190 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



III. 



CONTINUATION 

TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



Continuation Schools ^ ^ 





Attendance 




Number of 
Pupils in — 


N 
Pu 


umber 
Dils fro 


of 

m — 


w cd 








"O ^ — 








c- c 


4-> 












£ 5*3 


"5 
o 


o 
o 


"o 

o 




0)'C 


c 

o 

r i en 


OTl 






Q y 


<.= c 




-C3 


CJ 


O-G .2 


c . 

3 C 

o o 

UU 


Number 
on the R 
Year 


Cfl 

O 


J2 


c 

CD cd 

> ti 


Number 
for the F 
to a Seco 


CJ 
CD C 

£ £ 
o o 
.Jln 


u 

o o 


C/3 

a) 


Sch. Sec. 
forming t 
School D 


C C 
CD 3 



113 New Dundee 

114 New Hamburg. . 

115 New Liskeard. . . 

116 North Augusta.. 

117 North Gower. . . 

118 Odessa 

119 Oil Springs 

120 Onondaga 

121 Orono 

122 Paisley 

123 Pakenham 

124 Palmerston 

125 Pickering 

126 Pierce's Corners. 

127 Plattsville 

128 Port Burwell.... 

129 Port Colborne.. . 

130 Port Credit 

131 Powassan 

132 Princeton 

133 Rainy River. . . . 

134 Richard's Landing 

135 Richmond 

136 Ridgeway 

137 Ripley 

138 Rockwood 

139 Rodney 

140 Russell 

141 St. George 

142 Schomberg 

143 Schreiber 

144 Scotland 

145 Southampton .... 

146 South Mountain.. 

147 South Porcupine. . 

148 South River 

149 Spencerville 

150 Springfield 

151 Sprucedale 

152 Stayner 

153 Stella 

154 Stevensville 

155 Stouffville 

156 Sturgeon Falls. . . 

157 Sunderland 

158 Sutton 

159 Tamworth 

160 Tara 

161 Tavistock 

162 Teeswater 

163 Thamesford 

164 Thamesville 

165 Thessalon 

166 Thornbury 

167 Thorndale 

168 Tilbury 



10 


3 


7 


9 


9 


55 


29 


26 


42 


17 


65 


24 


41 


50 


29 


45 


18 


27 


37 


17 


40 


16 


24 


33 


10 


50 


25 


25 


38 


24 


36 


15 


21 


27 


13 


18 


6 


12 


16 


18 


62 


30 


32 


50 


27 


68 


27 


41 


64 


24 


51 


26 


25 


44 


12 


63 


33 


30 


53 


25 


19 


6 


13 


15 


16 


15 


8 


7 


13 


2 


47 


22 


25 


41 


18 


36 


16 


20 


29 


9 


99 


52 


47 


83 


46 


81 


32 


49 


62 


29 


60 


25 


35 


48 


26 


30 


10 


20 


24 


7 


45 


18 


27 


36 


22 


18 


5 


13 


16 


10 


67 


23 


44 


50 


18 


68 


29 


39 


62 


26 


83 


33 


50 


75 


23 


29 


14 


15 


26 


17 


82 


40 


42 


66 


27 


60 


27 


33 


48 


21 


69 


30 


39 


61 


18 


27 


11 


16 


20 


14 


30 


11 


19 


24 


30 


45 


28 


17 


37 


16 


56 


24 


32 


52 


18 


59 


17 


42 


50 


22 


32 


17 


15 


28 


14 


17 


8 


9 


11 


15 


62 


24 


38 


50 


18 


41 


16 


25 


31 


17 


25 


7 


18 


19 


12 


64 


31 


33 


57 


18 


21 


6 


15 


18 


6 


18 


6 


12 


13 


18 


61 


22 


39 


53 


26 


63 


24 


39 


50 


24 


42 


19 


23 


37 


16 


69 


19 


50 


60 


22 


85 


32 


53 


65 


30 


47 


21 


26 


42 


20 


54 


29 


25 


44 


21 


89 


28 


61 


75 


32 


32 


12 


20 


26 


10 


58 


32 


26 


42 


22 


90 


31 


59 


75 


39 


75 


30 


45 


65 


20 


74 


26 


48 


61 


32 


42 


13 


29 


29 


18 



5 
16 
29 

17 
11 

25 
10 
18 
31 

24 
12 
26 
11 

3 

18 
10 
49 
30 
28 

9 
21 
10 
22 
26 
20 
17 
32 
25 
27 
17 

6 
16 
22 
28 
14 
10 
21 
18 
15 
20 

6 
10 
28 
20 
15 
27 
36 
20 
21 
40 

9 
27 
42 
22 
32 
18 



13 

20 

15 

21 

8 

4 

8 

9 

27 

28 

11 

11 

10 

3 

22 

19 

30 

12 

22 

9 

18 

10 

24 

16 

19 

13 

9 

5 

28 

10 

10 

18 

6 

8 

19 
19 
13 
16 
24 
15 
16 
24 
14 
11 
28 
24 
19 
11 



10 
31 
58 
19 
22 
20 
24 
14 
20 
22 
24 
45 

9 

7 
17 
21 
54 
78 
36 
25 
36 
18 
27 
31 
36 
14 
38 
36 
59 
11 
30 
19 
56 
15 
30 
16 
22 
18 

5 
26 

2 
14 
35 
44 
21 
40 
30 
33 
35 
40 
22 
35 
86 
31 
07 
25 









14 


9 


1 

7 


26 
17 






1 




21 


9 




12 

4 

41 












1 


46 
19 






7 


1 


18 
10 










8 






24 


6 




14 


1 




45 
1 






1 


1 


22 




2 


3 


2 




9 












40 






37 






47 






14 


1 




34 


9 


1 


15 


6 


3 


1 


9 




10 


6 




15 


11 




38 


6 




7 






1 






40 






73 






70 






38 






19 






4 






22 


3 


1 


16 




3 


19 


2 




23 






34 


15 




13 


1 




11 


8 




49 






3 


7 




20 


2 




4 






44 






5 


2 




13 


4 





1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



191 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 



Number of Pupils from Families whose 
Head is occupied as below — 


Number of Pupils in the Various 
Subjects 


o 
u 

<D 

B 

S 
o 

U 


4) 
U 

3 

3 

# y 
'u 
to 

< 


3 ^ 

- +j v.. 

£ 3 3 


•a 

cd 

u 

H 

a> 

H 


en 
bJO § 

'£ a 

3 a 

JO 


(A 

3 

.2 

a 
3 
u 
u 



u 

a> 
.3 
+-> 
O 


3 
O 

a 

.3 3 

."3" W 

£0 


u 

£ 

s 

ej 

O 

(0 

'bi) 

3 

W 


as 

.3 3 
3 O 

W +5 


u 

3 
u 

3 

w 


u 



£ 

3 

"-0 

3 

U 


u 

to 

2 

.3 

(0 

+j 

'u 


>> 

u 



tn 

s 

3 
# 0J 
*o 

3 
< 


113 


13 


9 
20 


2 


1 
11 








4 
6 


10 

55 


10 

55 


6 
22 






114 


1 


8 




14 


13 


115 


12 


9 


1 


13 


4 


24 


2 


20 


65 


65 


29 


15 




116 


5 


30 


1 


4 




3 


2 


14 


45 


45 


17 


13 


13 


117 


6 


25 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


7 


40 


40 


18 


9 


7 


118 


2 


34 


1 


6 


2 


5 




39 


50 


50 


27 


8 


10 


119 


2 


12 




4 


8 


10 




14 


36 


36 


12 


6 


7 


120 


"5 


17 
45 




1 

5 








13 
12 


18 
62 


18 
62 


18 

32 






121 


2 


5 




13 


14 


122 


2 


47 


2 


8 


5 


2 


2 


22 


68 


68 


29 


22 


21 


123 


4 


33 


1 


4 


3 


3 


3 


21 


51 


51 


6 


4 


12 


124 


5 


17 




29 


8 


4 




21 


63 


63 


26 


16 


16 


125 


"4 


12 
15 
31 


i 


2 


1 


1 


2 


8 
6 
8 


19 

15 

47 


19 
15 

47 


13 

3 

18 






176 


3 
14 


4 


127 


3 


4 




5 




14 


128 


4 


13 


1 


6 


8 


4 




11 


36 


36 


13 


7 


12 


129 


/ 


16 


1 


22 


28 


16 


9 


27 


99 


99 


49 


15 


10 


130 


22 


26 


5 


13 


9 


6 




22 


81 


81 


35 


16 


5 


131 


14 

1 


30 
19 


2 
1 


8 
3 


5 
4 


1 
2 






60 

30 


60 
30 


28 
9 


20 

7 


19 


132 




11 


5 


133 


2 


18 
13 




7 
1 


' '2 


18 
2 






44 
18 


43 
18 


29 
11 


14 

4 


11 


134 




2 


6 


13S 


7 
21 


47 
32 


4 
3 


7 
6 


2 
4 






22 
22 


67 
68 


67 
68 


23 
26 


22 
20 


21 


136 


2 




21 


137 


14 

8 

13 


56 
12 
51 


3 

2 

5 


7 
1 
3 


3 
5 
8 






2 
27 
13 


72 
29 

77 


72 
29 

77 


23 
21 
37 


42 


24 


138 




1 

2 




139 


18 


11 


140 


9 


36 


1 


10 


2 


2 




8 


60 


60 


26 


18 


15 


141 


8 
2 
1 
5 
11 


42 
19 


2 


13 

2 

29 

5 

7 


4 
1 






14 

7 

21 

4 

1 


69 

27 
21 
45 
56 


69 

27 
21 
45 
56 


27 

17 

5 

16 
27 


19 


22 


142 


3 






143 






144 


33 
10 


2 
3 








3 
9 


10 


145 


24 


1 




9 


146 


2 


42 


6 


3 


3 


2 


1 


13 


59 


59 


34 


12 


11 


147 


11 


2 




5 


12 


2 




9 


32 


32 


14 


7 


3 


148 


"8 


4 
44 


"3 


10 
4 


3 








17 
60 


17 
60 


12 
26 


2 
14 


2 


149 


3 




23 


9 


150 




34 




2 


1 


4 




22 


40 


40 


21 


9 


9 


151 


1 

7 


7 
41 


"i 


1 

2 


8 

2 


4 
11 


4 


12 
18 


25 
64 


25 
64 


15 
20 






152 


15 


15 


153 


"3 
15 


19 

5 
30 








2 


6 


6 

7 
19 


18 
18 
59 


18 
18 
60 


12 
12 

28 


7 


5 


154 


1 


4 
4 


4 

5 




155 


12 


9 


156 


2 


3 




24 


30 




4 


20 


. 63 


63 


35 


11 


11 


157 


5 


28 


1 




3 


5 




13 


42 


42 


16 


12 


13 


158 


7 


28 


3 


2 


16 


13 




15 


71 


71 


29 


22 


13 


159 


6 


59 




9 


2 


6 


3 


19 


85 


85 


39 


15 


12 


160 


8 


24 


4 


6 


4 


1 




15 


47 


47 


23 


8 


10 


161 


11 


19 


2 


13 


7 


2 




15 


46 


54 


20 


10 


10 


162 


10 


49 


3 


9 


5 


9 


4 


52 


89 


89 


40 


17 


17 


163 


10 
12 


15 

25 






1 
2 


6 
9 




17 

5 


32 
58 


32 
58 


11 
31 


8 
6 


9 


164 


4 


6 


14 


165 


12 


31 




28 


1 


18 




28 


90 


90 


42 


10 


11 


166 


3 
8 

5 


42 
57 
21 


7 


16 


7 
2 
2 






24 
18 
31 


75 
74 
41 


75 
74 
41 


24 
34 
22 


6 
15 

7 


25 


167 


7 
3 


' 6 


5 


168 


1 


4 


5 



192 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 

III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



Continuation Schools 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 



43 

a 

CTJ 

u 

to 
o 

<u 

o 



43 

a 

a3 



Oh 



rt C 



B3 






a3 


,i_> 


u 


<i) 


43 
a> 


6 
o 


< 


o 



o 



113 New Dundee 

114 New Hamburg.. . . 

115 New Liskeard. . . . 

116 North Augusta. . . 

117 North Gower 

118 Odessa 

119 Oil Springs 

120 Onondaga 

121 Orono 

122 Paisley 

123 Pakenham 

124 Palmerston 

125 Pickering 

126 Pierce's Corners.. . 

127 Plattsville 

128 Port Burwell 

129 Port Colborne 

130 Port Credit 

131 Powassan 

132 Princeton 

133 Rainy River 

134 Richard's Landing. 

135 Richmond 

136 Ridgeway 

137 Ripley 

138 Rockwood 

138 Rodney 

140 Russell 

141 St. George 

142 Schomberg 

143 Schreiber 

144 Scotland 

145 Southampton 

146 South Mountain . . 

147 South Porcupine. . 

148 South River 

149 Spencerville 

150 Springfield 

151 Sprucedale 

152 Stayner 

153 Stella.... 

154 Stevensville 

155 Stouffville 

156 Sturgeon Falls. . . . 

157 Sunderland 

158 Sutton 

159 Tamworth 

160 Tara 

161 Tavistock 

162 Teeswater 

163 Thamesford 

164 Thamesville 

165 Thessalon 

166 Thornbury 

167 Thorndale 

168 Tilburv 



6 
16 

30 
17 
11 
27 
10 
18 
31 
25 
27 
26 
12 

4 
18 
11 
49 
30 
27 

9 
22 
10 
25 
27 
21 
17 
29 
27 
24 
17 



8 


8 


12 


13 


29 


27 


28 


27 


10 


10 


12 


11 


10 


6 


5 


7 


19 


20 


21 


22 


32 


32 


12 


12 


19 


23 


13 


14 


18 


38 


10 


10 


17 


18 


16 


16 


15 


5 


14 


18 


9 


23 


5 


3 


29 


28 


7 


10 


12 


14 


19 


20 


3 


12 


8 


8 


19 


20 


21 


23 


12 




25 


19 


21 


22 


14 


14 


17 


16 


21 


22 


15 


14 


14 


14 


28 


28 


24 


26 


20 


21 


13 


13 



6 
16 

65 
30 
20 
35 
20 
18 
46 
46 
26 
42 
11 
3 
47 
24 
56 
48 
49 
30 
33 
17 
36 
46 
48 
17 
41 
3S 
47 
17 



29 
53 
46 
4 
17 
32 
30 
13 
30 
14 
10 
40 
38 
16 
42 
57 
10 
53 
88 

18 
42 
60 
28 
48 
24 



35 
23 
39 
10 

17 
26 
27 
31 

5 

4 
37 
19 
11 
26 
13 

5 
30 
31 
13 
24 
20 

9 
29 
42 
22 
22 
41 
33 
3X 
16 



7 




6 


31 




32 


64 




64 


33 




39 


24 




27 


42 




43 


24 




24 


18 




18 


40 




38 


34 




30 


32 




44 


39 




31 


18 




14 


5 




4 


40 




25 


24 




24 


76 




57 


77 




74 


29 




31 


18 




18 


29 




33 


8 




8 


34 




23 


51 




55 


56 




68 


27 




26 


SO 






39 




38 


45 




45 


26 




27 


23 




5 


39 




37 


37 




31 


35 




29 


5 




4 


15 




13 


44 




39 


24 




24 


24 




13 


33 




37 


13 




12 


17 




13 


42 




49 


53 




28 


32 




35 


44 




43 


51 




48 


33 




30 


45 




43 


34 




33 


16 




16 


43 




42 


58 




51 


69 




71 


59 




59 


18 




17 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



193 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 







Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 






c 

O 


u 

CO 

"e 



# y 


tafl 

3 

"a 

<u 
<v 

J4 

--* 





.3 

a 
a 
u 

ba 


a 
<v 

CO 


a 


< 


3 

"3 
U 

>-> 


<u 
u 

3 

3 

bfl 
< 


C 

!s 

H 

"c3 

3 

3 

a 


u 

3 

_oj 
"0 
CO 

12 

"0 

-3 
0) 
t£ 

O 

X 


113 


7 












7 
20 
31 
17 
17 


10 
55 
65 
45 
40 
50 
36 








114 


15 


16 








32 
62 






115 












116 


17 
10 

"ii 

18 
32 

25 

""'26 
14 

""l8 
11 
48 
30 
37 
20 
31 

""25 

"29 


12 
7 
5 

11 


3 
9 

7 
9 












117 














118 














119 








16 








120 














121 


16 
21 
12 
16 


15 

21 

9 

16 








36 
26 

28 
35 


62 
68 
50 
63 
19 
15 
47 
36 
99 
81 
60 
30 
45 
18 
66 
68 
83 
29 
78 
60 
68 
27 
23 
45 
56 
59 
32 








122 














123 








33 






124 












125 














126 


3 
20 
12 
15 
18 
20 

7 
14 

5 

16 
19 
29 


2 
20 
11 
16 

6 
20 

3 
14 

4 
19 
20 
26 








8 
18 
12 
52 
30 
30 
11 
31 
12 
32 
23 
21 






9 


127 














128 














129 














130 














131 














132 














133 














134 














135 














136 








45 




45 


137 










138 














139 


32 
25 
27 
19 
21 
16 
39 
30 


14 
13 
14 


14 
12 
16 








36 
25 
17 
17 
20 
16 
37 
30 
13 
16 
31 
10 
13 








140 














141 














142 














143 


"ii 

12 

8 


17 
11 

9 
15 














144 














145 














146 














147 














148 


15 

24 
20 
13 
20 
8 


















149 


10 
9 


12 
9 








61 
41 
25 
64 
19 
18 
61 
63 
41 
69 
84 
47 
54 
89 
32 
58 








150 














151 














152 


21 

5 


20 
4 














153 








11 
11 








154 














155 


28 
26 
15 
30 
38 
21 
20 
46 


12 
11 
12 
11 
18 
11 
12 
16 


9 
9 
13 
20 
14 
9 
11 
15 














156 








33 
25 
29 
39 
24 
23 
9 
17 
30 
42 
24 
37 








157 














158 














159 














160 














161 














162 














163 








17 






164 


30 

42 
22 
38 
20 


14 
12 

7 
10 

5 


14 
12 
16 
16 

7 












165 














166 








75 
74 
42 








167 












168 








1 





7 D.E. 



194 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ill. 



CONTINUATION 

TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Attendance 


Number of 
Pupils in — 


Number of 
Pupils from 


Continuation Schools 


en cd 

°| 

Z o 


en 

O 

m 




M c 

b/0^3 
2 G 


Number Admitted 
for the First Time 
to a Second'y Sch. 


"o 
o 

o 

o o 


o 
o 

43 

o 

J-H 

o o 


o 
o 

y 

en 

-a 
g 


Sch. Sec. or Sect'ns 
forming the Cont'n 
School District 


y 

• -. (A 

£<% 

a . 

3 C 
O O 

uu 


c 

c c 
< o 


CO 

y 

a 

Oh 

6 


169 Timmins 

170 Tottenham 

171 Warkworth 

172 Wellington 

173 West Lome. 


71 
65 
56 
42 
79 
21 
58 
70 
70 
23 
15 
34 
47 


29 
22 
19 
17 
32 

7 
25 
23 
29 
13 

4 
13 
18 


42 
43 
37 
25 
47 
14 
33 
47 
41 
10 
11 
21 
29 


58 
51 
45 
37 
65 
20 
49 
63 
58 
18 
13 
30 
40 


41 
23 
17 
33 

23 
14 
20 

22 
25 
9 
11 
28 
25 


42 
26 
18 
34 
45 
14 
20 
22 
25 
13 
13 
27 
25 


19 
15 

17 

5 

13 

7 

14 

21 

32 

10 

2 

7 

10 


10 
24 
21 
3 
21 

"24 

27 
13 

12 


49 
22 
19 
37 
54 
13 
28 
30 
29 
21 
7 
17 
16 


22 
29 
37 

5 
25 

7 
22 
30 
11 

2 

8 
16 
31 


14 








174 Westmeath 

175 Westport 

176 Westport (r.c.s.s) 

177 Wheatley 

178 Winona. . . 


"8 
10 
30 


1 


179 Wolfe Island 






180 Woodville 

181 Wroxeter. 


1 










1 Totals, 1922-23.. . 

2 Totals, 1921-22.. . 


8,777 
7,505 


3,569 
3,080 


5,208 
4,425 


7,234 
6,309 


3,539 
3,226 


3,667 
3,423 


2,649 
2,316 


2,461 
1,766 


5,003 
4,461 


3,275 
2,555 


464 
429 


35 
60 


3 Increases 

4 Decreases. . . 


1,272 


489 


783 


925 


313 


244 


333 


695 


542 


720 


35 


?S 




























5 Percentages 




40.66 


59.33 


82.42 


40.32 


41 78 


30.18 


28.04 


57.00 


37.31 


5.28 


40 









1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



195 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 





Number of P 


upils from Families whose 




Number of Pupils 


in the Various 








rlead is occupied as below — 










Subjects 


















Cfl 

3 




u 

03 
£ 


. y 
'33 'C 
C O 


U 

3 


>> 

Ih 

O 


>, 


■^ 






0) 


3 " M 


CO 


Cfl 

3 


03 

a 

3 


3 


03 


Z* 4) 


Ih 


C/5 







eft 




o 


3 


sTtJ is 


Ih 


U) 
_3 ■-« 
'£ o3 




u 




.0 

* 3 03 


O 


U 

.3 e 


h3 


3 


X 


X 




5 


3 
o 


H 


O 3 


Ih 


a 

-3 3 


C/3 


t C0 rf 


CO 


-0 

03 


tn 


0/ 




Ih 


£ 3 3 


0) 


.JO O 


.3 




bfl 


bfl c 


b/j 


3 


■M 


<J 




o 


b>0 


03 ,£> J= 


h3 


03 U 




^O 


3 


C O 


3 


03 


Ih 


3 




U 


< 


JQU 


H 


JO 


O 


U 


W+3 


w 


u 


cq 


< 


169 


9 

4 

10 

5 


1 

32 
36 

27 


3 
8 

2 
3 


58 








18 
3 

16 
6 


68 
65 

55 
42 


69 

65 

55 
42 


43 

27 
19 
35 


7 

11 
15 

3 


6 


170 




21 




11 


171 


4 
4 


4 
1 


8 


172 




2 




173 


19 
3 
9 

11 


36 
14 
24 
44 


"l 


21 
1 
8 

11 


3 

2 

15 
1 






18 

7 


71 
21 
55 
70 


79 
21 

55 
70 


43 
14 
22 
34 


12 


21 


174 


1 






I7S 


18 
16 


7 


176 


3 




5 


22 


177 


4 

5 
3 


39 
11 

2 
20 
28 


"3 
1 
1 


6 

2 

"7 
2 


3 

2 
3 
3 
3 


18 
3 
3 
2 

11 






70 
23 
15 
34 
44 


70 
23 
15 
34 
44 


33 
13 
12 

28 
23 


14 


7 


178 


1 
1 

2 


10 

2 

7 

24 




179 






180 






181 


5 


9 


1 


993 


4,690 


284 


1,051 


870 


707 


182 


2,450 


8,628 


8,601 


4,030 


1,750 


1,547 


2 


886 


3,841 


248 


902 


725 


733 


143 


3,034 


7,358 


7,427 


3,388 


1,727 


1,515 


3 


107 


849 


36 


149 


145 




39 




1,270 


1,174 


642 


23 


32 


4 












26 




584 


































5 


11.31 


53.44 


3.23 


11.97 


9.91 


8.06 


2.07 


27.91 


98.30 


97.99 


45.91 


19.94 


17.63 



196 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 

III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





N 


umber 


of Pupils in th 


e Various Subjects (Concluded) 


Continuation Schools 


xi 

C3 

bh 

O 

CD 

o 


>> 

x, 

a 

qj 

.2 
'53 

X 

a. 


G 

o.2 

S =i 


CD 

< 


CD 

£ 
o 

0) 

O 


u 

c 

CD 


c 

s 

u 

O 


.5 


bo 

JO 

o 
o 
N 


169 Timmins. . 


42 
25 
19 
35 
41 
14 
23 
25 
25 
13 
10 
28 
25 


19 
15 
20 

4 
16 

6 
20 
23 
31 
10 

1 

7 
11 


11 

16 
20 

5 
15 

7 
17 
25 
29 
10 

2 

7 
13 


48 
36 
37 
37 
72 
14 
42 
37 
39 
13 
15 
29 
10 


26 
26 
27 

8 
22 

7 
23 
40 
42 
10 

2 

7 
44 






64 
44 
31 
42 
47 
17 
49 
46 
24 
22 
14 
29 
24 


12 


170 Tottenham 


39 
27 
42 
46 
20 
44 
47 




40 


171 Warkworth 


35 


172 Wellington 


4 


173 West Lome. . . . 


14 


174 Westmeath 


6 


175 Westport.. . . 


34 


176 Westport (R.C. Sep. Sch.) 

177 Wheatley. . 


23 


178 Winona 


23 
14 
26 
34 




10 


179 Wolfe Island 




180 Woodville 


4 


181 Wroxeter 


32 






1 Totals, 1922-23 


3,722 
3,218 


2,721 
2,312 


2,673 
2,830 


5,630 
6,415 


4,102 
3,925 


5,933 
6,066 


' 1 


5,763 
5,852 


2,843 


2 Totals, 1921-22. . . 


2,449 






3 Increases. 


504 


409 






177 








394 




157 


785 


133 


1 


89 












5 Percentages 


42.41 


31.0 


30.45 


64.14 


46.73 


67.60 




65.66 


32.39 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF ECUDATION 



197 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Concluded) 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Concluded) 



a 

o 

CQ 


>-> 

S 

<u 
U 


>> 

0* 


a 
'a 

<v 
<v 
M 

O 
O 

CQ 


a 

ba 

o 
a 

C/3 


tuD 


< 


Physical Culture 


"3 

o 

00 

< 


1-1 

d 

2 


O 

c 
.Si 
"0 

IS) 

12 


0> 
CQ 

3 
O 

M 


169 47 


7 
22 
17 


8 
11 
19 








42 
28 
22 
34 
42 
14 
23 
30 
54 
13 
13 
22 
7 


71 
65 
56 
42 
79 
21 
58 
70 
70 
23 
15 
34 
44 








170 3 














171 














172 33 














173 54 


21 


19 














174 14 














175 


15 
18 
11 


20 
17 
10 














176 35 














177 56 














178 13 














179 7 


















180 21 


















181 1 


11 


5 




























1 3,422 

2 4,927 


1,662 
1,475 


1,645 
1,512 


80 

72 


1 

32 


30 

8 


3,792 
4,792 


8,497 
7,315 


373 
186 


"43 


97 
91 


3 

4 1,505 


187 


133 


8 


"ii 


22 


' 1,666 


1,182 


187 


"43 


6 
















5 38.99 


18.93 


18.74 


.91 




.03 


43.20 


96.81 


4.25 




1.11 



198 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
IV. TABLE K— ATTENDANCE OF 





Lower School, Form I 


Lower 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Continuation 
Schools 


(0 

>> 

o 


CO 


to 

<D 
>. 

CN 


to 
>> 


g 

ca 
>> 
<* 


CO 

CO 
OJ 

>. 


TO 

S 

11 

>> 


CO 

>-. 

<L> 

>> 


CO 

s 

V 

>» 

00 


CO 

CTj 
O 


TO 

i_ 
rt 

>, 

O 


CD 
> 


X) 

c 


CO 

CO 

CD 


CO 

CD 
>. 

CM 


CO 

3 


CO 

<d 


re 
h 

CO 


TO 


rcj 
cd 
>■ 


a 

(LI 

00 


CO 

u 

ca 

V 

>. 

©i 


c3 

CD 
>> 

O 


Ih 

CD 

> 
o 

-a 
s 
a 


CD 

>. 


CO 
i~ 

a 

>. 
es 


CO 

Ih 

C3 
CD 
>l 


TO 

S3 


TO 

u 

s 


CO 

a 
<v 


CO 

01 

>l 

(^ 


CO 

c3 

cv 

00 



1 Aberfoyle 

2 Acton 

3 Agincourt 

4 Ailsa Craig 

5 Alvinston 

6 Arkona 

7 Ayr 

8 Bancroft 

9 Bath 

10 Beachburg 

11 Beaverton 

12 Beeton 

13 Belmont 

14 Blackstock 

15 Blenheim 

16 Blind River. . . . 

17 Blyth 

18 Bobcaygeon ... . 

19 Bolton 


'. 2 

. 1 

'. 2 


1 
1 
2 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

3 

'3 

1 
2 

1 
1 


1 

5 
2 
4 

2 
2 
4 
4 
1 

10 
1 
3 

3 
3 
3 
4 


3 
4 
2 
4 
3 

1 

2 

2 
1 

'4 

"2 

2 
2 
2 
7 
1 
3 

i 

4 
2 
1 
3 
2 

'2 

1 
2 
1 
5 
1 
7 
5 
1 
1 

1 

2 
4 
3 
4 
2 
2 
4 
3 
1 
2 
2 

6 


i 

i 

1 

2 

! 

2 
2 
4 

1 

3 

1 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

4 

i 

'3 

1 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
2 

1 

1 
i 


1 

1 
"i 

1 

1 
2 

1 
i 

i 

1 


1 

1 

1 
i 
i 


1 




i 


1 

i 

1 

i 


"2 

1 

2 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

i 

i 

"2 

1 
1 
1 

1 

3 

1 

2 

2 
2 
3 

1 
1 
4 


6 

3 

3 
2 
1 
3 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
6 
1 

'3 

2 
1 
3 

7 
4 

2 

2 

1 
6 
2 
6 

i 

7 
1 

2 
4 

2 
1 

4 

3 

"2 

1 

2 
3 


3 
4 

5 
2 

3 
5 
5 
4 
2 
5 
2 
5 
3 
5 
4 
2 
4 
3 
4 
1 
9 
1 

il 
7 
5 
5 
J 

5 
4 
3 
5 
3 

4 
4 
4 
6 
3 
4 
2 
1 

2 
6 

5 
3 

2 

(> 
2 
4 
3 

1 

2 
7 
1 


1 
2 
2 
6 
2 
4 
2 
] 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 

LO 
6 

'5 
3 
1 
4 

'4 
3 

3 
2 
3 

2 

1 
3 
6 
3 
2 
4 
7 
1 
2 
4 
1 
3 

2 
5 
6 

2 

5 

4 
3 

3 
1 
1 
6 

1 


1 

1 

6 

1 
1 
1 
i 
4 
1 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
3 
3 
1 
1 

4 

i 

4 

3 
4 

5 

1 

1 

1 
2 
5 

'3 
1 
1 
1 

i 


i 

1 

1 

'2 

1 

"2 

1 

'2 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

'3 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
2 

1 
2 


1 

2 

i 

1 
'2 


1 
i 

1 

i 




i 




1 
i 

1 


1 

1 

'2 
1 

1 

'3 
1 

'2 

1 

1 

i 

"2 

i 

1 

2 


1 

3 
4 
3 
3 
2 
4 
1 

3 

1 

2 

2 

'4 
1 

'5 

'3 
'3 

1 

i 

'2 

'2 

2 
3 

i 

2 
4 
1 
1 

1 


1 
3 
1 

5 

3 
5 
3 
1 

4 
5 
5 
4 
1 
2 

"4 

1 

1 

i 

6 
1 
2 
7 
5 
2 
1 
2 
3 
2 
1 

1 

2 
2 
3 

*4 

'3 
3 

'2 
3 
6 

2 

1 
1 
1 
2 

"2 

2 
1 


1 

i 

'2 

2 
2 
1 
1 

i 

2 

2 
2 
3 
2 
i 

1 

2 

'3 

1 
2 

2 
1 
1 
1 

1 

'2 
'3 

1 

1 

i 

4 

1 

'2 
4 
3 

1 

3 
2 


'2 

2 

1 

2 
1 

"1 

'4 

1 

2 

'2 

'5 
1 

i 

1 
1 

"a 

1 
"a 


1 

2 

5 


20 Bothwell 

21 Bowesville . 


. 1 


1 


1 




22 Bridgeburg 

23 Brownsville ... . 

24 Bruce Mines . . . 

25 Brussels 

26 Burk's Falls... . 

27 Caledon East. . . 

28 Cannington ... 

29 Cardinal 

30 Carp 

31 Claremont 

32 Clifford 

33 Cobden 

34 Cochrane 

35 Coldwater 

36 Comber 

37 Cookstown .... . 

38 Copetown . 

39 Creemore 

40 Danforth Park. . 


. 2 

'. 1 
. 2 

'. 1 

. 2 

i '. . 
'. "l 

. 2 


4 
3 
1 

4 

1 

2 
1 
2 

3 
2 

'0 

i 

1 
1 


6 
3 
1 

3 
1 

'4 

*3 
3 

2 

*3 

'2 

1 
J 


1 
1 

1 

1 
1 


41 Delaware 

42 Delhi . 

43 Denbigh . 

44 Devizes . 

45 Dorchester .... . 

46 Drayton 

47 Dresden 

48 Drumbo . 

49 Dryden 

50 Eganville 

51 Eganville (r.c) • 

52 Elmvale 

53 Ennismore .... 

54 Erin 

55 Espanola 

56 Fenelon Falls. . • 

57 Fenwick 


'. 2 

1 '3 

. 1 

'. 3 
'. "l 
'. 3 


'2 
1 

3 

6 
1 
3 

2 

*3 

8 

1 
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1 
6 

2 
1 
3 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
4 

*3 
3 
3 

5 


1 

1 

i 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



199 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

PUPILS BY AGE, SEX AND GRADE 



School, Form II 


Middle School 




Girls 


Boys Girls s 














u 

a 

H 




i 


































E 










S 


u u 


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.... 1 .. 2 1 1 2 11221 44 


4 . . 


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1 2 1 .... 1 . 1 . 1 2 7 .. 1 ... . 42 


5 . . 




5 


1 3 


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.1... 132321 2475.. 1.. 85 


6 . . 




2 


2 






27 


7 . . 




5 . 


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1 22211 312 55 


8 . . 


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1 4 


1 


2 


2 1 1 . 2 .... 1 3 1 44 


9 . . 




1 


1 4 


3 




3 2 1 1 . . 2 1 . . 1 . . 35 


10 . . 


. 2 3 


1 


3 .. 


3 




2 1 . . 1 2 14 111.... 40 


11 . . 




2 


6 5 






12222.1. ..144.. 2.. 1 72 


12 . . 




2 


2 2 






2 . . 2 1 113 2 111 42 


13 . . 


. . 1 


4 


5 5 


1 




1423 156121.... 72 


14 . . 


. . 1 


1 . 


. 2 


1 


1 


26 


15 . . 




4 


2 3 








16 . 1 




4 


3 2 


2 




2 13 2 2 1.. 42 


17 . . 


. 1 3 


1 


5 2 


1 




132.. 2 12624.. 1.. 56 


18 . . . 


. . 1 
. . 1 


1 
1 
1 


4 






21 


19 . . . 


1 2 
1 5 






19 


20 1 . . 


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3 5 1 ... 1 .... 3 1 .. 3 1 ... . 48 


21 . . . 




1 . 




2 


2 


16 


22 . . . 




4 


7 i 






53.. 1 23 14 90 


23 . . . 




1 . 


. 1 
2 .. 






14 


24 . . . 


3 


1 


2 2121321.. 43 


25 . . . 






7 1 


2 




11322 244.... 1.. 73 


26 . . . 






. 8 
1 1 
1 .. 






2 2 1 1 2 14 1.1 49 


27 . . . 






19 


28 . . . 






2 1 . 1 .... 1 4 8 1 4 .. 1 50 


29 1 . . 






3 2 


2 




1 . . . . 1 13 2 3 1.... 40 


30 . . . 




3 


5 1 


2 




1 1 .. 1 .... 3 4 1 2 4 63 


31 . . . 


. . 1 


2 . 


. 3 


1 




. . . 3 1 2 4 5 44 


32 . . . 


1 . .. 


1 


7 7 






1 5 1 . . 1 13 37 


33 . . . 


. . 1 


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1 


1 


31 


34 . . . 




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19 


35 . . . 


. 2 


1 


1 


31222.. ..1211211.. 41 


36 . 1 . 






5 2 






1 12 2 1.... 30 


37 . . . 




2 


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1 




1114 1 15 6 2.... 76 


38 . . . 


. . 1 


1 

4 


1 






18 


39 1 . . 


7 3 






15221 2434 85 


40 . . . 












20 


41 . . . 


. . 2 


3 


1 1 






21212 472 1 47 


42 . . . 


. . 1 


2 


2 3 


1 




1112 2 4 1 1 .. 1 . . .. 51 


43 . . 1 






3 1 


1 


2 


11 18 


44 . . . 


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1 


2 2 13 3 49 


46 1 . . 


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4 




1.. 451.13... 466521.. 105 


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5 2 


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11933. .1... 23553.... 98 


48 . . . 


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2 1 3 .... 1 ... 1 1 .... 1 ... . 35 


49 . . . 




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2 3 
L 6 


1 




3 1 31 


50 . . . 


3 1 1 . 1 .... 3 6 2 1 48 


51 . . 1 




3 : 


2 3 






13 2 7 4 1 15 7 2 70 


52 . . . 




2 : 


I 5 






.1 2 .... 1 1 1 1 4 . . 2 . . 1 63 


53 . . . 




i j 


L 1 


1 




1 .. 3 1 1 1 1 ... 2 1 1 4 2 1 1 . . 42 


54 . . 1 




i . 


5 1 


1 




1 . . 1 4 3 2 1 43 


55 . . . 




l : 


I 4 


1 




11 2 3 1 39 


56 . . . 






5 3 


1 




3.. 41 35412.... 70 


57 . . . 


. . i 


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19 



200 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
IV. TABLE K— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS 





Lower School, Form I 


Lower 




Boys Girls Boys 


Continuation 

Schools I 

> 
C 


CD CU 

■> >> >> 


03 

<u 

> 

IT) 


09 
U 

et 

<u 
> 


03 

i- 

CD 


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<D 
O 


03 03 03 CO > CO 03 U3 CO 03 03 

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rt rt ri cd d nirtrt ri rtcdrt 
a>aj<ycu„_ cu qj cu <u cu v ti v 
>>>>>.>.^ >> >.>>>. >> >.>.>, 

n 00 a ^ h tNfo^e 10 t» 00 


58 Feversham 

59 Finch 

60 Fingal 

61 Florence 

62 Frankford 

63 Gore Bay ... 


! i 

. 2 


2 
4 

3 

1 


1 

3 
3 
3 


*5 
1 

'2 


i 

2 

'2 
3 

'2 

3 
2 


6 2 11 

6 7 13 3 1 

13 2 1.. 

1 .. 1 1 

3 6 4 2 

2 .... 1 1 3 4 6 6 

143753. 

1 3 2 1. 

16 6 7 1 

13 7 2 1. 

2 . . . 


2 1..... 

13 2 3... 

15 1..... 

. 1 1 1 1 1 .. 1 

1 15 2... 

5..1 3 2 11 


64 Grand Valley. . . 

65 Hallville.. .... . 

66 Hanover 

67 Harrow 

68 Havelock . 


. 4 

i '.'. 

. 1 

; "i 
\ "i 

i i 

'. l 

'. i 

'. "i 
l l 


5 

*3 

2 

1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
4 
1 

2 
6 

*3 

2 
6 
1 


4 
1 
3 
2 

1 


1 

6 
2 

4 
3 
3 
3 

1 
1 
3 
4 
6 
3 
4 
3 
1 


3 
3 
3 
2 

2 
2 

1 
4 
4 
2 
3 
1 

1 
1 
5 
1 
1 
3 
2 
6 


. 1 13314. 

. .. 1 2 . 

1 23651. 

1 .. 5 6 .. • 

45121 


69 Hepworth 

70 Highgate 

71 Holstein 

72 Huntsville 

73 Ilderton 

74 Inglewood 

75 Iroquois Falls. . 

76 Islington 

77 Jarvis 

78 Jockvale 

79 Kars 

80 Keewatin 

81 Kenmore 

82 Kinburn 

83 Lakefield 

84 Lambeth 

85 Lanark . 


1 
3 

1 

"2 

1 

'2 
1 
1 

1 


.. 1 14.. 

22544. 

111.. 

14.. 1 .. . 

3 4... 

2 1111. 

2 12211. 

2 .. 1 .. 1 .. . 

1 2 .. . 

2382... 

1642... 

1 2 3.. 

2362... 

..1..1.3346... 

13621. 

35432. 

3733. 


1 3 .... • 

2 .. 2 . 

1 1 .... 1 1 

11 1 

1 . 

1 .. 1 1 2 1 

1 1 1 .. 1 . 

13..... 

1 . 

2 .. 2 1 • 

112..... 

1 .... 1 .... 2 .... 1 . 

2233... 

1.. 3152 

4 12 1. 

3 14... 

1 . 


87 Laurel 

88 Lion's Head. 


2 

2 

4 

i 

3 
3 
2 
2 
5 
1 
2 

'2 
1 
2 

4 
3 
3 


"2 

'3 
4 
1 
2 

1 

1 
2 

1 

2 

2 

2 


2 1 1 

1 1 1 .. . 

11342. 

1 1 .. 4 1 1 . 

3.. 3 2... 

7 3 3. 

2 2 6 3 1. 

1 14 1 

12 3 1. 

8 13. 

1 2152. 

1 . . . . 128621. 

2 144 

332 1. 

2 219.. 1. 

1 2 1 . . 2 . 

1 2 3 5.. 3 . 

1 19412. 

1 9 15 11 8 . . . 

1223... 

. . . 1 . .... 1 




89 Little Current . . 

90 Lobo . 

91 Long Branch. . . 

92 Lucknow 

93 Lyndhurst .... 

94 Manitowaning. . 


2 1 
1 1 


1 
2 

"l 

1 


4 
6 

1 
2 


2 112. 

2 12.. 11 

1 . . . 

12 2 1. 

111. 

3 1.1 1 2 1 . . 1 


95 Manotick 

96 Marmora 

97 Massey . 

98 Maxville . 

99 Melbourne.. . . . 

100 Merlin . 

101 Merrickville.. . . 

102 Metcalfe 

103 Millbrook 

104 Milverton . 

105 Mimico 

106 Mindemoya... 

107 Minden..' 


'. 3 
. 2 
1 2 

' 2 
.' 1 
. 4 

'. 1 


1 
5 
6 
3 

I 

2 
2 
6 
5 
3 

"l 

2 

2 
1 
1 


1 
5 

2 
2 

4 
1 

1 

2 
5 

2 

7 

1 
1 
1 
1 

3 
1 

6 


1 . 

23411 

2 2 

3 3 3 3..1 

112... 

2442... 

1 1 . . 5 . . 1 

2 1... 

1523. 

1 1 1 .. 1 • 

9 7 2 

Ill 

2 . . 1 . 


108 Morriston . 

109 Mount Albert . . 

110 Mt. Brydges. . . 

111 Mount Elgin. . . 

112 Navan 

113 New Dundee.. 

114 New Hamburg. . 


J 
2 

1 

1 
2 


1 
1 

2 


13 12... 

2 1332.. 

16 4 

2 .... 3 1 . 

1 13 1 1 . 

....111. 

II . . . 2 2 2 . . . 


1 

1 . . 1 3 . . 2 1 . 

222 

1 ..... . 

3 1. 

1 2 . 

1 11 1 3 21 2| . 



923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



201 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BY AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 



School, Form II 


Middle School 






Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


— 




u 

0> 


3 

>> 
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58 

59 

60 

61 

62 

63 

64 

65 

66 

67 

68 

69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 

109 

110 

111 

112 

113 

114 


3 
1 

1 
1 

i 




1 


1 


1 

2 


2 
1 

'2 

1 

1 
1 

3 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

4 
1 
1 

1 

4 
1 
1 

1 

'5 
1 
1 
1 

1 


1 


2 
1 
1 

6 

2 

4 

1 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 

1 

3 

3 
1 

2 
1 

5 
3 

4 

'2 
1 
2 
1 
1 

2 
2 

4 

2 
1 
2 
8 

5 

1 

2 
5 
3 
1 
3 

'3 


2 

2 

1 
3 

3 

1 

3 
2 
4 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 

4 

2 
2 
1 
4 

3 
8 

2 

2 
2 
1 
2 
5 
1 
3 
2 
4 

'7 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
7 
4 
2 

'2 

2 

'5 
4 


1 

4 
3 
1 
1 
5 


6 

2 
3 
2 
4 

'3 
4 

'2 

1 
1 
5 
1 

4 
3 

'3 
3 

'2 
3 

'3 
7 

2 
4 

2 
1 

5 

'5 

'2 
3 
1 
5 

1 

'5 
2 
1 


1 

2 
3 
2 
3 

'5 

2 

1 
1 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
4 

'2 

'2 
1 
3 
1 

1 

"l 

1 

3 
4 

1 
1 

2 

1 

'2 


1 

2 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

'3 
1 

i 

1 

1 
3 

1 

1 
1 


2 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 

2 

1 


1 
1 


2 




' 1 
1 

1 

1 

"l 

3 

'2 


4 

1 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

1 

1 

3 
1 
1 
1 

1 

3 

5 
2 

1 
3 


4 
2 

2 

2 

3 

"l 

2 
1 

3 

'2 
5 

2 

1 

4 
1 
1 

1 

1 

2 

4 

4 
1 

1 

3 

4 


3 

1 

3 
2 

'5 
3 

1 

1 

'2 
3 
4 
1 
3 
2 

1 

2 

'5 

1 
1 
3 

1 

2 
2 

'3 

2 

'2 
1 

'2 


i 

"2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

'3 

'2 

'2 

1 

1 

i 

1 

1 


2 
1 

1 

2 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 
2 

1 

2 
1 


1 

2 
1 

1 
1 

i 

1 
1 


i 

3 

1 

1 

2 

i 
1 




1 

1 

i 

1 

1 
1 


3 

1 
1 

i 

2 

2 

1 

2 
i 

3 
1 
1 
1 

4 

2 
1 


1 

3 

1 

2 

1 
2 

2 

1 

1 
3 
1 
2 
1 

3 

1 

2 

'2 
1 

5 

'2 
6 
5 
7 
1 
3 
2 
2 

'3 
3 

1 

4 


'5 

3 

4 
3 
4 

1 
1 

2 
2 
1 
4 
9 
2 
3 
2 

1 

'5 

'2 
2 
7 

3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
7 
5 
3 
4 
1 

3 

2 

2 


() 
1 

3 

2 

2 

3 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
4 

4 

3 

8 
2 
8 
5 

*3 

2 

'7 

1 

3 

5 

6 
3 

2 
7 
2 
4 
4 

'2 

4 

7 

2 

2 


'2 

2 

1 
1 

3 
"2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

7 

'2 
3 

'7 

6 

8 
1 

'3 
2 
4 
2 

1 

3 

2 

1 


1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

'3 

'2 

1 

"3 

4 

1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

1 


'1 

1 
1 

i 

'2 


1 

1 

'2 

1 
1 

1 


20 
92 
40 
19 
56 
73 
88 
31 
92 
52 
50 
17 
60 
21 

102 
33 
18 
27 
27 
17 
7 
47 
45 
45 
55 
93 
48 
86 
55 
9 
8 
37 
50 
24 
79 
31 
38 
25 
85 
24 

100 
51 
61 
62 
34 
81 
69 

127 
39 
27 
21 
47 
51 
16 
40 
10 
55 



202 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
IV. TABLE K— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS 





Lower School, Form I 


Lower 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Continuation 

Schools i 

a 

a. 
> 

O 


co co 

rt co 

» >> >» 


s 

CO 

cu 

>. 

CO 


If; 

CO 

K 


CO 

cu 
^. 

to 


Ih 

CO 
O 


CO CO 

CO CO 

>> >, 

t» 00 


CU 
CO CO > CO 

H £j K Ih 

CO CO U CO 

cu cu __ cu 

>> >> ^ >. 

«J -< 

CN 


CO 

CO 

cu 

>■ 


CO 

cu 

>. 


1-. 

CO 

Si 


CO 
Ih 

CO 

K 

LO 


CO 

Ih 

CO 
cu 

>, 



CO 

CO 
cu 

> 


Ih 

CU 
CO CO CO > CO O; CO 

CO CO CO ° CO CO CO 
cu CU CU __ CU cu cu 

>>>.>» TjJ >, >> >, 

00 O O CO rt M r/5 
CN 


CO 
Cu 

>1 


CO 

)-. 
CO 
CU 
> 

l/J 


CO 

Ih 

CO 
Cu 
>i 


E 

CO 

cu 

>> 


2 

l 

00 


115 New Liskeard . . 

116 North Augusta . 

117 North Go wer. . . 

118 Odessa 1 

119 Oil Springs 

120 Onondaga 


. 3 
. 1 

'. 1 

'. 4 

'. "l 
. 2 

. 4 

L . .. 

. 1 

. 1 

. 1 

'. '4 
. 2 
. 1 

1 "l 

. 1 

. 1 

'. 2 

'. '3 
1 'l 

! 1 
. 2 
. 1 

! "2 


3 
3 

3 

1 

"l 
2 
2 
4 

'3 

1 
4 
3 

2 
1 

1 
3 

2 
4 
3 

2 
1 
2 

"l 
4 

1 
4 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 
3 

'3 

2 
2 

6 

'4 

2 
1 


4 

2 
1 

3 
2 
3 
6 
4 
1 
4 

1 
2 
1 

2 
2 
2 

1 

4 

2 
3 

7 
5 
1 
4 
1 

'2 
2 
3 
2 

1 
2 
2 

'3 
1 
2 
2 
6 
3 
2 
4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
5 
■1 
3 
1 

2 
6 
2 
1 


4 
3 

'2 
1 

2 
4 
2 
1 
3 

2 

11 
5 
2 

5 
3 
3 

5 

2 

4 

2 
4 
1 

4 
5 

\ 

4 
3 
2 
3 
5 
1 

7 
2 
1 
1 
6 
2 
2 
1 

"l 

7 
2 
2 
1 
4 
3 
2 


1 

1 
1 

'2 

3 
2 
2 
4 

'2 
1 
1 
6 
3 

4 

1 
} 

6 

1 
2 
1 

i 
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1 

2 
1 
3 
1 
2 
4 

"2 

! 

2 
1 
1 

2 
i 
1 


"2 . 

1 ! 

1 '. 
'3 ! 






1 
2 

1 
1 

1 

1 
*2 

i 

5 

j 
1 
4 
1 
1 

1 
3 

1 
1 
2 

'2 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
1 

2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 


1 

3 
3 

4 
1 
1 
7 
2 
1 
4 
2 

3 

1 

4 
1 
4 
2 
1 
2 
1 

1 

'3 
2 
5 

i 

4 

2 
1 

'2 
1 
2 

'2 

4 

3 
3 

1 

2 
4 
4 
3 
10 

'7 
1 

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2 
2 


5 
1 
3 
5 
2 
3 
2 
5 
5 
4 
4 

1 

8 
3 

7 
3 

2 

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4 

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4 
5 
4 
4 
3 
2 
9 
4 

1 
4 

2 

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4 
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1 
7 
5 
5 
5 
8 
1 
4 

cS 

3 

4 
(» 
5 
7 
3 


5 

2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
3 
3 

*3 

1 
1 
1 

/ 
5 
4 

3 

2 

*5 
2 
4 
5 
1 
5 
3 

1 

4 

2 
3 

{ 
5 

1 

4 
4 
2 
5 
8 
2 
1 


1 

5 
5 
7 
3 
8 
5 
4 


3 

1 

2 
3 
1 
3 
1 

1 

3 
1 
1 
4 
1 
1 

4 
1 

'4 
1 

i 

1 

'3 

3 

1 

2 

i 
3 

'a 
3 
3 

2 
3 
2 

4 

1 
2 

•1 
3 
1 


i 

1 
"2 

i 

1 
2 


! . . i 


. 1 .. 
. 1 1 

. . 3 

I . . .. 


'2 
1 

2 
2 


5 

3 

2 
2 


2 

1 
2 
3 


1 
1 
1 




121 Orono 

122 Paisley 

123 Pakenham .... 

124 Palmerston. . . . 




1 


. . 1 

. . 4 
. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 1 

. . i 
. . 1 


4 
1 
2 
4 
1 

2 
3 

1 


1 
4 

1 
5 

'2 
2 
1 

2 
2 


2 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


2 
2 
1 
3 


'1 

2 

3 

2 

1 
1 




125 Pickering 

126 Pierce's Corn's. 

127 Plattsville 

128 Port Burwell. . 

129 Port Colborne. 




1 




130 Port Credit. .. 1 

131 Powassan 


1 . 
1 . 






1 


132 Princeton 

133 Rainy River. .. 

134 Richard's L'd'g 

135 Richmond.... 








1 

'3 

1 

1 

2 
1 


! '. i ! ! 


. . 1 

. . 1 
. . 1 
. . 1 

'. '. '3 
'. '. i 


2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
3 

*2 


1 
9 

*3 

1 
3 
2 

5 
3 
4 
1 


1 
6 
3 

2 

i 

'3 
3 
1 

2 


1 
1 
3 

i 

i 


1 


136 Ridgeway 

137 Ripley 

138 Rockwood .... 

139 Rodney 

140 Russell 

141 St. George .... 

142 Schomberg .... 

143 Schreiber 

144 Scotland 

145 Southampton.. 

146 S. Mountain. . . . 


1 . 
1 1 




1 


2 
1 


1 . 
1 . 
1 . 








147 S. Porcupine. . . . 

148 South River . . . . 


' ! i 


1 
1 

1 




149 Spencerville ... . 

150 Springfield 

151 Sprucedale 

152 Stayner 

153 Stella 

154 Stevensville. . . . 

155 Stouffville 

156 Sturgeon Falls. . 

157 Sunderland 


2 

1 
4 
1 
1 

1 
2 

2 

"2 


1 . . . 
1 ' . . 

'.'. 1 . ' 
. . 1 . . 


. i . . 
. . 1 

'. '. 1 
. . 1 

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'. '. 1 

i '. . '.'. 
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1 

i 

1 

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i 

1 
3 

i 
2 

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1 
2 

1 
1 


4 
1 
1 

1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
3 
2 
1 
2 
4 
4 
1 
2 

*5 

2 
3 


1 
3 

4 
1 

1 
4 
4 
1 
4 
1 
1 

'3 
2 

*3 

2 
1 


1 
"3 

3 

1 
1 
2 

1 

"2 
"2 

3 

1 

2 




158 Sutton 










159 Tarn worth 

160 Tara 


1 . 








161 Tavistock 










162 Teeswater 


3 








163 Thamesford . . . . 

164 Thamesville ... . 

165 Thessalon 


1 ! 




i 




166 Thornbury 










167 Thorndale 

168 Tilbury 

169 Timmins 






1 












170 Tottenham 










171 Warkworth. . . . 











1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



203 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BY AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 



School, Form II 


Middle School 




Girls Boys 


Girls J 


2 g 

<U <L> 

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118 . . 

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12 11 

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3 5 . . 1 . . . . 40 

12 11.... 50 

1115 1.... 36 

18 


121 . . 

122 . . 

123 . . 

124 . . 

125 . . 

126 . . 


. . . i 

.' .' .' 3 

. . . 2 


1 

2 
3 
3 
1 


3 
2 

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1 


1 1 2 .. 3 .. 1 . 

5 1 1 .. 1 6 1 . 

.. 1 114232 

4 1 

2 1 

2 


.... 1 4 2 3 .. 1 ... . 62 
....126321.... 68 

6 1 3 .. 1 .. .. 51 

.... 2 5 2 1 1 63 

19 

1 2 . . 2 . . 1 . . 15 


127 . . 

128 . . 

129 . . 

130 . . 

131 . . 

132 . . 

133 1 . 

134 . . 

135 . . 

136 . . 

137 . . 

138 . . 

139 . . 

140 . . 

141 . . 

142 . . 

143 . . 

144 . . 

145 . . 

146 . . 

147 . . 

148 . . 

149 1 . 

150 . . 

151 . . 

152 . . 

153 . . 

154 . . 

155 . . 

156 . . 

157 . . ] 

158 . . 

159 . . 

160 . . 

161 . . 

162 . . 

163 . . 

164 . . 

165 . . 

166 . . 

167 . . 

168 . . 

169 . . 

170 . . 

171 . . 


.' '. '. "2 
. . . 1 

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'. '. '3 
. . 4 

. . 1 
. . 4 
. . 1 

'. '. 1 
. . 1 

[ . . .. 

. . 1 

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'. . 2 
. . 2 


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4 
1 

4 
1 
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1 

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1 

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1 
3 
3 

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6 
2 
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4 
2 
5 
2 
3 
3 
4 
3 

1 
4 

3 

1 

4 
1 
3 
2 
3 
2 
5 

2 
3 
4 
7 
1 
7 
5 

4 
5 
5 
3 


21 2231. 

1 1 1 1 .. 2 

2.. 2 2731. 

632 242. 

11 1322... 

3 1 .... 1 1 1 . 

112 13. 

Ill 

44 1.. 13... 

22 1 142. 

83 13 11 

2 .. 1 1 

2....1 12521 

.. 1 52321. 

2 1 1 .. 5 2 .. . 

1 

3 

3 1... 21 1121 

24 33 11 

3 1 22 

1 1 2 .. . 

..13 11 

..2 1 2 12... 

.. 1 1 .. 2 .. . 

1 1 .. . 11 

5 .. 1 6 7. 

2 1 .. 1 2 

53 11 1.. 113 

2 1 3 

Ill 124... 

1112 4 2 1. 

8 3 223 11 

3 1 1 . . 1 

1 1 2 1 .. 2 . 

2531. ...1122... 

2 1 . . 1 

..2 2243. 

831 11.. 34. 

53 3 124. .2 

6.. 2.... 1.. 22 1... 

.. .. 1 115 1... 

2 2 

12 1 12 3 2 1 

4 2.... 2 1. 


14 3 3 2.... 47 

3 3 4 . . 1 . . . . 36 

1 ... 1 1 3 3 1 99 

2 3 7 3 81 

.... 2 4 5 1 1 60 

.... 1 1 1 3 30 

1 .... 5 2 .. 2 45 

113 18 

. 1 . . 1 3 4 7 2 67 

2 9 4 68 

. 1 . . . 1 8 7 7 . . 3 . . 83 

29 

1 ... 1 2 7 2 4 82 

.... 1 4 3 3 2 60 

.... 1 1 3 7 3 .... 1 69 

27 

30 

3 1 . . 1 . . . . 45 

1 . . 3 3 56 

2 3 6 3 59 

3 12.... 32 

17 

1 4 . . 1 2 . . . . 62 

. . . . 1 1 5 . . 2 1 . . . . 41 

25 

6 4 2 .... 1 64 

5 .. 1 1 .. .. 21 

18 

2 3 2 1.... 61 

....132531.... 63 

....21112 42 

2 4 8 4.1.. 69 

12 5 6 2.... 85 

2 3 . . 1 3 . . . . 47 

. 1 ... 2 1 6 1 54r 

3 5 4 6 .... 1 89 

. . . . 1 2 . . 1 . . . . 1 . . 32 

. . . . 1 2 . . 5 1 58 

3 5 2 .... 1 90 

1 5 7 1 1 .. 2 75 

. . 1 . . 5 6 2 3 74 

12 11 42 

3 2 1 71 

2 6 5 11.... 65 

. . .. 1 4 4 3 2 l! 1 .J 56 



204 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 

IV. TABLE K— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS 





Lower School, Form I 


Lower 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Continuation 
Schools 

c 


si co 

U l-i 

■n a 

>> >> 

3 -H 


X 

>. 


CO 

a 

>. 


on 

a 


en 

H 

a 
o 
>i 


09 

CU 

>. 

O 


17 years 

18 years 

19 years 


20 years 

21 and over 

11 years 


DO 

a 

cu 

>l 

CN 


0] 

<U 


0] 

H 

Ct) 

cu 


to 

CD 

cu 
>» 


e 

a 

cu 

>. 

o 


co 
U 


2 
a 

cu 

>. 

00 


CO 

cu 

>> 


09 

c3 

o 
o 


H 

> 

o 

-a 
c 
ed 


CO CO 

a ni 

CU CU 

>> >. 

*H CN 


DO 

a 

V 

>, 


■r. 

a 

o 


1/9 


a 

cu 
>> 


DO 

3 

cu 
>, 


cu 
>. 

00 


172 Wellington .... 

173 West Lome. . . 

174 Westmeath. .. . 

175 Westport 

176 Westport (r.c.) 

177 Wheatlev 

178 Winona 

179 Wolfe Island.. 

180 Woodville 

181 Wroxeter 


' i 
. 1 

' i 


2 

2 

2 
3 


2 
4 
1 
3 
3 
3 
1 

*2 


4 

7 
1 
4 

2 
2 
2 

3 
3 


4 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
2 
4 
4 


2 

1 
1 

*2 
2 

1 


1 . . 

1 '. '. 
. . 1 . 


'. '. 1 


1 

5 

4 
1 
1 

i 

*2 


4 

4 
1 
2 
4 
5 
5 
1 

3 
2 


8 
10 

5 

2 
5 
5 
1 

's 

5 


3 
6 

2 

1 
2 
1 

6 
2 


3 
1 

2 

*7 

1 
1 


' 2 
2 

1 
1 








i 


! i 


1 


2 

i 
l 
4 
4 
1 

i 


3 

"i 

5 
2 
1 

1 
1 


2 

1 
4 
1 
6 


1 

2 

1 

i 











SUMMARY OF 


PUPILS 




10 yrs. 


11 yrs. 


12 yrs. 


13 yrs. 


LOWER SCHOOL 
Form I 


Boys. . . 


2 


15 


119 


316 


Girls. . . 




22 


170 


430 


LOWER SCHOOL 
Form II 


Boys. . . 




1 


7 


91 


Girls. . . 




2 


15 


105 


MIDDLE SCHOOL 


Boys. . . 






4 


5 


Girls. . . 






1 


12 


TOTALS BY 
SEXES 


Boys. . . 


2 


16 


130 


412 


Girls. . . 




24 


186 


547 


GRAND TOTALS, 1922-23 


2 


40 


316 


959 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



205 



SCHOOLS (Concluded) 

BY AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Concluded) 



School, Form II 


Middle School 






Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


In 




m 

3 

u 

>< 


so 

>. 

o 
cs 


9 

> 



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CO 
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CO 

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CO 

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so 


CO 

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0. 


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6 

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c 
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cs 


U 

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05 

3 


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10 


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co 

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>> 

to 


CO 

In 

cd 



00 


In 

cd 


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CO 

cd 
cu 
>. 




In 
OJ 
> 
O 

c 
cd 


3 



EN 


CO 

cd 
>. 
t*5 


e 


In 

OJ 

>> 
10 


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cd 

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In 

ea 

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3 
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>> 

00 


an 

cd 

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3 

a; 

>» 

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> 


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cd 

tN 


a 

W 

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XI 

g 

3 

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H 


172 

173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
181 


i 


1 






i 


1 

i 

2 
1 
1 
1 


1 

1 

1 

3 
5 

2 


4 

S 

4 
7 
1 

2 

2 


2 

'2 

4 

4 
1 

i 


1 
'2 

1 

3 


i 
i 




1 


1 


2 




i 
i 


i 

i 
1 


2 
1 

1 


1 

i 


4 

2 


2 
1 


1 






1 

2 


2 
3 


'3 

"i 

5 
1 


2 
3 



2 


*3 

*5 

5 
5 

*5 


2 

'5 

i 
1 


2 

'2 


1 




42 
79 
21 
58 
70 
70 
23 
15 
34 
47 



BY AGE 


, SEX AND GRADE 












14 yrs. 


15 yrs. 


16 yrs. 


17 yrs. 


18 yrs. 


19 yrs. 


20 yrs. 


21 yrs. 
or over 


TOTALS 


431 


405 


185 


54 


10 


2 




4 


1,543 


675 


474 


238 


84 


14 


10 


2 


5 


2,124 


221 


348 


252 


129 


47 


15 


3 


6 


1,120 


318 


442 


379 


171 


64 


16 


13 


4 


1,529 


61 


138 


228 


237 


131 


57 


24 


21 


906 


78 


256 


394 


424 


246 


97 


25 


22 


1,555 


713 


891 


665 


420 


188 


74 


27 


31 


3,569 


1,071 


1,172 


1,011 


679 


324 


123 


40 


31 


5,208 


1,784 


2,063 


1,676 


1,099 


512 


197 


67 


62 


8.777 



206 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE L— FINANCIAL 



Receipts 



Collegiate 
Institutes 






~- o 



So 



13 © 

So 



4J O 
U 03 

PQ c 



Barrie 

Brantford .... 
Brockville .... 

Chatham 

Clinton 

Cobourg 

Collingwood . . 

8 Fort William.. 

9 Gait . 

10 Goderich 

11 Guelph 

12 Hamilton 

13 Ingersoll 

14 Kingston 

15 Kitchener- 

Waterloo . . . 

16 Lindsay 

17 London 

18 Morrisburg . . . 

19 Napanee 

20 Niagara Falls . 

21 North Bay... . 

22 Orillia 

23 Ottawa 

24 Owen Sound . . 

25 Perth 

26 Peterborough . 

27 Picton 

28 Port Arthur... 

29 Renfrew 

30 St. Catharines. 

31 St. Mary's.... 
.32 St. Thomas.. . 

33 Sarnia 

34 Sault Ste. 

Marie 

35 Seaforth 

36 Smith's Falls . 

37 Stratford 

38 Strathroy 

Toronto : 

39 Harbord 

40 Humberside 

Jarvis 

Malvern 

North 

Oakwood . . . 
Parkdale . . . 
Riverdale. . . 

47 Vankleek Hill . 

48 Windsor 

49 Woodstock . . . 

Totals 



41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 



$ c. 
1,903 85 
2,392 26 
2,090 70 
2,354 72 
1,560 14 
2,328 78 

560 57 
4,300 60 
2.304 76 



1,666 23 
3,213 63 
1,654 98 
1,775 50 

2,108 14 
1,763 00 
1,675 50 
1,331 87 
1,863 61 
2,591 90 
3,437 00 
1,670 77 
1,882 00 
2,279 95 
1,837 50 
1,457 50 
2,031 50 
4,033 90 
1,885 50 
1,584 50 
1,733 50 
2,305 55 
1,742 50 

4,431 44 
1,553 50 
1,975 50 
2,700 60 
1,858 92 

2,392 44 
1,705 50 
2,257 94 
1,691 50 



1,573 

1,757 

1,681 

1,801 50 

1,659 20 

1,959 

2.283 



100.605 29 



$ c. 

10,224 56 

11,188 88 

5,289 66 

8,541 38 

8,129 76 

7,059 80 

4.023 29 



18,852 
6,143 

4,572 


97 
59 

60 


6,714 43 


5,349 
14,998 


90 

82 


5,170 
9,392 
4,860 


27 
22 

57 


6,963 


70 


5,525 
7,781 


60 

29 


12,503 


98 


11,088 
12,025 


70 

66 


11,639 
4,922 


65 

73 



10,558 32 

2,589 80 

6,251 77 

10.371 34 



9,219 20 
20,423 25 
17,381 90 



279,759 68 



ft c. 

13,829 83 

54,932 47 

22,018 84 

31.722 20 
5,350 00 

14,900 00 

19,355 03 

35,602 21 

29,452 04 

14,500 00 

31,961 77 

129,254 00 

14,902 00 

41,250 00 

37,693 01 

21,266 46 

142,391 60 

6,647 55 

10.723 00 
19,156 89 
28,359 54 
16,407 90 

168,321 68 
34,770 05 

9,597 97 
55,000 00 

9,000 00 
39,925 11 
13,900 
72,082 
14,150 
38,913 
58,839 



43,614 96 

4,885 32 

23,449 60 

31,261 07 

5,000 00 

157,253 49 

83,110 25 

75,998 30 

49,064 04 

56,178 60 

91,875 50 

77,682 52 

87,559 59 

6,000 00 

86,573 59 

22,296 43 



2,157,980 00 



ft c. 

80 00 

2,125 25 



8 00 

40 00 

12.992 50 



8.127 25 



739 00 
167 65 

562 27 



90 00 
8,590 00 
1,059 00 

555 43 
2,143 55 

114 32 



108 00 
4,616 14 



417 64 



504 00 
5 00 

767 00 

2,236 25 

947 34 

6,426 75 

2,127 75 

8,189 21 

361 67 

750 25 

114 00 



64.965 22 



5,500 00 



172.657 00 



532,000 00 



178,402 04 

23,291 50 

5,000 00 

54,940 22 



95,000 00 
90,000 00 
380,000 00 
20,000 00 
33,275 00 
2,475 00 
30,000 00 



1,622,540 76 



$ c. 

215 17 

950 13 

1,046 74 

2,538 22 

993 06 

7,608 31 

1,333 31 

203 84 

1,781 05 

833 51 

38 76 

57,087 96 

3,903 34 

1,910 07 

195,064 97 

1,196 96 

155,337 57 

220 75 

4,948 32 

4,556 44 

25 84 

10,752 45 

8,440 86 

4,271 11 

6,946 14 

1,318 03 

9,308 66 

641 91 

3,699 37 

4,566 27 

387 78 

1,975 98 

17,677 24 

33,330 75 

5,839 09 

1,139 69 

9,218 75 

1,263 60 

155,112 16 



96,297 

137,844 

70,525 

8,592 
36,028 
10,285 
12,329 

2,467 



1,092,053 83 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



207 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS 
STATEMENT 



Expenditure 






CO c 



O co 

2 c 



IS 



<u c H <u,±i 

co co 0> S o 

i-J rt <u nl O) 



— 3 *0 
3J3 H rt. 



go 



..a . - s 



o .-3 <u 

■ 5*0 a 

Sex 



•g«H§£ 



3 8, 

O X 



26,253 41 
71,588 99 
35,945 94 
45,156 52 
16,032 96 
31,896 
25,272 
40,106 65 
52,390 82 
21,485 10 
210,936 45 
202,548 09 
27,174 75 
53,062 82 

240,216 02 
39,225 24 

300,143 67 
13,538 09 
27,489 42 
31,165 80 
31,822 38 
35,884 82 

719,234 54 
47,905 71 
26,718 33 
59,919 08 
32,958 46 
44,600 92 
30,573 57 

268,769 44 
44,178 92 
59,834 45 

138,122 04 

81,794 79 

22,836 23 

29,154 59 

49,936 19 

18,498 86 

39 410,525 09 

40 177,052 00 

41 459,203 58 

42 173,480 25 

43 230,999 01 

44 174,822 31 

45 118,318 00 

46 126,139 53 

47 27,277 67 

48 121,285 49 

49 44,428 70 



19,463 51 
55,805 13 
22,690 00 
29,343 53 

13.039 82 
17,820 00 
18,920 00 
26,866 00 
39,379 91 
13,610 00 
30,320 00 

100,377 16 
16,970 50 
42,820 45 

33,375 32 

25,810 00 

99,090 99 

9,826 37 

16.040 00 
20,693 00 
20,630 00 
18,496 80 



112,240 
29,880 
15,517 
40,930 
17,815 



28,410 00 



20,395 
42,523 
15,847 
49,207 
38.039 



35,607 25 
13,900 00 
23,037 59 
38,005 17 
14,227 00 



72.333 88 
69,657 76 
56,927 00 
41,762 50 
45,994 54 
81,343 62 
63,364 36 
71,136 01 
12,758 57 
68,042 06 

31.334 75 



# c. 

1,786 89 

5,465 52 

5,500 00 

2,151 80 

14 75 

719 10 

177 63 

4,731 92 

1,014 45 



173,860 50 
5,462 47 



723 53 

186,182 51 

3,500 00 

114,577 73 



387 07 

405 60 

546,705 06 

3,627 01 



1,603 92 



1,114 20 



181,541 83 

22,904 28 

5,612 97 

81,935 96 

20,417 2 
2,250 43 



591 62 



51,687 82 

55,489 93 

74,897 31 

83,557 59 

173,706 30 

64,101 11 

26,815 11 

28,252 88 



5,317,904 78 1,841,626 12 



387 91 



1,933,861 95 



265 

1,990 

355 

202 
221 
176 
311 
946 
437 
964 

2,130 
632 

.1,275 



» c 
180 60 
1,219 12 
112 66 
763 
377 



230 72 
298 20 

6,498 47 
323 81 
266 93 

1,263 38 



867 08 

2,378 39 

1,105 07 

2,244 64 

400 00 

177 75 

634 28 

387 92 

561 67 



319 43 
214 12 
289 53 
122 40 
248 00 
20,821 94 
614 26 
335 13 

3,565 4 

254 53 

1,451 94 



775 30 
81 17 

93 06 
214 31 
235 60 
617 08 
913 99 

3,648 21 
4,471 78 
4,401 18 
2,117 81 
1,492 61 
3,130 30 
2,225 15 
3,168 26 
64 15 
4,200 81 
649 45 



60,049 66 52,985 49 



523 70 

50 50 

656 65 

158 48 

73 00 

1,619 22 

550 00 

377 65 

321 46 



571 49 



687 00 
9,621 97 

3,851 87 
284 13 
653 09 
326 21 
188 09 

155 33 

78 12 

85 47 

198 74 

109 47 

170 54 

183 50 

96 45 

284 56 



$ 


c. 


132 


46 


200 


00 


19 


15 


73 


75 


14 


85 


98 36 


7 


00 







218 41 



290 01 



7,077 67 



629 23 



510 96 
220 98 



788 53 



39 22 



17 64 



25 00 
4 09 



563 06 

9 80 

629 02 



1,473 83 
280 26 



13,104 87 



$ c. 
4,216 92 
6,425 11 
5,963 94 

11,292 39 
2,324 35 
4,574 09 
5,216 10 
7,983 32 
9,103 96 
• 5,746 12 
4,126 99 

35,603 70 
4,685 80 
6,562 64 

11,836 24 
8,646 18 

71,446 87 
3,383 27 
3,810 64 
8,685 72 

11,665 75 
5,489 18 

44,166 48 
6,047 00 
4,550 71 

11,448 76 
4,290 74 
7,909 96 
7,340 83 

40,020 57 
3,864 30 
2,674 51 
5,387 27 



10,335 
2,316 
5,228 

10,378 
3,169 



49,989 84 
10,232 37 
15,198 87 
10,516 27 

9,696 09 
14,027 72 
11,355 91 
12,494 63 

2,700 94 
40,888 79 

6,833 94 



591.853 51 



# c 
25,913 23 
71,038 09 
34,822 49 
43,570 73 
16,032 96 
23,349 34 
24,908 17 
40,106 65 
50,741 67 
19,916 48 
209,519 84 
164,685 37 
22,902 99 
51,717 13 

235,190 28 
38,508 91 

300,143 67 
13,533 45 
20,117 57 
31,165 80 
32,733 32 
25,915 31 

705,648 41 
41,361 31 
23,932 07 



54,932 68 
22,661 39 
38,900 86 
28,345 03 

265,218 56 
42,616 38 
59,745 85 

135,065 55 

70,343 78 
18,964 90 
29,154 59 
49,936 19 
18,498 86 

177,815 08 
139,954 96 
151,513 92 
138,152 91 
230,999 01 
163,336 35 
103,953 83 
115,777 25 

15,808 22 
114,605 49 

39,704 72 



4,493,481 60 



208 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE L— FINANCIAL 



High Schools 



Receipts 



' 5 5 
So 



So 



m 3 
V o 



1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg. . 

5 Arnprior 

6 Arthur 

7 Athens ....... 

8 Aurora 

9 Avon more. . . . 

10 Aylmer 

11 Beamsville 

12 Belleville... .. 

13 Bowmanville. . 

14 Bracebridge. . . 

15 Bradford 

16 Brampton .... 

17 Brighton 

18 Burford 

19 Burlington.. . . 

20 Caledonia .... 

21 Campbellford . 

22 Carleton Place 

23 Cayuga .... 

24 Chapleau... 

25 Chatsworth . . . 

26 Chesley 

27 Chesterville . . . 

28 Colborne 

29 Cornwall 

30 Deseronto . . . . 

Dundalk 

Dundas 

Dunnville . . . . 

34 Durham 

35 Dutton 

36 Elmira 

37 Elora 

38 Essex 

39 Exeter 

40 Fergus 

41 Flesherton 

42 Forest 

43 Fort Frances. . 

44 Gananoque . . . 

45 Georgetown. . . 

46 Glencoe 

47 Gravenhurst. . 

48 Grimsby 

49 Hagersville . . . 

50 Haileybury . . . 

51 Harriston 

52 Hawkesbury . . 

53 Iroquois 

54 Kemptville . . . 

55 Kenora 

56 Kincardine . . 

57 Kingsvillr . . . 



31 
32 
33 



& c. 
1,277 31 

959 75 
1,450 96 
1,036 15 
1,594 00 
1,345 29 
1,507 36 
1,371 23 
1,066 80 
1,532 54 
3,871 77 

336 29 
1,661 32 
3,842 24 

966 30 
1,701 91 
1,191 21 
1,391 77 

823 80 
1.118 62 



1,165 39 

1,084 42 

1,723 90 

797 29 

1.319 13 
1,087 13 

845 95 
1,594 53 
1,246 34 

914 71 
1,476 87 
1,693 87 
1,222 91 

1.118 83 
891 90 
838 68 

1,645 51 
1,134 97 
1,128 96 
1,046 77 

1.119 69 
2,384 12 
1,370 79 
1,493 48 
1,065 44 
2,554 33 
1,180 67 
1,100 99 
3,007 62 
1,262 23 
1,115 44 
1,228 18 

1.320 99 
3,128 40 
1,560 25 
1.451 04 



$ c. 


$ c. 


1,277 31 


8,425 00 


4,985 17 


2,400 00 


3,831 50 


7,002 91 


4,483 09 


59,091 56 


4,904 88 


11,246 34 


5,093 90 


3,563 90 


6,060 96 


4,608 86 


3,915 61 


7,766 25 


1,293 70 


5,750 00 


6,933 00 


2,900 00 


11,000 00 




7,638 82 


27,179 04 


4,253 18 


7,975 00 




5,750 00 
2,500.00 


3,334 22 


9,806 02 


8,500 00 


3,752 47 


3,400 00 


1,391 77 


10,002 08 


3,122 32 


5,000 00 


6,565 15 


3,000 00 


6,140 16 


7,560 00 


1,866 53 


8,250 00 


4,739 20 


75,501 85 




5,850 00 


797 29 


3,534 27 


4,816 89 


5,800 00 


3,144 83 


2,600 00 


2,682 40 


3,820 10 


8,557 77 


13,864 38 


1,832 07 


4,600 00 


3,452 81 


2,500 00 


4,001 78 


9,320 00 


6,731 84 


5,000 00 


5,151 91 


4,500 00 


5,727 88 


2,300 00 


l;285 24 


5,295 02 


3,964 51 


2,350 00 


8,651 59 


5,000 00 


5,088 99 


4,500 00 


4,329 78 


5,000 00 


1,279 34 


6,975 00 


5,099 68 


4,500 00 




12,600 00 


3,22i 79 


7,245 38 


5,103 63 


6,091 03 


4,935 06 


1,700 00 




4,500 00 


4,951 06 


4,000 00 


6,491 92 


3,500 00 




6,173 00 


3,433 81 


5,697 04 


2,341 21 


4,252 91 


4,560 56 


8,059 92 


5,965 57 


4,000 00 




15,000 00 


6,463 2£ 


6,885 92 


4,076 2t 


8,088 91 



30 00 



25 00 



114 00 



37 00 



4,933 50 
6,500 '66 



1,307 68 
14,543 56 

72.287 83 



98,613 12 



2,624 22 



85.000 00 



223 50 



44,609 83 



280 80 



$ c. 

1,198 04 

396 94 
5,332 28 

610 04 
2,165 24 

501 94 
25,325 61 

532 68 
2,348 57 
1,951 62 
1,624 87 
1,254 76 
1,599 15 
11 50 
52 01 

458 84 

466 86 
12,872 37 

1,550 76 

156 83 

2,081 42 

770 85 
17,056 94 

2,144 96 

470 72 

1,337 65 

1,207 74 

4,694 73 

8,732 31 

114 50 

649 99 

402 77 

1,369 90 

302 75 

874 10 

231 60 

385 42 

2,911 13 

1,622 85 

3,027 89 

1,742 29 

2,105 40 

664 82 

383 50 

342 77 

1,521 52 

226 60 
1,262 31 

771 58 
6,520 97 

467 06 
36 40 

830 92 

227 41 
1,326 35 
1,129 47 

724 60 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



209 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 



35 u 



c~ a 
3 e c £ 

cq w § a 



g B 

•a a 



£ a £.5 u 
o » »-< a>;tj 
w . 3 0..2- " 

"- a" e-c 
i-3 oi <u o3 a 



£2 






-.2 i — « oj 
m •- oars v) 

>r: - r: o 



t/. 



i» a 
o x 



$ C. 

12,177 66 
8,741 86 
17,617 65 
65,220 84 
19,910 46 
10,505 03 
37,532 79 
13,585 77 
10,459 07 
13,317 16 
21,430 14 
36,433 91 
21,988 65 
9,603 74 
6,852 53 
20,466 77 
10,118 22 
40,201 55 
82,784 71 
10,840 60 
15,781 58 
110,779 89 
98,382 41 
9,718 86 
5,599 57 
13,273 67 
8,039 70 
12,043 18 
32,748 99 
7,792 91 
7,517 51 
15,238 42 
17,419 83 
11,177 57 
10,020 81 
7,703 76 
7,538 61 
103,208 23 
12,346 81 
13,486 63 
11,043 40 
12,824 77 
60,258 77 
12,444 96 
13,030 91 
9,222 02 
7,280 93 
11,394 04 
11,864 49 
15,701 59 
10,860 14 
7,745 96 
14,679 58 
11,794 7 
19,454 75 
16,038 92 
14,340 84 



$ c. 
7,630 00 
5,520 00 
8,981 00 
7,896 00 

14,004 21 
7,552 50 
8,880 00 
9,410 00 
5,650 00 
9,380 00 

10,562 00 

30,183 28 

10,299 77 
7,690 00 
5,160 00 

15,363 13 
5,680 00 
6,880 00 
6,540 00 
7,480 00 

10,186 50 
8,563 50 
7,700 00 
5,643 00 
3,460 00 
9,680 00 
5,600 00 
4,800 00 

20,620 00 
5,780 00 
5,400 00 

10,404 75 

10,692 05 
7,630 00 
7,820 00 
4,548 00 
5,380 00 

10,040 00 
8,290 00 
7,580 00 
6,504 05 
7,670 00 

10,320 50 

9,352 13 

9,720 00 

5,852 50 

5,237 75 

7,020 00 

7,892 28 

10,506 04 

8,060 00 

5,717 00 

8,040 00 

9,400 00 

14,121 00 

10,570 00 

9.060 00 



$ c. 
107 97 



1,200 00 

52,058 18 

' 501 79 

192 30 

652 02 



91 28 
1,004 65 
6,399 55 
1,062 78 
8,378 55 

13 09 



595 46 

897 79 

23,075 47 

64,502 58 



24,116 94 



77,432 
1,312 


68 

28 


1,370 

212 


00 
01 


697 


25 


241 


74 


398 
106 
511 
142 


85 
00 
64 
37 


88,656 
486 


18 
84 


481 00 

249 03 

46,203 46 

95 45 

352 05 




216 
1,137 


65 
34 


65 

1,236 

94 


33 
73 
12 


572 


54 


518 90 



$ c. 

275 61 



261 86 
39 95 
75 62 

323 94 
66 93 

337 73 



179 96 
517 94 



52 50 



127 26 
14 25 



4 30 

136 95 

391 52 

1,623 26 

385 57 
33 20 



451 22 
156 86 



137 89 
289 78 
332 29 
165 57 
145 43 
24 15 
92 08 



384 02 



59 21 

226 07 

66 59 



105 91 
161 75 
192 32 
61 14 
145 73 
132 47 



454 09 
98 66 
181 88 
149 66 
450 00 
680 20 
246 20 



$ c. 
62 32 





847 


40 


103 


79 


14 


90 


22 


50 


34 


17 



213 80 

320 50 

45 38 

112 54 



427 31 
260 57 
919 40 
434 75 

90 93 
607 91 

34 25 



74 10 

282 26 



69 00 

77 66 



244 94 
19 

7 40 
174 78 



854 23 
102 94 



551 11 

124 00 

342 33 

50 00 



1,151 63 

56 53 



76 88 
204 78 



159 72 



11 

18 
192 80 
266 10 
203 
140 43 
258 95 



* c. 
73 59 



257 40 



73 98 
61 38 



333 01 
375 97 
116 50 



103 00 



269 22 



17 56 



$ c. 
2,004 43 
1,948 83 

835 42 
2,699 23 
3,234 78 
1,728 72 
2,946 78 
2,092 04 
4,683 62 
2,752 55 
3,403 84 
4,491 38 
2,848 06 
1,687 53 
1,565 27 
3,270 59 
3,092 69 
3,641 85 
2,877 64 
1,735 03 
2,333 92 



23 68 



2,154 
7,151 50 
2,672 33 
952 11 
960 20 
1,181 87 
1,467 17 
4,506 07 
1,702 93 
1,222 52 
1,032 33 
5,346 91 
2,079 30 
1,500 94 
1,255 44 
1,244 
4,242 83 
1,419 10 
1,616 62 
1,775 32 
2,386 82 
2,226 38 
1,739 84 
2,651 61 
1,542 47 
1,464 57 
2,377 93 
1,937 29 
2,773 17 
1,640 19 
675 47 
1,666 07 
2,123 66 
4,107 45 
2,717 41 
2.873 29 



$ c. 

10,153 92 

7,468 S3 

11,278 28 

63,798 16 

17,920 19 

9,871 44 

12,622 01 

11,862 27 

10,459 07 

13,317 16 

21,430 14 

36,433 91 

21,740 76 

9,503 16 

6,852 53 

19,670 74 

9,931 05 

34,521 02 

74,491 92 

9,697 48 

14,751 59 

35,358 15 

92,317 38 

9,627 61 

4,937 43 

12,449 32 

6,993 88 

6,336 17 

26,038 87 

7,772 71 

7,441 49 

11,622 53 

16,590 64 

10,014 23 

9,924 66 

6,800 04 

7,111 08 

103,208 23 

10,806 26 

9,546 69 

9,169 29 

10,355 85 

58,750 34 

12,444 96 

12,941 94 

7,587 29 

6,840 34 

9,965 09 

11,116 94 

13,438 93 

10,231 24 

7,745 96 

10,174 87 

11,939 42 

19,454 75 

14,131 72 

12,957 34 



210 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 

I. TABLE L— FINANCIAL 



High Schools 



Receipts 



bit a) 

JO 



So 



§u 



<u o 



PQ o 



58 Leamington. 

59 Listowel 

60 Lucan 

61 Madoc 

62 Markdale. . . 

63 Markham . . 

64 Meaford.. . . 

65 Midland.. . . 

66 Milton 

67 Mitchell.... 

68 Morewood . . 

69 Mount Forest 

70 Nepean . . . 

71 Newburgh. 

72 Newcastle . 

73 Newmarket 

74 Niagara. 

75 Niagara Falls 

South 

76 Norwich 

77 Norwood. . . . 

78 Oakville 

79 Omemee 

80 Orangeville . . 

81 Oshawa 

82 Paris 

83 Parkhill. 

84 Parry Sound , 

85 Pembroke . . . 

86 P'n't'guishene 

87 Petrolia 

88 Plantagenet. 

89 Port Dover . 

90 Port Elgin . . 

91 Port Hope.. 

92 Port Perry. . 

93 Port Rowan 

94 Prescott .... 

95 Richmond 

Hill 

96 Ridgetown.. 

97 Rockland... 

98 Scarborough 

99 Shelburne . . 

100 Simcoe 

101 Smithville.. 

102 Stirling 

103 Streetsville. . 

104 Sudbury. . . . 

105 Sydenham.. 

106 Thorold. . .. 

107 Tillsonburg. 

108 Toronto. 

Davenport 

109 Trenton .... 

110 Tweed 

111 Uxbridge. .. 

112 Vienna 



$ c. 

1,614 00 

1,540 40 

1,273 90 

1,236 82 

928 58 

1,201 67 

1,738 54 

1,624 31 

1,361 36 

1,302 39 

926 18 

1,276 38 



888 91 

710 44 

1,642 10 

872 77 

2,181 17 
1,099 44 
1,077 70 
2,694 53 

776 37 
1,673 43 
1,666 51 
1,484 24 
1,242 99 
2,600 94 
1,546 62 
1,204 26 
1,200 30 
1,048 31 

843 34 

845 95 
1,545 35 
3,967 85 

621 83 
1,327 23 

891 81 

1,372 36 

991 83 



1,037 67 
1,619 66 

966 94 
1,309 50 

740 31 
7,165 36 
1,291 40 
1,167 37 
1,627 21 

1,512 89 
1,795 06 
1,221 28 
1,337 54 
605 71 



$ c 
5,415 07 
5,869 14 
6,847 96 
5,332 16 

928 58 
5,932 48 
4,389 65 
2,249 10 
2,200 72 
4,185 35 

926 1 
4,295 18 



4,424 72 

1,500 36 

13,631 08 

986 44 

1,498 88 

10,899 83 

3,733 66 

4,748 17 

1,809 20 

3,320 08 

5,085 93 

3,383 00 

3,132 77 



3,951 77 
1,204 26 
4,540 1 
2,184 52 
937 80 
2,932 20 
4,202 83 
8,622 61 
1,552 00 
2,083 02 

4,280 96 
5,516 63 
3,167 94 



2,983 71 
7,607 45 
3,415 15 
6,028 27 
3,161 01 



7,800 00 
2,391 40 
4.559 93 



5,384 93 

4,522 00 

6,476 30 

230 84 



$ 


c. 


12,500 


00 


4,600 


00 


3,000 


00 


3,174 00 


3,909 


28 


1,700 


00 


8,000 


00 


8,377 


24 


10,750 00 


4,000 


00 


4,106 


24 


3,300 


00 



1,850 00 
2,065 90 
5,000 00 
3,000 00 

15,000 00 
3,181 81 
3,200 00 
8,742 69 
2,498 15 

11,000 00 

24,581 80 
7,500 00 
5,202 91 
7,105 10 

18,226 59 
5,277 22 
8,000 00 
5,500 00 
2,128 07 
3,500 00 



1,384 61 
2,273 45 
8,050 54 

3,000 00 
5,100 00 
2,810 07 

13,112 50 
3,500 00 
7,387 25 
3,800 00 
2,000 00 
1,800 00 

19,162 91 



7,370 00 
10,000 00 

40,880 13 
9,500 00 
2,800 00 
4,000 00 
2,800 00 



45 00 



$ c. 
33.500 00 



12.170 80 



920 00 



200.000 00 



2,500 00 
7,951 59 



140 00 



270 00 



26.500 00 



$ c. 

3,153 93 

414 92 

993 88 

314 28 

2,466 95 

1,314 35 

753 37 

2,212 30 

701 40 

308 58 

7,287 45 

1,221 35 

3,808 '42 

38 65 

6,151 50 

261 61 

18,197 42 

1,734 09 

1,025 48 

3,990 46 

549 54 

308 08 

1,016 23 

1,568 04 

930 84 

140 17 

761 05 

342 16 

2,856 43 

5,541 28 

479 01 

1,549 76 

11,573 10 

270 52 

"36056 



356 


27 


364 


57 


1,121 


64 


52,060 


00 


182 


67 


4,036 


74 


5,036 


28 


354 


98 


4,554 


17 


208 


13 


1,746 99 


758 


32 


1,538 


79 


3,594 37 


1,298 


10 


1,721 


17 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



211 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 
STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 



i,ci c 



m ". 



2 « 

2 c 
•G c 

O-o 

*-" o 



1 s fc* nil 

i m (Li 2 y 
. 3 G.9- 



&« 



> 3 03 



Gi- 
rt . «■> 55 

ni ai rt O. 



C3 O JJ 

s s 

G C (O 

^22 



5 5 

II 

r5 o 



O ..- o 

2 ^H? a 
•° >- c3 c « 

H--SI 

vxZ'Z o 



'Ji 



2% 

O X 



$ c. 
56,183 00 
12,424 46 
12,115 74 
22,228 06 

8,233 39 
10,148 50 
14,926 56 
15,382 95 
15,013 48 

9,796 32 
13,246 05 
10,092 91 

70 200,000 00 

71 10,972 05 

72 4,315 35 

73 26,424 68 

74 5,120 82 



15 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 



36,877 47 
16,915 17 

9,036 84 
20,175 85 

5,633 26 
18,801 59 
40,302 06 
13,935 
10,509 51 

9,846 21 
24,486 03 

8,027 90 
16,596 91 
14,274 

4,388 22 

8,827 91 
17,321 
14,245 

4,447 
11.821 



95 8,529 04 

96 12,353 56 

97 8,231 48 

98 165,172 50 

99 7,704 05 
16,614 36 
12,218 83 
14,374 05 

6,056 30 
30,882 44 

9,299 53 
12,675 



100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 



/6 
43,445 46 



108 
109 
110 
111 
112 



42,663 
18,218 
12,137 
13,111 

5,357 



$ c. 

12,660 00 

10,290 00 

7,897 52 

7,678 56 

5,480 00 

7,580 00 

10,973 00 

10,168 00 

10,101 85 

7,910 00 

4,000 00 

7,390 00 

3,160 00 

5,140 50 

3,433 20 

15,604 50 

3,600 00 

14,264 33 
6,720 00 
5,900 00 

10,519 25 
3,800 00 

12,578 00 

24,156 01 

10,581 74 
7,720 00 
7,876 49 

14,960 00 
6,000 00 

10,180 00 
5,400 00 
3,540 00 
5,240 00 

14,304 71 
9,262 50 
3,490 00 
8,540 00 

6,621 02 
9,325 00 
4,168 00 
3,600 00 
5,804 50 

12,283 50 
5,480 00 
7,341 58 
4,250 00 

17,105 95 
7,228 71 
8,809 75 

12,382 37 

31,989 38 

11,930 00 

6,520 00 

9,300 00 

2,903 01 



$ 

225 

311 

192 

12,616 


c. 

30 
53 
50 
01 






100 
1,121 


00 
93 




178 39 
128,645 90 






150 54 


1,074 01 
404 20 
726 30 


3,094 99 

4,208 92 

195 23 

134 94 


499 


39 




400 00 
150 00 
195 85 
381 32 
691 39 


605 

440 


47 
60 




136,470 49 






190 


10 


621 
1 «n 


80 



512 91 
24,527 25 

2,586 97 



378 81 



$ c. 

279 80 

136 23 

128 12 

35 38 

26 44 

40 55 

42 26 

253 58 

86 57 

7 50 

163 35 

97 15 



255 94 
207 99 
315 00 

48 77 

467 04 

50 29 

589 70 

399 02 

10 00 

57 53 



154 27 
82 86 
130 70 
473 
355 84 
796 80 



19 47 



16 53 
132 99 
186 50 



445 

516 

33 



71 

1,170 

196 

362 

40 

2,200 

250 

69 

70 



2,439 81 

217 54 

91 66 

33 00 



$ c. 
30 42 
65 10 



71 65 
373 00 
545 79 
155 28 



47 80 
67 56 



51 36 



277 79 
106 32 

837 34 
416 50 
221 91 



182 25 

210 00 

2,535 42 



38 60 



1,269 90 



39 55 

42 50 

212 91 

364 46 



71 14 

56 99 

58 11 

183 62 

87 99 



197 90 
213 38 



413 47 

21 00 

344 27 

,255 34 

157 37 

10 08 

377 22 



337 71 



742 27 



58 63 
79 63 



9 60 



6 40 



2 40 



$ c. 
2,399 52 
1,621 60 
3,897 58 
1,509 12 
1,476 84 
1,251 05 
2,256 37 
3,556 17 
2,615 15 
1,849 22 

858 94 
2,024 15 

397 16 
1.425 77 



674 16 



10,227 
765 



3,154 39 
2,525 56 
1,921 03 
3,653 82 
1,202 53 
2,587 15 
8,956 87 
1,834 79 
1,869 82 
1,839 02 
4,187 75 
1,428 50 

2.116 97 
1,788 75 

639 20 

1.117 22 
2,363 71 
2,585 01 

824 29 
2,427 64 

950 66 

2,405 24 

1,023 82 

15,111 84 

1,649 69 

2,628 92 

1,267 44 

2,117 90 

735 44 

4,392 83 

1,450 30 

1,814 45 

3,399 63 

5,487 09 

4,892 30 

1,988 06 

2,014 11 

547 81 



$ c. 
15,595 04 
12,424 46 
12,115 
21.839 



72 
07 



6,983 28 



25 
63 
54 
78 



8,943 

13,644 

14,623 

14,080 
9,766 72 
5,070 09 
9,757 25 
132,203 06 
6,873 57 
4,315 35 

26,424 68 
4,671 35 

19,060 81 

10,786 36 

9,036 84 

16,040 66 

5,194 78 

18,527 67 

39,857 22 

12,766 03 

9,846 22 

9,846 21 

21,390 77 

7,784 34 

13,093 77 

7,588 75 

4,388 22 

6,595 57 

17,321 28 

12,999 52 

4,447 28 

11,769 21 

8,529 04 
12,304 06 

5,283 05 
157,372 35 

7,613 74 
16,083 38 

7,142 27 
10,225 67 

5,026 04 
24,734 81 

9,130 56 
11,551 



12 



41,635 53 

42,663 02 
17,049 92 

9,355 75 
11,347 11 

3,450 82 



212 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE L— FINANCIAL 





Receipts 


High Schools 


> 

So 


c 

3 
— . O 
cfl (J 

a— 
'0 m 

'gc 

So 


73 

o 

73° 
a*— 
"0 j2 
" s S 

So 


03 

<U 

<u 

fa 

73 

o 
.a 

u 
CO 


a) 
t 

s 

C 

Q 


T3 to 

™ 3 

t) o 
y w 

S »- 

CQ o 


113 Walkerton... 

114 Walkerville. . 

115 Wallaceburg. 

116 Wardsville... 

117 Waterdown .. 

118 Waterford. . . 

119 Watford 

120 Welland 

121 Weston 

122 Whitby 

123 Wiarton 

124 Williamstown 

125 Winchester. . 

126 Wingham.. . . 


$ c. 
1,429 12 

839 29 
1,499 56 

637 26 
1,079 49 
1,061 36 
1,296 00 
1,755 18 
1,517 61 
1,871 63 
1,164 73 
1,397 28 
1,413 23 
1,512 15 


$ c. 
4,595 98 

3,242 57 
3,119 03 
1,079 49 
4,166 14 
5,679 46 
10,070 46 
13,919 19 
6,867 93 
3,831 29 
1,272 28 
4,838 88 
7,081 89 


$ c. 

8,150 00 

24,200 00 

8,900 00 

568 48 

8,200 00 

3,000 00 

2,300 00 

12,000 00 

11,800 00 

6,228 88 

4,035 00 

8,031 00 

4,350 00 

6,898 54 


$ c. 
199 85 


$ c. 


$ c 

1,670 95 

8,033 10 

1,925 55 

308 43 

395 89 

2,501 24 

5,427 01 

5,857 07 

4,404 32 

853 89 

842 69 

183 85 

3,623 28 

1,237 52 


1 Totals, High 

Schools 

2 Totals, Col- 

legiate 
Institutes.. 


176,283 24 
100,605 29 


510,757 73 
279,759 68 


941,846 03 
2,157,980 00 


1,084 35 
64,965 22 


614,242 93 
1,622,540 76 


431,880 24 
1,092,053 83 


3 Grand Totals, 

1922 

4 Grand Totals, 

1921 


276,888 53 
223,164 53 


790,517 41 
618,206 40 


3,099,826 03 
2,561,395 45 


66,049 57 
148,053 89 


2,236,783 69 
1,492,463 44 


1,523,934 07 
580,243 88 


5 Increases 

6 Decreases 


53,724 00 


172,311 01 


538,430 58 


82,004 32 


744,320 23 


943,690 19 


7 Percentages 


3.46 


9.89 


38.78 


.83 


27.98 


19.06 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



213 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

STATEMENT (Concluded) 



Expenditure 



<o C 

a) r 
£?=a 



J2S 
a. 9 



5*3 

.& g 3 

3 <U £ O 

3 a. & _ 

i >>3 rt 

■^ Co 
5 .<"■«; 

5.CJT3 >» 

>.£ cj= 

i u nl ft 



tn m m 

_ 3 T3 
>-■ P 3 O hfl rr 



-.2 , -. 8 

o .--2 4> 

Ills* 



O X 



113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 



15,846 05 
33,072 39 
15,567 68 

4,633 20 
10,754 87 
10,728 74 
14,702 47 
29,682 71 
31,641 12 
16,022 18 

9,873 71 
10,884 41 
14,225 39 
16,730 10 



1 2,676,094 52 

2 5,317,904 78 



3 7,993,999 30 

4 5,623,527 59 



5 2,370,471 71 

6 



$ c 

10,800 00 

12,906 25 

11,480 00 

3,280 00 

6,280 00 

5,740 00 

7,850 00 

16,600 00 

20,092 30 

10,880 00 

6,460 00 

7,850 00 

8,430 00 

11,980 00 



1,121,374 42 
1,841,626 12 



2,963,000 54 
2,531,068 69 



431,931 85 



43.94 



$ c. 
120 00 
857 03 
683 50 
9 47 
2.208 30 



55 00 

187 58 

5,459 69 



381 35 
16458 



739,980 48 
1,933,861 95 



2,673,842 43 
1,058.690 61 



1,615,151 82 



39.65 



$ c. 
72 41 
59 83 



229 73 

10 13 

26 54 

212 99 

121 82 

955 44 

104 07 

530 26 

64 87 



297 46 
86 20 



27,471 40 
60,049 66 



87,521 06 
111,413 19 



23,892 13 



1.30 



$ c. 
46 82 



33 


07 


90 


70 


315 


15 





2,034 50 
89 62 

259 55 
196 27 



185 67 
201 79 



27,332 79 
52,985 49 



80,318 28 
42,802 15 



37.516 13 



1.19 



$ c. 
282 90 



225 08 



3,449 91 
13,104,87 



16,554 78 
18,885 74 



2,330 96 



25 



$ c. 

1,755 53 

14,130 12 

2,163 69 

502 68 

1,194 01 

1,543 51 

2,539 38 

9,551 36 

5,532 59 

2,918 36 

2,026 89 

1,529 37 

3,651 24 

2,776 35 



329,784 86 
591,853 51 



921,638 37 
1,027.350 19 



105,711 82 



13.67 



$ c. 
12,794 76 
28,236 13 
14,589 99 

3,892 98 
10,024 00 

7,496 50 
10,566 20 
29,328 88 
31,278 27 
14,588 17 

9,129 38 

9,379 37 
12,954 03 
15,044 34 



2,249,393 86 
4,493,481 60 



6,742,875 46 
4,790,210 57 



1,952,664 89 



Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance, $151.08. 



214 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. TABLE M— BOARDS OF EDUCATION, 





u 
O 

T3 O 

o -o 

C/5 O 


Value of 


Collegiate Institutes 


>> 

a 
u 


3 rt 


a, 

Si! 

~ O 


jn 

<u 

O 
< 


w 

u 

a 


a c 
'5b £ 


1 Barrie 


1 
1 
1 
1 


524 

949 

1,094 

1,248 

1,042 

1,786 

904 

1,244 

1,394 

1,136 

1,140 

2,431 

1,032 

1,180 

2,165 

1,991 

2,532 

825 

1,190 

1,241 

882 

894 

4,046 

1,263 

1,247 

1,759 

1,171 

1,321 

857 

1,231 

1,158 

1,085 

1,253 

585 

896 

768 

1,114 

1,336 

3,162 

3,022 

2,601 

2,053 

1,154 

2,876 

2,443 

2,057 

897 

2,196 

1,746 


947 

2,762 
1,403 
3,992 
1,218 
1,618 
1,949 
1,718 
1,939 

847 
2,799 
14,203 
1,230 
1,425 
1,494 
1,682 
5,206 
1,232 

925 
1,137 
1,273 
1,488 
5,238 
1,574 
1,257 
2,224 
1,367 
2,205 

945 
1,948 
1,190 
2,150 
1,868 
1,779 

855 
1,436 
1,716 
1,164 
6,397 
5,838 
4,600 
2,660 
2,857 
6,068 
3,601 
2,578 
1,127 
2,818 
2,516 


$ 

78 
616 
268 
271 
287 
268 
248 
280 
452 
201 
233 
452 

89 
279 
333 

87 
710 
167 
272 
258 
243 
163 
479 
125 
190 
150 
340 
372 

95 
298 
146 

85 
182 
108 
105 

76 
191 
278 
340 
196 
265 
133 

89 
249 
299 
127 
103 
275 
249 


113 
222 
130 
101 
113 
132 
114 
139 
300 
102 

77 
100 

78 
110 
195 
139 

51 
111 
107 
103 
101 

93 
245 
191 
110 
181 
102 
104 
101 
114 
106 
155 
113 

76 
100 
107 
104 
100 
140 
182 
167 
173 
105 
163 
161 
127 
107 
142 
157 


750 
3,267 

659 
2,100 

225 
1,250 

659 

895 
1,500 

500 
1,485 

450 

750 
1,180 
2,696 
1,000 


$ 
122 


2 Brantford 


686 


3 Brockville 


103 


4 Chatham 


213 


5 Clinton 


148 


6 Cobourg 




163 


7 Collingwood 

8 Fort William 

9 Gait 


1 
1 


119 
274 
391 


10 Goderich 




107 


11 Guelph 

12 Hamilton 

13 Ingersoll 


1 
1 
1 
1 

"l 
1 
1 

1 
1 


319 
270 
100 


14 Kingston 

15 Kitchener- Waterloo. . 

16 Lindsay 


114 
185 
268 
194 


18 Morrisburg 


340 
1,003 


100 


19 Napanee 


115 


20 Niagara Falls 

21 North Bay 


110 


1,000 
670 


102 


22 Orillia 


1 


116 


23 Ottawa . 


465 


24 Owen Sound 

25 Perth 


1 
1 
1 


1,045 

735 

4,373 

1,270 

1,394 

475 

1,265 

260 

2,095 

2,085 


101 
167 


26 Peterborough 

27 Picton 


251 
150 


28 Port Arthur 

29 Renfrew 

30 St. Catharines 

31 St. Mary's 


1 
1 
1 


54 

133 
217 
184 


32 St. Thomas 

33 Sarnia 


1 
1 


155 
140 


34 Sault Ste Marie 


59 








115 


36 Smith's Falls 

37 Stratford 

38 Strathroy 


1 

1 


611 

1,050 

200 


103 

500 

94 


39 Toronto, Harbord. . . 

40 Toronto, Humberside 

41 Toronto, Jarvis 

42 Toronto, Malvern . . . 

43 Toronto, North 

44 Toronto, Oakwood.. . 

45 Toronto, Parkdale. . . 

46 Toronto, Riverdale . . 

47 Vankleek Hill 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


1,320 




383 




600 




239 




198 




483 




438 




626 




152 


48 Windsor 

49 Woodstock 


1 
1 

36 


2,460 
791 


153 
157 






Totals 


74,121 


122,463 


11,800 


6,364 


42,488 


11,956 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



215 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, ETC. 



General Equipment 


Value of Manual Training 
Department Equipment 


Equipment for 

Physical 

Culture 


.3.3 3 

w o <u 
>,0 3 


3 

3 
V 

3 

2 


§1 


en 

<v 

3 

y 


3_ +j 

> a 3 

— ■ q3 o. 

o_ cr 


J* 

u 

% 

O 
O 


^3 

'5 

u 

3 

-o 
o 
o 


biO 

3 

'So 
u 
o 


a 
o 

(S) 

J 8 
•S'-S 


1 


$ 

604 

613 

446 

417 

331 

555 

787 

333 

223 

370 

1,191 

3,787 
335 
530 
616 
506 
488 
386 
575 
355 
417 
288 

1,855 
357 
488 
55 
790 
444 
379 
409 
577 
480 
318 

1,407 

157 

64 

406 

377 

1,176 
578 
435 
581 
141 
797 
370 
600 
796 
595 
537 


8 
9,000 

10,000 
2,500 
7,500 
1,116 
3,500 
1,700 

16,000 


$ 


$ 


$ 

177 
415 
319 
177 
160 
350 


$ 

17,765 
19,530 
6,997 
11,050 
4,640 
14,677 
5,506 
71,047 
9,476 
5,953 
10,844 
40,143 
4,335 
15,168 
9,096 
10,098 
41,181 
4,141 
5,313 
18,437 
14,301 
5,667 
73,914 
4,876 
11,750 
10,199 
10,517 
71,771 
7,985 
13,975 
9,837 
8,337 
7,339 
19,307 
3,078 
10,853 
7,431 
7,744 
73,165 
21,014 
18,113 
11,262 
4,544 
21,771 
17,687 
22,130 
5,987 
48,939 
11,440 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


? 






958 


1,750 


100 


908 


3 


50 


75 
36 




4 


874 








S 








6 


5,000 
31 

"'697 












7 


1,317 
5,174 

1,877 








8 


119 

75 


40 

7,560 

190 

675 

450 


1,779 
799 













10 


2,500 

7,800 

18,000 

771 

10,000 

1,000 

4,000 

37,000 

980 

967 

15,000 

10,000 

1,800 

10,000 






11 


100 


75 










1? 


1,519 








n 












14 






350 
417 

375 










IS 






984 


195 


700 


896 


16 


100 






17 


1,575 








18 














1Q 






714 

733 

783 

150 

1,121 

75 

56 

905 

787 

233 










70 














7,1 














?,?, 














23 


"100 


465 










74 


505 


350 






75 


7,000 






76 


751 
"l38 


50 
40 

6 










77 


5,000 

15,000 

5,000 

8,000 

6,000 

1,537 

1,380 

15,000 

600 

7,688 

7,000 

3,500 

10,000 

10,000 

7,000 

5,000 










78 
79 


1,000 


775 


75 




30 


50 


6 


437 
216 
500 










31 










37 


100 




375 








33 








34 






793 
700 


539 


770 


738 


7,997 


35 






36 






1,360 
563 


364 
400 






37 






350 
700 
500 
815 
1,677 
473 


143 


390 


38 








39 




180 










40 










41 


698 


75 










47 










43 














44 


10,000 
10,000 
15,000 

3,700 
40,000 

5,000 




85 


1,005 

475 
665 
100 
700 
797 


7,780 


351 






45 






46 


300 


50 


7,000 


480 






47 






48 


100 




686 

778 








49 


471 


843 


7,104 








77,637 


348,479 


7,710 


1,737 


18,850 


673,105 


74,759 


6,384 


7.099 


7,795 



216 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. TABLE M— BOARDS OF EDUCATION, 



Collegiate 
Institutes 



Value of Household 


3.& 


Science Department 


Equipment 


*3 cr 






j* 


<L> 


a 


u 

o 


bfl+-> 


as 


^ j3 


£ 


<£ 


£.2 m 


O nS 


>> 


Value of 
Departm 
ment 




IS!? 


X) 

c 


2 co 

OnJC 

Uc/) cd 




3 



A. 8 

3 O 

crCD 
W <u 

.3 c 
«J £ 
> 6 



03 QJ 

& a c 

<" &3 

«* ST 3 

> S 

— a ^ 



HW 






t^ en 






1 Barrie 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


122,000 


2 Brantford 


2,963 


295 








6,974 
676 

2,363 
606 
1,956 
2,279 
7,537 
4,008 


135,000 


3 Brockville 




556 


120 


50,137 


4 Chatham 


1,539 






60,000 


5 Clinton . . 






518 
223 


88 


40,000 
27,600 


6 Cobourg 


1,472 

922 

1,076 

1,652 


261 




7 Collingwood 

8 Fort William . . 


45 


30,705 
446,547 


58 
33 






9 Gait 


22 





125 


90,000 


10 Goderich 


40,000 
50,000 


11 Guelph 














12 Hamilton 


427 


150 








2,096 
193 


290,000 


13 Ingersoll 




193 




50,000 


14 Kingston 










125,370 


15 Kitchener- Waterloo. . 


1,662 








125 


4,562 


239,748 


16 Lindsay 








150,000 


17 London 


768 


91 








2,434 


425,000 


18 Morrisburg 








15,000 


19 Napanee 














60,000 


20 Niagara Falls 














100,000 


21 North Bay 














105,000 


22 Orillia 














82,500 


23 Ottawa 










73 
30 


73 
1,668 


1,202,000 


24 Owen Sound 


731 


52 






100,000 


25 Perth 






50,800 


26 Peterborough . . 














83,992 


27 Picton 








254 




254 
4,357 


65,000 


28 Port Arthur . . 


2,859 


93 


55 




200,000 


29 Renfrew 






35,000 


30 St. Catharines 










95 


95 


45,000 


31 St. Mary's 










70,000 


32 St. Thomas 


666 






326 




1,317 


75,000 


33 Sarnia 








600,000 


34 Sault Ste. Marie.. 


995 


104 








5,143 


265,000 


35 Seaforth 








30,000 


36 Smith's Falls. 


582 
1,000 


35 
88 




210 




2,551 
2,734 


150,000 


37 Stratford. . 


150 


100,000 


38 Strathroy 






70,000 


39 Toronto, Harbord . . . 














200,000 
















220,000 


41 Toronto, Jarvis . . 














73,000 


42 Toronto, Malvern . . 














220,000 


43 Toronto, North. . . . 














400,000 


44 Toronto, Oakwood. . . 


412 


22 


75 






3,140 


435,000 


45 Toronto, Parkdale . . . 






205,000 


46 Toronto, Riverdale . . 


1,600 








26 


4,106 


325,000 


47 Vankleek Hill . . 








30,000 


48 Windsor 


1,395 
1,363 










2,081 
5,576 


255,500 


49 Woodstock 


67 








100,000 












Totals 


24,084 


1,349 


152 


2,280 


877 


68,779 


8,339,899 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



217 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, ETC.— (Continued) 



Religious 


and other Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 


n which 

Selec- 

erefrom 


c 

a cD 
o >> 


T3 
<L> 

in u 
o <u 

13 ^ 


G 

s 


O 


0) 

3 


a 
"8 £"fi 


bA 




tn 

C 

o 


+-> 

3 


c 
o 


Schools i 
Bible or 
tions th 
are used 


J2£ 


MS 


S'S 

o X 


B 
£ 
o 
U 


"3 

bo 

< 


^ co.g 

jQ5 


o 
ti 


2 

-a 


oo 


K MM 

Oc>)U 


3 a 
o a 

J5 3 

±2 <-> 

kT u 


1 








11 


17 


1 


18 


5 


15 


. 16 


6 


2 1 








98 

22 


15 

6 


20 
1 


15 
12 


37 


14 

27 


21 

5 


26 


3 






24 


4 1 




1 




44 


17 


7 


13 


8 


29 


15 


6 


5 1 








7 


10 


3 


12 


5 




2 




6 1 








15 

22 


8 

5 


5 
4 


5 
11 


5 
5 


9 
6 


1 
14 


7 


7 1 






4 


8 1 








52 


8 


7 


11 


12 


35 


9 


1 


9 1 








52 


13 


1 


7 


24 


38 


8 


19 


10 1 








19 


6 




9 


1 


1 


10 


11 


11 








54 


14 




12 


4 


18 


12 


9 


12 1 








38 


4 


28 


26 


15 


69 


49 


41 


13 1 








12 


16 




3 


6 


7 


6 


8 


14 1 








58 


17 


15 


10 


20 


24 


30 


8 


15 1 








68 

22 


6 

23 


1 

4 








19 
9 




16 


10 


4 


11 


29 


17 1 








96 


10 


10 


15 


27 


39 


20 


33 


18 1 








3 


8 


3 


4 




3 


11 


10 


19 








23 


18 


2 


7 


2 


2 


9 


11 


20 1 








12 


6 


8 


4 


10 


7 


8 




21 








31 




6 


10 


4 


4 


9 


18 


22 1 








37 
74 


13 
9 


2 
24 


19 

• 27 


7 
23 


12 
109 


17 
40 


6 


23 1 






74 


24 








46 


10 


4 


21 


7 


22 


10 


6 


25 1 








10 


12 


3 


10 


8 


8 


8 


8 


26 








57 


16 


6 


12 


31 


11 


17 


25 


27 








8 


13 




8 




11 


14 


8 


28 1 








51 


2 




4 


14 


14 


19 


4 


29 








16 


18 


12 


26 


13 


5 


6 


6 


30 1 








53 


15 


9 


13 


28 


3 


43 


37 


31 1 








5 


10 


3 


10 


2 


4 


1 


10 


32 








57 


39 


11 


12 


30 


5 


5 




33 1 








25 


1 


17 


7 


3 


68 


8 


5 


34 








14 


1 


6 


8 


14 


17 


19 


9 


35 








5 
16 


9 


8 

5 


29 
14 


5 

2 


8 
6 


4 

2 


2 


36 1 








37 








60 


5 


1 


19 


9 


55 


15 


12 


38 








10 


10 




20 


2 


12 


4 




39 1 








50 




40 


30 




22 


60 


50 


40 1 








31 


1 


8 


15 


4 


33 


24 


32 


41 1 








38 


3 


57 


18 


14 


45 


42 


21 


42 1 








51 


14 


13 


4 


20 


12 


60 


38 


43 1 








23 


6 


17 


3 




7 


10 


12 


44 1 








96 


2 


10 


10 


10 


36 


101 


36 


45 








50 


5 


20 


21 


12 


47 


50 


18 


46 1 








93 


3 


18 


7 


7 


34 


51 


46 


47 








6 


10 




11 


3 


7 


2 


11 


48 








95 




13 


4 


23 


64 


133 


12 


49 








15 


21 


15 


27 


15 


21 


15 


11 


30 


49 


1 


44 


1,851 


475 


448 


623 


500 


1,056 


1.063 


770 



218 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. TABLE M— BOARDS OF EDUCATION, 



High Schools 



T3 




u 




rt 




o 
pq 






u 




<v 


d 


-o 


o 


d 




3 


<n 


w 


u 


o-a 


o 
,d 


W 


u 




C/J 


o 






o 3 

d rt 

0) ex 



a 

cti en 

* o 

go 

5T3 



Value of General 



& 



'3a £ 

£^ 
CQc/5 



1 Alexandria 




$ 

817 
406 
771 
315 
747 
353 
63 
613 
448 

1,159 
448 

1,202 
803 
488 
381 
340 
428 
544 
328 
777 
982 
831 


$ 
691 
827 
660 
438 
745 
811 
654 
966 
868 

1,061 
735 

1,861 
968 
990 
461 

1,014 
450 
769 
489 
895 

1,045 
676 

2,349 
453 
341 
509 
720 
625 
822 
548 
525 
987 
800 
565 
733 
405 
523 
863 
582 
491 
679 
677 
404 

1,109 
690 
754 
522 
515 
657 

1,018 
650 
718 

1,189 

1,039 
884 

1,116 
979 


$ 

87 

83 

68 

82 

97 

58 

58 

109 

134 

268 

121 

299 

144 

146 

76 

186 

287 

104 

42 

114 

165 

120 

8 

29 

78 

109 

121 

60 

118 

103 

70 

85 

169 

80 

66 

54 

62 

66 

69 

49 

56 

50 

180 

76 

106 

73 

93 

157 

132 

83 

62 

62 

187 

84 

360 

85 

69 


$ 
83 
65 
87 
52 
75 
79 
13 
84 
65 
85 
65 
93 

103 
47 
89 

101 
76 
77 
61 
68 

119 
86 


$ 


$ 
13( 


2 Alliston 






5^ 


3 Almonte 


1 




io: 


4 Amherstburg 


289 


8: 


5 Arnprior 


1 


10^ 


6 Arthur 


8: 


7 Athens. . 




7: 


8 Aurora . . 






10; 


9 Avon more 






6^ 


10 Aylmer 




140 


22( 


11 Beamsville 


1 
1 


10. 


12 Belleville 


1,494 


19i 


13 Bowmanville 


13? 


14 Bracebridge 


1 
1 


20 


71 


15 Bradford 


5: 




ii* 


17 Brighton . . 


1 




7. 


18 Burford 




10^ 


19 Burlington 






91 


20 Caledonia 


1 

1 
1 
1 




10' 


21 Campbellford 

22 Carleton Place. 


280 


17' 
10( 






u: 


24 Chapleau 


199 
360 
462 
402 
615 
989 
624 
296 
863 
482 
452 
429 
302 
317 
430 
560 
628 
393 
528 
428 
858 
564 
502 
393 
348 
728 
697 
453 
634 
1,071 
562 
682 
735 
400 


44 
51 
65 
48 
55 
80 
51 
57 
76 

101 
76 
85 
52 
53 
75 
79 
80 
61 
58 
83 

104 
91 
51 
53 
85 
79 
92 
79 
88 
77 
33 
74 

109 
41 




3< 


25 Chatsworth 






A) 


26 Cheslev 






11 








9f 


28 Colborne 


1 




54 


29 Cornwall 


1,070 


104 






5£ 


31 Dundalk. . 






5C 




1 
1 




61 


33 Dunnville 




122 






105 


35 Dutton 




103 


36 Elmira 






42 


37 Elora . . 


1 





3C 


38 Essex 


101 


39 Exeter. . 


1 
1 




63 






106 


41 Flesherton . . 




52 


42 Forest 




1,281 

1,171 

235 


58 


43 Fort Frances. . . . 




56 


44 Gananoque 


1 


81 


45 Georgetown 


151 






124 


47 Gravenhurst 

48 Grimsby .... 


1 
1 


160 


53 
48 






95 








81 




1 
1 




99 


52 Hawkesbury 




52 




108 


54 Kemptville 

55 Kenora 


1 

1 

1 




111 


1,328 

"iio 


63 


56 Kincardine 


95 


57 Kingsville 


249 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



219 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, ETC. (Continued) 



Equipment 



E rt i> 



b/0 

.5,3 c 



5— a 

c cr 1 



a 









e 




CD 


3 






u- a3 


Ih 


CO 


cd o 


3 


3 1 . 






cr a> o 


o 


s 


<£"£ 


PL 



_ a> a, 

.gO'3 
o_ cr 



Value of Manual Training 
Department Equipment 






26 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 








10 


57 
105 

15 
182 

39 


57 






524 


1,600 






80 






13 








2 








94 








200 

3 

117 

55 

280 

309 


97 








141 


3,000 
3,054 






271 






221 






90 








102 








44 










249 
40 


10,000 


100 




140 


326 


2,500 






64 


44 






40 










41 








449 


52 


















8 






6 


"l5 
50 

74 
100 
397 

75 
25 


16 






106 








40 








45 








60 






25 


211 






10 








48 








80 




750 




350 


119 




15 








59 


40 








50 




1,000 




20 
25 

75 


53 


5,000 


16 






30 








35 








25 

55 


38 








125 








202 


1,600 






437 
100 


39 


200 




26 




9 








20 

68 


155 








182 








38 








345 
100 


11 








42 








40 








91 
118 
180 


85 








450 


2,500 
800 






67 






95 









1,834 
1,502 
1,850 
3,397 
2,030 
1,436 

863 
2,168 
1,679 
6,191 
4,854 
5,645 
2,556 
1,844 
1,123 
12,248 
1,356 
4,488 
1,055 
2,001 
3,258 
1,865 
2,469 

772 

908 
1,376 
1,504 
1,554 
3,665 
1,670 
1,033 
2,120 
2,854 
1,401 
1,490 

895 
2,055 
6,613 
1,444 
1,384 
1,301 
1,464 
2,557 
5,638 
2,176 
1,530 
1,303 
1,376 
1,873 
2,354 
1,454 
1,596 
2,763 
2,032 
6,521 
3,007 
1,943 



203 



220 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. TABLE M— BOARDS OF EDUCATION, 





Value of Household 

Science Department 

Equipment 


Value of Agricultural 
Department Equip- 
ment 


, 'o 

•§■! 

crc/3 

.a c 

> E 


. — . 

Total value of Special 
Equipment as per pre- 
ceding nine columns 


Value of School Sites, 
Buildings and Furni- 
ture 


High Schools 


Cookery, 
Sanitation 
and Hygiene 


Handwork 
and Machine 
Sewing 


u 

1 

u 

-o 

C 
3 
03 


1 Alexandria 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 
25 000 


2 Alliston 














25 000 


3 Almonte 








162 
129 




162 
129 


950 
78,150 
20 000 


4 Amherstburg 










5 Arnprior 










6 Arthur 








250 




250 


18,000 
5,000 

100,000 
20,000 
18,000 
80,000 
85,000 
55,000 
8,500 
25,000 

100,000 
40,000 
60,000 
82,000 
25,000 
25,000 


7 Athens 










8 Aurora 














9 Avonmore 














10 Aylmer 














1 1 Beamsville 


747 
865 


"ll 


150 

22 


785 
300 
714 




1,885 

1,264 

714 


12 Belleville 






14 Bracebridge 








15 Bradford 














16 Brampton 














17 Brighton ' 














18 Burford 














19 Burlington 














20 Caledonia 














21 Campbellford 














22 Carleton Place 














23 Cayuga 














78,000 

11,713 

1,894 


24 Chapleau 














25 Chatsworth 














26 Chesley 














27 Chesterville 














15,000 
11,000 
47,500 
40,000 

8,500 
32,000 
42,000 
16,250 
10,000 
17,000 

5,000 
90,000 
27,000 

8,000 
50,000 
40,000 
56,566 
30,000 
50,000 
15,000 
15,000 
33,982 
20,500 
60,000 
16,000 
25,000 


28 Colborne 














29 Cornwall 














30 Deseronto 














31 Dundalk 














32 Dundas 














33 Dunnville 














34 Durham 














35 Dutton 














36 Elmira 














37 Elora 














38 Essex 














39 Exeter 














40 Fergus 














41 Flesherton 














42 Forest 














43 Fort Frances 














44 Gananoque 














45 Georgetown 














46 Glencoe 














47 Gravenhurst 














48 Grimsby 














49 Hagersville 














50 Haileybury 




























52 Hawkesbury 




























15,000 
20,000 


54 Kemptville 










33 


33 


55 Kenora 










47,228 


56 Kincardine 










278 


278 


20,000 


57 Kingsville 










54,000 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



221 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, ETC. (Continued) 



Religious 


and other Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 


Schools in which 
Bible or Selec- 
tions therefrom 
are used 


-o 
aj 
c 

^ u 
a a; 
o >> 

a 


^ . 
o v 

J* 


O) 

E 

1 2 

O X 


u 
u 

<v 

£ 
1 

O 

u 


5b 
< 


G 

% S £ 

JQ5 


bJO 

.5 

u 


D 
u 


tf3 

c 
a 

00 


tn 
0) 

3 

j- 

<u _■ 

Oc>)U 


3 a 

a 

.3 3 

^0 


1 








1 


9 
11 

6 
1 

7 
2 


1 

7 

4 


6 
8 
5 
1 
4 
4 


2 

2 


7 
3 

7 
5 

2 


2 
4 
1 
3 
3 
8 


7 


2 


1 
1 
1 






11 


3 

4 

5 





1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


3 
3 
6 


6 
3 
3 


6 


1 


7 






8 


6 


15 


3 


5 
5 

12 
6 
1 
7 
7 
2 

10 
6 
1 


2 


10 


5 


13 


9 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 








10 






3 


10 
2 
9 
9 
1 
3 

16 


' i 

"10 

1 
1 


3 
2 
14 
6 
4 

5 

"i 


5 

14 
29 

6 

"4 

"i 

6 
4 


2 

3 

35 

4 

2 
5 
3 

5 


1 


11 


"i 

"i 


1 

1 
1 
1 


4 


12 
13 
14 


25 
7 
6 


"i 


15 


1 


3 


16 


1 


5 


15 


17 


4 


18 


1 
1 
1 




1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


2 
2 
3 

12 
8 
1 
2 
3 
6 
2 
3 

24 
4 


9 

7 
6 
. 8 
1 
1 




19 


4 
3 
3 
7 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
2 

10 
4 
2 
5 
6 

5 
7 
. 4 
4 
3 
5 
7 
6 
9 
4 
6 
2 

15 
7 

17 
7 
7 
1 

14 
1 
6 
5 


2 


20 


2 
4 

"i 


10 

10 
6 
3 
2 
1 

10 
2 
6 

18 
2 
7 
9 
5 
3 

10 
4 
3 
6 
6 
6 
5 

13 
8 
9 
6 
6 
3 
2 
7 
4 
5 
3 
7 
5 
3 

14 




4 


21 


5 
3 

3 

2 

8 

2 

6 

8 

"2 

8 


1 
2 
1 
4 
2 
2 
5 
4 
18 
2 
3 
7 
3 

5 


2 


22 
23 


1 


17 


24 




25 


i 
1 






7 
5 

11 
3 
5 
2 

10 

12 
8 
1 

14 


7 

2 

5 

3 

1 

"i 

1 

"i 
1 

6 

"1 




26 
27 




1 


3 
3 


28 






2 


29 
30 


1 


"i 


1 

1 
1 
1 


7 
2 


31 




32 


15 
4 
3 
1 


17 


33 


5 


34 
35 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




1 


2 


36 




1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


8 


37 


1 

7 
1 
1 
6 
3 
1 
8 
8 
3 
4 

10 
4 
8 
5 
5 
3 
1 

15 
2 
6 


1 

8 

2 

10 

1 
8 


4 


38 
39 
40 


"l 
3 

"3 
6 
3 

"5 
1 
4 
4 

"l2 

"2 


7 

"*"i7 

6 

6 

14 

5 

10 

1 

4 

2 

16 

28 

6 

8 

1 

12 

2 

11 

2 


1 
3 


41 


1 
1 


2 


42 

43 


"l 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1 
7 


44 

45 


1 


7 

10 
4 


1 
2 
5 


4 
2 


46 

47 


1 

1 
1 
1 


3 
2 


48 
49 
50 




1 
1 
1 


8 

"l 
13 

2 
1 

5 

"23 
4 


"1 

"2 
3 
1 
3 
3 


2 
9 


51 


52 


1 








53 




1 


3 
1 


54 


1 


55 


l 


1 
1 
1 


16 

' 4 


56 

57 


1 

1 



222 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

II. TABLE M— BOARDS OF EDUCATION, 





u 

a 
o 

CQ 

u 

•8 3 

.§« 

C/3 O 


Value of General 


High Schools 


u 
JO 


en 

SS"S 
•a a 


CO 

a 

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So 
•Si! 

U 5 


jtn 

o 

u 
< 


en 
1* 

<v 

'u, 

a 
>> 
H 


'3d £ 

•2 & 
CQctf 


58 Leamington 




$ 

672 
439 
504 
502 
350 
501 
762 
719 
471 
487 
363 
544 
407 
623 
390 
664 
275 
798 
514 
495 
737 
342 
908 
1,094 
696 
759 
464 
909 
447 
571 
487 
596 
290 
887 
504 
404 
542 
521 
892 
396 
362 
443 
512 
313 
460 
382 
883 
532 
304 
514 
807 
780 
370 
574 
727 
578 
312 


$ 
837 
527 
679 
957 
358 
804 
1,402 
974 
512 
550 
420 
674 
402 
488 
429 
956 
349 
1,728 
628 
587 
, 977 
521 
1,242 
2,062 
856 
876 
663 
1,062 
853 
762 
510 
519 
543 
1,020 
782 
529 
948 
765 
1,199 
401 
475 
697 
903 
414 
536 
561 
2,255 
744 
802 
1,103 
1,337 
847 
974 
700 
287 
797 
2,108 


$ 
12C 
68 
116 
94 
96 
299 
110 
165 
85 
197 
72 
194 
55 
59 
42 
186 
65 
106 
92 
110 
261 
58 
247 
415 
105 
65 
93 
161 
76 
66 
130 
113 
114 
155 
60 
40 
113 
222 
104 
77 
97 
120 
194 
70 
67 
89 
97 
102 
125 
248 
74 
260 
81 
138 
71 
112 
144 


110 
133 
76 
97 
53 
81 
77 
123 
54 
200 
50 
131 
49 
57 
49 
91 
45 
76 
41 
65 
77 
67 
75 
83 
75 
86 
65 
99 
68 
84 
80 
52 
76 
76 
70 
40 
103 
76 
107 
53 
71 
73 
23 
50 
77 
49 
89 
76 
48 
79 
42 
79 
63 
115 
42 
100 
49 


£ 


$ 
109 


59 Listowel 


1 




124 


60 Lucan 




102 


61 Madoc 






103 


62 Markdale 






50 


63 Markham 






112 


64 Meaford 






144 


65 Midland 


1 




122 


66 Milton 




114 


67 Mitchell 






101 


68 Morewood 






90 


69 Mount Forest 


1 




112 


70 Nepean 


100 


59 


71 Newburgh 


1 

1 


54 


72 Newcastle 




54 


73 Newmarket 


1,242 


122 


74 Niagara 




56 


75 Niagara Falls South. 

76 Norwich 




970 


117 
60 


77 Norwood 


1 
1 
1 




77 


78 Oakville 


560 


110 


79 Omemee 


50 


80 Orangeville 


794 

2,498 

252 


99 


8 1 Osha wa 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


210 


82 Paris 


111 


83 Parkhill 


54 


84 Parry Sound 

85 Pembroke .... 




55 


625 

180 


116 


86 Penetanguishene. . . . 

87 Petrolia 


157 

77 


88 Plantagenet 




92 


89 Port Dover 


1 




58 


90 Port Elgin 




42 


91 Port Hope 




600 


90 


92 Port Perry . 


1 
1 
1 
1 


78 


93 Port Rowan . . 




51 


94 Prescott 




101 


95 Richmond Hill 




84 


96 Ridgetown 




101 


97 Rockland. . 






66 


98 Scarboro' . . 






152 


99 Shelburne 


1 
1 




63 


100 Simcoe . . 




141 


101 Smithville. . . 




65 


102 Stirling 


1 




102 


103 Streetsville . 




73 


104 Sudbury 






99 


105 Sydenham. . . 






162 


106 Thorold.. 






51 


107 Tillsonburg 






104 


108 Toronto, Davenport 

109 Trenton. 


1 




91 




67 


110 Tweed. . . . 






68 


Ill Uxbridge 


1 
1 




126 


112 Vienna 




59 


113 Walkerton 


509 


84 


114 Walkerville 


1 


38 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



223 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, ETC. (Continued) 



Equipment 


Value of Manual Training 
Department Equipment 


Equipment for 

Physical 

Culture 


If- 

g c e 


S 

3 
0) 
en 

3 

2 


J-B 

3*5 

cr <u c3 


en 

Ih 

3 

y 


73"fi § 

> « £ 
■a £•£* 


o 

O 
1 


bfl 

.5 
"S 

3 

■S 

O 
O 


bo 
C 

o 


o 
CO 

.5 o 

43*43 

u u 


58 


137 
114 
140 

52 
125 

16 
450 
390 
128 
212 

18 

15 

"i6 

8 

184 

213 

466 

9 

32 

59 

30 

313 

207 

34 

17 

108 

40 

31 

22 

20 

104 

37 

41 

177 

42 

78 

19 

261 

12 

1,274 

36 

24 

17 

20 

13 

570 

106 

22 

195 

145 

46 

117 

98 

7 

24 

1,102 


$ 


$ 


$ 


73 

110 

40 

75 

39 

95 

435 

204 


2,058 
1,515 
1,657 
1,880 
1,071 
1,908 
4,784 
2,747 
1,364 
2,401 
1,051 
1,795 
1,122 
1,357 
1,011 
3,445 
2,453 

11,861 
1,344 
1,417 
2,846 
1,068 
6,205 
6,569 
2,129 
1,957 
1,545 
3,200 
2,017 
1,682 
1,319 
1,474 
1,163 
3,269 
1,765 
1,116 
1,960 
1,687 
3,789 
1,005 

14,431 
1,472 
1,797 
949 
1,512 
1,270 
6,533 
1,766 
1,352 

12,615 
2,496 
4,775 
1,876 
1,808 
1,205 
2,324 

54,458 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


59 
















60 
















61 
















62 
















63 
















64 


1,404 














65 




50 










66 










. 




67 


550 






104 
37 

125 
50 
60 
39 










68 


l 












69 












70 
















71 
















72 
















73 
















74 


1,450 
7,500 
















75 






100 










76 














77 








51 
65 










78 
















79 
















80 


2,500 






27 










81 














82 


















83 








100 
94 
188 
115 
100 










84 






3 










85 














86 




75 


15 










87 












88 
















89 








32 
61 
400 
94 
10 
75 










90 
















91 
















92 








141 




37 




93 










94 
















95 
















96 


1,000 




25 


100 










97 










98 


12,000 
















99 






40 










100 
















101 








20 

250 

103 

40 

44 










102 
















103 
















104 


2,500 














105 














106 
















107 


10,000 






372 










108 














109 


2,500 






196 
198 

57 

12 

120 










110 




5 










111 














112 
















113 
















114 


50,490 




215 


4,405 


964 







224 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
II. TABLE M— BOARDS OF EDUCATION, 





Value of Household 

Science Department 

Equipment 


Value of Agricultural 
Department Equip- 
ment 


. "o 

3 O 

crc/3 

Is 


Total value of Special 
Equipment as per pre- 
ceding nine columns 


o 


High Schools 


Cookery, 
Sanitation 
and Hygiene 


Handwork 
and Machine 
Sewing 




Value of Schc 
Buildings anc 
ture 


58 Leamington 


$ 


$ 


t 


147 


$ 


$ 
147 


$ 
15,000 


59 Listowel 










37,000 
22,000 
25,000 
15,000 
15,000 
35,000 
50,000 


60 Lucan 














61 Madoc 














62 Markdale 














63 Markham 














64 Meaford 














65 Midland 














66 Milton 














81,881 
10,000 
11,999 
25,000 
130,000 
5,500 
20,000 


67 Mitchell 








88 




88 


68 Morewood 










69 Mount Forest 














70 Nepean 














71 Newburgh 










16 


16 


72 Newcastle 










73 Newmarket 














40,000 


74 Niagara 














6,000 


75 Niagara Falls South. 


564 


150 




570 




1,284 


36,000 


76 Norwich 




20,000 


77 Norwood 














20,000 


78 Oakville 








840 




840 


25,000 
9,000 


79 Omemee 










80 Orangeville 










75 


75 


25,000 


81 Oshawa 










38,600 


82 Paris 














30,000 


83 Parkhill 














14,000 


84 Parry Sound 














30,000 


85 Pembroke 














35,000 


86 Penetanguishene. . . . 














35,000 


87 Petrolia 














6,000 


88 Plantagenet 














3,400 


89 Port Dover 














1,300 


90 Port Elgin 














10,000 


91 Port Hope 














60,000 


92 Port Perry 


424 


100 




625 




1,327 


30,500 


93 Port Rowan 




4,000 


94 Prescott 














20,142 


95 Richmond Hill 














17,000 


96 Ridgetown 














25,000 


97 Rockland 














15,000 


98 Scarboro' 








110 




110 


174,537 


99 Shelburne 










9,000 


100 Simcoe 














40,000 


101 Smithville 














15,000 


102 Stirling 














35,000 


103 Streetsville 














8,000 


104 Sudbury 














51,576 


105 Sydenham 














50,000 


106 Thorold 














13,000 


107 Tillsonburg 














55,000 


108 Toronto, Davenport 

109 Trenton 




























75,000 


110 Tweed. . 














35,000 


Ill Uxbridge 














12,000 
















1,250 


113 Walker ton . . 














2,500 


114 Walkerville 


1,616 


367 


30 






7,382 


650,000 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



225 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, ETC. (Continued) 



Religious 


and other Exercises 




Destination of Pupil 


s 




■ 

Schools in which 
Bible or Selec- 
tions therefrom 
are used 


<D 
3 

o >» 
03 

■8* 

a* 

C/) £ 


T3 
<v 

Hi U 

o <u 

y 0? 

en >-< 

J3 +3 
u-r; 


4-> 

c 

s 

CD 

s % 

6 & 
o -x 


o 
u 

B 

E 
o 
U 


S-, 

3 

+J 

13 
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ojO 

< 


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ojO 

.5 



H 


QJ 

03 

Ih 

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.2 
+-> 

03 

u O, 

00 


Ui 

<v 

3 

bX) *-• -'-' 
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G 

.2 

3 « 
a 

.3 3 

."tl ° 
^ a 


58 

59 1 






1 


18 
11 
3 
5 
3 
8 
9 
10 
4 
2 

7 

7 

3 

15 

1 

13 

6 

3 

12 

6 

12 

54 

7 

2 

6 

7 

12 

11 


26 

16 

16 

11 

7 

8 

7 

1 

10 

3 

3 

12 

5 

6 

1 

16 

2 

6 

25 

11 

3 


1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
3 
5 
2 

i 

"i 
i 

"i 

6 


6 

13 

5 

4 

1 

12 

12 

5 

5 

1 

6 

4 

4 

3 


10 
5 
1 


2 
1 
1 

7 


11 
6 

5 
7 
1 
7 
7 
6 


2 
5 


60 








61 1 

62 1 




1 
1 
1 


2 
4 


63 

64 


"i 
1 

6 

1 
"1 

7 


7 

10 

1 

20 

5 

1 

5 

21 

3 


12 

2 


65 

66 1 




1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


7 


67 1 

68 1 


5 


1 


69 1 

70 1 


8 

16 
5 
4 
11 
7 
10 
2 
3 
4 


1 


71 1 

72 1 




1 
1 


1 
3 


73 1 


7 


8 
3 
4 
3 
1 
2 


2 
2 
4 
4 
8 
4 
2 
5 

18 

14 

20 

5 

12 
6 
8 
4 
2 
8 

14 
6 


16 


74 1 




1 
1 


2 


75 

76 1 


4 

"l 

3 


1 
1 

5 


7 
2 


77 1 

78 1 

79 




1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


6 


80 

81 

82 

83 


7 
9 

10 

13 
3 

11 
1 
6 
2 
4 

12 
5 

14 
6 


1 
5 
4 
2 
2 
4 


10 
6 

5 


1 
"17 


4 

10 

4 

4 

3 

10 
3 
3 
3 
8 

"4 

7 
4 
5 
4 
5 
6 


10 
16 


84 1 






7 
4 


15 

8 


11 


85 

86 




1 


6 

g 


87 1 

88 




1 


"2 


3 
4 
6 

5 
3 

5 


8 
1 
1 

2 




89 1 

90 1 




1 


2 
3 
9 

2 
2 
3 
7 
6 
1 


"4 


91 1 

92 

93 1 




1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


2 
2 


94 




4 
3 
6 
3 


6 

5 
4 


9 
2 
4 

2 


9 


95 1 

96 1 


4 
9 
2 


3 

5 


3 


97 






2 


98 1 




1 
1 




99 1 
100 ..:.... 


3 
11 
1 
5 
4 
3 
2 
5 

15 
9 
18 
5 
6 
1 
2 


4 
6 
8 

7 
9 


2 
5 


5 
3 
3 
5 
1 
3 
19 

"4 

"l3 

4 

15 

2 
10 


2 
6 


3 

5 
4 


4 

28 
7 
6 
5 

28 
1 
8 
4 

21 
7 
6 
7 
2 
4 

23 


2 
20 


101 1 

102 1 




1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


3 


103 1 






1 


104 1 


5 

4 

9 

16 

5 


12 

4 

13 

8 
8 
5 
3 

5 


3 


105 1 

106 1 

107 1 


6 

2 

14 

"s 

1 
9 


"2 
1 
1 
1 

"2 


4 


108 1 

109 1 

110 1 

111 1 

112 1 




1 
1 
1 
1 


3 
9 

5 


113 1 






2 

1 


1 




6 
13 


10 


114 




i 


5 



a D.E. 



226 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. TABLE M— BOARDS OF EDUCATION, 





u 

ccj 

O 

u 

■§.§ 
m o 


Value of General 


High Schools 


u 

ccj 
u 


cn 
O ^ 

3 3 

O) Oh 

C/3< 


Cfi 

a 

d cn 

« O 

go 

u § 


J2 

% 

id 
o 

•4-> 
< 


cn 
u 
a> 

*C 

0) 

a 
>> 
H 


—4 W 

ccj G 
'So£ 

«C/3 


115 Wallaceburg 

116 Wardsville 


1 
1 

i 

i 

i 


1 

561 
335 
252 
558 
604 
584 
549 
735 
802 
481 
586 
512 


695 

444 

634 

700 

1,374 

1,167 

1,414 

1,719 

759 

717 

757 

947 


103 

57 
85 
92 

243 
85 

252 
42 
87 
83 

100 

274 


127 

51 

47 

37 

109 

108 

132 

92 

82 

79 

50 

78 


1,230 

648 

435 

50 


108 
51 


117 Waterdown 

118 Waterford 


67 

53 


119 Watford 


203 


120 Welland 


118 


121 Weston 


106 


122 Whitby 


114 


123 Wiarton 


66 


124 Williamstown 

125 Winchester 

126 Wingham 


102 

63 

127 






1 Totals, High Schools. . 

2 Totals, Coll. Institutes 


56 

36 

92 
88 

4 


69,968 
74,121 


102,733 
122,463 


14,757 
11,800 


9,346 
6,364 


18,271 
42,488 


11,700 
11,956 


3 Grand Totals, 1922-23 

4 Grand Totals, 1921-22 


144,089 
136,069 


225,196 
194,315 


26,557 
25,057 


15,710 
14,946 


60,759 
61,026 


23,656 
23,462 


5 Increases 


8,020 


30,881 


1,500 


764 


267 


194 


6 Decreases 








7 Percentages 


13.63 


21.30 


2.51 


1.48 


5.75 


2.24 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



227 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, ETC. (Continued) 



Equipment 


Value of Manual Training 
Department Equipment 


Equipment for 

Physical 

Culture 


Gymnasium 
(not including 
equipment) 


£ 

3 
<u 

3 


Aquarium, 

Herbarium, 

etc. 


cn 

<L> 
U 

3 

a 


Total Value 
of General 
Equipment 


M 

u 

o 

O 
1 


bo 

'5 

u 

3 

-a 
o 

1 


biO 

a 
'So 

u 

o 


a 


JG 
(S) 

cd cd 


115 59 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 
15 


$ 

1,668 
943 
1,186 
1,543 
2,832 
11,641 
3,335 
3,211 
2,036 
1,959 
1,661 
2,195 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


116 5 
















117 21 








80 

42 

117 

139 

80 










118 61 
















119 182 
















120 210 


8,000 














121 151 




3 










122 74 














123 25 








165 

180 
60 
80 










124 117 


200 














125 45 














126 177 
































1 14,460 

2 27,637 


130,148 
348,479 


2,126 
7,710 


357 
1,237 


10,327 
18,850 


384,193 
673,105 


4,749 
24,259 


964 
6,384 


37 
2,099 


7,295 


3 42,097 

4 33,137 


478,627 
345,445 


9,836 
3,712 


1,594 
633 


29,177 
28,510 


1,057,298 
866,312 


29,008 
23,993 


7,348 
4,569 


2,136 
2,580 


7,295 
7,248 


5 8,960 

6 


133,182 


6,124 


961 


667 


190,986 


5,015 


2,779 


'444 


47 




















3.98 


45.27 


.93 


.15 


2.76 




33.40 


8.46 


2.46 


• 8.40 



228 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 









II. 


TABLE 


M— BOARDS OF EDUCATION, 




Value of Household 

Science Department 

Equipment 


Value of Agricultural 
Department Equip- 
ment 


. 'o 

'3 o 
crco 
W oj 

ctj a; 
> S 


Total value of Special 
Equipment as per pre- 
ceding nine columns 


53 £ 


High Schools 


Cookery, 
Sanitation 
and Hygiene 


Handwork 
and Machine 
Sewing 


o 

u 

C 


Value of School 
Buildings and 
ture 


115 Wallaceburg 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


40,000 

7,500 

1,000 

16,000 

15,000 

83,000 

100,000 

50,000 

12,000 

2,000 

19,500 

35,000 


116 Wardsville 














117 Waterdo wn 














118 Waterford 














119 Watford. 














120 Welland . 














121 Weston 














122 Whitby 








640 




640 


123 Wiarton . . 










124 Williamstown 








412 
740 

284 




412 
740 

284 


125 Winchester 










126 Wingham 




















1 Totals, High Schools . . 

2 Totals, Coll. Institutes 


4,216 
24,084 


694 
1,349 


202 
152 


6,796 
2,280 


402 

877 


18,060 
68,779 


4,586,918 
8,339,899 


3 Grand Totals, 1922-23 

4 Grand Totals, 1921-22 


28,300 
27,016 


2,043 
1,866 


354 

288 


9,076 
6,677 


1,279 
1,085 


86,839 
75,322 


12,926,817 
9,569,685 


5 Increases 


1,284 


177 


66 


2,399 


194 


11,517 


3,357,132 


6 Decreases 


















7 Percentages 


32.59 


2.35 


.40 


10.45 


1.47 







1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



229 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF PUPILS, ETC. (Concluded) 



Religious and other Exercises 






Destination of Pupils 






Schools in which 
Bible or Selec- 
tions therefrom 
are used 


-v 
tu 

c 

a. £ 
o >, 
a 
m *- 
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Ox 
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o-r; 


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or 

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3 
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a 

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£0 


115 

116 1 

117 1 

118 1 




1 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 


20 
2 
3 
3 
7 
22 
22 
4 
5 
3 
2 
4 


8 
1 
4 
5 

16 
8 
9 

10 
5 
5 
7 
7 


"i 


3 
1 
1 


6 
2 


10 
3 

7 
7 
5 
2 
16 
4 
1 
2 
3 
6 


12 
3 

15 
3 
1 
9 

14 

14 
8 
1 
3 
4 


8 
3 

7 


119 

120 1 

121 1 


3 
8 
8 
2 

3 

2 
5 


10 

5 
8 
6 
9 
6 
9 
12 


1 

5 

10 
6 

5 

"i 
3 


"l 
14 


122 1 

123 1 




1 


5 
8 


124 

125 

126 1 




1 
1 
1 


2 
10 

2 


T 79 
2 30 


126 
49 


6 
1 


88 
44 


741 
1,851 


791 

475 


197 

448 


645 
623 


340 
500 


738 
1,056 


746 
1,063 


481 
770 


3 109 

4 95 


175 

165 


7 
3 


132 
118 


2,592 
2,122 


1,266 
1,086 


645 

687 


1,268 
1,080 


840 
614 


1,794 
1,428 


1,809 
1,521 


1,251 
1,170 


5 14 

6 


10 


4 


14 


470 


180 


"42 


188 


226 


366 


288 


81 
























7 62.28 


100. 


4.0 


75.42 


22.61 


11.04 


5.62 


11.06 


7.32 


15.65 


15.78 


10.91 



230 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



Collegiate Institutes 



Attendance 



'ft <u 

"3.2 

|3 

a a; 



Si rt 



< H >> 
J- ot rt 

S 1 ^ o 

3 <L> O 

25w 



Number of 
Pupils in — 



Number 
Pupils 



1 


S o 


•S.S?t3 

a bfi.2 

S.SQ 


5 >.o 

ft 3 05 

*-> — i <v 

O £H 



1 Barrie 

2 Brantford 

3 Brockville 

4 Chatham 

5 Clinton 

6 Cobourg 

7 Collingwood 

8 Fort William 

9 Gait.. 

10 Goderich 

11 Guelph 

12 Hamilton 

13 Ingersoll 

14 Kingston 

15 Kitc'ner- Waterloo 

16 Lindsay 

17 London 

18 Morrisburg 

19 Napanee 

20 Niagara Falls 

21 North Bay 

22 Orillia 

23 Ottawa 

24 Owen Sound 

25 Perth 

26 Peterborough. . . . 

27 Picton 

28 Port Arthur 

29 Renfrew 

30 St. Catharines.. . . 

31 St. Mary's 

32 St. Thomas 

33 Sarnia 

34 Sault Ste. Marie.. 

35 Seaforth 

36 Smith's Falls 

37 Stratford 

38 Strathroy 

39 Toronto, Harbord 

40 " Humberside. . 

41 " Jarvis 

42 " "Malvern 

43 " North 

44 " Oakwood .... 

45 " Parkdale.... 

46 " Riverdale .... 

47 VankleekHill.... 

48 Windsor 

49 Woodstock 

Totals, 1922-23... 



394 


185 


209 


340 


143 


179 


80 


82 


53 


225 


909 


437 


472 


774 


302 


348 


269 


248 


44 


716 


414 


184 


230 


333 


149 


158 


108 


120 


28 


282 


405 


184 


221 


330 


110 


159 


131 


82 


33 


276 


227 


93 


134 


192 


63 


59 


57 


76 


35 


111 


216 


98 


118 


167 


73 


82 


81 


41 


12 


134 


269 


107 


162 


219 


73 


73 


72 


85 


39 


203 


359 


187 


172 


319 


133 


134 


96 


110 


19 


343 


460 


242 


218 


412 


165 


179 


119 


130 


32 


235 


203 


88 


115 


173 


63 


75 


60 


51 


17 


134 


569 


260 


309 


472 


149 


241 


148 


132 


48 


447 


1,316 


653 


663 


1,142 


478 


499 


336 


379 


102 


1,207 


250 


106 


144 


194 


74 


90 


85 


58 


17 


161 


717 


351 


336 


579 


208 


237 


173 


276 


31 


588 


440 


230 


210 


391 


184 


166 


102 


96 


76 


383 


461 


223 


238 


395 


155 


168 


130 


116 


47 


261 


1,320 


637 


683 


1,157 


423 


489 


357 


376 


98 


1,148 


152 


60 


92 


91 


43 


54 


43 


42 


13 


77 


244 


82 


162 


204 


82 


89 


79 


56 


20 


125 


233 


134 


99 


188 


85 


84 


58 


71 


20 


182 


341 


178 


163 


302 


113 


144 


91 


87 


19 


303 


364 


168 


196 


309 


123 


136 


118 


89 


21 


241 


1,719 


987 


732 


1,479 


628 


699 


458 


483 


79 


1,607 


479 


216 


263 


403 


152 


162 


143 


133 


41 


333 


265 


116 


149 


224 


94 


106 


65 


69 


25 


135 


513 


261 


252 


457 


198 


213 


160 


105 


35 


462 


245 


98 


147 


199 


79 


104 


70 


59 


12 


114 


386 


170 


216 


341 


156 


200 


109 


70 


7 


380 


377 


157 


220 


352 


126 


149 


120 


78 


30 


186 


709 


339 


370 


597 


264 


314 


200 


155 


40 


510 


282 


118 


164 


256 


86 


105 


76 


86 


15 


155 


797 


370 


427 


676 


286 


280 


298 


175 


44 


593 


424 


218 


206 


377 


117 


122 


101 


165 


36 


335 


458 


228 


230 


350 


193 


208 


109 


113 


28 


412 


242 


111 


131 


211 


73 


75 


58 


78 


31 


108 


393 


165 


228 


346 


125 


136 


134 


99 


24 


298 


621 


319 


302 


541 


234 


268 


184 


127 


42 


536 


214 


98 


116 


191 


52 


64 


44 


75 


31 


96 


854 


484 


370 


719 


286 


293 


239 


250 


72 


849 


918 


508 


410 


796 


335 


404 


221 


239 


54 


897 


790 


482 


308 


659 


260 


284 


216 


233 


57 


786 


473 


245 


228 


405 


. 186 


186 


126 


131 


30 


459 


647 


317 


330 


539 


223 


223 


191 


186 


47 


584 


1,218 


624 


594 


1,087 


420 


411 


306 


401 


100 


1,173 


858 


455 


403 


748 


302 


307 


229 


270 


52 


849 


950 


502 


448 


812 


382 


400 


250 


261 


39 


944 


174 


70 


104 


150 


48 


58 


38 


68 


10 


59 


713 


399 


314 


627 


268 


298 


230 


113 


72 


627 


511 


239 


272 


453 


175 


218 


116 


145 


32 


265 


26,493 


13,183 


13,310 


22,678 


9,139 


10,130 


7,284 


7,170 


1,909 


21,534 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



231 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. 



of 




Number 


f Pupils from Families whose 




Number of Pupils in the 




from 




Head is occupied 


as below — 






Various 


Subjects 






|H 






A 1 






CO 

s 


3 


"■3 


c3 


3 

.2 




>> 








CO 

a 

-C en 



u 

a 
a 



g 

3 

"3 


a 8 . 
8"$ 

03 to 


co 

2 

H 

Xi 


co 
M 

2 a 

2 =" 

Xt O 
cd 


.0 

cd 

a 
3 

CJ 


O 

aJ 

Xi 


cd 
a 

3 

O 

4J 

3 
O 
X 


a 
a 



.3 

.co 

*5a 
c 


1 

h 

3s 

fa 


3 

<L» 

XI 

CO 

Tab 

a 




co 

3 
3 
.2 

•3 

cd 
3 
cd 




CO 

s 

at 


u 



CO 

s 

3 

1 




o3 





< 


J "5 


H 


■JO 


O 


s 


W 


W cd 


W 


O 


M 


< 


1 


3 


43 


131 


28 


61 


34 


67 


30 


178 


3U 


5 394 


t 173 


5C 


63 


2 


11 


37<: 


133 


53 


188 


98 




61 


177 


86c 


> 90C 


362 


77 


77 


3 




84 


111 


12 


138 


1C 


'"'47 


12 


9 = 


41C 


) 411 


151 


85 


42 


4 


"3 


51 


153 


It 


80 


73 


2e 


6 


132 


38h 


38^ 


138 


27 


55 


5 




28 


121 


U 


30 


28 


7 




20 


22C 


220 


60 


45 


56 


6 


"i 


2C 


65 


11 


29 


67 


12 


""8 


81 


192 


195 


82 


24 


15 


7 


1 


68 


53 


18 


59 


35 


21 


15 


3 


248 


248 


82 


62 


41 


8 


2 


129 


14 


16 


61 


36 


90 


13 


230 


359 


359 


230 


72 


8 


9 


54 


148 


83 


22 


144 


16 


44 


3 


18 


460 


460 


180 


94 


33 


10 


4 


35 


71 


12 


30 


19 


34 


2 


60 


203 


203 


75 


51 


8 


11 


18 


153 


106 


30 


128 


38 


102 


12 


200 


543 


543 


224 


78 


63 


12 


14 


516 


91 


89 


339 


120 


83 


78 


375 


1,212 


1,212 


497 


292 


252 


13 


22 


44 


80 


8 


44 


26 


30 


18 


71 


240 


240 


81 


42 


21 


14 


8 


132 


119 


39 


156 


62 


188 


21 


421 


711 


711 


423 


162 


96 


15 


2 


213 


31 


40 


109 


10 


7 


30 


268 


439 


439 




60 


• 68 


16 


48 


95 


162 


19 


64 


40 


73 


8 


9 


327 


363 


""80 


91 


82 


17 


13 


510 


118 


100 


462 


37 


65 


28 


364 


1,287 


1,287 


488 


331 


333 


18 


2 


11 


84 


8 


22 


9 


10 


8 


45 


141 


130 


52 


13 


31 


19 


2 


49 


101 


5 


30 


50 


5 


4 


45 


235 


235 


84 


22 


34 


20 


30 


61 


28 


20 


68 


30 


11 


15 


233 


233 


233 


85 


33 


21 


21 


22 


81 


17 


4 


146 


14 


70 


9 


33 


336 


337 


230 


49 


33 


22 


46 


92 


89 


24 


85 


60 


7 


7 


119 


355 


356 


136 


47 


35 


23 


33 


409 


84 


92 


391 


109 


576 


58 


10 


1,504 


1,677 


694 


753 


149 


24 


9 


106 


132 


15 


149 


36 


18 


23 


104 


470 


470 


199 


80 


78 


25 


11 


29 


124 


7 


28 


39 


32 


6 


1 


256 


256 


139 


58 


45 


26 


8 


147 


40 


28 


168 


55 


41 


34 


213 


513 


513 


213 


67 




27 


1 


39 


109 


9 


41 


22 


18 


7 


36 


238 


231 


66 


36 


"46 


28 


4 


92 


17 


9 


98 


75 


85 


10 


79 


386 


386 


198 


51 


17 


29 


7 


46 


192 


13 


58 


33 


24 


11 


42 


371 


358 


154 


136 


62 


30 


2 


185 


75 


15 


316 


71 


30 


17 


244 


705 


697 


313 


63 


63 


31 


45 


36 


135 


8 


47 


29 


16 


11 


76 


273 


272 


109 


52 


66 


32 


18 

2 


159 

54 


142 
51 


17 
35 


463 
190 






16 

57 


31 
122 


777 
424 


777 
424 


281 
122 


162 
92 


150 


33 


"'33 


"4 


73 


34 


5 


120 


32 


31 


72 


18 


185 




165 


457 


457 


209 


70 


35 


35 


15 


47 


109 


5 


39 


16 


14 


12 


58 


236 


237 


77 


63 


56 


36 . 




56 


92 


13 


138 


74 


11 


9 


130 


382 


382 


140 


99 


99 


37 


"28 


145 


83 


17 


173 


38 


117 


48 


9 


621 


621 


268 


85 


29 


38 


2 


20 


108 


6 


23 




35 


22 


9 


199 


199 


64 


27 


43 


39 


5 


417 
230 


2 
15 


45 

23 


290 
217 






100 

78 


530 
625 


844 
904 


848 
904 


295 

404 


151 
152 


107 


40 . 


"86 


"269 


87 


41 


"4 


344 


5 


39 


222 


9 


108 


63 


115 


790 


790 


280 


132 


104 


42 . 




209 


10 


28 


134 


29 


35 


28 


122 


473 


473 


186 


93 


34 


43 


"i 


299 


18 


61 


127 


15 


84 


43 


177 


568 


643 


245 


126 


70 


44 


3 


370 


18 


60 


273 


132 


282 


83 


253 


1,203 


1,205 


401 


215 


182 


45 


5 


392 


8 


35 


264 


30 


106 


23 


220 


835 


835 


307 


157 


97 


46 


1 


254 


5 


54 


315 


51 


206 


65 


250 


934 


934 


417 


170 


36 


47 


37 


24 


110 


11 


9 


8 


9 


3 


41 


169 


169 


58 


38 


31 


48 


2 


120 


23 


18 


181 


107 


197 


67 


31 


712 


712 


271 


152 


11 


49 


10 


33 


195 


19 


140 


45 


69 


10 


12 


502 


502 


193 


81 


64 


564 


7,321 


3,899 


1,300 


7,039 


2,072 


3,570 


1,292 


6,882 


25,532 


25,836 


10,216 


5,178 


3,295 



232 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS, 





Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 


Collegiate Institutes 


>. 

u 

o 

CO 

5 

a 

H 
V 

O 

2 


>> 

O. 

a 

u, 
BO 
O 

<u 

o 


a 
.2 

"55 
>» 

X! 
Oh 


c 

rt C 

o.2 

S3 

fj 


u 

V 

bfl 

< 


>> 

H 

B 
o 

O 


u 

a 
§ 

o 

.$? 
'u 
H 


o 
C 
V 


'H 

Q 
V) 


c 

£ 

14 

<U 
O 


.5 


1 Barrie 


39 
25 
15 
14 
22 
3 

18 

8 

33 

12 

21 

66 

7 

9 

18 

15 

31 

10 

11 

4 

5 

8 

37 

29 

17 

13 

17 


160 

246 

142 

150 

58 

74 

79 

34 

179 

88 

242 

754 

84 

75 

268 

80 

487 

58 

83 

84 

230 

126 

210 

199 

78 

213 

83 

156 

156 

217 

109 

302 

122 

204 

78 

130 

238 

64 

295 

404 

227 

146 

76 

199 

307 

409 

58 

221 

150 


83 

206 

91 

94 

57 

45 

74 

32 

119 

47 

117 

363 

68 

136 

176 

108 

358 

39 

48 

54 

'"84 
437 
105 

55 
114 

37 

79 

89 
155 

87 
175 
101 
113 

60 
109 
184 

46 
239 
225 
216 
126 
115 
306 
225 
254 

51 
212 
116 


82 

375 

153 

185 

57 

88 

72 

135 

147 

97 

200 

37 

83 

257 

268 

80 

361 

36 

48 

11 

126 

147 

366 

180 

94 

80 

100 

154 

195 

261 

84 

367 

101 

126 

65 

109 

223 

46 

187 

221 

102 

122 

183 

282 

221 

257 

50 

158 

100 


295 
469 
219 
226 
152 
119 
180 
282 
318 
127 
227 
798 
149 
438 
334 
261 

1,144 

92 

90 

130 

233 

172 

1,099 
332 
147 
231 
131 
384 
22 
463 
198 
411 
240 
319 
165 
190 
220 
141 
509 
598 
463 
333 
437 
732 
514 
609 
131 
346 
249 


192 
238 
139 
180 
123 

70 
111 
178 
213 

80 
217 
612 

98 
360 
192 
236 
790 

63 
119 

94 
105 
104 
683 
109 
133 
252 

99 

76 

20 
289 
159 
375 
240 
180 
130 
144 
302 
140 
403 
348 
385 
155 
302 
573 
375 
357 
103 
379 
190 


44 
25 
16 
22 
14 
7 
24 
10 
12 
15 
19 
55 
19 
20 
31 
28 
62 
7 
4 
5 
11 
19 
82 
32 
15 
33 
9 
6 
24 
22 
7 
25 
22 
18 
18 
8 
23 
19 
37 
41 
52 
21 
38 
55 
30 
20 
6 
15 
18 


300 
668 
371 
252 
123 
163 
211 
224 
431 
106 
417 

1,081 
181 
697 
392 
328 

1,016 
67 
192 
195 
305 
339 

1,663 
378 
238 
341 
221 
311 
253 
567 
194 
571 
424 
398 
130 
355 
476 
174 
816 
760 
744 
436 
636 

1,210 
840 
935 
163 
616 
355 


"2 


13 
41 
17 

8 
20 

7 


303 


2 Brantford 


675 


3 Brockville . . . 


246 


4 Chatham 


240 


5 Clinton 


129 


6 Cobourg 


140 


7 Collingwood 

8 Fort William 


176 






303 


9 Gait 


2 
"66 


25 
12 
51 
94 
19 
15 
47 


423 


10 Goderich 


121 


11 Guelph 


443 


12 Hamilton 


1,051 
176 

542 


13 Ingersoll 

14 Kingston 


15 Kitchener- Waterloo. . 


314 
323 


17 London 


"53 


50 
1 
7 
5 
6 

14 
59 
12 
6 
12 


1,141 


18 Morrisburg 


56 
159 


20 Niagara Falls 

21 North Bay 


212 

227 


22 Orillia 


281 


23 Ottawa 


1,366 


24 Owen Sound 

25 Perth 


370 
203 


26 Peterborough 

27 Picton 


376 
150 


28 Port Arthur 




14 


301 




19 
14 

7 
65 
36 
13 
20 

5 

17 
22 
24 
13 
20 
12 
10 
35 
18 
10 

6 

3 
11 


262 


30 St. Catharines 

31 St. Mary's 


"37 


36 
20 
14 
28 
51 
..... 

9 


518 
185 


32 St. Thomas 


473 


33 Sarnia 


424 


34 Sault Ste. Marie 

35 Seaforth 


344 
131 


36 Smith's Falls 

37 Stratford 


314 
424 


38 Strathroy 


172 


39 Toronto, Harbord. . . 

40 " Humberside. . . . 

41 " Jarvis 


54 


164 
72 

220 
53 
96 

136 

119 

38 

6 

21 

26 


797 
748 
720 


42 " Malvern 

43 " North 


405 
596 


44 " Oakwood 

45 " Parkdale 

46 " Riverdale 

47 Vankleek Hill 

48 Windsor 


1,195 
721 
930 
115 
571 


49 Woodstock 


430 






Totals, 1922-23 


887 


8,832 


6,430 


7,479 


16,069 


11,415 


1,165 


22,264 


225 


1,675 


20,922 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



233 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 





Number of Pupi 


s in the Various Subjects 


(Continued) 


Special Courses 


M 

CI 
OJ 

u 

o. 


>> 

bo 

"0 


N 


a 



pa 


>> 
a 

1 

(LI 

O 


.8 

co 
>> 
A 


c 
'ft 

(LI 
01 

M 




pa 


>. 

a 
id 

& 


c 

to 


3 

1 

(L> 
ft 
>> 

H 


4J 

< 


<LI 
H 

3 

u 

"to 
>» 

.3 


Is 

'0 

b 


a 
s 

u 


V 

u 

3 

3 

'C 

bo 

< 


c 
'.S 

u 

3 
c 
a 


(L> 
V 

c 

V 

'u 



•G 
<V 
w 

3 
O 

a 





A 
<J 

t3 
| 

< 


1 


5 
4 
9 
2 

2 
.... 

"i 
l 

2 
5 
3 
3 

"l8 
3 

1 

' 12 

"is 

"l3 
6 
4 

"2 
1 

'"3 
1 

28 
6 
3 

"5 

24 

14 

2 

"id 


26 

206 
32 
96 
39 
25 
63 
96 
87 
* 8 
80 

347 
35 
59 

151 
46 

139 
31 
36 
16 
24 
70 
98 

115 
55 

114 
38 
44 
12 
52 
76 
14 
68 
45 
69 

109 

105 
78 
67 
67 
65 
67 
55 
74 
55 
8C 
3? 
32 
8C 


232 

264 

53 

96 

30 

24 

79 

132 

109 

54 

163 

506 

57 

197 

5 

80 

230 

43 

61 

30 

108 

85 

179 

139 

83 

157 

71 

158 

12 

84 

110 

14 

129 

89 

96 

130 

226 

57 

57 

101 

250 

100 

116 

167 

321 

105 

58 

119 

120 


97 

174 

35 

95 

52 

28 

35 

83 

70 

33 

88 

170 

18 

144 

86 

113 

281 

39 

31 

35 

38 

55 

200 

89 

49 

110 

27 

20 

34 

117 

27 

15 

174 

55 

56 

109 

113 

43 

115 

149 

118 

13 

68 

225 

161 

82 

30 

112 

64 


90 
92 
69 
89 
74 
44 
76 
37 
93 
46 
40 

306 
28 

122 
71 

155 

169 
28 
13 
27 
64 
41 

796 
93 
28 

107 
21 
50 
52 
87 
63 

127 

117 
79 
91 








42 
127 
90 
46 
61 
45 
125 


387 
900 
411 
405 
227 
208 
265 
355 
456 
190 

' V,138 

249 
667 
440 
461 
1,258 
143 

"233 
337 
356 

1,713 
473 
247 
405 
235 
386 
372 
709 












2 
3 


206 
54 

55 


206 

53 
59 


206 

55 
58 


206 

'"85 

"oi 

19 


"84 

"58 
53 


282 


330 




4 
5 


76 


101 




6 . 

7 
8 . 


60 
19 


52 
19 


61 

19 


"54 
110 

154 


57 

91 

118 

132 




9 








109 

60 

159 

259 

67 

85 

138 

75 

194 

47 

229 

26 

50 

87 

668 

158 

85 

61 

71 

158 

54 

81 

69 

204 

223 

33 

81 

73 

266 

73 

50 

121 

42 

129 

115 

171 

180 

131 

63 

272 

112 








10 


5 

83 


20 
83 


13 
83 


33 
83 






11 










12 




283 

72 


325 

82 




13 
14 


42 

121 

84 


42 

121 

92 


42 
121 

97 


42 

121 

5 

50 






15 . 










16 . 










17 










235 


254 




18 


12 
121 


11 


10 








19 


43 










20 . 








49 


24 




21 . 


65 

62 

164 

75 
37 

107 
58 
75 
48 

119 
50 

197 
3 


65 
62 
43 
75 
36 

107 
49 
75 
48 

117 


65 
62 

""'77 
37 

107 
63 
75 
48 

119 


66 

62 






22 . 










?,3 








89 


24 . 

25 


74 

38 

107 

63 

75 
48 




132 


173 




26 . 

?,7 




115 


91 




28 . 










29 










30 










31 












32 . 
33 


197 

3 


130 
3 


797 
424 
457 
242 
373 
619 
208 
834 
896 
785 
467 
631 
1,216 
817 
942 
172 
710 
508 


197 


379 


136 
112 
140 


146 
111 
135 




34 








35 . 














36 . 








31 
86 










37 
38 


34 

60 

161 

167 

142 

135 

159 

205 

75 

229 

59 

44 

74 


80 


86 


86 




140 


89 


2 


39 


290 
114 

225 
103 
111 

163 

127 
217 
















40 
















41 
















47, 










24 


10 




43 












44 










290 


276 




45 












46 










280 


242 




47 












48 












248 
160 


146 
149 


12 


49 


68 


65 


65 


68 








215 


3,484 


5,886 


4,175 


5,029 


3,420 


1,786 


1,702 


5,865 


24,724 


1,663 


574 


3,092 


3,082 


103 



234 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Attendance 


Number of Pupils in — 


Number of 
Pupils from — 




§g 








5 


B 


B 






6 




High Schools 


"a v 

13 


o 
PQ 


xn 

o 


>> 

Si rt 

fc«J 

« 


S5o 

3 <U O 


& 

"o 
o 

J3 
(J 

w 

I 

h5 


o 

U* 

*o 
o 

o 
(/} 

1 


o 
o 

y 
W 


o 
o 

u 

in 

H 

<u 

a 

a 
U 


.a J* 

■u O 

Ill 

3 M.S3 


"■3 >» 

ft3m 

335 

3_c"3 

0£H 


1 Alexandria. . . 


142 


53 


89 


115 


42 


74 


28 


40 




135 


4 


2 Alliston 


119 


45 


74 


88 


43 


41 


40 


38 




42 


70 


3 Almonte 


137 


57 


80 


121 


38 


59 


36 


29 


""l3 


79 


58 


4 Amherstburg. 


77 


35 


42 


62 


30 


30 


30 


17 




77 




5 Arnprior. . . . 


275 


97 


178 


230 


75 


108 


62 


94 


"ii 


170 


"66 


6 Arthur 


148 


62 


86 


135 


44 


66 


31 


30 


21 


58 


90 


7 Athens 


103 


47 


56 


84 


22 


22 


25 


55 


1 


61 


40 


8 Aurora 


169 


66 


103 


142 


63 


64 


44 


47 


14 


92 


77 


9 Avonmore. . . 


64 


22 


42 


54 


18 


21 


17 


26 




51 


12 


10 Aylmer 


154 


73 


81 


126 


52 


57 


36 


52 


""9 


57 


95 


11 Beamsville.. . 


181 


88 


93 


121 


70 


73 


34 


39 


35 


50 


121 


12 Belleville.... 


436 


196 


240 


374 


141 


153 


136 


121 


26 


324 


97 


13 Bowmanville. 


179 


77 


102 


158 


50 


58 


45 


55 


21 


98 


81 


14 Bracebridge. . 


129 


63 


66 


77 


42 


42 


33 


54 




80 


47 


15 Bradford. ... 


102 


48 


54 


94 


43 


48 


25 


29 




23 


75 


16 Brampton. . . 


242 


105 


137 


224 


82 


82 


65 


76 


'"l9 


118 


114 


17 Brighton. . . . 


95 


37 


58 


79 


34 


36 


24 


35 




40 


55 


18 Burford 


71 


23 


48 


63 


20 


21 


27 


15 


""s 


71 




19 Burlington.. . 


137 


62 


75 


115 


64 


66 


39 


29 


3 


65 


"58 


20 Caledonia. . . 


141 


50 


91 


134 


51 


60 


36 


33 


12 


56 


58 


21 Campbellford 


181 


66 


115 


139 


55 


57 


36 


52 


36 


75 


82 


22 CarletonPlace 


207 


92 


115 


187 


58 


58 


76 


66 


7 


124 


80 


23 Cayuga 


98 


39 


59 


83 


33 


37 


21 


24 


16 


42 


53 


24 Chapleau. . . . 


60 


34 


26 


47 


20 


22 


20 


18 




60 




25 Chatsworth. . 


54 


19 


35 


44 


24 


24 


17 


13 




51 


"2 


26 Chesley 


142 


67 


75 


129 


48 


43 


44 


34 


"21 


73 


47 


27 Chesterville. . 


100 


40 


60 


83 


30 


37 


27 


36 




36 


64 


28 Colborne 


95 


30 


65 


79 


31 


32 


31 


29 


""3 


38 


57 


29 Cornwall 


411 


164 


247 


336 


134 


148 


116 


111 


36 


220 


151 


30 Deseronto . . . 


77 


32 


45 


63 


21 


26 


23 


28 




54 


20 


31 Dundalk 


107 


40 


67 


85 


41 


41 


33 


29 


"4 


39 


43 


32 Dundas 


153 


77 


76 


136 


56 


71 


31 


34 


11 


98 


55 


33 Dunnville. . . 


171 


79 


92 


138 


75 


74 


32 


55 


10 


71 


84 


34 Durham 


135 


53 


82 


118 


38 


39 


36 


60 




135 




35 Dutton 


144 


47 


97 


123 


55 


61 


30 


31 


"22 


33 


'"iio 


36 Elmira 


75 


40 


35 


64 


28 


29 


18 


28 




40 


20 


37 Elora 


73 


23 


50 


57 


36 


38 


20 


15 




32 


41 


38 Essex 


140 


56 


84 


132 


50 


50 


35 


36 


*"l9 


58 


82 


39 Exeter 


173 


85 


88 


143 


40 


44 


43 


71 


15 


62 


102 


40 Fergus 


160 


82 


78 


140 


51 


61 


42 


42 


15 


86 


65 


41 Flesherton. . . 


64 


27 


37 


57 


20 


23 


13 


28 




60 


4 


42 Forest 


128 


52 


76 


113 


46 


46 


39 


41 


"2 


50 


78 


43 Fort Frances. 


117 


47 


70 


97 


46 


59 


28 


25 


5 


93 


24 


44 Gananoque. . 


180 


77 


103 


139 


73 


73 


60 


37 


10 


123 


43 


45 Georgetown.. 


148 


60 


88 


120 


56 


64 


29 


38 


17 


78 


51 


46 Glencoe 


127 


57 


70 


115 


55 


55 


36 


33 


3 


32 


83 


47 Gravenhurst. 


67 


27 


40 


54 


35 


35 


18 


11 


3 


53 


14 


48 Grimsby 


125 


57 


68 


101 


46 


50 


37 


38 




55 


38 


49 Hagersville. . 


160 


73 


87 


107 


50 


78 


25 


41 


"l6 


53 


107 


50 Haileybury. . 


184 


84 


100 


133 


102 


85 


55 


41 


3 


82 


102 


51 Harriston.. . . 


138 


64 


74 


115 


42 


49 


27 


51 


11 


60 


50 


52 Hawkesbury. 


79 


34 


45 


66 


21 


23 


25 


31 




43 


24 


53 Iroquois 


122 


45 


77 


108 


30 


34 


36 


38 


"ii 


40 


80 


54 Kemptville. . 


149 


62 


87 


128 


33 


47 


39 


47 


16 


54 


77 


55 Kenora. 


179 


76 


103 


143 


66 


84 


59 


30 


6 


169 


9 


56 Kincardine.. . 


188 


87 


101 


157 


58 


68 


69 


31 


20 


88 


98 


57 Kingsville. . . 


140 


64 


76 


110 


54 


66 


28 


31 


15 


80 


60 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



235 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 





Number of Pupils from Families whose 
Head is occupied as below — 


Number of Pupils in the 
Various Subjects 


h 

O 
co 

3 
3 
O to 

JS 

.3 co 

oS 


V 

o 

4) 

s 
a 

o 
U 


a; 
3 

3 

o 

i 

< 


3 o 
v g 

M .3 
aJO 
.S<u 

.0.3 

a°. 
.>. 

rt co 
■433 


co 

cu 

■a 

5 
H 

K 
u 

X! 

H 


to 

MO 

3 o. 
2 3 

JO 


s 
.2 

a 

3 
o 
o 
O 
u 
V 
J3 
+-> 

o 


3 

# o 
+3 

a) 
O. 

3 

CJ 

O 

O 

3 
O 

.3 

1 


a 

s 
s 

O 

.3 

CO 

"3 

3 

w 


3 

a 

'3 
o 

i4j 

<u 
JSM 

!•§ 


li 

3 
-u 

a 

E 

<u 

3 

Xt 

CO 

*M 

3 

w 


>> 

u 
O 
co 

8 

3 

2 
•3 
a 

3 
cd 

U 


>> 

o 

CO 

s 

CO 

"C 

m 


>. 

o 

co 

X 

*-> 

G 

•Si 
'o 

3 
< 


1 


3 


7 


83 


6 


15 


11 


19 


1 


20 


131 


142 


66 


30 


13 


7 


7 


22 


68 


1 


5 


12 


9 


2 


42 


105 


105 


43 


26 


7 


3 




16 


49 


3 


29 


28 


7 


5 


59 


135 


135 


61 


30 


1 


4 




12 


28 


1 


16 


10 


7 


3 




77 


77 


32 


12 


10 


5 


39 


65 


77 


14 


65 


42 


10 


2 


30 


275 


260 


102 


61 


34 


6 




10 


91 




3 


41 


3 




69 


147 


147 


67 


22 


25 


7 


2 


13 


58 


1 


5 


7 


13 


6 


31 


103 


103 


26 


26 


38 


8 




14 


56 


10 


19 


16 


28 


26 


64 


169 


169 


66 


49 


20 


9 


1 


4 


48 


2 


5 




5 




17 


58 


60 


24 


15 


17 


10 


2 


20 


95 


6 


17 


14 


2 




35 


143 


143 


63 


30 


27 


11 


10 


12 


100 


16 


10 


17 


17 


9 


32 


174 


176 


77 


35 




12 


15 


109 


86 


18 


133 


36 


45 


9 


66 


376 


376 


156 


69 


45 


13 




41 


77 


9 


15 


14 


7 


16 


41 


179 


179 


58 


38 


29 


14 


2 


35 


49 


3 


14 


19 


6 


3 


19 


129 


129 


59 


36 


46 


15 


4 


8 


65 


8 


8 


3 


6 


4 


23 


102 


102 


47 


21 


12 


16 


10 


25 


125 


10 


40 


20 


10 


12 


65 


242 


242 


82 


41 


35 


17 




15 

" 2 


53 
54 


10 

2 


15 

-2 


2 
8 






35 
30 


95 
71 


95 

71 


36 
26 


6 
11 


20 


18 


3 




7 


19 


14 


23 


63 


o 




31 


7 


8 


39 


134 


133 


66 


21 




20 


27 


8 


80 


5 


10 


14 


18 


6 


60 


141 


141 


64 


36 


27 


21 


24 


33 


63 


3 


27 


13 


32 


10 


69 


156 


160 


53 


28 


26 


22 


3 


2 


37 


2 


63 


41 


48 


14 


3 


200 


199 


64 


40 


60 


23 


3 


17 


51 


12 


8 


5 


4 


1 


36 


48 


53 


37 


24 


24 


24 




9 


2 




2 




45 


2 




60 


60 


22 


8 


8 


?S 


1 

22 


"ii 


43 
60 


"l3 


7 
23 


4 
20 






17 
41 


54 
127 


54 
125 


27 
76 


8 
21 


11 


26 


8 


4 


24 


27 




12 


64 


2 


2 




15 


5 


20 


100 


100 


37 


26 


27 


28 




li 


46 


8 


14 


8 


4 


4 


2 


95 


95 


32 


21 


22 


29 


40 


67 


96 


18 


115 


53 


62 




115 


386 


376 


167 


63 


39 


30 


3 


6 


15 


4 


26 


10 


6 


10 


18 


62 


65 


13 


15 


13 


31 


25 


3 


62 


5 


11 


6 


20 




74 


107 


107 


41 


29 


27 


32 




19 


49 


4 


43 


10 


26 


2 


17 


147 


147 


71 


23 


19 


33 


16 


15 


87 


6 


30 


8 


15 


10 




183 


179 


73 


31 


16 


34 




22 


55 


2 


10 


38 


8 




6 


135 


135 


52 


36 


40 


35 


1 


8 


87 


4 


15 


4 


24 


2 


29 


129 


132 


68 


26 


32 


36 


15 




31 


2 


27 


10 


4 


1 


47 


75 


75 


31 


24 


24 


37 




5 


38 




4 


11 


7 


8 


21 


73 


73 


38 


10 


4 


38 




26 


73 


6 


14 


12 


8 


1 


13 


140 


140 


53 


29 


24 


39 


9 


25 


95 


3 


28 


4 


13 


5 


43 


173 


173 


45 


48 


50 


40 


9 


12 


74 


1 


27 


36 


6 


4 


7 


160 


160 


72 


42 


42 


41 




5 


48 




5 


3 


2 


1 


28 


64 


64 


23 


21 


20 


42 




16 


79 


4 


9 


9 


4 


7 


46 


125 


125 


46 


23 


25 


43 




27 


20 


7 


11 


27 


20 


5 


66 


117 


117 


33 


14 


13 


44 


14 


17 


110 


2 


32 


10 


9 




18 


180 


180 


73 


37 


37 


45 


19 

12 


32 
20 


52 
86 


6 

3 


37 

7 


7 
8 


14 

2 






141 
127 


141 
127 


64 

58 


27 

7 


31 


46 


1 


39 


35 


47 




10 


12 


4 


20 


16 


3 


2 


38 


67 


67 


35 




10 


48 


32 


34 


47 


4 


22 


8 


2 


8 




125 


125 


50 


30 


15 


49 




22 


70 


7 


19 


6 


35 


1 


27 


158 


158 


87 


36 


39 


50 




34 


7 


9 


53 


52 


25 


4 


46 


183 


183 


85 




41 


51 


28 


22 


63 


11 


11 


5 


12 


14 




135 


137 


42 


13 


33 


52 


12 


16 


28 


7 


11 


3 


12 


2 


26 


79 


79 


27 


28 


24 


53 


2 


12 


79 


6 


9 


10 


6 




18 


118 


118 


33 


27 


10 


54 


18 


21 


83 


6 


15 


5 


7 


12 


49 


143 


141 


47 


19 


25 


55 


1 


42 


7 


4 


60 


44 


20 


2 


2 


176 


176 


108 


20 


6 


56 


2 


27 


92 


7 


28 


15 


13 


6 




188 


186 


68 


26 


26 


57 




31 


I 64 


2 


16 


3 


24 




29 


136 


133 


65 


22 


9 



236 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 


High Schools 


o 

to 

s 

c 

u 

<D 
O 

2 


.c 
a 
a 
u 
bo 
o 




xi 

a 
a 

M 

.2 

*tD 

>> 


c 

a a 
o.2 

S3 


Ih 

.a 

bfl 
< 


u 

a 

o 

01 

o 


>> 

a 

o 
c 
o 
bo 

*n 

H 


J3 


a 

u 

to 


w 
"3 

a 

a 


c 

a 

8 

O 


d 

a 


1 Alexandria 




65 
41 
59 
25 

108 
65 
23 
65 
22 
57 

105 

125 
56 
42 
45 
82 
36 
21 
66 
56 
59 
59 
36 
22 
27 
74 
37 
33 

114 
24 

'"70 
43 
34 
63 
30 
37 
52 
44 
72 
23 
46 
55 
68 
58 
58 
35 
84 
76 
85 
75 
22 
33 
45 
86 
68 
61 


28 
18 
37 
20 
65 
38 
24 
48 
15 
39 
30 
92 
45 
51 
22 
65 
23 
32 
39 
36 
38 
74 
25 
20 
20 
17 
28 
34 
84 
27 
33 
31 
32 
32 
29 
20 
19 
28 
43 
44 
16 
39 
34 
53 
29 
39 
18 
37 
24 
55 
33 
29 
39 
39 
34 
69 
34 


30 
40 
41 
19 
66 
35 
34 
44 
21 
96 

"l43 
44 
39 
15 
65 
20 
32 
38 
36 
42 
72 
12 
20 
18 

■ 19 
26 
34 
152 
27 
33 
31 
14 
40 
31 
23 
20 
31 
47 
47 
13 
39 
49 
59 
29 
38 
16 
37 
28 
94 
35 
29 
42 
38 
92 
69 
31 


98 

76 

133 

54 

180 

64 

72 

114 

57 

110 

129 

239 

113 

93 

67 

123 

53 

37 

94 

107 

128 

112 

70 

40 

49 

81 

96 

88 

270 

53 

107 

111 

116 

98 

104 

55 

50 

91 

97 

118 

42 

89 

66 

33 

111 

88 

49 

80 

127 

129 

97 

47 

78 

102 

99 

117 

136 


68 
56 
72 
28 

103 
30 
62 
75 
37 
72 
54 

147 
86 
72 
45 

100 
29 
47 
44 
61 
36 

143 
53 
38 
11 
92 
50 
57 

120 
39 
63 
62 
41 
40 
70 
41 
22 
28 

109 
99 
34 
42 
45 
17 
51 
45 
18 
49 
75 
63 
57 
28 
71 
71 
59 

115 
60 


"8 

"8 

18 

1 

5 

"6 
18 
13 
14 

"5 
••••j 

"8 
20 

5 

7 

""l3 

"3 
17 

"3 
4 

"io 

""*5 
6 
9 

"9 

5 

7 

12 

'"'4 

3 
10 

"2 

5 

6 

15 

10 


131 
97 

111 

70 

181 

27 

158 

44 

81 

145 

219 

117 

86 

87 

227 

70 

51 

129 

102 

139 

150 

89 

50 

47 

94 

33 

63 

264 

46 

74 

135 

107 

47 

65 

62 

67 

85 

80 

68 

44 

112 

54 

121 

105 

87 

60 

112 

104 

172 

97 

51 

90 

117 

132 

157 

111 






132 


2 Alliston 








85 


3 Almonte 


3 






107 


4 Amherstburg 






49 


5 Arnprior 


4 
19 




4 


98 


6 Arthur 


37 


7 Athens 


60 


"u 


58 


8 Aurora 


2 


160 


9 Avonmore 


40 


10 Aylmer 


7 

10 
12 

8 






62 


11 Beamsville 






137 


12 Belleville 




1 


313 


13 Bowmanville 


120 


14 Bracebridge 






78 


15 Bradford 








88 


16 Brampton 


5 




11 


227 


17 Brighton 


75 


18 Burford 


8 






33 


19 Burlington 






127 


20 Caledonia 


8 
17 

7 
6 






128 


21 Campbellford 






99 


22 Carleton Place 






147 


23 Cayuga 






86 


24 Chapleau 






54 


25 Chatsworth 








42 


26 Chesley 


14 






80 


27 Chesterville 






34 


28 Colborne 


3 
15 






57 


29 Cornwall 






227 


30 Deseronto 






35 


31 Dundalk 


1 

2 
5 






77 


32 Dundas . . 




6 
9 


138 


33 Dunnville 


99 


34 Durham 


46 


35 Dutton 


13 




1 


56 


36 Elmira 


61 


37 Elora 








67 


38 Essex 


5 

5 

12 




2 


80 


39 Exeter 


61 


40 Fergus 






76 


41 Flesherton 






42 


42 Forest 


12 

4 
3 
7 
3 
2 






89 


43 Fort Frances 


1 






44 Gananoque 




105 


45 Georgetown 




4 


94 


46 Glencoe 


81 


47 Gravenhurst 






60 


48 Grimsbv 






109 


49 Hagersville 


5 
3 
6 






108 


50 Haileybury 






128 


51 Harriston 




1 


96 


52 Hawkesbury 


40 


53 Iroquois 


11 
20 

2 
17 

9 






60 


54 Kemptville 






114 


55 Kenora 






130 


56 Kincardine 






155 


57 Kine:sville 




... 


107 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



237 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects 


(Continued) 




Special Courses 


u 

o 


>. 

bo 

"o 

o 

N 


>» 
c 
ed 

o 


>» 

u 
m 

a 

0> 
O 


'to 

>> 

A 


M 

3 

a 

M 
M 

O 
M 


>> 

■3 
a 
a 

G 
H 

O 

a 


# S 
'u 
t 

a 
>. 


1* 

< 


3 

u 

"3 



'to 
>. 
J3 


13 

"2 

s 
a 




0) 

Im 

3 



i 

< 


bfl 

a 

'5 

H 

H 

3 

3 

a 

2 



3 

4> 

'0 

w 

"3 

-3 
U 
to 

3 
O 

E 





.3 
O 

w 
t3 

8 

< 


1 


28 
32 


77 
32 


18 
18 
14 

"34 

9 

33 

29 

16 

33 

16 

116 

32 

52 

21 

41 

9 

8 

"l8 
31 
49 
30 
11 

9 
31 
24 
21 
57 
15 
28 
28 
20 
35 
32 
24 

4 
15 
56 
42 
23 
40 
25 
21 
21 
18 
10 
24 
28 


31 
29 
32 
6 
59 








76 
69 
95 

30 
121 
33 
20 
42 
26 
94 
29 
155 
49 
75 
69 
76 
15 
21 
66 
15 
35 
67 
23 
22 
28 
50 
45 
54 
59 
25 
41 
101 
41 
52 
69 


142 
118 
137 
77 
274 
145 












2 

3 












34 
19 






"n 


95 

34 








4 

5 

6 


6 
54 

4 
15 
48 
36 
40 


6 

108 

6 

5 

65 

"62 


19 


19 
















. . . 4 . 






127 

28 








7 

8 2 
9 

10 


47 
40 
21 
28 

8 

74 
51 
54 
19 
46 
27 
16 
28 
39 
38 
49 
31 
10 

9 
36 
30 
27 
99 
26 
26 
30 
36 
43 
35 

9 
14 
15 
60 
42 
25 




















169 
62 
152 
181 
. 391 
178 
129 










































11 








"62 


146 

38 
90 


28 


20 
69 




12 

13 2 


92 

3 
33 
25 
65 
14 
35 
44 
19 
34 

120 
23 
20 
17 
48 
11 
31 

101 
23 
33 
39 
14 
36 
38 
46 
20 


105 
3 
42 
45 
82 
33 
29 
71 
58 
55 
2 
37 
22 
26 
51 
53 
35 

118 
24 
41 
73 
37 
34 
69 

"29 


62 


62 


62 




14 














i z 


















16 








242 

94 

71 

137 

141 

184 

146 

98 

60 

54 

142 

100 

95 

401 

77 

107 

153 

170 

135 

143 

73 

73 

139 

173 

160 

64 

128 

117 

180 

148 

127 

67 

123 

155 

182 

137 

79 

122 

149 

179 

186 

137 












17 


















18 


11 
















19 
















20 


















21 


22 


18 


12 


6 










22 










24 


















24 


















25 


















26 


















27 


















30 


















29 


66 


66 


66 












30 












31 


















32 


















33 5 


















34 


















35 


















36 


















37 








37 
61 
49 

103 
12 
85 
16 
90 
33 
65 
8 
50 

102 
30 
44 
48 
66 
30 
40 

137 
95 












38 


















39 


47 
42 
12 
39 
29 
40 
14 
39 
15 
37 
28 


47 
72 
28 
46 
38 
60 
32 
59 
38 
50 
85 


















40 


















41 


















42 


















43 


25 
31 
24 
30 

"7 
25 
44 
33 
19 
23 
34 
26 
21 
30 


24 
18 
20 


24 
29 
20 


24 
29 
21 












44 


29 










45 1 










46 












47 


35 
















48 
















49 


















50 










76 








51 


30 
21 
30 
37 
9 
4 
29 


50 
29 
32 
49 
36 
4 
62 


24 
23 
23 
28 
24 
19 
12 














52 


















53 


















54 


















55 


21 


22 


24 


27 










56 


129 








57 















238 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



High Schools 



Attendance 






1* 

Z-5 



o 



M c 

Si rt 



sm o 

3 01 O 



Number of 
Pupils in — 



Number of 
Pupils from— 



■O.Sf.« 

■as 5 



58 Leamington 

59 Listowel 

60 Lucan 

61 Madoc 

62 Markdale 

! 63 Markham 

64 Meaford 

I 65 Midland 

66 Milton 

67 Mitchell 

68 More wood 

69 Mount Forest. . . 

70 Nepean 

71 Newburgh 

72 Newcastle 

73 Newmarket 

74 Niagara 

75 Niagara Falls Sth 

76 Norwich 

77 Norwood 

78 Oakville 

79 Omemee 

80 Orangeville 

8 1 Oshawa 

82 Paris 

83 Parkhill 

84 Parry Sound. . . . 

85 Pembroke 

86 Penetanguishene 

87 Petrolia 

88 Plantagenet 

89 Port Dover 

90 Port Elgin 

91 Port Hope 

92 Port Perry 

93 Port Rowan 

94 Prescott 

95 Richmond Hill.. 

96 Ridgetown 

97 Rockland 

98 Scarborough .... 

99 Shelburne 

100 Simcoe 

101 Smithville 

102 Stirling 

103 Streetsville 

104 Sudbury 

105 Sydenham 

106 Thorold 

107 Tillsonburg 

108 Toronto- 

Davenport.. . . 

109 Trenton 

110 Tweed 

111 Uxbridge 

112 Vienna 



211 
188 
133 
124 

97 
128 
141 
193 
166 
137 

48 
144 
166 
108 

23 
224 

52 
199 
125 
121 
188 

56 
196 
359 
149 
110 
151 
205 

96 
203 

50 

58 

83 
222 
104 

52 
156 
144 
180 

40 
116 

92 
200 

79 
129 

81 
208 
147 
112 
182 

392 
206 
109 
164 
20 



104 
90 
66 
46 
48 
48 
53 
84 
73 
64 
24 
53 
78 
41 
8 

105 
26 
95 
59 
73 
92 
17 
70 

179 
66 
49 
54 

117 
39 

101 
18 
24 
32 
93 
49 
21 
73 
70 
70 
17 
48 
35 
90 
36 
42 
33 
93 
54 
53 
83 

230 
91 

43 

77 
6 



107 
98 
67 
78 
49 
80 
88 

109 
93 
73 

. 24 
91 
88 
67 
15 

119 
26 

104 
66 
48 
96 
39 

126 

180 
83 
61 
97 
88 
57 

102 
32 
34 
51 

129 
55 
31 
83 
74 

110 
23 
68 
57 

110 
43 
87 
48 

115 
93 
59 
99 

162 

115 

66 

87 

14 



181 
154 
101 
106 

84 
100 
117 
162 
156 
125 

34 
119 
126 

83 

14 
184 

45 
161 
108 
101 
168 

50 
154 
316 
129 

89 
124 
150 

78 
172 

43 

52 

75 
194 

85 

41 
134 
139 
130 

33 

96 

78 
179 

54 
116 

63 
169 
134 

95 
152 

311 

179 

94 

137 

16J 



59 
56 
36 
29 

28 
41 
50 
68 
68 
36 

9 
49 
74 
33 

6 
85 
22 
65 
39 
34 
84 
12 
54 
133 
59 
28 
60 
81 
43 
57 
18 
18 
32 
78 
48 
22 
51 
61 
59 
22 
51 
31 
65 
22 
41 
25 
92 
37 
54 
58 

126 
81 
37 

37 
7 



62 
57 
46 
29 
26 
31 
57 
79 
68 
44 
9 
50 
74 
48 
6 
94 
23 
71 
45 
38 
84 
13 
84 

148 
68 
29 
73 
97 
49 
65 
16 
19 
37 
79 
55 
27 
58 
63 
73 
22 
53 
37 
70 
24 
45 
32 

109 
44 
54 
66 

133 

85 

31 

40 

9 



71 
46 
32 
37 
26 
34 
38 
56 
38 
35 
]3 
48 
50 
24 
7 
75 
15 
79 
29 
25 
47 
21 
32 
93 
40 
27 
40 
52 
27 
59 
17 
19 
24 
78 
19 
13 
44 
34 
39 
14 
31 
24 
43 
30 
38 
29 
35 
4-! 
30 
54 

97 
62 
30 

48 
4 



61 

53 
38 
40 
33 
34 
34 
45 
49 
35 
26 
33 
42 
36 

8 
45 
14 
41 
45 
48 
57 
22 
62 
88 
33 
50 
38 
45 
20 
47 
17 
20 
22 
53 
19 
12 
34 
34 
52 

4 
25 
31 
55 
25 
41 
20 
51 
51 
27 
44 

136 
50 
32 

47 
71 



13 



133 
84 
43 
60 
23 
33 
75 

169 
89 
83 
39 
67 

159 
28 
15 

106 
37 

107 
62 
49 

107 
45 
82 

285 
96 
40 

131 

181 
91 

126 
17 
30 
43 

141 
48 
32 

111 
31 
77 
39 

115 
33 
98 
33 

12 
26 

150 

142 
84 
97 

386 

141 

42 

63 

17 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



239 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 







Number of Pupils from Families whose 




Number of Pupils in 


the 










Head is occupied 


as below — 






Various Subjects 






o 

n 

"S 

3 

,2 « 
1 

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62 


S 

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B 

a 

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u 

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o 

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u 

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CO 

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B 'J 
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3 a 

2 3 
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^£ I 

JO 


co 

a 

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B) 

O, 

O 

o 
O 

u 

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6 


s 
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o 
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4-> 

3 
O 
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ds 

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u 
u 

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rt 
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rt 
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u 
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3 

XI 
co 

? 

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o 

5 

a 

V 

I 


58 


3 


53 


92 


4 


25 


11 


19 


7 


66 


184 


209 


64 


47 


48 


59 


27 


37 


87 


8 


24 


6 


12 


14 


41 


182 


182 


57 


95 


49 


60 


..... 


28 
19 


86 

57 


7 
6 


12 
11 








15 

32 


127 
115 


127 
115 


44 
40 


32 
37 


37 


61 


12 


8 


11 


32 


62 




11 


48 




14 


12 


9 


3 


26 


97 


92 


28 


31 


26 


63 


12 


8 


85 


10 


6 


12 


4 


3 


33 


122 


120 


33 


32 


30 


64 


3 


33 


59 


7 


15 


13 


13 


1 


70 


140 


140 


68 


22 


26 


65 




39 


28 


8 


49 


35 


26 


8 


54 


186 


186 


79 


27 


20 


66 




55 


74 


4 


10 


15 


6 


2 


35 


158 


155 


72 


25 


37 


67 


1 


36 


52 


3 


27 


8 


11 




48 


131 


131 


50 


33 


18 


68 


2 


3 


35 


1 


4 


2 


3 




16 


48 


48 


14 


8 


18 


69 


44 


23 


83 


5 


21 




2 


10 


48 


138 


138 


53 


30 


15 


70 


3 


36 


44 


3 


23 


13 


47 




50 


166 


166 


75 


29 


29 


71 


1 


2 


81 


3 


10 


5 


7 




24 


108 


108 


48 


14 


18 


77 


"l 


4 
31 


13 

81 


1 
13 


2 
36 


1 
41 


"l9 


2 
3 


8 
72 


23 
230 


23 
230 


8 
96 






73 


37 


12 


74 




14 


24 




5 


6 


1 


2 


12 


51 


51 


23 


12 


4 


75 


1 


50 


34 


7 


76 


12 


20 




25 


197 


197 


71 


34 


25 


76 


9 


15 


60 


11 


16 


14 


1 


8 


32 


123 


123 


45 


34 


20 


77 


19 


13 


68 


4 


13 


12 


7 


4 


30 


121 


121 


36 


34 


22 


78 




39 


59 


12 


40 


11 


5 


22 


49 


185 


155 


66 


37 


18 


79 


7 


3 


33 


2 


9 


4 


4 


1 


26 


56 


56 




18 


19 


80 


46 


23 


107 


14 


27 


4 


18 


3 


85 


162 


131 


64 


37 


25 


81 


15 


85 


40 


27 


102 


45 


56 


4 


148 


350 


350 


148 


42 


28 


82 


2 


19 


52 


4 


30 


21 


21 


2 


8 


149 


149 


70 


25 


9 


83 


24 


14 


62 


2 


6 


5 


21 




27 


108 


110 


29 


27 


26 


84 


2 


25 


14 


3 


36 


35 


30 


8 


30 


151 


151 


75 


34 


33 


85 


1 


27 


26 


12 


39 


37 


56 


8 


31 


201 


201 


108 


21 


18 


86 


3 


17 


3 


4 


25 


21 


24 


2 


76 


96 


93 


49 


20 




87 




35 


69 


3 


39 


35 


22 




65 


203 


203 


65 


26 


23 


88 


2 


4 


29 


1 


7 


3 


2 


4 


17 


48 


48 


20 


16 


8 


89 


18 


5 


28 


1 


3 


2 


18 


1 


18 


58 


58 


20 


15 


2 


90 




6 


41 


4 


14 


10 


4 


4 


24 


83 


83 


37 


20 


21 


91 




34 


56 


5 


55 


44 


14 


14 


79 


214 


214 


59 


32 


3 


92 


6 


24 


59 


4 


11 


2 


3 


1 


55 


101 


101 


56 


6 


17 


93 




7 


18 


6 


2 


9 


9 


1 




52 


52 


39 


11 


5 


94 




24 


44 


1 


33 


13 


36 


5 


58 


143 


143 


58 


37 


35 


95 




10 


101 


8 


10 


11 


1 


3 


3 


142 


142 


63 


18 


21 


96 


1 


26 


90 


11 


20 


9 


12 


12 


99 


175 


174 


91 


36 


49 


97 


1 


8 


8 


4 


12 


2 


3 


3 


36 


40 


40 


36 


3 




98 




27 


30 


3 


30 


10 


11 


5 


84 


115 


116 


53 




27 


99 


2 


16 
42 


58 
89 


4 
7 


6 
37 


2 
10 


6 
13 






89 
189 


89 
189 


41 

70 


16 

30 


20 


100 


2 


43 


73 


101 


12 


8 


53 


4 


5 


5 


3 


1 


16 


79 


79 


36 


18 


17 


102 


1 


16 


86 


3 


10 


10 




4 


15 


127 


127 


45 


26 




103 


8 


11 


43 


2 


8 


7 


6 


4 




81 


81 


41 


15 


7 


104 


1 


33 


4 


7 


19 


60 


78 


7 


31 


178 


173 


98 


42 


11 


105 


3 


10 


91 


2 


11 


4 


16 


13 


14 


125 


123 


60 


30 


45 


106 


6 


6 


5 




74 


5 


21 


1 


83 


111 


110 


53 


24 


12 


107 


42 


43 


71 


12 


15 


12 


27 


2 


64 


182 


182 


65 


28 


15 


108 


3 


75 




43 


109 


77 


38 


50 


27 


392 


392 


133 


78 


58 


109 


41 


43 


62 


9 


48 


34 


8 


2 


85 


204 


204 


85 


30 


19 


110 




23 


51 


2 


22 


5 


4 


2 


39 


102 


106 


38 


31 


7 


111 


5 


17 


99 


4 


14 


6 


18 


6 


38 


160 


160 


40 


47 


28 


112 


2 




19 




1 








12 


19 


19 


10 


5 


5 



240 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



High Schools 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 



6 3 

33 



to 



58 Leamington 

59 Listowel 

60 Lucan 

61 Madoc 

62 Markdale 

63 Markham 

64 Meaford 

65 Midland 

66 Milton 

67 Mitchell 

68 Morewood 

69 Mount Forest 

70 Nepean 

71 Newburgh 

72 Newcastle 

73 Newmarket 

74 Niagara 

75 Niagara Falls South 

76 Norwich 

77 Norwood 

78 Oakville 

79 Omemee 

80 Orangeville 

81 Oshawa 

82 Paris 

83 Parkhill 

84 Parry Sound 

85 Pembroke 

86 Penetanguishene.. . . 

87 Petrolia 

88 Plantagenet 

89 Port Dover 

90 Port Elgin 

91 Port Hope 

92 Port Perry 

93 Port Rowan 

94 Prescott 

95 Richmond Hill 

96 Ridgetown 

97 Rockland 

98 Scarborough 

99 Shelburne 

100 Simcoe 

101 Smithville 

102 Stirling 

103 Streetsville 

104 Sudbury 

105 Sydenham 

106 Thorold 

107 Tillsonburg 

108 Toronto — 

Davenport 

109 Trenton 

110 Tweed. . 

111 Uxbridge 

112 Vienna 



15 



62 

57 

42 

29 

29 

30 

57 

77 
106 

47 

16 

53 

75 

48 
7 

85 
23 
57 
45 
33 
84 
17 
58 

241 
35 
29 
70 

108 
49 
65 
16 
19 
37 
79 
52 
41 
58 
63 



36 
51 
34 
70 

24 
45 
34 
90 
54 
53 
65 

133 

85 

31 

39 

9 



81 

41 

32 

35 

27 

36 

41 

54 

38 

38 

17 

52 

50 

24 
7 

60 

12 

46 

29 

29 

49 

20 

31 

61 

40 

27 

40 

44 

27 

59 

19 

21 

24 

44 

19 

11 

41 

37 

40 

14 

32 

26 

43 

26 

38 

29 

31 

47 

30 

56 

97 

62 
36 
48 



78 
38 
53 
23 
31 
37 
41 
52 
18 
38 
17 
50 
53 
24 
8 
104 



81 

9 

33 

50 

24 
62 
85 
52 
27 
14 
81 
27 
62 
17 
20 
24 
98 
12 
9 
43 
34 
39 
15 
30 
28 
43 
25 
36 
29 
38 
43 



196 
115 

92 

80 

71 

77 

96 
121 
115 

82 

22 

92 

98 

81 

14 

164 
12 

104 

85 

65 

114 
16 
93 

328 
68 
82 

140 

184 
69 

124 
27 
36 
58 

126 
79 
36 

103 
31 

139 
26 
84 
57 

124 
31 
89 
55 

151 
99 
81 

121 

231 
126 

68 
109 

14 



128 
114 

69 

75 

94 

78 

72 
100 
114 

72 

24 

89 

80 

32 

16 
109 

23 

68 

49 

62 

67 
19 
95 

163 
40 
60 
60 
65 
27 

106 
28 
6 
57 
83 
42 
25 
84 
29 
90 
16 
56 
42 
86 
28 
53 
34 
85 
86 
54 

112 

175 
87 
67 
88 

7 



11 



11 



11 



11 



173 
106 

59 

55 

91 
104 

98 
158 
141 
117 

20 

96 
100 

76 

12 
140 

38 
118 

89 
83 

134 
35 

130 

274 
88 
71 
90 

190 
69 

121 
44 
52 
56 

103 
76 
50 

125 

138 
65 
40 

113 
52 

164 
39 
84 
58 

173 
81 
92 

150 

385 

184 

72 

101 

8 



36 



40 



149 
141 

75 
53 
58 
98 
102 
150 
131 
123 
20 
99 
98 
76 
16 
137 
40 
125 
89 
89 
147 
30 
150 
270 
84 
75 
110 
180 
76 
113 
44 
51 
57 
148 
76 
49 
105 
131 
70 
35 
109 
48 
146 
30 
86 
78 
122 
91 
60 
125 

375 

161 

71 

101 

7 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



241 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects 


(Continued) 




Special Courses 


M 

i 




>. 

M 

"o 
o 
N 


>, 

c 

*j 
o 
PQ 


>> 

M 

CO 

I 



8 

"35 
>> 


M 
C 
'S. 

cu 
cu 

3 



pq 


>> 

O, 

2 
Si 

q 

<u 


bO 

# c 

cu 
O. 
>» 

H 


< 


3 



O 

"35 
>> 

X! 
Pl. 


3 

cu 

a 
a 




cu 
u 

a 
3 

< 


bfl 

c 

!s 

'53 
H 
"a 

c 

2 


cu 
u 
c 

.a 

w 

•a 

1 

<u 

CO 

O 


"3 


| 


58 


37 
70 
26 
29 
30 
38 
44 
53 
38 
35 
13 
51 
75 
15 
7 
56 
12 


22 
77 
43 
33 
28 
36 
61 
81 
68 
49 
24 
58 
51 
34 
6 
71 
21 


54 
54 
43 
40 
26 
30 
25 


57 
55 
33 
38 
31 
37 
30 








52 
57 
23 
55 
32 
34 
37 


211 
186 
133 




72 








59 














60 


















61 


















62 








97 

128 
140 
192 
165 
137 
48 
143 
166 
108 
23 
214 
52 
198 
125 
121 
185 
56 
196 
350 
149 
105 
149 
202 
94 
203 
50 
58 
83 
221 
104 
52 
156 
144 
180 
40 
116 
92 
200 
79 
129 
81 
205 
145 
111 
180 

392 
206 
109 
162 
20 












63 


















64 


















65 


















66 


59 

40 
15 
16 
22 
29 
5 

12 
23 
23 
34 
37 
16 
19 
38 
48 
24 
27 
36 
26 

'"27 

8 

9 

11 

40 

22 

9 

29 

28 

35 

2 

7 

12 

22 
4 = 
It 
4: 
3: 
2: 
) 2( 

1 4> 

) 3 
) 3 
I 3 
) 


62 
28 
19 
36 
22 
17 








71 
35 
24 
55 
73 
30 
8 
42 
36 
31 
66 
36 
46 
18 
27 
6 
23 
29 
56 
38 
25 
59 
17 
21 
40 
24 
10 
26 
36 
91 
50 
10 












67 


















68 


















69 


















70 


















71 3 


















72 


















73 


41 
12 
24 
18 
12 
26 
20 
54 
29 
25 
33 
34 
41 
10 
30 
7 

19 

21 

21 

16 

7 

32 

30 

46 

1 

27 

15 

66 

1( 

17 

) 5 

5 49 

! 3£ 

5 25 

) 3( 

$ 9' 
J H 
2 i; 
J 4: 
5 


39 


42 


17 


42 










74 










75 








57 


91 




60 




76 


24 

27 


45 
33 










77 


















78 


16 


21 


21 


21 


70 








79 


15 

23 
65 
12 
27 
17 
40 
20 
65 
20 
2 
23 


21 
50 
20 
36 
29 
48 
118 
49 
59 
16 
39 
37 








80 


31 

115 

34 


34 
85 
34 


34 
85 
34 


34 

85 










81 1 










82 










83 












84 


















85 


31 


31 


31 












86 












87 


















88 1 


















89 


















90 


















91 6 


38 


36 


38 




50 
45 








92 1 


8 

13 
53 
16 
32 
14 
29 
27 
52 
22 
3$ 
2£ 
3! 
45 
3( 
5. 

7( 
6 

3< 
5 


8 
43 
67 
63 
29 
36 

'"33 
8C 
19 
45 

"9C 

i 5£ 
) 52 
5 6( 

) 13: 

I 7( 
3 3( 
3 31 
i 1( 




35 




93 










94 


15 
















95 
















96 


24 
















97 
















98 


















99 








60 
70 
24 
43 
18 
82 
84 
3C 
49 

132 

27 
32 
4* 

4 












100 


















101 


















102 ... 


















103 ... 


















104 ... 












66 


76 




105 














106 


















107 


> 
















108 ... 












91 


24 




109 


) 












110 


} 
















111 


1 
















112 ... 


; ■ 1 


.... 















242 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Attendance 


Nun- 
s' 
£ 

"o 
o 
jet 


tber of Pupils 


in — 

"o 
o 

J3 


Number of 
Pupils from — 


High Schools 


o « 

"S <u 

3J3 

•- 

^5£ 








u 
O 

£.8o 




u 

£ 

"3 
o 

J3 


o 
o 

J3 


S 

u 
o 

.2 J 


en *-" 

.5 &v 
■3 SB 

3 """rt 




*1 

IS 


o 
m 


3 


2 a 
<< 


Jr; 03 ca 

§*8 

1:5$ 


o 


03 
u 

o 

•J 




s 

u 

HI 

a 
a 


•o-SPtS 

"8 SB 


d.C.2 

S2'£ 
o£fr- 


113 Walkerton.. 


113 


51 


62 


106 


45 


49 


26 


25 


13 


112 




114 Walkerville. 


209 


130 


79 


182 


89 


87 


69 


44 


9 


173 


36 


115 Wallaceburg 


170 


62 


108 


144 


57 


68 


43 


42 


17 


114 


34 


116 Wardsville.. 


49 


17 


32 


39 


18 


18 


17 


14 




13 


19 


117 Waterdown. 


93 


40 


53 


79 


35 


40 


28 


25 




72 


13 


118 Waterford.. 


77 


34 


43 


66 


31 


33 


20 


24 




68 




119 Watford.... 


112 


44 


68 


98 


36 


44 


27 


27 


14 


53 


52 


120 Welland.... 


296 


141 


155 


233 


75 


112 


77 


74 


33 


153 


140 


121 Weston. . . . 


408 


177 


231 


351 


157 


157 


130 


99 


22 


164 


231 


122 Whitby 


156 


75 


81 


129 


47 


62 


41 


41 


12 


99 


54 


123 Wiarton. . . . 


120 


53 


67 


89 


53 


54 


27 


28 


11 


70 


48 


124 Will'mstown 


101 


36 


65 


85 


28 


33 


29 


35 


4 


99 




125 Winchester. 


141 


55 


86 


112 


68 


28 


43 


62 


8 


70 


70 


126 Wingham. . . 


174 


74 


100 


155 


60 


57 


37 


51 


29 


81 


70 


1 Totals, High 
























Schools 


18,138 


7,956 


10,182 


15,143 


6,251 


6,902 


4,903 


5,040 


1,293 


10,497 


6,701 


2 Totals, Colleg- 
























iate Institutes 


26,493 


13,183 


13,310 


22,678 


9,139 


10,130 


7,284 


7,170 


1,909 


21,534 


4,395 


3 Grand Totals, 
























1922-3 


44,631 


21,139 


23,492 


37,821 


15,390 


17,032 


12,187 


12210 


3,202 


32,031 


11,096 


4 Grand Totals, 
























1921-2 


39,405 


18,328 


21,077 


34,262 


14,653 


15,950 


11,323 


9,794 


2,338 


27,840 


10,015 


5 Increases 


5,226 


2,811 


2,415 


3,559 


737 


1,082 


864 


2,416 


864 


4,191 


1,081 


















































7 Percentages. . . 




47.36 


52.63 


84.74 


34.48 


38.16 


27.30 


27.35 


7.17 


71.76 


24.86 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



243 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 







Number of Pupils from Families whose 




Number of Pupils in the 








Head is occupied 


as below — 






Various Subjects 






b 

o 
CO 
<u 

•M 

3 

O ro 


u 

o 




.0.3 

T3 *"" 


-<v 

T3 


co 

M o 


s 
.2 

& 

a 

o 


a 
o 

a 

3 
O 

o 
O 


u 

a 

B 

u 

O 


3 

.2 

'§ 


V 

3 

u 

*-» 

3 


u 

o 
m 

K 

3 


>» 

u 

o 

co 


>> 

u 



m 

£ 




U tJ 


<D 


a 


£° 




"C cd 


O 


3 


X, 


XXi 


x 


rt 




*j 




SB 


6 

S 


.2 


^ 


2 


3 a 

2 =" 


u 

.3 


O 

X! 


"5 


.23 


"3b 


T3 
3 


•S 


•0 






o 


bfl 




.3 


3 o 


4-> 


$ 


C 


c 3 


3 


rt 


*n 


3 




o5 


U 


< 


J -75 


H 


JO 


O 


w 


w S 


W 


U 


pq 


< 


113 


l 


9 


42 


4 


18 


16 


23 


1 


45 


110 


110 


47 


27 


14 


114 




58 


2 


3 


94 


24 


23 


5 


87 


208 


207 


87 


38 


4 


115 


22 


41 


44 


10 


22 


37 


10 


6 


18 


156 


159 


73 


33 


17 


116 


17 


8 


27 


3 


6 


1 


4 




11 


47 


47 


21 


9 




117 


8 


7 


66 


5 


8 


4 


1 


2 


42 


91 


91 


44 


22 


16 


118 


9 


8 


49 


3 


7 


5 


4 


1 




76 


76 


33 


16 


7 


119 


7 
3 


23 
65 


59 

87 


11 

20 


7 
91 


4 

27 


8 
4 






111 
293 


111 
295 


48 
122 


"93 


27 


120 


2 


106 


27 


121 


13 


73 


97 


7 


137 


42 


27 


25 


111 


403 


403 


157 


74 


25 


122 


3 


54 


55 


17 


14 


11 


3 


2 


103 


156 


156 


62 


20 


27 


123 


2 


29 


51 


2 


10 


5 


20 


3 


12 


119 


119 


50 


18 


12 


124 


2 


4 


76 


2 


9 


1 


2 


7 


34 


98 


98 


33 


19 


12 


125 


1 


20 


76 


3 


10 


8 


16 


8 


43 


141 


141 


31 


32 


23 


126 


23 


8 


95 


5 


15 


35 


9 


7 


17 


174 


172 


55 


31 


6 


1 


940 


2,877 


7,197 


744 


3,063 


1,889 


1,764 


604 


4,638 


17,558 


17,501 


7,125 


3,463 


2,751 


2 


564 


7,321 


3,899 


1,300 


7,039 


2,072 


3,570 


1,292 


6,882 


25,532 


25,836 


10,216 


5,178 


3,295 


3 


1,504 


10198 


11096 


2,044 


10102 


3,961 


5,334 


1,896 


11520 


43,090 


43,337 


17,341 


8,641 


6,046 


4 


1,550 


9,307 


10119 


1,822 


8,149 


3,442 


5,108 


1,458 


13629 


38,359 


38,541 


16,309 


11508 


6,308 


5 




891 


977 


222 


1,953 


519 


226 


438 




4,731 


4,796 


1,032 






6 


46 














2,109 


2,867 


262 


























3.36 


22.84 


24.86 


4.57 


22.63 


8.87 


11.95 


4.24 


25.81 


96.54 


97.10 


38.85 


19.36 


13.54 



244 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 


High Schools 


>» 

u 
O 

s 

d 
& 
o 

a 


>> 

& 
O 

o 


>. 
a 
g 

O 

"R 

a. 


•a 
c 

°:§ 

11 


2 
■8 

< 


M 

1) 

B 

s 

o 


>> 
5 

a> 
B 
o 
a 
o 
.£? 

'u 
H 


o 

a 


J3 
to 

C 

as 


c 
a 
B 

5 




113 Walkerton 


9 


47 
68 
68 
20 
43 
32 
38 
122 
96 
62 
17 
50 
36 
94 


18 
69 
43 
15 
26 
20 
26 
67 
113 
40 
18 
27 
51 
37 


7 
66 
49 
17 
33 
20 
25 
120 
192 
50 
60 

"50 


S3 

125 

148 

29 

62 

57 

80 

136 

273 

113 

89 

71 

130 

87 


24 

119 

34 

21 

34 

43 

62 

111 

226 

94 

41 

47 

79 

109 


5 
2 
8 


73 
192 
107 

26 






76 


1 14 Walkerville 




6 


193 


115 Wallaceburg 


13 


102 


116 Wardsville 






21 


117 Waterdown 








87 


118 Waterford 




"10 

16 

13 

10 

4 

"e> 

24 


59 

68 

224 

333 

111 

71 

91 

98 

137 




6 


55 


119 Watford 


9 

12 

6 

4 

5 


100 


120 Welland 






178 


121 Weston 






266 


122 Whitby 






115 


123 Wiarton 






56 


124 Williamstown 






92 


125 Winchester 

126 Wingham 


7 
20 




3 


82 
121 










1 Totals, 

High Schools 

2 Totals, Collegiate 


684 
887 


6,817 
8,832 


4,653 
6,430 


5,154 
7,479 


12,021 
16,069 


8,136 
11,415 


733 
1,165 


12,795 
22,264 


105 

225 


160 
1,675 


12,318 
20,922 






3 Grand Totals, 

1922-23 


1571 
1163 


15649 
14593 


11083 
10434 


12633 
14072 


28,090 
31,561 


19,551 
19,722 


1,898 
1,631 


35,059 
21,211 


330 
167 


1,835 
1,710 


33,240 


4 Grand Totals, 

1921-22 


29,607 


5 Increases 


408 


1,056 


649 








267 


13,848 


163 


125 


3,633 




1,439 


3,471 


171 






















7 Percentages 


3.51 


35.06 


24.83 


28.30 


62.93 


43.80 


4.25 


78.55 


.51 


4.11 


74.47 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



245 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Concluded) 





Number of Pupil 


s in the Various Subjects 


(Concluded) 




Special Courses 


U 

CU 

u 




M 

O 

N 


>> 

3 
co 


PP 


>> 

-4-> 

co 

a 

o> 
43 
O 


co 

'co 
>>• 

43 
Oh 


3 

'a 
cu 

CU 

4* 
M 
O 
O 

m 


>. 

43 

a 
as 

M 
O 

a 

cu 


.5 
% 

cu 

a 
>> 

C-t 


< 


cu 
3 

"5 
O 

H 

*co 

>. 

Oh 


!j3 
'0 

u 
cu 

s 

E 

O 


2 

3 

"5 

<: 


to 
s 

•a 

£ 

3 
3 
ei 


cu 

3 
<u 
'0 
w 

"0 

43 

cu 

CO 

3 
O 





43 

u 

•0 

1 

u 

< 


113 


"2 


12 
41 
43 
17 
25 
15 
75 
64 
118 


44 
87 
68 
20 
41 
29 
4 
70 
104 


16 
32 
33 
13 
12 
21 
26 
49 
197 
23 
24 
18 


27 

39 

41 
3 

18 
23 
26 
31 
102 
20 
21 
40 
9 
46 


14 


15 


14 


11 

87 
47 
22 


113 

209 

170 

48 

92 

77 

111 

295 

407 

156 

117 

100 

139 

174 












114 






92 


63 




115 














116 


















117 


















118 








44 
70 
66 
97 

24 
42 
27 
30 

57 












119 


















120 


55 
75 
17 


55 
75 
14 


55 
75 
17 
20 












121 












122 


17 


31 








123 




39 


18 








124 








61 
109 








125 




















126 


1 


49 


72 


68 
































1 
2 


25 
215 


3,986 

3,4:84 


5,255 
■ 5,886 


3,398 
4,175 


3,707 
5,029 


837 
3,420 


702 
1,786 


698 
1,702 


5,867 
5,865 


17,602 
24,724 


397 
1,663 


1292 

574 


205 
3,092 


347 
3,082 


103 


3 
4 


240 
259 


7,47C 
6,934 


) 11141 
[ 14921 


7,573 
7,850 


8,736 
8,766 


4,257 
4,489 


2,488 
3,117 


2,400 
2,933 


11732 
11930 


42,326 
38,529 


2,060 
2,617 


1866 
1423 


3,297 
3,390 


3,429 
3,768 


103 
189 


5 


19 


53t 
















3,797 


"557 


443 








6 


3,780 


277 


3C 


232 


629 


533 


198 


93 


339 


86 


.53 


16.7: 


124.96 


16.96 


19.57 


9.53 


5.57 


5.37 


26.2? 


94.83 


4.61 


4.18 


7.38 


7.68 


.23 



246 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 





















Lower School, 


Form I 














Boys 


Girls 


Collegiate 
Institutes 


co 
u 

n 
<u 

© 


CO 
U 

a 

CD 

>> 


co 

u 

oj 
<D 

CM 


en 
u 

<v 

CO 


co 
u 
a 
<u 
>> 


CO 

u 
a 
<u 
>% 

10 


CO 

u 
a 
<u 
h 


CO 

u 

a 
<u 
>> 


CO 

u 

a 

CU 

>> 

00 


o3 
>> 


2 

<U 
O 


u 

CU 

> 


-a 
c 

a} 


CO 

u 

aJ 

CU 

O 


co 

u 

03 

CU 


CO 

u 

03 

CU 
CN 


CO 

u 

03 
<v 

CO 


CO 

u 

03 

CU 


en 
u 

<U 
10 


CO 

u 
o3 
a> 
>> 




1 Barrie 




1 

"l 

2 


3 
11 

"3 


13 
33 
17 
15 
15 

8 

5 

18 
38 

6 
13 
29 

9 
21 

17 

16 

59 

8 

5 

6 

18 

19 

99 

6 

7 

22 

8 

19 

12 

27 

15 

46 

13 

26 

9 

7 

40 

5 

53 
67 
18 
24 
15 
74 
48 
58 
6 
35 
33 


25 
72 
20 
18 

8 
11 
10 
23 
40 

8 
46 
91 
14 
33 

34 
33 
95 
8 
8 
22 
26 
15 
133 
17 
19 
38 
18 
27 
16 
50 
15 
46 
19 
36 
11 
17 
51 
8 

53 
76 
53 
37 
32 
65 
59 
68 
6 
55 
32 


26 
36 
14 
20 

4 
13 

7 

10 
18 
10 
21 
69 

6 
34 

32 
13 
45 

5 

9 
13 
19 
13 
82 
37 
13 
30 

8 
33 
26 
36 

8 
20 
15 
19 

4 
15 
24 
11 

27 
48 
73 
14 
30 
33 
26 
46 
5 
52 
16 


11 

12 
10 
10 


2 
2 
4 
6 


2 
2 
1 
2 












4 
7 
3 
8 
6 
3 
5 
8 
5 
1 
11 
5 
2 
5 

3 

10 
33 

6 

5 

10 

1 
23 


16 
52 
22 
17 
7 
13 
10 
21 
25 
10 
37 
45 
11 
29 

16 

27 
79 

11 
10 
12 
11 
75 
14 

9 
11 
13 
21 
20 
44 
17 
49 
24 
25 

9 
11 
44 

6 

35 
35 

8 
26 
12 
60 
38 
63 

9 
32 
33 


37 
59 
28 
23 
15 
11 
13 
23 
26 
16 
29 
112 
20 
39 

30 

27 
92 

18 
10 
13 
25 
82 
24 
22 
35 
16 
31 
36 
60 
19 
56 
23 
33 
13 
14 
33 
15 

41 
60 
24 
30 
50 
71 
37 
69 
5 
46 
38 


25 
39 
29 
13 
2 

13 
13 
8 
9 
10 
24 
72 
13 
19 

20 

22 
41 

14 
4 
10 
22 
61 
28 
12 
30 
12 
25 
11 
46 
11 
34 
14 
23 
5 
23 
28 
4 

25 
37 
28 
21 
42 
31 
33 
35 
4 
25 
25 


V 


2 Brantford 


1 










2 
1 


16 


3 Brockville 


1 








6 


4 Chatham 




1 






13 


5 Clinton 










? 


6 Cobourg 






2 
1 
7 
6 
2 
4 
5 
4 
10 


2 
3 
5 
4 
5 

12 

29 

3 

14 

8 
1 

19 
1 
5 
7 

11 

11 

37 

14 
7 

13 
7 

10 
1 

16 
3 
6 
5 

13 
4 

14 
6 
1 

9 
13 
34 

6 
10 

7 
18 

7 

5 
15 

6 


1 
1 
4 














3 


7 Collingwood 


















3 


8 Fort William 




1 












1 
1 
1 

1 


3 


9 Gait 














6 


10 Goderich 




. 1 














4 


11 Guelph 




6 
8 
2 
6 


1 
1 


1 








?S 


12 Hamilton 












3? 


13 Ingersoll 
















3 


14 Kingston . . 






1 










4 


14 


15 Kitchener- 
Waterloo 














6 


16 Lindsay 




1 

5 


4 
9 
i 
4 
4 
2 
1 
36 


2 
1 




1 








1 
2 


S 


17 London 










8 


18 Morrisburg 
















19 Napanee 




1 
1 
1 
1 
9 


1 








4 


20 Niagara Falls. . . . 












2 


21 North Bay 




6 
3 

13 
3 


1 

3 
1 


1 










9 


22 Orillia 






1 






9 


23 Ottawa 






4 


30 


24 Owen Sound 












13 


25 Perth 






2 
4 
1 
4 
5 
6 
3 
6 
2 
8 

10 
4 

15 
2 

18 
25 

3 
16 

4 
26 
14 
20 

5 

8 
10 












3 
6 
8 
6 
7 
7 

10 
8 
5 

10 

10 

4 

8 

1 

12 

19 

1 

7 

4 

27 

17 

19 

4 

10 

10 


9 


26 Peterborough. . . . 






4 
1 
6 

"4 






1 








10 


27 Picton 














1 


10 


28 Port Arthur 






2 
1 










14 


29 Renfrew 




2 






1 




4 


4 


30 St. Catharines. . . . 




IS 


31 St. Mary's 




1 














3 


32 St. Thomas 


















9 


33 Sarnia 






















34 Sault Ste. Marie. . 


















1 


11 


35 Seaforth 




















36 Smith's Falls 






6 
3 

2 

2 
2 
9 


"l 


1 


1 


1 




2 
3 


11 


37 Stratford 


i 


1 

1 

4 
8 


8 


38 Strathroy 

Toronto — 

39 Harbord 










S 












3 

2 


9 


40 Humberside. . . 














11 


41 Jarvis ■. . . 




1 






1 




23 


42 Malvern. . . 




1 


3 


43 North 




1 














19 


44 Oakwood . . . 




3 
1 












1 


13 


45 Parkdale 


4 












10 


46 Riverdale 






1 








2 


12 


47 Vankleek Hill.. . 




4 


1 
4 










? 


48 Windsor.... 




1 


2 








12 


49 Woodstock. . 




1 










10 























1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



247 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 
AGE, SEX AND GRADE 





Lower School, Form II 




Boys 


Girls 


CO 

u 


en 
u< 

>> 

00 


u 

a 

CD 


2 

O 


? 



c 

CN 


CO 

s- 

CU 


CO 

1_ 

Cj 

cu 
>> 


CO 

t-l 

cu 


CO 

u 

cc! 

0) 

1*1 


CO 

u 

o3 
cu 

>> 


CO 

u 

a 

CU 


CO 

u 

a 
cu 


CO 

u 

a 

CU 
OO 


CO 
Vh 

>. 

0\ 


CO 
CU 




u 

cu 

> 


G 


t 

cd 

cu 


co 

n 

CO 

;>> 

CM 


05 
cu 

CO 


CO 
Ih 

oj 
CU 

>> 


CO 

u 

CD 


CO 

u 

03 
CU 

>. 


CO 

Ih 

03 

>, 


CO 
Ih 

03 

O) 

'^ 

00 


CO 
Ih 

03 

CD 


CO 

u. 

03 

CU 

>1 



CN 


Ih 



c 

at 
CM 


1 


2 

3 

"h 

"i 

l 
l 

"i 

6 

l 

3 

7 

"4 

2 

"i 

2 
8 
4 
3 
6 
1 
2 
2 
2 

"i 

3 

"3 

2 

1 

2 
i 
6 
1 
4 

"2 

"i 

3 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

'2 

'l 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

i 
'3 

i 

'1 

"2 
"2 

1 
'1 


'i 

'2 

'3 

1 


1 

1 

'l 

1 


1 
'1 


1 


"i 
"i 

"i 
"i 

1 

"1 

1 

"2 

2 

"2 
1 

8 
1 

2 
2 

3 

1 

2 


1 
12 

5 
6 
3 

"2 
6 
2 
2 
3 
'5 
3 
6 

1 
2 

4 
1 
3 
3 
29 

"5 

3 
6 
1 
9 

'is 

5 

11 

4 

3 

7 
2 

21 

6 
1 

"3 
16 
9 
13 
3 
9 
9 


9 
40 

13 

14 

5 

8 

4 

17 

17 

7 

21 

19 

9 

14 

11 
13 
10 

3 

4 
15 

9 
61 

4 

5 
17 

4 
13 

2 

16 
16 
40 
20 
19 

4 
10 
36 

6 

36 
31 
16 

2 
27 
54 
40 
39 

2 
24 
24 


12 

32 

21 

11 

8 

7 

8 

16 
20 
10 
20 
57 
12 
20 

15 
19 

4 
10 

9 
18 
69 

7 

8 

16 
10 
13 
18 
32 
13 
32 
17 

9 
10 
10 
23 

7 

46 
31 

42 
23 
32 
58 
36 
44 
2 
48 
20 


12 
19 

8 

6 

9 

4 

6 

7 

3 

4 

13 

55 

6 

17 

7 
21 

2 

10 
9 

10 

55 

28 

7 

11 

4 

8 

20 

24 

5 

36 

9 

2 

3 

9 

18 

2 

27 
22 
37 
25 
22 
22 
15 
34 
4 
26 
12 


4 
9 

2 
6 

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5 
1 
6 
4 
11 
19 

"3 

2 
5 

2 
3 
5 
4 
42 
11 
8 
12 
6 
1 
7 
7 
1 
6 
2 
1 


1 

2 

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1 
1 
1 
2 

1 

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1 

3 


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2 

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1 








1 

1 


3 
12 

4 
5 
4 
2 


7 
55 
14 
23 
13 

8 

6 

18 
23 

7 
24 
26 

9 
23 

22 
13 

13 

7 

6 

13 
53 

6 

6 
28 

4 
15 

2 
32 
14 
46 
12 
15 
17 
23 
33 

8 

38 

36 

9 

4 

14 

39 

35 

24 

3 

39 

20 


9 
51 
23 
21 

5 
11 

7 

17 
24 
11 
18 
75 
18 
35 

19 
17 

12 
12 
14 

23 
49 
22 
10 
23 

5 
23 
19 
32 
15 
40 
16 
12 
14 
20 
39 

8 

35 
33 
28 
23 
38 
55 
43 
41 
8 
34 
13 


8 
28 
10 
19 

6 

14 
14 

7 
10 

6 
14 
55 
15 
24 

14 

9 

12 

6 
15 

16 

39 

31 

12 

19 

8 

11 

28 

25 

6 

32 

8 

9 

1 

20 

9 

4 

13 

18 

33 
16 
28 
22 
23 
28 

2 
16 

8 


12 
7 
5 

12 
2 
6 

13 
2 
4 
4 
9 

12 
5 
7 

5 
12 

12 

2 
7 
9 
25 
23 
c 

7 

6 

8 

10 

li 

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4 
1 
1 

9 
2 
3 

7 

5 

22 

14 

11 

10 

4 

7 

1 

3 


2 

1 

1 








2 
3 


1 






4 


1 


2 




5 




.... 






6 

7 


3 
5 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
3 
2 

1 

9 


3 


2 


1 


8 








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2 
6 
3 
6 
4 
1 
9 

3 
15 

3 
1 
4 
2 

13 
2 
1 
4 
5 
5 








Q 








10 


1 

'2 

3 














11 


1 






1 


2 






1? 






13 


1 
2 

1 


1 




14 
15 




1 




2 

1 

2 


2 
1 


16 


1 

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2 












17 












18 
19 
70 








i 

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5 
5 
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5 
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77 


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13 

3 
2 
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1 

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2 
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74 


1 
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1 

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25 




.... 

1 




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26 

27 
78 


3 
5 
2 

1 


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29 












30 
31 
37 








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6 
5 

20 
2 

20 
2 
9 

10 
1 

7 

10 
1 
2 
5 

13 

14 

15 

6 

9 

7 




33 


2 














34 








2 
1 








35 




















36 


11 

5 
2 

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14 

14 

11 

9 

10 

6 

3 

3 

18 


3 
1 
1 

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5 
1 






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39 










40 


3 
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41 
42 


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48 


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1 










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49 

























248 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 





Middle School 




Boys 


Girls 


Collegiate 
Institutes 


(A 

03 

>> 


u 

o3 

CD 

>> 


u 

o3 

CD 

>> 


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u 

CD 

>> 


en 

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en 

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10 


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>> 

SO 


en 

u 

CD 


en 

u 

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00 


en 
u 

03 

CD 
On 


en 

Ih 
03 
CD 
>> 

O 

cs 


Ih 
CD 
> 
O 

C 

OJ 
CM 


1 Barrie 




1 

4 

1 

5 
5 
1 
1 
6 
8 
2 
1 


5 

16 

12 

11 
6 
3 
4 
8 
6 
7 

11 

20 
4 

36 

16 

8 

43 

1 

4 

8 

7 

5 

51 

13 

2 

9 

3 

3 

2 

22 

4 

23 

16 

12 

7 

7 

15 
5 

11 

33 
6 


16 

42 

15 

9 

9 

6 

6 

12 

34 

2 

21 

63 

7 

36 

13 

24 

47 

4 

3 

11 

10 

13 

87 

18 

5 

20 

7 

6 

8 

26 

12 

20 

20 

15 

5 

7 

29 

7 

27 
29 
31 
11 
27 
46 
4= 
1 45 
2 


10 

32 

14 

6 

3 

6 

16 
14 
10 
7 
12 
50 
9 
36 

19 
10 
43 


4 

17 
4 
6 
3 
3 
5 

10 
5 
2 
6 

45 
3 

14 

5 

9 

19 


4 

7 


...1 2 
4 ... 


"1 
1 


5 
8 
4 
3 
4 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
8 
5 
2 
7 

6 


8r 1 


7 
32 
21 

7 
11 

1 
12 
16 
14 

6 

18 
58 

9 
32 

4 
16 
44 

6 

7 

6 

13 

61 

21 

14 

8 

12 

10 

18 

20 

15 

19 

21 

9 

13 

16 

12 

16 

27 
30 
34 
25 
28 
36 
31 
30 
14 
8 
22 


5 

8 

7 

4 

5 

3 

8 

7 

6 

1 

5 
39 

6 
17 

1 

9 

18 

6 

3 

1 

3 

35 

11 

10 

8 

8 

7 

11 

4 

4 

11 

9 

2 

6 

10 

15 

1 

14 

10 

22 

6 

17 

16 

12 

13 

4 

4 

7 


2 
4 


... 


2 Brantford 




33 
15 
13 
13 

6 

7 

10 
12 

8 
11 
15 

5 
26 

12 
13 
46 

6 

11 

10 

12 

39 

11 

3 

5 

2 

7 

2 

13 
11 
25 
16 
19 
12 
9 

22 
8 

30 

23 
8 

12 
13 
46 
33 
20 
16 
13 
22 


40 
24 
13 
10 

6 

14 
18 
21 
12 
23 
52 

9 
43 

13 
12 
59 

2 

7 

9 
12 
11 
62 
18 

8 
17 

9 
12 

9 

20 
16 
21 
27 
18 
18 
16 

8 
14 

33 
44 
17 
18 
17 
68 
31 
34 
9 
24 
25 






3 Brockville 


2 








4 Chatham 


4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
3 
1 
7 
10 

"5 

3 
1 
7 
2 
4 
3 
3 
3 

14 
3 
2 
2 
1 


1 










5 Clinton 




3 
1 
2 
1 
5 
1 
1 
9 
1 
3 




1 


6 Cobourg 




1 
1 

"2 

"3 

8 
1 
4 

"2 
6 
2 

"2 

1 

"5 
"2 


1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

2 
1 
2 


"1 
"i 

"i 

"1 

2 




7 Collingwood 




"i 

2 

1 

4 


1 


8 Fort William 

9 Gait 


2 


1 


10 Goderich 






11 Guelph 


1 


1 


12 Hamilton 


1 


13 Ingersoll 








14 Kingston 


1 


8 

2 

6 

13 

1 


1 


15 Kitchener- 
Waterloo 




16 Lindsay 


2 

2 
3 
1 


2 

8 

4 


1 
1 
1 
3 


1 


17 London 


5 


1 


14 




18 Morrisburg 




19 Napanee 


3 

13 
12 
10 
55 
15 

9 
13 

5 

6 
12 
21 

7 

18 
21 
11 
11 
12 
11 
15 

37 
26 
3* 
25 
31 
43 
3/ 
35 

e 

n 

1! 


6 
2 
7 
9 

37 

11 

10 

10 

3 

4 

6 

13 

2 

11 

8 

6 

4 

11 

3 

2 

34 
13 
34 
18 
16 
35 
15 

n 

2 


1 
1 

"2 
1 
3 

1 


"1 
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2 
1 

12 
2 

14 
5 
1 
3 

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20 Niagara Falls. . . 




21 North Bay 




3 

1 

15 


2 
3 
5 
4 
5 
3 
2 
3 
5 
2 
1 
1 
3 






22 Orillia 




1 

"i 

3 
1 
3 


1 


23 Ottawa 


1 


1 


24 Owen Sound 




25 Perth 








26 Peterborough 




4 

1 
3 
1 
6 
5 
9 
2 

10 
2 
1 
4 




27 Picton 




2 


28 Port Arthur 




1 


29 Renfrew 




1 
1 
2 
4 

8 








30 St. Catharines 

31 St. Mary's 


2 




1 




4 

7 

11 

3 

7 




32 St. Thomas 


1 
1 
4 


"3 


"2 


1 




33 Sarnia 

34 Sault Ste. Marie 


3 


2 


35 Seaforth .... 
















36 Smith's Falls 




1 
3 


1 

1 


1 




2 
1 


3 
2 

2 

3 
4 

10 
3 
6 

11 
4 
5 
1 


2 
"3 

"i 

2 
1 
1 
2 




37 Stratford 


1 






7 


Toronto — 
39 Harbord 




4 
12 

2 


15 
1 

17 

10 
6 
7 
6 
4 


5 


1 


3 


6 

11 

2 




40 Humberside 


3 




41 Jarvis. . . . . . . 


4 

"i 

3 
1 
1 


5 
1 

4 




? 


42 Malvern 






43 North 




2 

21 

( 

t 


U 
4= 
25 

» 34 
5 

11 
V, 




3 

12 
10 
12 
4 
6 
1C 




44 Oakwood 


3 


2 


45 Parkdale 


2 


46 Riverdale 


1 


47 Vankleek Hill 






48 Windsor . 




1 
1 


1 




i 






49 Woodstock. . 




3 















1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



249 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 



Upper School 



Boys 



Girls 





3 


3 


.. 2 


7 


7 


.. 1 


3 


8 


.. 4 


3 


2 




2 


4 




2 


3 




3 


2 




2 


3 


... 1 


6 


5 
1 




2 


5 




3 


14 




3 


2 


1 


2 


2 


.. 1 


7 


21 


3 2 


5 


4 


2 8 


11 


11 




1 


3 


1 


1 


2 




4 


2 




1 


1 
4 




9 


12 








1 


2 


3 







2 




3 


4 


• .. 2 


5 
1 


6 


... 1 


5 


6 
6 

4 


... 1 


5 


... 1 


10 


6 

2 

10 




5 


... 2 


3 


8 


1 


10 


12 


... 1 


6 


12 


1 




4 


... 1 


3 


6 




2 


6 


1 


6 


18 




2 


11 




2 


4 




1 


1 


1 3 


7 


8 




3 


6 



12 
4 
8 

10 

11 

7 

13 



185 

437 

184 

184 

93 

98 

107 

187 

242 

88 

260 

653 

106 

351 

230 
223 
637 

60 

82 
134 
178 
168 
987 
216 
116 
261 

98 
170 
157 
339 
118 
370 
218 
228 
111 
165 
319 

98 

484 
508 
482 
245 
317 
624 
455 
502 
70 
399 
239 



209 
472 
230 
221 
134 
118 
162 
172 
218 
115 
309 
663 
144 
366 

210 
238 
683 

92 
162 

99 
163 
196 
732 
263 
149 
252 
147 
216 
220 
370 
164 
427 
206 
230 
131 
228 
302 
116 

370 
410 
308 
228 
330 
594 
403 
448 
104 
314 
272 



250 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 



High Schools 



Lower School, Form I 



Boys 



Girls 



1 Alexandria. . . . 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg. . 

5 Arnprior 

6 Arthur 

7 Athens 

8 Aurora 

9 Avon more. . . . 

10 Aylmer 

11 Beamsville.. . . 

12 Belleville 

13 Bowrnanville . . 

14 Bracebridge. . . 

15 Bradford 

16 Brampton. . . . 

17 Brighton 

18 Burford 

19 Burlington 

20 Caledonia. . . . 

21 Campbellford. 

22 Carleton Place 

23 Cayuga 

24 Chapleau 

25 Chatsworth. . . 

26 Chesley 

27 Chesterville. . . 

28 Colborne 

29 Cornwall 

30 Deseronto .... 

31 Dundalk 

32 Dundas 

33 Dunnville. . . . 

34 Durham 

35 Dutton 

36 Elmira 

37 Elora 

38 Essex 

39 Exeter 

40 Fergus 

41 Flesherton. . . . 

42 Forest 

43 Fort Frances . . 

44 Gananoque . . . 

45 Georgetown. . . 

46 Glencoe 

47 Gravenhurst. . 

48 Grimsby 

49 Hagersville. . . 

50 Haileybury. . . 

51 Harriston 

52 Hawkesbury. . 

53 Iroquois 

54 Kemptville. . . 

55 Kenora 

56 Kincardine. . . , 

57 Kingsville. . . . 



9 


4 

7 
9 
5 
9 
4 
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8 

11 
4 

12 
4 
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1 
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6 


1 
1 




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10 














7 
















6 


1 














1 
1 

2 


4 














6 


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8 
4 
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4 
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1 
2 
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5 


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4 


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19 


9 
1 

2 
3 
3 
1 
1 


2 
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1 
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5 
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5 


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4 
6 

4 
4 

12 

6 
4 
2 
9 

10 
2 
3 

18 
5 
1 
7 
7 
8 
9 
4 
1 
2 
7 
5 
8 

15 
2 
4 

12 
5 
4 

12 

6 
6 
7 

12 
1 
4 
1 
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9 
7 

6 

8 

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15 

9 

3 

2 

3 

7 
15 

6 



10 
4 
7 
3 

30 

10 
5 

12 
4 

11 
8 

29 
6 
5 
7 

26 
3 
8 

10 

10 

17 
9 
2 
2 
6 
6 
2 

10 

35 
3 
6 

14 

13 
5 
9 
1 
8 
9 
6 
6 
3 
9 
9 

15 

13 
7 
6 
9 

11 

15 
8 
2 
9 
7 

17 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



251 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 





Lower School, Form II 




Boys 


Girls 


en 
u 

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2 
4 

12 

2 
5 
7 
2 
4 
6 
2 
5 
5 
6 
4 
1 
6 
2 
5 
1 
6 
2 
6 
2 
8 
5 

"3 
7 
8 
6 

2 


4 

12 
7 
6 

21 
3 
7 
7 
2 
7 
6 

24 

11 
4 
3 

16 
6 

2 
4 
7 

17 
7 
1 
6 
3 
1 

12 

25 
7 
6 
3 
4 
3 
7 
3 
3 
7 
6 
5 
1 

10 
3 
() 
8 
6 
3 

13 
8 
8 
6 
2 
5 
5 
2 
8 
4 


6 

5 
9 
6 
11 
1 

5 
1 
5 
3 

29 
4 

10 
5 
6 
1 
3 
9 
7 
5 
8 
1 
6 
3 

6 

8 

7 

14 
1 
5 
1 

6 
( i 
4 

2 

5 
3 
3 

4 

3 

6 
10 

3 

4 

3 

2 

4 

8 

2 

7 

5 

4 
12 
12 

3 


3 
4 

1 

4 
3 

1 
1 
1 

2 

*5 
15 
1 
4 
2 
1 
3 


1 
2 . 

i . 

1 


1 




? 








3 

i 

1 






S 


1 




4 






S 


1 




6 






7 








8 


1 . 
1 . 

1 . 

2 . 
1 . 






Q 














10 


5 
6 
6 

"i 

5 
2 
2 

4 

"i 

6 

2 

"4 
2 

"7 
1 
4 

"2 
1 

"l 

"l 

"l 

2 
2 
6 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
4 

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1 
1 
1 
5 
3 


"3 

2 

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"i 

5 

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1 

1 

"1 

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"1 

"1 

1 

"2 
1 


1 
1 

1 




' i 








11 




1 


1? 






1 

3 

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1 




H 






14 


2 . 
1 . 






15 






16 






17 








18 








19 


2 
3 
2 
2 
1 

'4 
1 

11 

1 
1 




. 1 




70 


i 
1 








2 
1 
1 

2 
1 
4 
3 
2 
5 
1 

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3 

' '2 
1 
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2 
3 

5 

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22 


1 '. 
1 . 

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1 . 

'5 
1 . 
1 . 


. 1 




74 






25 
96 


1 .. 
1 




97 






28 
29 
SO 


1 .. 

2 .. 


"i 


SI 






s? 






S3 








34 


5 

1 
2 
1 
1 








S5 








36 








37 








38 


1 . 






39 






40 


5 
1 
3 
2 
5 
3 
1 
3 








41 


'3 . 

2 . 
7 


1 




4? 






43 






44 


I 1 
I 




45 
46 






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1 

' 1 

2 
1 
4 
4 
1 
3 
1 


.... 


47 








48 


"i 

2 

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2 
2 


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40 


1 
3 

2 
1 

6 
4 
7 

8 
2 


1 . 






50 






51 


1 . 

1 . 

2 1 
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4 1 

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52 






53 

54 


i .. 




55 
56 


1 

> 


1 


57 




1 L 




..'... 







252 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 





Middle School 




Boys 


Girls 


High Schools 


en 

CO 


en 
u 
a 


10 


en 


en 
Ih 

Cj 
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>> 


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en 

l-H 

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03 
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03 
0) 


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o3 
<t> 
>> 


en 

a 

>> 


en 
in 

03 


en 

Ih 


en 

li 
03 


en 

Ih 

r3 
OJ 
>. 

O 
CN 


Ih 
O 

c 
cd 


1 Alexandria 








2 
1 
3 
1 
4 
4 

10 
3 
2 

11 
3 

11 
7 
7 
4 
9 
4 
2 

"3 

7 
9 
2 
2 

"5 
2 
4 
16 
1 
4 
3 
3 
5 
1 
5 


1 

4 


8 
2 


3 

2 








1 


2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
8 
4 
6 
3 
8 
1 
8 

14 
3 
5 
3 

8 
1 
6 
3 
2 
1 
2 


7 

1 

2 
3 
7 
8 
9 
8 
4 

10 
5 

20 
4 
7 
3 

12 

7 
3 
9 

10 
6 
1 
1 
6 
7 
4 

13 
6 
4 
6 
6 
7 
7 
2 

"5 

13 

8 

5 

5 

1 

8 

3 

12 

1 

11 

12 

5 

6 

3 

8 

7 

4 

3 

5 


9 

5 
6 
4 

29 
3 
9 
9 
5 
5 
6 

24 
4 
3 
5 

27 

1 
11 
10 

12 
8 
1 

"9 
4 
1 
27 
4 
6 
1 
12 
11 
5 
5 
8 
6 
4 
1 
6 
7 
6 
6 
3 
4 
2 
3 
6 
7 
2 
3 
6 
3 
8 
6 
2 


.1 
8 
1 
1 

20 
1 
5 
6 
2 
2 
7 

10 
8 
3 
2 
5 

2 
7 
5 
7 
3 
1 
1 
5 
7 
4 
12 
2 
4 


4 
6 
3 






2 Aliiston. . 






1 
5 
4 
2 
2 
1 
4 
3 
5 


1 
1 


1 




3 
1 


? 


3 Almonte . . 


3 


2 
1 
1 








4 Amherstburg 


1 
10 

2 
9 
3 
1 

5 
8 

27 
4 
8 
3 

13 
2 
1 

"l 
3 

7 

"5 
1 
2 
4 
5 
3 
3 
1 
6 
3 
5 
3 


"8 
1 

5 
3 


1 

5 
1 










5 Arnprior 




1 






1 


3 


1 




6 Arthur. . . . 






7 Athens 








1 










? 


8 Aurora 




2 


2 




1 
4 












1 


1 


"2 

2 
1 
1 




1() Aylmer . 






3 
4 
8 
2 
10 
1 
6 
3 


1 
2 
3 
2 
4 






1 1 Beamsville 






"l 


1 










*2 Belleville 




1 


5 
6 
1 
4 
1 
4 


2 
3 

7 
1 




















1 






15 Bradford 










1 


^6 Brampton 








































18 Burford 














3 
1 

2 


1 


1°- Burlington 




3 
1 
1 

1 


2 
1 
4 
3 


2 

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3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
5 
1 

"2 
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1 
3 


1 
1 
2 
4 
1 
2 




















2 
2 
4 

1 


1 




2 1 Campbellford. . 












2 2 Carleton Place 




1 


1 






1 
















1 


2 
2 
3 
2 
4 
8 
2 

"5 

7 
4 




1 


"2 


"3 






^5 Chatsworth.. 
















2 
















1 
1 
1 
2 
1 

3 








1 
1 
6 

1 


3 

3 

11 

2 


2 






2 8 Colborne . 




1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 










29 Cornwall . 


1 






1 


4 

2 

5 


1 




30 Deseronto 




3l Dundalk. . 




1 








1 


^2 Dundas . 






1 

"i 
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' '2 
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2 
2 

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4 
4 


6 
3 
7 
2 
3 
1 
4 
16 
6 
1 
1 
3 
2 
7 
4 
1 
1 
6 
4 
5 
5 
3 
5 
1 








3 
1 
1 

2 

"i 


"i 
1 


5 
8 
2 
2 
1 


3 
3 
1 


1 

1 
1 




34 Durham 


1 
2 




35 Dutton . 


1 




1 


2 




37 Elora . 


1 
9 

5 
3 
2 
8 

"5 
3 
2 
1 
6 
1 
3 
5 
4 
1 
3 
7 
2 
3 


2 
2 
5 
1 
1 
3 
1 
5 
3 

"i 
1 

4 
2 
1 
2 
2 
3 
3 

6 


1 

2 
1 








38 Essex 






3 
6 

5 


3 

8 
7 
4 
4 
5 
5 
1 
4 

6 
7 
6 
7 
4 
3 
4 
1 
1 








39 Exeter. . 


1 


3 

5 


3 
2 
3 
6 

7 
2 
9 
1 

"2 

1 
3 
7 
1 
6 
5 
1 
6 
2 


1 






40 Fergus 












2 
3 








3 
2 


1 

2 




42 Forest . . 
























2 
2 
4 
2 
3 
5 
1 
6 
3 
3 
4 
3 
2 


















"i 

1 

"i 

2 


1 
1 








1 






45 Georgetown 




"i 






4 

2 










2 
1 
3 
1 






'i 










1 










49 Hagersville . . 








3 










4 
1 
1 


"2 
3 
3 
3 


'i 




51 Harriston 


1 


1 


"2 


2 
1 


1 
















"3 


1 


54 Kemptville . ... 




3 
1 
3 
4 


1 






2 
1 


1 






1 








2 






4 
4 


1 




57 Kingsville 






1 






1 


2 


1 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



253 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 













Upper School 






co 

>> 




6 




^co 

c 


6 




-0 


Boys 


Girls 




u 

C 

W 


co 

c3 
<D 
>> 


co 
u 

a 
<u 
>> 


CO 
U 

a 
<u 
>> 


CO 

CD 


to 
u 

00 


CO 

cd 


co 
u 

a 

CD 
O 


CU 

> 
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c 


co 

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CD 
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co 

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CO 
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ON 


co 

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cs 


u 

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> 
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6 



1 


























53 
45 
57 
35 
97 
62 
47 
66 
22 
73 
88 

196 
77 
63 
48 

105 
37 
23 
62 
50 
66 
92 
39 
34 
19 
67 
40 
30 

164 
32 
40 
77 
79 
53 
47 
40 
23 
56 
85 
82 
27 
52 
47 
77 
60 
57 
27 
57 
73 
84 
64 
34 
45 
62 
76 
87 
64 


89 
74 
80 
42 

178 
86 
56 

103 
42 
81 
93 

240 

102 
66 
54 

137 
58 
48 
75 
91 

115 

115 
59 
26 
35 
75 
60 
65 

247 
45 
67 
76 
92 
82 
97 
35 
50 
84 
88 
78 
37 
76 
70 

103 
88 
70 
40 
68 
87 

100 
74 
45 
77 
87 

103 

101 
76 


142 


2 
































119 


3 






2 


3 


2 










2 


1 


3 








137 


4 












77 


5 


"i 


1 


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1 


1 
1 


1 


1 

1 










1 

5 


2 


3 

2 


1 

3 




275 


6 

7 






1 


6 


148 
103 


8 


2 


2 








2 




2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 




169 


9 










64 


10 






1 

4 
3 
4 


1 

2 
3 
3 














4 
4 

5 
4 


2 

12 
4 
2 


1 






154 


11 


1 


2 
3 

2 


4 
2 
2 


1 
1 


1 




1 


3 
2 
3 


181 


12 


3 
1 






436 


13 








179 


14 














129 


15 
































102 


16 






1 


2 


9 


1 


1 










4 


1 






242 


17 


















95 


18 






2 


















2 
2 
8 
1 
3 




3 




71 


19 


















1 

2 
6 
1 
3 


137 


20 




"i 


1 
2 


1 

7 


1 
3 


1 

1 








1 
1 

2 
3 


2 

5 
2 
1 


1 

2 


"i 


141 


21 








181 


22 








207 


23 


1 


l 


1 


1 


1 


1 








98 


24 












60 


25 
































54 


26 






4 


4 


3 












3 


4 


3 






142 


27 
















100 


28 










1 
1 












2 
9 










95 


29 
30 


3 


2 


4 


3 


1 






2 


6 


3 


1 


1 




411 

77 


31 




1 
















1 

1 

2 


"3 

1 


1 
1 
1 


1 






107 


32 


3 


1 

1 


1 
1 








1 






153 


33 






1 






2 




1 


171 


34 














135 


35 




6 


2 


1 




1 




1 


3 


3 


5 










144 


36 










75 


37 
































73 


38 






1 

2 
2 






1 
1 

1 




1 


6 
1 


3 
1 


2 
2 
1 


4 
1 
2 






1 


140 


39 2 
40 


2 


1 
1 


1 
3 


"2 


1 

2 


"i 


173 
160 


41 










64 


42 
























1 
1 

1 
1 


"i 


1 




128 


43 






















3 
1 
1 

1 

2 


117 


44 






1 

3 


4 
6 


2 










1 

2 
1 






180 


45 




2 


1 






1 








148 


46 


1 






127 


47 




1 






















67 


48 


























125 


49 






1 


4 
1 

2 




1 


1 




1 


3 
1 

2 


2 
"2 


2 
1 


1 






160 


50 










184 


51 


1 


1 


1 


1 










1 






138 


52 










79 


53 








2 

2 
1 
3 
3 


2 
1 


2 








2 


1 
3 
1 
4 


3 

2 


1 
1 


1 




122 
149 


54 


1 
2 


2 

1 


2 

"i 


2 






55 






1 
1 
1 






179 
188 
140 


56 


3 
1 


1 








5 
3 


2 
2 






57 






2 






2 


1 



254 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



IV. 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 



High Schools 



Lower School, Form I 



Boys 



en 


CO 


co 


CO 




CO 




to 


S-c 


u 


i-i 


u 


s_ 


u 


H 


u 


ctf 


a 


nj 


a 


cd 


c3 


cd 


a 


QJ 


<v 


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<v 


0) 


<L> 


CD 


<u 


>, 


>» 


>> 


>> 


;>> 


>. 


>> 


>» 


O 


- 


cs 


«r> 


^ 


lO 


O 


t^ 



Girls 



58 Leamington. . . . 

59 Listowel 

60 Lucan 

Madoc 

Markdale 

Markham 

Meaford 

Midland 

66 Milton 

67 Mitchell 

68 Morewood 

69 Mount Forest . . 

70 Nepean 

71 Newburgh 

72 Newcastle 

73 Newmarket .... 

74 Niagara 

Niagara Falls S. 



76 Norwich. 

77 Norwood 

78 Oakville 

79 Omemee 

80 Orangeville 

81 Oshawa 

82 Paris 

83 Parkhill 

84 Parry Sound 

85 Pembroke 

86 Penetanguishene 

87 Petrolia 

88 Plantagenet 

89 Port Dover 

90 Port Elgin 

91 Port Hope 

92 Port Perry 

93 Port Rowan 

94 Prescott 

95 Richmond Hill. . 

96 Ridgetown 

97 Rockland 

98 Scarborough 

99 Shelburne 

100 Simcoe 

101 Smithville 

102 Stirling 

103 Streetsville 

104 Sudbury 

105 Sydenham 

106 Thorold 

107 Tillsonburg 

108 Toronto- 

Davenport. . . 

109 Trenton 

110 Tweed 

111 Uxbridge 

112 Vienna 

113 Wallarton 



() 
1 
9 
7 
5 
9 
3 
5 

10 

10 
2 
4 

10 
5 
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2 
3 
6 
6 
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7 
7 
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4 
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20 
13 

3 



11 1 



22 
3 

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11 
7 
2 
4 

10 

2 
6 
5 
7 
2 
3 
1 

13 
5 
9 
9 



31 13 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



255 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 
AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 





Lower School, Form II 




Boys 


Girls 


17 years 

18 years 

19 years 

20 years 


£ «J en 

£ >-« *-" 

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59 
















60 2 










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61 




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62 




2 








5 1.. 








63 










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64 




2 
1 








5 .. .. 








65 11.... 




5 
6 


2 .. 






7 6 2 
5 2.. 








66 2 


2 .. 








67 ........ 




1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


... 1 






5 .. .. 








68 1 








. 1 
1 


12.. 








69 11.... 




2 
2 
5 


4 . . 






5 3 2 
5 2.. 


2 






70 12.... 




1 .. 








71 3 




1 . . 






1 ... 


1 .. 1 
1 . . . . 








72 .... 1 .. 












73 




4 


6 

1 
4 

8 
2 
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15 
5 
5 
2 
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11 15 


? 5 . . 








74 1 


















75 1 






i '.'. 






1 5 
. 3 


9 3 

2 3 

6 9 

3 2 
13 4 
11 15 

7 6 
6 3 . 
6 6 
6 10 
2 7 

4 9 1 

2 5 

4 1 

6 3 

7 15 1 

3 1 
2 2 

5 10 

2 6 

8 8 
1 1 

4 8 

7 5 

8 12 

6 5 

7 5 

3 5 

8 2 

9 11 

5 8 . 
7 16 

10 12 
15 13 

4 5 
4 5 


4 1 . 






1 


76 1 




77 


.... 1 


1 

2 
3 








2 5 1 
1 .. 1 
4 2.. 








78 




7 
2 
4 

11 
4 
2 
6 
6 
2 

16 
1 
3 
3 
7 
1 
2 
1 
6 
3 

"i 

"5 
4 
3 
2 
2 
4 
2 

> 5 

L S 
I 2 

b <: 

L 4 










. 2 
. 1 




1 




79 . . 1 . . . 




1 

2 
2 
1 
1 
3 
2 
3 
1 
1 










80 9 . . 1 . 




1 .. 














81 3 1... 


.. .. 2 


1 

2 


2 .. 






2 11 

. 2 
4 


5 2.. 
4 4.. 






1 


82 




1 




83 1 




. 2 . 








84 3 


i 


1 
4 








3 


7 2.. 








85 11... 


1 1 


1 




i ; '. '. 


4 4.. 








86 




2 2 1 
1 2 1 
1 2 . 








87 2 






3 .. 












88 












1 1 

3 








89 






1 1 








90 .... 1 . 






2 
2 
2 








1 


13.. 








91 11... 


1 


3 








2 2 
i ... 
. 1 

? 


1 9 2 

2 2 1 
1 1 








92 2 


1 1 


i 










93 












94 5 




3 








9 3 1 
4 3 2 
6 2 1 
3 .. 1 
3 . . . . 








95 3 




"i 

3 

"l 


1 .. 














96 1 


1 


"i 
l 

2 


1 .. 






? 








97 


1 
















98 1 


2 


... 1 






. 2 
1 








99 1 




5 . . 








100 11.. 


1 








1 


3 .. .. 

3 2 


1 






101 








1 . . 






? 




102 




2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

\ 

4 
) 
i .. 








* 


4 3 1 
3 1 1 
7 1 .. 
6 2 2 








103 




1 
3 








4 








104 3 












2 
2 






105 2 










? 




106 












1 




107 1 




1 

2 


1 1 






1 


4 1 1 

9 1 1 

9 2.. 








108 


1 






2 5 
9 








109 1 
















110 2 1... 






... 2 






1 


4 2.. 








Ill 


] 


I 3 


... 1 






1 3 


2 3.. 

3 


1 






112 








113 5 .. .. 






> 


5 K 


[ : 












1 3 


3 3 2 


1 







256 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 





Middle School 




Boys 


Girls 


High Schools 


CO 

u 

03 
CD 


co 

0) 

>> 


co 
u 

a 

<D 

>> 


co 


co 
i-l 

Rj 


to 
1* 

o3 

CD 

>. 

CO 


CO 

u 
o3 

CD 

as 


CO 

u 
03 
<D 
>> 

O 


> 



C 

03 

CN 


co 
u 

a 

CD 


co 

u 

03 
0) 


co 

u 

a 

CD 


CO 

u 

03 

CD 


CO 
Vh 

03 
a> 
>> 


co 
u 

a 

CD 
>s 

00 


u 

co co ^ 

U lH > 

03 o3 O 

!£ & *a 

rt 

i-H CN ,_, 


58 Leamington 




2 

1 


2 
4 
6 


5 

10 
8 
3 
5 
4 
5 
6 
4 
5 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 
5 
1 
7 
1 
8 
7 
1 
8 
11 
5 
1 
4 
10 
2 
3 
2 
5 
1 
8 
1 
2 
4 
6 
6 


6 

7 
4 
1 
3 
3 
5 
2 
5 
1 
4 
2 
4 
4 
2 
8 
3 
6 
5 
9 
8 
2 
6 
13 
1 
2 
2 
4 
2 
4 


8 

7 

1 
1 

2 
3 
1 
4 
1 

"3 
1 
3 


1 

2 

"i 

1 
1 
1 

4 


1 






2 


6 

3 
1 

7 
3 


13 
8 
6 
7 
4 
3 
6 
6 

13 
7 
1 
8 
2 
6 


10 
6 
6 
6 
3 
6 
7 
6 
4 
6 
1 
6 
9 
4 


3 
5 
3 
6 
5 
8 
1 
8 
3 
1 
2 
4 
2 
7 
1 
6 

3 
2 
6 
6 
9 
2 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 
2 

10 
1 
1 
2 

"3 


1 . 


1 


59 Listowel 






60 Lucan 






1 






2 . 
6 




61 Madoc. . 










1 1 


62 Markdale 




2 


1 


'"2 


2 




2 




63 Markham. . 




3 

"2 ' 
1 . 

"i 
"i 

8 . 
1 . 


1 


64 Meaford 






1 

"l 
6 
2 
2 
5 
1 
2 
2 






1 


5 
4 
'11 
6 
1 
4 
3 
1 


1 


65 Midland 




1 


2 








66 Milton. . 












67 Mitchell 






1 

2 

' '2 


"i 
1 
1 


"i 




1 
3 


1 . 


68 More wood 




1 


1 . .. 


69 Mount Forest.. . . 




1 . 


70 Nepean 




2 




3 
3 


2 ... 


71 Newburgh 




1 


72 Newcastle. . . 










1 








73 Newmarket .... 






5 
1 

5 
4 

7 
4 




1 






4 


7 

7 
7 
9 
3 
9 

22 
9 
3 

12 
7 
4 
9 
2 
4 
6 
7 
4 
3 
7 
2 

10 


7 

4 
1 
8 
1 
8 

10 
3 

10 
4 
9 
5 
9 

"2 
8 
9 
2 
2 
6 
6 
6 
2 
1 
2 
8 
4 
6 
2 
6 
10 
6 
2 

16 
10 

2 
4 
2 
6 




74 Niagara 






1 












75 Niagara Falls S. . . . 




1 

7 
1 


5 
6 
2 
6 
1 
4 
2 
3 
4 
2 
3 
1 








1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 


3 
5 
4 
2 
4 
12 
6 
3 
5 
3 

4 

4 

7 




76 Norwich 




1 
1 
1 








2 . 
1 . 
1 . 
2 
3 
1 . 


1 


77 Norwood. . 










1 


78 Oakville 




1 




"i 




79 Omemee 






1 1 


80 Orangeville . . . 






1 
6 
1 
6 


4 
4 


2 
1 




3 . . . 


81 Oshawa 


1 
1 

3 


2 
1 
4 
3 
3 




82 Paris 




83 Parkhill 




3 


1 




2 
1 
1 . 

1 . 

2 . 


2 ... 


84 Parry Sound. . . 


1 1 


85 Pembroke 




3 
2 

7 


1 










86 Penetanguishene. . . . 












1 


87 Petrolia 


















88 Plantagenet 

89 Port Dover. . 


1 


1 


1 








2 
1 


3 

2 
1 




2 


1 








1 . 
1 . 

3 . 

"i . 
3 . 
1 
1 . 




90 Port Elgin 






2 
3 
1 










91 Port Hope 






7 
3 
1 
3 

5 
4 


4 
1 












92 Port Perry 


1 


1 


1 




1 




1 

1 
2 


1 ... 


93 Port Rowan 




94 Prescott 


1 


1 

2 
2 


3 
3 
2 


1 
1 

5 
1 

"3 
2 
2 












95 Richmond Hill 


3 








1 ... 


96 Ridgetown 


1 






1 


4 




97 Rockland 


1 
1 








98 Scarborough 

99 Shelburne 


3 




3 

2 
5 

5 
5 
2 
7 
3 

6 

18 
4 
4 

7 


2 

2 
10 

2 
2 

4 

7 
2 
6 

5 

28 
3 
5 
8 
1 
3 


"5 
4 
2 
4 

(S 

5 
2 
3 

23 

7 
2 
7 


1 


1 

1 


1 




3 
3 
4 
2 

13 
5 
3 
6 
1 

11 

12 

4 
3 
3 


7 
4 

14 
5 
9 
5 
7 
9 
9 

11 

12 
10 
6 
8 
3 
3 


2 
5 
3 

"i 






2 
1 . 

2 .. 


2 . 


100 Simcoe 




2 


1 








1 


101 Smithville. . . 






1 








102 Stirling 














1 


103 Streetsville 






2 

1 
3 














104 Sudbury 




4 


1 
3 








3 
3 


5 
2 

1 


1 . 

2 . 




105 Sydenham 






3 






106 Thorold 








107 Tillsonburg 






1 

7 
2 
1 
2 


1 

1 
2 
1 
1 


1 

"l 

1 

2 




2 


3 

5 
1 






108 Toronto, 

Davenport 




6 
1 


3 
3 

4 
2 
1 
4 


3 . 
2 . 
3 . 




109 Trenton 






1 10 Tweed 






Ill Uxbridge 




1 




1 


1 




112 Vienna. . . . 








113 Walkerton 




2 


2 


1 


1 












1 


1 .. 


1 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



257 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 
AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 



Upper School 


en 
>> 

O 

CQ 

6 

O 

H 


en 

3 


6 


H 


-0 

JO 


Boys 


Girls 



u 

c 
U 


In 

03 
CU 
>> 


en 
u 
Vt 

<V 

>^ 


u 

03 


03 

CU 
>> 


C/3 
In 
03 
0) 
>> 

00 


en 

o3 
CU 

Os 


en 

o3 
0) 

O 


U 

> 


-v 
c 

03 


en 

o3 

CD 
<* 


Ih 

03 

cu 

10 


en 
03 
>^ 


en 

In 

03 

CU 


en 

Ih 
03 
0) 

00 


en 

03 

CU 

>-. 


en 

u 

03 
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O 

CO 


Ih 

CU 
> 
O 

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c 

03 


6 

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O 

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58 







5 
3 
3 
2 
3 
2 
1 
2 
6 


1 

2 

2 

' 1 
6 








3 

1 
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2 


C) 









104 
90 
66 
46 
48 
48 
53 
84 
73 
64 
24 
53 
78 
41 
8 

105 
26 
95 
59 
73 
92 
17 
70 

179 
66 
49 
54 

117 
39 

101 
18 
24 
32 
93 
49 
21 
73 
70 
70 
17 
48 
35 
90 
36 
42 
33 
93 
54 
53 
83 

230 
91 
43 
77 
6 
51 


107 
98 
67 
78 
49 
80 
88 

109 
93 
73 
24 
91 
88 
67 
15 

119 
26 

104 
66 
48 
96 
39 

126 

180 
S3 
61 
97 
88 
57 

102 
32 
34 
51 

129 
55 
31 
83 
74 

110 
23 
68 
57 

110 
43 
87 
48 

115 
93 
59 
99 

162 
115 
66 
87 
14 
62 


211 
188 


59 


1 

4 
2 


4 
4 

2 


3 








7 
3 
1 
1 
4 
2 
5 


9 


60 






1 








133 


61 


2 
2 
1 


3 




"2 
7 
1 
1 
4 
2 


1 

2 
4 






124 


62 


"i 




07 


63 


"l 

1 


1 
1 

2 


2 
2 
1 








198 


64 






1 
1 


1 


141 


65 


1 
3 
1 














193 


66 








2 
1 






166 


67 




1 


7 


1 








1 


2 


1 




1 37 


68 








48 


69 






2 


2 




1 








4 


2 


2 








144 


70 


















166 


71 
































108 


72 






















1 
1 


"i 


1 
1 






93 


73 




2 


1 








1 




1 


2 


994 


74 












52 


75 




3 

1 
1 


1 
"3 


1 

1 


1 
1 






















199 


76 










2 
1 


1 

2 








195 


77 








1 




1 91 


78 














188 


79 
































56 


80 




1 
3 
1 


3 
1 
1 


2 

7 
1 


2 

5 




1 






4 
4 
1 
2 


4 
3 
4 

1 








1 
1 


196 


81 




1 


2 


1 


2 


350 


82 








140 


83 


1 


















1 m 


84 


























1 51 


85 




1 


1 


5 




1 










1 


1 


1 






905 


86 














06 


87 




3 


5 


2 


8 


2 








2 


4 


4 


1 


1 




203 
50 


88 








89 
































58 


90 
































S3 
222 
104 


91 








2 
1 


2 
2 


3 












2 
1 


1 


2 




92 


1 


1 


3 








1 


1 


93 
















52 
156 
144 
180 

40 


94 




3 


7 
2 
3 


3 
3 


2 

2 
2 








1 


1 


2 
2 
2 


1 
2 
1 








95 








1 

3 




1 


96 






1 








4 


97 








98 


1 




1 


1 


1 












2 


1 








116 
92 


99 


















100 
101 




4 


5 


4 


5 




1 




1 


3 


4 


3 




2 




200 
79 

129 
81 


102 






1 


1 












1 


1 


1 








103 






















104 


"i 


1 


3 


2 




1 

1 






2 


3 


1 










208 


105 










147 
112 
182 

392 
206 
109 
164 


106 
















107 






6 

4 
1 


2 

3 
2 


3 
5 


1 




1 


2 

1 
2 

2 


3 
4 

7 










108 


i 


3 


3 
1 

4 


2 
1 

4 




"i 


109 








1 
1 


110 






1 








111 


2 


5 


3 










112 








20 


113 


2 


1 


3 




1 








1 


1 


4 








113 



9 D.E. 



258 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 





















Lower School, 


Form I 














Boys 






Girl 


5 


High Schools 


XIX 

a 
o 


CO 

u 

03 
<D 
>> 


tn 

u 

a 

CO 

cn 


CO 

u 

a 
<v 
>» 

CO 


to 
u 

>> 


co 
u 

d 

co 

10 


co 
u 

a 


CO 


CO 

u 

03 

0) 

CO 


CO 

co 
>^ 

0\ 


co 
u 

o3 

CO 

>. 

O 


> 


C 
03 


co 

03 
O 


CO 

03 
>> 


CO 
CN 


10 

03 
co 

>> 

CO 


to 

03 
<L> 


to 

Ih 

03 
CD 
>, 


co 

u 

CD 

VO 


114 Walkerville 




1 


3 


16 

8 


15 
10 


16 
5 
3 
4 
2 
5 
9 

14 
13 
5 
4 
2 
8 


6 
6 
1 
2 
2 
1 
17 
2 
3 
9 


2 
3 

' 'l 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 














4 

5 
2 
2 
2 
5 
1 
9 
1 
1 
3 
1 


6 
9 

2 
5 
2 
4 
6 
24 
6 
2 
4 
6 
7 


16 

10 
2 
8 

12 

10 
9 

42 
7 
7 

10 
7 

10 


4 

4 

5 

3 

3 

3 

24 

14 

14 

12 

6 

3 

14 


1 


115 Wallaceburg. . 














1 


? 


116 Wardsville 




1 




1 










1 


117 Waterdown . . . 




3 
2 
1 
1 
9 
2 
2 
2 


5 
2 
4 
6 
16 
2 
1 

"3 
2 


6 
4 
5 

13 
18 
9 
4 
3 
4 
11 














118 Waterford. . . 




















119 Watford 
















3 


1 


120 Welland 








1 








16 


121 Weston 












4 


3 


122 Whitby 
















3 


123 Wiarton 


















S 


124 Williamstown . . . 


















1 


125 Winchester. . . . 






2 


















126 Wingham 






1 


1 

















1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



259 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 





Lower School, Form II 




Boys 


Girls 


to 
u 

cu 


en 
U 
OS 

OJ 

>. 

00 


en 

o3 
cu 


en 

OJ 


<u 
► 

o 

c 
pj 

cs 


en 
u 

03 

>> 


en 

S 
cu 
>> 


to 
u 
a 
<u 
>> 


CO 


CO 

H 

CU 
>> 


to 

!h 

03 

CU 

>> 


CO 
Ih 

o3 

CU 

>» 


CO 

c3 

CU 

>» 

00 


CO 

aj 


en 

03 
cu 
>i 

O 


CU 
> 
O 

e 

03 
CM 


en 



>1 


en 

cu 


co 
u 

03 

CU 

CO 


CO 

u 

03 
CU 


en 
S-H 

CU 

>»• 


en 

cu 



CO 

03 
CU 


en 

O 


en 
u 

03 
cu 


en 
U 

03 
CU 
>> 

O 
CS 


g3 


-0 

c 

cs 


114 . . 


1 
i 
i 


'i 










4 
1 

"l 

5 

' 2 

5 
1 


9 

5 

"i 

3 
3 
1 
16 
3 
3 
2 
3 
4 


15 
2 
2 
3 
3 
5 
8 

24 
9 
5 
2 
3 
6 


8 
3 

"4 

1 

io 

11 

7 
1 
1 

2 

8 


1 

4 
1 

"2 

10 

3 

"4 
5 
4 
1 












6 

1 


8 
1 


6 
3 
3 
4 
5 
5 
5 
26 
2 
2 
4 
9 
2 




11 

4 

7 

6 

8 

16 

21 

7 

3 

3 

6 

8 


6 

7 
2 
4 
2 

ii 
11 
10 

3 
3 

6 
4 


'4 
1 

2 

'2 

8 
6 

3 
2 
2 

i 










115 5 


1 

2 

1 

"2 
1 

"i 

2 












116 . . 


1 

'1 








1 








117 .. 

118 1 

119 1 










1 
"2 


1 






120 5 


3 
1 


1 






121 .. 






'1 




5 

"2 

4 

1 




122 1 








123 3 


3 
1 








124 .. 








125 .. 








126 1 




1 









260 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 





Middle School 




Boys 


Girls 


High Schools 


en 
u 

03 
<d 


en 
u 

a 

CD 


en 

o3 
<u 

>> 

to 


en 

Ih 

03 
CD 
>> 


en 
u 

03 

CD 
>> 


CO 

u 
a 

CD 
>> 

00 


en 

Vh 

03 
CD 

0\ 


en 

Ih 

03 

CD 
O 


Ih 

CD 
► 
O 

-a 
c 

03 

CN 


en 
Ih 
rt 

CD 


en 

Ih 

03 
CD 


en 

Ih 

a3 

CD 

to 


en 

Ih 

o3 

CD 


en 

03 

CD 


en 

Ih 

03 
CD 

co 


en 

Ih 

03 
CD 
>» 


en 

Ih 

03 
CD 

O 


Ih 

> 
O 

C 
03 


114 Walkerville 






7 


11 

7 
1 
3 
5 
1 
9 
15 
6 
1 
2 
5 
6 


7 
1 
2 
3 
2 
1 
7 

11 
6 
5 
4 
3 
5 


4 
2 
1 

"i 

i 

9 

7 

"4 

2 
5 
2 


2 










3 
7 
2 
4 
4 
3 
8 
1 
2 
2 
3 
7 
6 


4 

7 

1 

6 
1 
6 
8 

16 
9 
4 
5 
7 

1S 


4 

9 

1 

3 

4 

2 

6 

19 

10 

6 

9 

10 

7 


1 

4 
1 
2 
1 
3 
5 

15 
1 
2 
3 
9 
5 


1 

1 

2 

"i 

3 
3 

*'i 

"3 
1 


"i 

"i 
i 




115 Wallaceburg 










2 
1 


2 




116 Wardsville 








1 


"i 




1 


117 Waterdown 




2 
2 


1 

4 
5 
7 
9 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 




118 Waterford. . . 












119 Watford.... . 




1 

4 
1 
3 
1 
1 
7 
1 


2 
2 




"l 


1 

2 




120 Welland 


1 


1 

2 
2 




121 Weston 




122 Whitby 




1 










123 Wiarton 








1 
2 
2 
1 




124 Williamstown 






1 

1 








125 Winchester 






1 


126 Wingham. . . 

































SUMMARY BY 





10 yrs. 


11 yrs. 


12 yrs. 


13 yrs. 


14 yrs. 


LOWER SCHOOL 


Boys . . . 


2 


83 


533 


1,806 


2,662 


Form I 


Girls . . . 


1 


99 


680 


2,020 


2,841 




Boys . . . 




2 


54 


421 


1,299 


LOWER SCHOOL 






Form II 


Girls. . . 




1 


64 


529 


1,632 










Boys . . 








55 


313 


MIDDLE SCHOOL 










Girls. . . 








38 


364 














Boys . . . 










8 


UPPER SCHOOL 












Girls . . , 










8 














TOTALS BY 


Boys . . . 


2 


85 


587 


2,282 


4,282 


SEXES 


Girls. . . 


1 


100 


744 


2,587 


4,845 


GRAND TOTALS 


1922-3 


3 


185 


1,331 


4,869 


9,127 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



261 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Concluded) 

AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Concluded) 



Upper School 


co 

O 

pq 

O 

6 


H 


co 

"Ih 
O 

*o 
6 

"c3 


E- 




Boys 


Girls 


2 

c 
U 


J-c 

d 
>> 


co 

u 

a3 

<L> 

>> 


CO 

u 

a 


CO 

u 


CO 
Ih 

Oj 

a> 
>. 

oo 


CO 

a 

On 


CO 

3 

•0 


u 

> 


a 

a 

04 


CO 

u 
cu 


CO 

u 

CT3 

cu 


CO 

u 

a 

CU 

>> 




CO 

u 

a 
<u 


CO 
Ih 

a 

CU 

00 


CO 

u. 
a3 
CD 

On 


co 
u 

O 


U 

s 



C 

CNI 


6 


114 




1 

1 




2 


"2 


2 
1 


1 










3 
4 










130 
62 
17 
40 
34 
44 
141 
177 
75 
53 
36 
55 
74 


79 

108 

32 

53 

43 

68 

155 

231 

81 

67 

65 

86 

100 


209 


115 








4 


3 


2 






170 


116 










49 


117 


































93 


118 


































77 


119 






1 

5 
2 
1 


2 
4 
1 

2 
2 


2 
3 
7 
1 






1 
1 




"2 


2 
7 
1 
i 
1 
1 


4 
4 

1 
1 

4 

' i 

7 


"6 
3 


1 

1 
3 


1 




112 


120 
121 




2 
1 


3 


1 


296 

408 


122 


3 
1 










156 


123 




1 
1 


1 






1 






120 


124 


1 
1 
3 






1 


101 


125 


1 
? 


1 

4 


"4 


1 
? 


1 


i 


1 


1 


141 


126 


3 






174 

































AGE, SEX AND GRADE, 



15 yrs. 


16 yrs. 


17 yrs. 


18 yrs. 


19 yrs. 


20 yrs. 


21 yrs. 
or over 


TOTALS 


1,986 


875 


235 


53 


12 


6 


4 


8,257 


1,958 


853 


243 


54 


15 


5 


6 


8,775 


1,675 


1,261 


578 


170 


41 


5 


9 


5,515 


2,062 


1,456 


654 


188 


62 


12 


12 


6,672 


1,008 


1,570 


1,394 


829 


334 


122 


64 


5,689 


1,223 


1,843 


1,691 


905 


328 


77 


52 


6,521 


69 


251 


418 


445 


290 


128 


69 


1,678 


79 


294 


487 


392 


176 


57 


31 


1,524 


4,738 


3,957 


2,625 


1,497 


677 


261 


146 


21,139 


5,322 


4,446 


3,075 


1,539 


581 


151 


101 


23,492 


10,060 


8,403 


5,700 


3,036 


1,258 


412 


247 


44,631 



262 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



DAY VOCATIONAL 





I. 


TABLE P 


—ATTENDANCE, 


NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 




£ 
to 

O en 

<y_£ 

£ rt 
5 cu 


u 
O 

2 en 

+J o3 

og 
»-, o 

-p 

£ u 
*° 


Attendance of Full Time Pupils 


Attendance of 
Part Time Pupils 


Schools 


Total Number of 
Pupils on the Roll 
for the Year 


2 


a 


<D 3 <u 


No. admitted for first 
time to a Secondary 
School 





u 

(U o> 

Q * 





u 

<v 
Si 

B 

3 33 


<L> 


s 

to 


en 
Ih 

O 

E 

3 
o> 

3 

CO 


1 Chatham 

2 Collingwood 


4 


1 

2 

"i 

6 
2 
1 
4 
2 
11 
8 
1 
6 
4 

"2 


30 


20 


10 


21 


15 


192 


1 
19 




1 

19 


242 
4,109 


3 Fort William 


10 

4 

3 

48 

1 

24 

6 

24 

11 

8 

8 

79 

43 

13 


164 

158 

57 

849 

29 

663 

151 

485 

295 

177 

105 

1,846 

1,602 

376 


54 
55 
35 

691 

29 

306 

62 

253 

117 

81 

62 

1,324 

492 

107 


110 
103 

22 
158 

'"357 

89 

232 

178 

96 

43 

522 

1,110 

269 


137 
134 

34 
506 

21 
516 
116 
357 
271 
135 

71 

1,466 

1,395 

338 


78 

75 

28 

533 

29 

366 

71 

226 

165 

121 

55 

1,019 

1,395 

133 


195 

185 
177 
184 
72 
186 
185 
191 
184 
194 
183 
185 
184 
192 


4 Gait 










5 Haileybury 

6 Hamilton 

7 Kingston 

8 London 

9 Niagara Falls 

10 Ottawa 

1 1 Sarnia 

12 Sault Ste. Marie 










100 


100 




4,878 


329 


155 


174 


26,699 


37 
13 


36 
11 


1 

2 


7,106 
2,655 


13 Sudbury 

14 Toronto, Central .... 

15 Toronto, Commerce 


4 

485 


' 192 


4 
293 


255 
15,028 


16 Windsor. . 




















1 Totals, 1922-23 

2 Totals, 1921-22 


286 
212 


51 
60 


6,987 
5,344 


3,688 
3,067 


3,299 

2,277 


5,518 
4,260 


4,309 
2,722 




988 
574 


494 
251 


494 
323 


60,972 
37,776 


3 Increases 

4 Decreases 


74 


"9 


1,643 


621 


1,022 


1,258 


1,587 




414 


243 


171 


23,196 


























5 Percentages 








52.78 


47.21 


78.79 


61.67 






50. 


50. 















ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS 




Religious and Other 
Exercises 


3 
JS 

.22 

*bfl 

3 
to 


two 

03 


^3 
'a; 

a 
in 

3 
03 

3 

.2 

"to 



a 

S 

u 


u 

£ 
£ 

O 


tn 
O 

"> 

u 

3 

03 

u 
O 

-M 

tn 

s 


>> 

,3 

a, 

bfi 

O 
0> 






Schools 


Schools where the 
Bible or selections 
therefrom used 


T3 

1 N 
en .jh 

rv O 
£ 

o> G 
.3 s 

tn <3 

2 <u 

2 biO 


A 

'% 

<V 
3 

a 
O 

JB a> 
>> 

O 03 

•Si; 

(7) 


a 

£ 

2 cu 
11 

££ 
c3 w 


.2 

£ 
,3 

'u 

< 


1 Chatham 


1 


1 


1 




31 


31 


31 


23 


31 


31 


23 


2 Collingwood 




3 Fort William 

4 Gait 


1 
1 






1 
1 
1 
1 


164 
139 

57 
827 


47 

""57 

586 


164 
139 

57 
811 


109 
"674 


121 
84 
49 

797 


121 

55 

41 

676 


154 
155 


5 Haileybury 


41 


6 Hamilton 






676 


7 Kingston 








8 London 


1 

1 
1 
1 






"l 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


678 
151 
485 
308 
177 
100 
1,852 
1,602 
356 


678 

151 

485 

33 

34 

89 

1,852 


678 
151 
485 
263 
177 
100 
2,038 
1,602 
356 


324 

151 

485 

33 

88 

50 

1,232 

870 


596 

151 

485 

108 

177 

89 

1,846 

1,602 

356 


461 
119 
485 

82 
155 

70 

996 

1,332 

356 


617 


9 Niagara Falls. ........ 

10 Ottawa 


151 

485 


11 Sarnia 


277 


12 Sault Ste. Marie 


167 


13 Sudbury 


1 
1 




89 


14 Toronto, Central 

15 Toronto, Commerce. 


1,335 

1,440 

376 


16 Windsor 














Totals, 1922-23 


9 


1 


14 


12 


6,927 


4,043 


7,052 


4,039 


6,492 


4,980 


5,986 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



263 



SCHOOLS 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. 



Attendance of Special Pupils 


Number of Full Time Pupils from Families whose 
Head is occupied as below 


c 
o 
u 
<v 
Si 
B 

it 


01 


JO 

E 

<U 


to 

u 

3 
O 

w 

c 

QJ ■ 

3 


<U 

o 
1_ 
<u 

B 

s 

o 
U 


<U 
U 

3 

4-> 

3 
*c 

< 


<U 

<u +-> 
3 u, 

•Q o 

<" h ~ 

C C 3 

riQU 
•J 


bit) 
.S 

IS 

o 
cd 
cu 

H 


T3 
3 
cd 

-2 v 
cd £ 

r 1 - 1 CO 
H 3 


a 

3 
cu 
y 
O 
ojO 

.5 

3 to 

2 c 


to 

C 

.2 

cd 

a 

3 
o 
u 
O 

<u 

-3 

-M 

o 


3 

.2 

"cd 

a 

3 
O 

o 

O 

3 
O 

►3 

i 


1 2 


2 




1,303 


5 


4 






9 


3 


9 




2 








3 








27 

36 

6 

118 


4 
17 

1 
46 






44 
79 
20 

378 


31 
9 

16 
66 


52 

16 

8 

145 

29 


6 


4 












1 


5 








1 

7 


"'"i 


5 


6 120 

7 


58 


62 


34,804 


81 


8 49 

9 


28 


21 


16,723 


112 

53 
59 

16 
15 

7 

783 

576 

80 


75 
18 
16 
20 
12 

3 
33 

5 
11 


8 
1 
2 
2 


2 
2 


253 

51 

147 

148 

93 

16 

675 

689 

191 


92 

8 
87 
82 
41 
36 
30 
48 
49 


81J 40 
10! 8 


10 422 

11 




422 


13,236 


117 
15 
16 
41 
251 
144 
25 


57 
12 


12 3 


3 

3 

171 


""52 
605 


98 

4,484 
172,426 




13 55 

14 776 

15 


1 

39 

2 

1 


""is 

10 


1 

20 

128 


16 








19 












1 1,427 

2 1,604 


265 
540 


1,162 
1,064 


243,074 
351,214 


1,893 
1,219 


265 
203 


64 
79 


37 
57 


2,793 
2,008 


598 
462 


959 

798 


378 
518 


3 




98 


' 108, i 40 


674 


62 






785 


136 


161 




4 177 


275 


15 


20 


140 
















5 


18.57 


81.42 




27.09 


3.79 


.91 


.53 


39.97 


8.56 


13.72 


5.41 



BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 
















CO 

u 
XI 

CD 

bJO 
< 


>> 
u 

s 

o 

<U 

o 


>s 

U 

s 

o 

3 
O 

Vh 

H 


to 

cd 
B 

O) 

-3 

Cd 

a 
o 
*d 

CO 


hfl 

.s 

'a, 
a 

CO 

-a 

3 

CO 
two 

<U 

> 

3 


CO 

•2 
"So 

-3 

Ih 

CU 
3 
a> 

o 


'u 

a 

0) 


to 

CJ 

*3 
cd 

j=l 
a 
<u 

3 

.2 

"a 

a 
< 


f 

O) 

3 
O) 

o 

u 

to 

'§ 

0) 

.3 

u 


73 

CO 

3 
3 

>> 

u 

to 

a 

-3 

u 


-a 

3 
cd 

ox) ojo 
$ $ 


-a 

3 

cd 

;>> 

o >^ 

CO o 
3 a; 


3 

'$ 

cd 

Q 

"cd 

_u 

*3 
cd 

.3 
a 

<U 


3 
3 
bX> 

.s 

"fc£ 

cd 

Q 

3 CS 

2 <u 


b/0 

3 

"IS 

cd 

Q 

3 


<u 

IS 

Ih 

< 


bJO 

3 

"5 

cd 

Q 

"cd 

CJ 

cu 

-3 

CO 


1 9 


9 




9 




9 






9 








22 








2 


















3 109 


58 


11 


37 




58 


37 




11 








37 








4 46 














5 35 


19 
96 


19 

20 


"ii9 


12 


52 
443 


8 
525 




40 
94 




19 


35 


35 








6 167 




748 


S?7 


7 














8 389 


123 

7 
44 


15 


122 
53 




143 

53 

246 

204 

53 

33 

1,736 

1,440 

61 


48 
7 

75 
110 

53 

16 
264 


15 

iio 

88 
11 
68 


133 

27 

145 








251 
52 

184 

110 
88 
33 

974 


"44 


5 

52 

184 

110 




9 129 


26 








10 288 








11 82 




110 












12 143 


22 

36 

1,530 


10 

16 

440 


88 

38 

1,667 

97 


88 
11 

25 








13 78 


"911 


11 


11 

27 


36 

27 






8 


14 1,530 

15 1,155 


65 


60 




16 61 


61 


















61 


































4.221 


2,005 


531 


1,361 


23 


4,531 


1,143 


292 


2,349 


150 


57 


98 


1,847 


109 


1,159 


535 



264 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



DAY VOCATIONAL 

I. TABLE P— ATTENDANCE, NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 













bfl 






tuo 
















u 

o 




two 




O 






'3 




bfl 


c 




T3 

C 


J4 




•5 




.5 




£ 


IS 


bfl 


PQ 




.s 






bo 

c 


O 
O 




a 




"o3 




*TD 


r ) 


.s 


"§ « 






O) 




°C 


pq 


Schools 


o 
in 

O 


u 

O 

o 

ti- 


c 

<u 
o 

< 


o 

C 
3 
O 


O 
u 

c 
O 


c 

Is 


aj 

G 

-m 

Oh 


S.2 

c3 u 


tuO 
G 

£ 

3 


G 
'So 

G 

W 

B 
a 

+-> 
w 


C 

W 

.s 


a 

.2 

"aj 
*> 


aj c 
U-G 

+2 <-> 
o aj 

3^ 


-a 
c 

bfl&f 

c.S 

g g 

£ 3 


1 Chatham 


9 








12 




9 
















2 Collingwood 














10 


9 






3 Fort William 


11 


ll 






26 


26 
36 


11 












26 




4 Gait 


















5 Haileybury 




























6 Hamilton 


651 












629 














445 


7 Kingston 




















79 






8 London 


253 

26 

161 

110 

42 










230 

46 

154 

110 


"46 


78 

52 

154 

110 

53 

8 










48 




9 Niagara Falls 

10 Ottawa. . 


26 


7 




46 
154 
110 




















75 
110 


105 


11 Sarnia . . 


110 
















12 Sault Ste. Marie. . 
















13 Sudbury. . 








44 


8 


8 














14 Toronto, Central 


798 


410 


24 


410 


873 


204 


160 


50 


670 


62 






456 


711 


15 Toronto, Commerce. . 






























16 Windsor. . 


61 








61 














































Totals, 1922-23 


2,122 


557 


31 


410 


1,326 


814 


863 


505 


670 


62 


10 


38 


715 


1,261 



ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS 







to 









8 
















1 

03 

to 






aj 

•a 








* 




bJO 

G 


Q 


u 
Q 






aj 








aj 


Schools 


c/> 


a 


X) 






>, 








~aj 




3 


a 


a 




u 

.s 


O) 












s 






c 

'So 
>> 
IE 


aj bfl 
ba C 

.5-2 

a) 6 
m 


u 

g 

3 

OJ 





d 

OJ 
In 


.5 


03 

"S 

aJ 

a 

(75 


s 
s 



u 


1 Chatham 


10 


10 


10 


10 














2 Collingwood 






















3 Fort William 




21 


42 




21 




96 

93 






55 


4 Gait. 








64 


5 Haileybury . 


18 


17 


22 












6 Hamilton 




514 


156 




156 




100 


127 






7 Kingston . . 








8 London 


11 

8 


184 

8 


113 
8 


24 
8 


112 
8 


103 


87 
68 






126 


9 Niagara Falls . . 






45 


10 Ottawa. 


62 


62 


193 

25 


62 


221 

53 




160 

13 






111 


11 Sarnia. 




84 


40 


12 Sault Ste. Marie . 










36 


13 Sudbury. . 


5 


17 


20 




20 




32 






21 


14 Toronto, Central 


91 


390 


735 


91 


438 


25 


927 


478 






15 Toronto, Commerce 




















583 


16 Windsor 


17 


17 


17 




17 




288 






138 










Totals, 1922-23 


222 


1,240 


1,341 


195 


1 ,046 


128 


1,864 


605 


84 


1,219 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



265 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 



m 

a 

O 

-a 
3 
a 

10 

0) 

o <u 

s.s 

O bJO 


bio 

c 

Q 

L 

c 

B 
S 


3 
.2 

S 

O) 

a 
O 

c 

ci 

cu 

u, 
0) 

o 

a* 


3 

CO 
u. 

3 

*o 
U 


* 
o 

s 
.3- 


c 
t S) 

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3 
3 


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# 3 

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2 

Q 

aj 

3 

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53 


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3 

2 
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3 

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3 
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s 

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3 
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a 

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cu 

s 

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10 


10 


10 


2 




























3 37 


21 




21 


21 


21 


















42 

44 

22 

153 


21 


21 


4 




















5 


20 
597 




20 
80 


20 
80 




















22 


22 


6 574 


80 


80 


80 


80 












102 


7 














8 




























100 

8 

192 


86 

8 

62 


86 


9 




























8 


10 149 


94 

53 
34 




94 

53 


94 


94 


















62 


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25 


12 60 




























13 .... 




5 

178 

65 


5 

150 

33 


5 

352 

65 


5 
120 

24 


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5 
76 


5 
64 










20 

582 

65 

17 


5 
59 


5 


14 91 

15 .... 


890 


63 


113 


74 


12 


63 


324 


16 .... 






















17 
































1,021 


1,720 


63 


516 


403 


617 


229 


156 


161 


69 


113 


74 


12 


63 


1,255 


273 


682 



BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 



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s 

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W 


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3 

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CO 

a 


u 

CO 

B 

o 

a 

O 


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O 

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£ 

13 



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3 
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CO 

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1 


31 






















2 






















3 6 


106 
156 


137 
157 


106 

157 


106 

158 






164 

156 

22 

849 


47 








4 8 












5 






22 








6 87 


527 












501 






7 .... 
















8 41 


311 
39 
302 
160 
124 
29 


317 

84 

175 

158 

54 

55 


348 

88 

223 

160 

90 

55 


170 

52 

167 

167 

90 

55 






678 
151 
485 
308 


129 








9 16 












10 47 






216 








11 40 












12 10 














13 8 






104 

1,846 

1,602 

370 






11 




14 341 


15 


12 


180 
414 




170 


15 121 


1,535 

298 


1,602 

298 


1,602 

298 


732 
298 








16 .... 


























725 


3,618 


3,037 


3.127 


1,995 


IS 


12 


6.735 


1,008 


501 


11 


170 



266 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



DAY VOCATIONAL 

I. TABLE P— ATTENDANCE, NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 





Occupation of Part Time and 


Schools 


C 
u 
^ en 


en 
<u 

*o 
c3 

u 

H 

bJO 
C 

u 
O 

o 

1 


en 

CD 

H 

G 

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tn 

CD 

13 

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4-1 

U 
<D 

5 


tn 

CD 

u 

H 

(D 

h 


tn 

# 0) 

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en 

3 
*0 

G 

"c3 
O 

"g 

CD 

u 


en 

CD 

-o 

a 

1 

o 
£ 
o 

3 
< 


bJO 
03 G 

.s8 

0-1 


S bo 

Ph'-P 


tn 

CD 
Ih 

H 

u 

CD 

+J 

O 


1 Chatham 






















2 Collingwood 






















3 Fort William 






















4 Gait 






















5 Haileybury 






















6 Hamilton 


25 


5 




28 




1 




61 




3 


7 Kingston 




8 London 


19 


7 


4 


3 


9 


3 


5 


12 




32 


9 Niagara Falls 




10 Ottawa. . 


5 














26 






1 1 Sarnia 
















4 


12 Sault Ste. Marie 








3 














13 Sudbury 




















14 Toronto, Central 


10 


6 


14 


16 




11 


30 


118 


3 


76 


15 Toronto, Commerce 




16 Windsor 












































Totals, 1922-23 


59 


18 


18 


50 


9 


15 


35 


217 


3 


115 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



267 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Concluded) 



Special Pupils on Entering School 



G 

bfl.2 

.S"ed 

u a 

S 3 
2 <-> 

,0 U 

an 

i— j 


< 
.5 '55 

2 s 

Q * 


Bookkeeping and 
Stenography 


G 

a 

c/3 


3 
"u 

£ G 

6.2 

c3 "S. 

u 3 

o° 


0) 

u 

3 

"p 

biO 
< 


Women at Work 
in Factories 


G 

••H CO 

g a 

s 2 

O-G 


t-, 

QJ 

1 

0) 

CO 

3 
O 

X 


w 

1- 
1) 
a 

cu 
0) 

J* 
<u 
tfl 

3 

o 


en 
0) 

3 


en 

G 

.2 

a 

3 
CJ 

u 

O 

Ih 
0) 

»G 

o 


G 

.2 

-t-> 

a 

3 
o 
o 
O 

3 
O 

1 


1 






















1 

19 


2 


2 
























3 
























4 


























5 


























6 


1 


3 














15 




1 


77 


7 
















8 10 

9 


2 


3 


17 


3 


8 


94 


46 


31 


4 




52 


14 


10 
















25 
1 


235 
1 




75 


93 


11 2 








4 


1 








12 


















13 




1 


















37 
56 


21 


14 


170 


50 








35 


293 


205 


293 


168 


15 










16 




















































12 


173 


7 


67 


7 


9 


94 


81 


350 


460 


293 


241 


375 



268 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



DAY VOCATIONAL 
II. TABLE 0— VALUE OF 



Schools 



Value of Equipment 



>> 

u 



a 

u 

C 

CO 

a 



r- 1 TO 



CO 




3 








rt 




J-. 




rt 




a 




a 


4-> 


< 


C 

a» 


u 

<43 


C 3 




*tl 


C 


cu 


2 c 


m 


Q~ 



1 Chatham 

2 Collingwood 

3 Fort William 

4 Gait 

5 Haileybury 

6 Hamilton 

7 Kingston 

8 London 

9 Niagara Falls 

10 Ottawa 

1 1 Sarnia 

12 Sault Ste. Marie. . . 

13 Sudbury 

14 Toronto, Central... 

15 Toronto, Commerce 

16 Windsor 

1 Totals, 1922-23.... 

2 Totals, 1921-22.... 

3 Increases 

4 Decreases 

5 Percentages 



318 

306 

36 



169 
,143 
127 
971 
23 
293 



162 

429 

4,104 

3,353 

140 



11,574 
13,587 



2,013 



1.70 



125 
174 
207 
421 



130 

35 



7 
405 
397 



341 

250 

1,249 

"942 

10,115 

60 

422 

8,231 

6,970 

4,070 

5,264 

8,630 

44,060 



350 



1,945 

1,488 



90,954 
77,491 



457 



13,463 



28 



13.42 



11,392 



13,379 



977 
57,147 



27,456 
20,132 
14,206 
19,940 
11,931 
11,003 
96,019 



47,835 



331,417 
236,112 



95,305 



48.96 



1,152 
300 

3,121 



121 

12,077 

100 

7,517 

8,628 

7,605 

625 

5,578 

5,355 

26,559 

4,581 

855 



84,174 
74.242 



9,932 



12.43 



250 

1 



176 

1,559 

62 

1,050 

683 

671 

425 

438 

173 

2,645 



1,071 



9,204 
7,218 



1,986 



1.35 



2,012 
"915 

128 

33 

"'75 
589 
120 



3,879 
3,646 



233 



57 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



269 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

EQUIPMENT, ETC. 



Value of Equipment 


3 


•a 

d 
a 

C 

>! 


O M 

s 6 

g cn 

CX cn 

.-H cu 

3 >-, 
CTQ 


u 

9 c 


V-c 
O 

it 

a -g 

fl 


bfi 

s.s 

0i cn 

£ <u 

3 
era 


Ih 

3 

£3 

s.a 

rv cn 


-t-> 
a 

5 <" 

'3*0 

cr flj 

ll 


O 

« g 
> a 

OM 


'S 

In 

r3 ^5 
3 « 

. C 

21 

•So 

CO 


$ 

1 1,836 

2 

3 790 

4 

5 1,598 

6 2,124 

7 

8 4,241 

9 787 

10 1,328 

11 300 

12 422 

13 1,233 

14 4,275 

15 

16 91 


422 

"252 

"223 
644 

1,335 

296 

1,365 

256 

"454 
3,604 

"578 


34 

"269 

"274 
18 
57 
41 

..... 

309 

"*27 


1,62 

2 

"4 
1,79 


13 
! '"48 

5 !!"' 



33 

28 

6 "53 
8 121 

; "179 


4', 53 6 
"l7l 

2,642 

1,867 

90 


1,863 

110 

466 

1,518 

7,987 

7,121 

25 

1,878 

5,148 

923 

7,124 

420 

11,311 

52,579 

' 2,526 


$ 

17,640 

999 

19,293 

1,518 

12,318 

98,969 

581 

48,276 

43,966 

33,709 

32,877 

24,215 

38,776 

239,709 

10,318 

53,742 


237,179 

20,666 

385,488 

25,580 
176,897 
352,670 
615,123 
272,980 
6,562 
1,759,160 
630,712 


1 19,025 

2 15,473 


9,429 
8,251 


1,036 
874 


3,48 
3,63 


9 475 

1 409 


9,306 
4,625 


100,999 
101,938 


676,906 
548,985 


4,482,351 
3,646,707 


3 3,552 

4 


1,178 


162 


"l4 


66 

2 


4,681 


"*939 


127,921 


835,644 


5 2.81 


1.39 


.15 


.5 


1 .07 


1.37 


14.92 








270 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



EVENING VOGA 

III. TABLE R— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE 





CO 

u 

V 

•s 

a 

CD 

H 

o 

u 
a 

e 

3 


Attendance 


Schools 


o g 
"SLs 

152 
** 32 
£2 

S <u 

Z 4 " 


3 
O 

3 

CD 

B 

3 

a 


3 
O 

3 
<L> 

£ 
% 

3 

a 

co^ 

o u 


-a 

CD 
-M 

3 a 

aj >* 

co CD 

r3-3 
3 bo 

a 3 


| cd 

^X3 

a3 

CD c 

CO cd 

r3 o 
a ea 

Oh 


l to 

.3 CD 

*A 

CD 2 
co +j 

CO 

co "" 

r3 <d 

3 03 

0u*a 


3 

>-• « 
o to 

J5.S 

CD£ 

o w 

-5 ^ 
co 73 

3 « 


o 
o 

u 
to 

0) 
-3 

3 
to CD 

.5 o 

3 to 

CD 03 

> £ 


"o o 

CD 

£1 to 

S 3 

3 O 

3,3 

CD u 

W H 111 

»!» 

< W4J 


1 Amherstburg 

2 Barrie 

3 Beamsville 


8 
7 
8 

18 

25 

17 

14 

14 

6 

6 

4 

10 

24 

16 

10 

6 

32 

105 

8 

6 

6 

9 

18 

14 

44 

No 

15 

12 

10 

85 

20 

15 

13 

18 

18 

9 

11 

15 

14 

26 

16 

14 

13 

1 

5 

60 

194 

10 

6 

48 

14 


78 
101 
121 
400 
988 
389 
282 
160 
136 
105 

75 
169 
642 
335 

85 

140 

733 

3,739 

183 

96 
116 
104 
410 
189 
1,091 
report 
485 
265 
223 
4,748 
496 
303 
252 
408 
267 

52 
172 
410 
288 
765 
437 
518 
343 

31 

63 

2,790 

7,240 

194 

70 

1,655 

169 


36 

36 

55 

167 

427 

136 

119 

54 

8 

20 

42 

89 

336 

101 

29 

26 

240 

2,161 

52 

49 

82 

50 

161 

116 

595 

receiv 

301 

111 

89 

1,297 

176 

107 

37 

231 

135 

12 

118 

179 

141 

373 

190 

263 

105 

16 

54 

1,350 

3,434 

115 

5 

1,019 

80 


42 

65 

66 

233 

561 

253 

163 

106 

128 

85 

33 

80 

306 

234 

56 

114 

493 

1,578 

131 

47 

34 

54 

249 

73 

496 

ed. 

184 

154 

134 

3,451 

320 

196 

215 

177 

132 

40 

54 

231 

147 

392 

247 

255 

238 

15 

9 

1,440 

3,806 

79 

65 

636 

89 


78 

101 

104 

334 

740 

267 

154 

110 

74 

59 

53 

25 

455 

246 

7 

95 

530 

1,624 

183 

52 

98 

80 

291 

118 

808 

380 

185 

181 

2,514 

275 

224 

202 

201 

69 

42 

41 

291 

99 

765 

347 

429 

290 

31 

41 

2,025 

4,536 

152 

39 

1,307 

150 


59 

95 

113 

330 

609 

304 

201 

125 

124 

82 

45 

55 

289 

229 

65 

125 

481 

1,696 

126 

75 

72 

63 

359 

172 

717 

264 

212 

109 

4,162 

374 

288 

237 

227 

144 

42 

126 

219 

173 

623 

341 

383 

262 

22 

17 

1,621 

4,182 

91 

70 

972 

123 


9 

6 

8 

57 

348 

75 

61 

33 

11 

21 

7 

109 

191 

101 

16 

12 

208 

1,684 

45 

21 

16 

15 

28 

13 

321 

174 
41 
82 

414 

122 
8 
11 
95 
58 
10 
38 

162 
69 

101 
25 

122 

53 

9 

11 

899 

2,510 

76 


10 

"ii 

31 
10 
20 

2 
1 
2 

23 
5 
162 
5 
4 
3 

44 
359 

12 

"28 

26 

23 

4 

53 

47 

12 

32 

172 

■■■■ 7 

4 
86 
65 

"s 

29 
46 
41 
71 
13 
28 

"is 

270 

548 

27 


80 
47 
35 
47 
89 
48 
83 
76 
49 

112 
64 
87 

100 

134 
50 

219 
87 

110 
40 
48 
48 
26 

115 
93 

110 

121 
46 
40 

143 
44 
96 
39 
72 
59 
40 
70 
95 
64 

101 
62 

119 
45 
38 
53 

120 

124 
80 
80 

115 
58 


3,399 
8,390 
3,520 


4 Belleville 


12,454 


5 Brantford 


18,800 


6 Brockville 


12,950 


7 Chatham 


12,216 




2,828 
5,124 
5,504 


9 Collingwood 

10 Dundas 


11 Espanola 


3,425 


12 Fairbank 


8,754 


13 Fort William 

14 Gait 


18,659 
11,870 


15 Gananoque 

16 Goderich 


3,382 
2,244 


17 Guelph 


33,190 


18 Hamilton 


90,053 


19 Hespeler 


6,571 


20 Ingersoll 


3,982 


21 Iroquois Falls 

22 Kenora 


2,162 
3,154 


23 Kitchener 


15,856 


24 Lindsay 


4,985 


25 London 


39,640 


26 Midland 




27 Niagara Falls 

28 North Bay 

29 Oshawa 


14,112 

10,370 

9,509 


30 Ottawa 


348,605 


31 Owen Sound 

32 Pembroke 


10,896 
10,142 


33 Perth 


6,912 


34 Peterborough 

35 Port Arthur 

36 Port Hope 

37 Preston 


12,329 
9,806 
4,160 

10,038 


38 St. Catharines 

39 St. Thomas 

40 Sarnia 


12,674 
10,140 
21,882 


41 Sault Ste. Marie 

42 Stratford 


11,842 
17,146 


43 Sudbury 


10,768 


44 Swansea 


1,010 


45 Timmins 


2,397 


46 Toronto, Commerce. 

47 Toronto, Technical . 

48 Welland 


117,116 

449,293 

8,186 


49 Whitby 


2,206 


50 Windsor- Walkerville 

51 Woodstock 


479 
39 


204 

7 


61,644 
4,020 


Totals, 1922-23... 


1,097 


33,511 


15,125 


18,386 


21,502 


21,895 


9,024 


2,592 


3,921 


1,510,315 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



271 



TIONAL SCHOOLS 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. 















Occupation 


of pupils on entering school 












oo 

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28 

66 

165 




3 


7? 




















2 








21 


?S 


4 


5 


5 


2 
23 


' 1 
32 


18 

2 

28 


3 

3 

41 






5 


' '7 


40 

4 

89 


46 


?4 


2 
14 








10 


25 
?6 


18 


17 


13 


16 


14 


43 


4 


56 


?7 




3 


7 
2 


32 

1? 

18 
125 

16 
2 
1 

42 
6 
4 

19 

30 


7 








14 
15 
15 

74 


2 
1 

"78 


3 

5 
2 
58 
3 
1 


1 

"l3 


31 

3 
1 

77 


6 

3 




9 

9 

30 

124 

46 
9 
24 
18 
22 


1 


26 
5 
27 
185 
17 
28 
67 
29 


50 


^8 








38 


?9 


8 
11 

**4 

5 

40 




6 
19 

1 


43 

18 


8 
18 


135 
20 


63 


30 
31 


43 
1 


45 


81 
5 
1 
1 
4 


22 
' 2 


671 
19 


3? 


9 


1 




1 

1 

21 

21 


18 


ss 


5 
"'8 


"7 
1 


20 


34 
3S 




4 


1 


2 


11 

2 


3 


2 
12 


"5 


39 

17 


S6 










1 
1 
1 






8 
37 
45 
30 

2 
65 
28 


12 


S7 


29 

2 

12 

"4 








1 

4 
57 
11 

2 


13 
2 


9 

2 


1 
19 








1 
10 




1 

33 

58 

248 

8 

138 

7 

9 

2 


' '2 
"2 


26 


38 
39 


"2 

11 


. 4 

8 

3 

12 




2 


1 


21 
62 


40 


37 

6 

42 


2 






11 
10 

3 

5 


6 

5 

"2 


9 

5 
4 


7*7 


2 
10 

2 
8 


8 
1 
1 


1 


25 


41 
49 




15 
9 


81 
17 


43 


1 






4 


1 


80 


44 


















5 


2 


45 


















4 






10 


9 








46 
































47 
48 


17 

23 

3 

15 

5 


34 
1 


25 
2 


62 
13 


8 
4 


33 
3 


21 


28 


258 

10 

2 

65 


46 
1 


181 
1 


25 


199 
4 


208 
1 


18 


444 
3 
6 

106 

35 


70 


426 
11 


203 
17 


49 






10 


50 
51 


34 


15 


182 
9 


12 

5 


22 


4 


12 

5 


21 


51 

2 


19 


30 


19 


3 


15 


35 
19 


89 
14 




























738 


198 


187 


1,297 


142 


370 


139 


357 


793 


206 


400 


179 


651 


508 


57 


2,053 


101 


1,805 


2,286 



272 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



EVENING VOCATIONAL 

III. TABLE R— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE 





Occupations 


, etc.(Cont'd) 


Number of pupils in 


Schools 


en 
U 

<D 

u 

1 

<D 
en 

G 
O 


en 

u 

<L> 

a 

0) 

<v 
en 

O 

X 


en 

a 

.2 
+j 

03 

ft 
3 


O 
u 

O 


g 
.2 

a 
3 


O 



1 


U 

3 
+-> 
o3 

en 

G 
W 


bfl 

G 

"-a 

03 
0) 

P4 


G 
o3 

G 

.2 
■ ts M 

0.5 

aG 

£ a 


u 

a 

s 

s 

03 
u 

O 


en 

O 

*> 

u 

G 
03 

u 
O 
en 

s 


English for Non- 
English Speaking 
Persons 


cx 
a 

u 
be 
O 

O 


en 

<U 
en 
O 

1- ft 

£^ 

G— ■ 

US 
•gf 


1 Amherstburg 

2 Barrie 


9 

15 
24 
48 
32 
30 
13 

3 
10 

3 
21 
28 
56 
11 

4 

28 

68 

573 

12 

4 
10 

8 

33 

12 

65 

No 

8 
24 
20 
204 
49 
23 

7 
10 
12 

6 

7 

2 


19 

10 

32 

93 

205 

140 

63 

46 

40 

27 

8 

12 

65 

84 

19 

46 

122 

33 

42 

7 

25 

102 

33 

98 

repor 

55 

28 

1 

687 

185 

71 

50 

28 

43 

12 

27 

77 

28 

92 

55 

42 

63 


25 
15 
62 
98 
60 
68 

102 
36 
33 
16 
15 
70 

282 

83 

4 

28 

58 

1,981 

6 

18 

52 

14 

54 

48 

184 
t recei 

176 

79 

24 

1,514 

117 
85 
41 

119 

110 
2 
























16 


16 


16 








? 


3 Beamsville 

4 Belleville 












6 


58 












20 




19 


5 Brantford 

6 Brockville 












33 


6 
4 

8 






31 
46 


31 
20 




1 

5 






25 


46 




27 




17 


9 Collingwood 






18 
11 










18 


10 


10 


11 








11 










46 












101 

23 








38 


13 Fort William 

14 Gait 


59 

2 


23 


23 


23 


84 


84 










15 Gananoque 


14 


14 


14 


14 








is 








16 


17 Guelph 


2 
72 


76 
996 


76 
996 


76 
966 


76 
996 

73 


"996 

52 


19 
47 




23 


18 Hamilton 






73 






5 










21 Iroquois Falls 

9? TTprinra 












20 
14 






8 
8 














31 


23 Kitchener 












18 




10 
97 
















41 
ved 
54 
41 

"521 


97 


97 


97 








m 


26 Midland 










27 Niagara Falls 

28 North Bay 

29 Oshawa 


49 

46 

17 

214 


"46 

43 

214 


49 
46 
43 
214 
71 
62 
8 










33 


46 

17 

214 


"43 


6 
26 


46 


"21 


30 Of-tawfl 




31 Owen Sound 

32 Pembroke 

33 Perth 










47 
30 
26 

8 

7 


62 

5 


62 










9? 










8 


34 Peterborough 

35 Port Hope 

36 Port Arthur 










17 






12 


12 




34 




18 






16 


28 


28 


28 


28 


28 






17 


38 St. Catharines 

39 Sf Thomas 


120 
33 

232 
97 

175 

113 
15 
29 
2,566 
3,618 
55 
18 

500 
36 


33 












26 
22 
34 


26 
22 




3 




26 




24 
45 
12 
18 


50 

"41 
41 


22 
34 


22 
34 


11 


41 Sault Ste. Marie.. . 

42 Stratford 




50 




10S 






35 














13 




17 








15 






9 




9 

89 

135 

15 

11 

37 

2 


"545 

27 

20 

200 

24 












29 






46 Toronto, Comm'ce. 

47 Toronto, Technical 

48 Wei land 


135 
636 

3 


25 
687 


"639 


772 

639 

25 


167 
639 


19 

28 






24 
12 








19 


49 Whitby 










12 


50 Windsor-Walkerv'e 

51 Woodstock 


169 
13 


154 














118 
































Totals, 1922-23.. 


1,889 


3,731 


13,286 


2,138 


2,584 


2,377 


3,495 


2,517 


1,250 


453 


130 


889 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



273 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 



the various branches of instruction 



CD 

s 

< 


Xi 

<v 

< 


u 

+-> 

s 

o 

CD 

O 


o 

c 

.1 

u 


# o 

o3 

B 

<d 
o3 

a 
o 
-d 
C/3 


> 

CO 


to 
(J 

.4 
Oh 

13 
Ih 

O) 

G 

<u 

o 


>> 

o 

.C 

H 

+j 

o 

(U 

s 


T3 

p a> 

"a 
a 
< 

"C 
u 

4) 

s 


'3 

03 

is 
O 

# <D 

*E 
a 
< 


i-H 

to 

6 

.a 
U 

13 

1h 

O) 

c 
CD 

O 


CO 

# CD 

*c 

"5 => 
^^ 
w i— i 


J4 

o 

CD 
CD 


jw 

cu 
> 

< 


bo 

c 

o3 

Ui 

Q 

'5 
y 

CD 


b/> 

G 

Q ** 

CD S 

.SQ 

cjT3 
a3 G 


13 

It 

o c 
cD-r; 

f-| o3 


13 

CD bo 
CD g 

Ji<5 

CO 


1 








4 












8 
















2 16 
































3 




































4 








14 

24 












30 








11 

19 
10 
19 
14 








5 62 










20 


"10 


34 
10 
















6 32 
























7 40 






























8 






























1 




9 18 






























10 11 








11 




















2 
16 


2 
16 






11 22 


3 


2 


1 
























12 115 


























13 23 




18 


21 


21 
21 






14 


28 
5 




14 
10 








13 

31 

6 


13 






14 












15 10 


























16 


































17 76 














33 
256 


33 
46 


14 










17 

142 








18 








167 


22 




30 


18 








75 




19 73 


26 












20 






19 

25 

4 

10 




















19 
19 








21 25 


25 


















9 












22 










11 

22 


















23 12 












11 








11 

6 

67 








24 10 




























25 








17 






14 


48 






13 








23 


Q 


26 






















27 






5 


34 






29 


34 












16 




14 




28 46 


















29 17 








18 
16 




















18 

32 

16 

6 

8 

14 

7 

3 

3 

35 

16 

26 








30 214 












45 


43 




40 








'"l4 


34 




31 71 










30 


18 




32 62 








6 
















9 




33 8 














6 






2 








34 


27 




27 


14 
6 
3 

14 

52 






8 
23 










22 




8 


35 15 
















36 3 


























37 28 




























6 
11 




38 52 












35 


15 














39 26 




















40 








16 






18 


18 












26 


26 




41 34 




















42 








68 




14 




32 




24 








51 








43 12 


12 


12 
















44 31 
































45 10 
















13 














11 






46 766 


17 

355 






























47 764 


355 


166 


355 
22 






439 


488 
11 


24 


111 
3 


77 






100 
22 


46 


280 


IS 


48 25 












49 


























50 154 








19 






57 


57 












60 
4 








51 






























































2,883 


465 


387 


220 


983 


22 


34 


1,014 


921 


38 


281 


119 


30 


18 


859 


150 


479 


32 



274 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



EVENING VOCATIONAL 

III. TABLE R— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE 









Number of pupil 


s in the various branches 


of instruction 




Schools 


S-, 

O 

a 
o 

<v 

.5 
IS 

o 

Oj 


J* 

u 
O 

0) 

bfl 
O 
fa 


u 
O 

"oj 

0) 

CD 
CD 

C/3 


General Wood 
Working 

Cabinet Making 
and Toinerv 


bfl 
C 

S 

c 

Ih 

CD 

Oh 


2 
CQ.S 

■otS 

C 3 

Su 
&brf 

oj C 




03 .— 

• rj O 

c2 Q 


be 

IS 
S 

5u 


Steam and Gas 
Engines and Power 
Plants 


bo 

a 

<v 

CD 

c 

'So 
c 
W 
<u 
.5 

03 


c 

b/j 

*> 

03 


bJO 
C 

1 

H 


<v 

a 

03 

Oh 

"O bX 

c c 

« "C 

fa 


i 

o 
o 
PQ 

T3 
G 
aS 

bJO ^ 

c.S 
.S.S 

fa*^ 








































































































A Rpllpvillp 








39 
48 
39 
17 
8 
35 




























19 










31 


















































11 


































































































































































32 
15 


























13 Fort William 

14 Gait 


20 






13 
30 












12 


































































































17 Guelph 

18 Hamilton 


14 

337 

5 




44 


55 
197 


21 
























53 


102 






55 












75 


















1 








16 


















































































































4 














































92 

53 








83 




30 






26 














26 Midland 






48 


















27 Niagara Falls 

28 North Bay 


















































































42 








103 




24 






33 


13 


















39 
















32 Pembroke 
































33 Perth 




































































35 Port Arthur 




















12 










7 




36 Port Hone 








































































22 
34 
26 
20 






11 

34 

5 








32 












39 St Thomas 








34 
19 


' *2 




















68 
23 














14 


14 








41 Sault Ste. Marie... 

4.9 Stratford 
















































22 














































































10 












46 Toronto, Commerce 






































80 

27 


22 




97 


16 


24 


135 


554 










127 


48 Welland 


















49 Whitbv 


























30 






50 Windsor-Walkerv'e 

51 Woodstock 


31 








85 
25 




46 






42 


38 










18 














































Totals, 1922-23.. 


829 


18 


44 


834 


457 


55 


380 


16 


24 


303 


663 


14 


14 


30 


7 


203 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



275 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 







N 


umber of pupil 


> in the various 


branches of instruction 










Photography, Photo- 
engraving and 
Lithography 


o> en 

'■2'S 
o a 

n 


>> 

a 

a 

u 
bo 


i 
Q 

u 

a 

£ c 


u 
U 


bo 

'.S 

<v 

0) 


bfl 
.S 
'u 

& 

u 

o 
en 


c 

# b0 
*cn 

Q 

'u 
+-> 
w 

3 

c 


txO 
.S 

a 
u 

en 


■4-> 

§< 

bo £ 




.S 


bO 

•S 

O 


bo 

c 

'> 

u 

a 
U 

T3 
O 

1 


u 
o 

o 


T3 
C 

-id 

u 

o> a) 


< 

O 


bo 

c 

o 
o 
U 


1 


11 
19 
20 

57 

157 

22 

14 

28 
































2 


11 
































3 






























6 


4 










23 






















35 


5 






























83 


6 


"io 


15 


5 


5 


3 




1 


3 


2 


1 












38 


7 • 












30 


8 






























13 


9 
































17 


10 


































9 


11 




































12 


































13 


13 


53 


24 








17 






















14 


14 






























15 


10 
37 


































16 


































17 








25 

57 


25 
57 






















26 


18 .... 


320 


55 


60 




23 




89 






14 










90 


19 
















20 


10 
























20 










21 
































22 


13 

52 

36 

122 


































23 
























15 










24 .... 










17 
46 






















25 .... 










22 












84 








80 


26 




























27 .... 


47 
39 
29 
395 
31 
38 
































28 


28 .... 


19 






























22 


29 .... 
































30 .... 








66 


66 


121 








17 












814 


31 .... 
























43 


32 .... 










28 
























33 .... 
































34 .... 


64 
17 

5 










15 
10 






















43 


35 .... 


12 






























36 .... 






























37 .... 


































38 .... 


































45 


39 .... 


20 
79 
92 
13 
44 








9 


9 
13 






















31 


40 .... 




5 


4 






4 


4 














42 


41 


















42 


42 
































21 


43 


18 






14 
























28 


44 .... 






























45 




































46 




































47 45 
48 


490 




197 


219 


188 


126 


27 


62 


62 


259 


68 


26 


44 


74 


34 


88 


1,184 
13 


49 


5 

174 

13 
































10 


50 










49 

18 






















57 


51 






























13 


































45 


2,576 


149 


277 


228 


364 


522 


193 


63 


158 


265 


86 


40 


163 


74 


34 


88 


2,848 



276 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



EVENING VOCATIONAL 

III. TABLE R— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE 





Number of pupils in the various branches of instruction 


Schools 


bo 

c 
"a 

CD 
CD 

a> 

CO 

3 
O 

X 


CO 

a 

*s 

o 

c 
o 
u 

W 

a> 

s 

o 


.5 
*o3 
u 

3 

CD 
6 

o 


-o 
a 

3 8 

5 % 


m 

w 

t 

Q 
q 

bo G 
0) g 

in 


a> 
.5 

CJ 

aj bfl 

%i 

oo 


C 


u 

.5 




-3 
o 
d 


J3 

# co 

"S 
3 

a 
m 


H-l 

w 
en 

CD 

JA 

"in 

3 
CQ 


1 Amherstburg 








31 

36 

20 

105 

276 

121 

56 

41 

20 

45 










8 






2 Barrie 






11 








8 
7 
18 
42 
57 
29 
9 

14 
12 








3 Beamsville 


















4 Belleville 






















5 Brantford 






62 
















6 Brockville 


















7 Chatham 








23 
5 














8 Cobourg 














5 






9 Collingwood 
















10 Dundas 






















11 Kspanola 
















13 






12 Fairbank 










37 

102 

143 

12 

77 

155 

760 

51 

23 

29 

31 

140 

27 

156 

100 

77 

29 

1,026 

127 

108 

115 

95 

62 

17 

33 

105 

52 

150 

41 

96 

90 






15 
29 
25 
12 
13 
64 
606 
24 
8 








13 Fort William 






















14 Gait 






5 

6 

13 

30 
















15 Gananoque 










24 


8 






16 Goderich 














17 Guelph 


















18 Hamilton 












55 


24 




19 Hespeler 
















20 Ingersoll 






















21 Iroquois Falls. . . . 
















14 






22 Kenora 






















23 Kitchener 






31 

17 

32 

t rece 


ived. 






60 

12 
54 










24 Lindsay 


















25 London 










160 


13 






26 Midland 


No 


repor 










27 Niagara Falls 






17 










28 North Bay 






















29 Oshawa 






9 
119 


"*24 
















30 Ottawa 










662 
107 
33 
40 
19 
17 
9 
13 
47 
26 
13 
15 




240 






31 Owen Sound 














32 Pembroke 






















33 Perth 














31 








34 Peterborough 




















35 Port Arthur 






















36 Port Hope 






1 

18 
















37 Preston 


















38 St. Catharines 


















39 St. Thomas 


31 

42 


31 

42 


















40 Sarnia 




7 








7 
15 






41 SaultSte. Marie. . 










42 Stratford 


















43 Sudbury 














30 




21 






44 Swansea 


















45 Timmins 


























46 Toronto, Comm'ce. 




















204 

356 


36 
44 


167 


47 Toronto, Technical 

48 Welland 




31 


167 


41 


1,248 

42 

10 

203 


65 


35 


785 


151 




49 Whitby 
























50 Windsor- Walkerv'e 






62 








52 
9 




46 






51 Woodstock 






41 
































Totals, 1922-23.. 


73 


104 


583 


100 


6,361 


65 


35 


3,012 


366 


1,005 


104 


167 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



277 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Concluded) 







Number of pupils in the various 


branches 


of instruction 








.9* 

(A 

c 

o3 

S 
c 

CD 

a. 


<D 
U 

3 

73 
U 

"3 

"en 

Cu 


.9 

'a 
<u 

O) 

J* 

J4 

o 
o 

CQ 


bJO 

.5 

a 
>. 
H 


►3 
a 

03 

u 

■ bo 

O 

s 

4J 

CO 


u 

M 

en 
ei 


bfl 

•S 

o 
c 


cu 
c 

CU 

+-> bJO 

u .a 

< 2 

J* 


b« 

c 

Ui CU 

o3 CU 

c c 

GO 


CU 

13 

3 cu 


c 

°en 
cu 

Q 

3 

"2 

3 


bA 
3 

o3 
0) 

a 
to 

_y 

3 

3 
CU 


.9? 
IS 

en 

C 
03 

6 
en 

jy 

CO 


bit) 

.5 

ed 
O 

cu 

Q 

.9 

cu 

c 


'en 

3 


l 




11 


14 


11 






















2 
























3 










38 




















4 3 






26 

78 
55 


26 

78 
38 




















5 


























6 


27 


31 






















7 






















8 






13 
14 
12 


5 

14 
12 


37 




















9 
























10 




5 






















11 
























12 






























13 




39 
16 


25 
30 


20 
30 






















14 




19 




















15 






















16 






16 


16 
51 


"il4 


24 


















17 






10 

35 
















18 








35 


21 












19 










30 














20 




























21 






























22 






























23 






20 
19 


10 












9 










24 


15 


16 




















25 


113 






13 


12 




17 










26 




















27 






87 


76 






27 
















28 
























29 






























30 


135 


119 


222 


197 






















31 






















32 




14 


45 
31 
44 
29 


45 
31 
18 
29 






















33 
























34 


























35 


























36 


























37 








10 
68 


25 




















38 




35 






















39 
























40 


203 




26 


26 

105 

70 

34 






















41 






















42 






70 
34 






















43 


























44 


























45 






























46 1,061 


"798 


1,055 


961 


1,183 














36 


96 






47 














87 


141 


48 




20 


20 




















49 


























50 






152 


152 






















51 
























































1,064 


1,178 


1,341 


2,043 


2,488 


263 


24 


85 


47 


21 


26 


36 


96 


87 


141 



278 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



VOCATIONAL 

IV. TABLE S— 





Receipts 


Day and Evening 
Schools 


Legislative 
Grants 


Local 

Municipal 

Grants 


School 
Fees 


Debentures 


Balances 

and Other 

Sources 


Total 
Receipts 


1 Amherstburg 

2 Barrie 

3 Beamsville 

4 Belleville 

5 Brantford 


1 c. 

784 31 

1,377 68 

526 50 

3,146 61 

2,995 36 

2,518 84 

7,015 59 

718 50 

1,791 54 

835 77 

1,092 60 

12,095 21 

1,895 12 

1,518 68 

417 00 

3,648 58 

13,522 08 

218,122 75 

568 53 

1,439 53 

847 25 

1,155 31 

275 32 

4,554 74 

1,688 57 

25,064 25 

442 01 

12,026 34 

1,704 25 

1,725 96 

30,154 89 

1,406 80 

2,133 40 

831 96 

2,613 42 

2,743 17 

1,629 17 

1,661 67 

41,687 20 

1,827 01 

39,415 08 

4,377 92 

1,673 33 

61,923 38 

32,357*89 
72,280 88 

1,846 95 

497 25 

10,314 01 

1,327 12 


431 51 
400 00 

2,575*49 
3,077 34 
1,581 16 
4,000 00 

Y, 148* 83 
585 54 

10,939 'ii 

547 96 

360 02 

142 05 

2,437 51 

1,678 32 

156,466 00 

"566*60 

61 75 

457 73 

2,366* 99 

94,747* 13 

1,322 76 
10,448 11 
1,195.75 
1,025 04 
83,269 57 
3,872 59 
1,599 17 

*i',8o6'6o 

99 89 

328 53 

450 00 

696 27 

1,188 11 

25,848 88 

11,347 04 

1,200 00 

8,478 47 

2,500 00 

114,537 90 

241,897 19 

2,371 22 

571 12 

31,369 54 


& c. 

' 208 *00 
200 50 
452 00 

290 '60 
276 00 
256 00 
2 00 
132 00 
352 00 
873 80 
189 50 
83 00 
900 00 

l',279*69 
466 25 

183 50 

184 00 
69 00 

125 00 
885 15 
298 00 
3,514 50 
40 00 
476 00 

*257*66 
8,537 00 

'536*40 
236 71 

1,026 04 
180 00 
230 53 
645 00 
401 00 

2,188 02 

"l0*81 

552 00 

238 85 

5,943 17 

32,519 55 

384 00 

2',928*02 
294 25 


* c. 
3,796* 18 

15,6o6 00 
25,420*51 

Hl',597'96 

47,124*95 
148,600 00 

10,666 '60 

90,666 00 


ft c. 

"170*75 
125 00 

"i7i'27 

1,717 73 

213 96 

"69*36 

1,044 56 

125 03 

"2* 40 '66 

316,480 81 

727 44 

53 35 

443 98 

"644*51 

288 60 

1,522 35 

9,326 26 

4,520 06 

1,563 54 

"867*19 

766 02 

55 67 

"i6*53 
2,431 15 

1*3,265 *45 

835 77 

44 00 

19,705 12 

14*8,947' 65 
53,879 89 

4,439' 2i 

432 38 


$ c. 
1,215 82 
2,156 43 
852 00 
6,174 10 
6,072 70 


6 Brockville 


4,271 27 


7 Chatham 


13,023 32 
1 208 46 


8 Cobourg 


9 Collingwood 

10 Dundas 


3,196 37 
1,492 67 
2,269 16 
27,307 83 
3,316 88 
2,068 20 
642 05 


11 Fairbank 

12 Fort William 

13 Gait 


14 Gananoque 

15 Goderich 


16 Guelph 


6,986 09 


17 Haileybury 

18 Hamilton 


15,440 40 
692,349 25 


19 Hespeler 


1,762 22 


20 Ingersoll 


2,176 38 


21 Iroquois Falls. ..... 

22 Kenora 


1,536 98 
1,682 04 


23 Kingston 


1,044 83 


24 Kitchener 


8,035 48 


25 Lindsay 


3,508 92 


26 London 


147,652 14 


27 Midland 

28 Niagara Falls 

29 North Bay 

30 Oshawa^ 


1,804 77 

52,891 02 

2,900 00 

3,008 00 


31 Ottawa 


123,525 00 


32 Owen Sound 

33 Pembroke 


5,279 39 
3,732 57 


34 Perth 


2,235 55 


35 Peterborough 

36 Port Arthur 

37 Port Hope 

38 Preston 


5,416 15 
3,924 77 
2,137 70 
2,358 73 


39 St. Catharines 

40 St. Thomas 

41 Sarnia 


157,057 58 

3,416 12 

127,842 38 


42 Sault Ste. Marie.... 

43 Stratford 


165,160 73 
2,928 14 


44 Sudbury 


100,658 97 


45 Timmins 


2,738 85 


46 Toronto, Commerce. 

47 Toronto, Technical. 

48 Welland 


391,786 61 

400,577 51 

4,602 17 


49 Whitby 


1,068 37 


50 Windsor-Walkerville 

51 Woodstock 


49,050 78 
2,053 75 


1 Totals, 1922 

2 Totals, 1921 


638,217 28 
670,758 56 


831,861 89 
691,817 18 


68,844 24 
68,994 13 


451,539 60 
731,572 40 


585,134 59 
234,953 75 


2,575,597 60 
2,398,096 02 


3 Increases 


32,541 ' 28 


140,044 71 


'149*89 


280,632' 80 


350,180 84 


177,501 58 










5 Percentages 


24 78 


32 29 


2 67 


17 53 


22.72 















1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



279 



SCHOOLS (Concluded) 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Expenditure 



Teachers' 
Salaries 



Buildings, 
Sites and All 

Permanent 
Improvements 



Repairs 
to School 
Accommoda- 
tions 



Library, 

Maps and 

Charts, All 

Apparatus 

and Equipment 



School Books, 
Stationery, 
Prizes, Fuel, 
Examinations 
and all Other 
Expenses 



Total 
Expenditure 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 



$ c 

997 50 

1,686 75 
852 00 

4,060 00 

3.724 00 
3,422 00 
7,250 75 
1,060 00 
2,329 00 
1,217 98 
1,539 00 

16,159 04 
2,505 00 
1,832 02 
574 00 
5,627 00 
8,983 90 

98,922 30 
1,304 00 

1.725 50 
1,006 00 
1,472 00 

875 00 
5,778 90 
2,137 00 

75,987 81 
952 00 

17,312 12 
2,408 00 
2,507 50 

82,965 70 
2,683 00 
3,137 00 
1,696 00 
3,518 00 
3,014 00 
1,883 00 
2,076 00 
2,432 00 
3,143 50 

15,967 82 

12,776 25 
2,371 00 

26,465 15 

1,568 00 

102,319 93 

209,283 44 

3,010 00 

746 00 

28,610 00 
1,496 50 



787,370 36 
625,848 64 



161,521 72 



42.07 



38 00 



120 00 



2,496 53 
122 50 



18,226 


58 


76 00 










11,760 08 


122 


78 


67 

4,302 
28 


50 
00 
49 


129 


09 








111,655 


96 


63,087 


74 


54 31 
60,785 21 


140,573 
4,750 


73 
14 




8,570 


00 



426,966 64 
488,896 90 



61,930 26 
22.81 



$ 



4 80 



198 28 
50 30 



4,356 07 



20 00 



1,657 53 



1,142 09 



188 37 



2,604 68 
323 14 



10,545 26 
11,758 24 



1,212 98 



.56 



# c. 
160 92 
206 88 



1,691 81 
608 38 
442 78 

2,003 77 
7 50 



18 16 

107 00 

3,796 18 

406 25 
88 00 



495 95 



21,945 51 

273 60 

16 75 

85 00 
68 42 

149 83 

584 53 

22 28 

4,196 33 
703 65 

2,176 47 

392 00 

16 00 

7,057 95 
414 16 
481 82 

86 57 
350 24 
323 90 
210 70 

10 00 

45 52 

156 62 

30,920 49 

28,710 97 



3,956 47 

5 40 

2,096 56 

20,032 70 

1,592 17 

2 37 

82 20 

51 14 



137,251 90 
112,726 54 



24,525 36 



7 . 33 



b c. 

57 40 

224 80 



422 29 
1,740 32 

147 00 
169 00 

1 00 
867 37 
228 64 
311 72 
4,657 80 
232 83 

148 18 
68 05 

863 14 
4,659 35 
80,018 78 
184 62 
194 15 
299 67 
141 62 



1,672 05 

272 89 

39,882 36 

149 12 

33,279 65 

100 00 

417 00 

28,057 26 

2,153 74 

113 75 

323 89 

812 60 

586 87 

44 00 

255 14 

300 24 

116 00 

11,446 92 

122,049 93 

355 95 

8,511 79 

733 10 

43,667 57 

110,659 52 



320 00 

7,054 87 

506 11 



509,480 05 
345,856 04 



163,624 01 



27.22 



$ c 
1,215 82 
2,156 43 
852 00 
6,174 10 
6,072 70 

4.011 78 
9,423 52 
1,193 30 
3,196 37 
1,464 78 
1,957 72 

27,307 83 

3,316 88 

2,068 20 

642 05 

6,986 09 

13,643 25 

223,469 24 

1,762 22 

2.012 40 
1,390 67 
1,682 04 
1,044 83 
8,035 48 
2,432 17 

133,484 11 

1,804 77 

52,891 02 

2,900 00 

3,008 00 

123,525 00 
5,279 39 
3,732 57 
2,235 55 
4,680 84 
3,924 77 
2,137 70 
2,341 14 

114,433 72 
3,416 12 

121,422 97 

163,537 15 

2,781 26 

99,906 99 

2,306 50 

291,262 47 

345,048 94 

4,602 17 

1,068 37 

44,317 07 

2,053 75 



1,871,614 21 
1,585,086 36 



286,527 85 



280 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



TABLE T— PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS 





c 

62 
£0 


. bo 
O rt 


L'Orig- 

nal 

Village 


Penetan- 
guishene 
Town 






h2 


Number of Schools 


1 

$ c. 

1,019 71 

449 22 

16 72 

1,321 00 
405 86 


1 

$ c. 

374 27 
541 35 
11 35 
305 00 
305 70 


1 

$ c. 

22 02 
207 73 

992 94 

35 


2 

$ c. 

"200"04 

12,500 00 
815 00 


5 


Receipts: 

Balances from 1921 


$ c. 
1,416 00 


Government grants 


1,398 34 
28 07 


Municipal grants 


Municipal assessments 


15,118 94 


Other sources 


1,526 91 






Totals 


3,212 51 


1,537 67 


1,223 04 


13,515 04 


19,488 26 




Expenditure: 

Teachers' salaries 


1,000 00 
96 35 
11 40 

1,435 00 


853 20 

48 15 

1 20 

421 70 


882 80 
327'04 


8,629 02 

i,6o9* ii 

3,796 82 


11,365 02 

144 50 

1,021 71 

5,980 56 


School sites and buildings 

Libraries, maps, apparatus, etc. 
Other expenses 






Totals 


2,542 75 


1,324 25 


1,209 84 


13,434 95 


18,511 79 






Balances on hand 


669 76 


213 42 


13 20 


80 09 


976 47 






Teachers: 

Male 


.... 

II 

$1,000 


.... 

Ill 

$900 


"i" 

II 

$900 


1 

7 

8 II 

Male, $1,750 

Av. Fem.,$l,000 


1 


Female 


10 


Certificates 


10 II; 1 III 


Salaries 


1 Male, $1,750 




Av. Fern., $980 


Pupils: 

Total number attending 

Boys 


26 
15 
11 
16 

7 

*4 

8 

6 

1 

26 

26 

26 
26 

7 
19 
19 
26 
26 
26 

1 
14 
15 


30 
15 
15 

22 
5 
2 
5 

10 
8 

30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
8 
23 
23 
30 
30 
30 


18 
9 
9 

12 
3 

5 
2 
2 
6 

18 
10 

15 

15 

6 

3 

8 

10 

10 

18 


369 

175 

194 

266 

73 

54 

87 

67 

88 

369 
232 
369 
232 
232 
111 
157 
157 
369 
369 
369 

'68* 


443 
214 


Girls 


229 


Average attendance 


316 


No. in Primer 


88 


" 1st Book 


61 


" 2nd " 


98 


" 3rd " 


87 


" 4th " 


108 


" Beyond 4th Book 

" Art 


1 

443 


" Geography 


298 


" Music 


399 


" Literature 


303 


" Composition 


303 


" Grammar 


132 


" English History 

" Canadian History 

" Physiology and Hygiene. 
" Nature Study 


202 
207 

435 
435 


" Physical Culture 

" Algebra 


443 
1 


" Agriculture 


82 


" Household Science 


15 


Brick or frame school house 


Brick 


Frame 


Brick 


1 Br.; 1 Fr. 


3 Br.; 2 Fr. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



281 



TABLE U— REPORT ON NIGHT SCHOOLS 
I. Night Elementary Schools 





Number of 
Schools 


Teachers 


Pupils 
Enrolled 


Average 

Daily 

Attendance 




18 
1 
2 


56 
1 

2 


2,200 
10 

53 


1,075 




6 


York Tp., S.S. No. 28 (a) and (c) .- 


27 






Totals, 1922-23 


21 


59 


2,263 


1,108 







II. Night High Schools 



School 


Number of 
Schools 


Teachers 


Pupils 
Enrolled 


Average 

Daily 

Attendance 


Brantford 


2 
1 


2 
5 

14 

10 

2 

2 

41 

6 


24 
22 
240 
95 
38 
18 
1,208 
64 


21 


Gait 


10 


Hamilton 

London 


48 
36 


Pembroke 

St. Thomas 

Toronto 

Windsor 


10 

13 

223 

31 


Totals, 1922-23 


9 


82 


1,709 


392 







282 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



TABLE V— GENERAL 

A General Statistical Abstract, exhibiting the comparative state and progress of 

and Vocational Schools from the year 1867 



No. 



9 
10 

11 

12 

13 
14 

15 
16 

17 

18 
19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 
28 

29 
30 



Subjects Compared. 



Population 

High Schools (including Collegiate 
Institutes) 

Continuation Schools 

Vocational Schools (Day) 

Public Schools 

Roman Catholic Separate Schools . . . 

Grand total of above schools in opera- 
tion 

Pupils attending High Schools (in- 
cluding Collegiate Institutes and 
Night High Schools) .' 

Pupils attending Continuation Schools 

Pupils attending Day Vocational 
Schools 

Pupils attending Evening Vocational 
Schools 

Pupils attending Public Schools (in- 
cluding Kindergarten and Night 
Schools) 

Pupils attending Roman Catholic 
Separate Schools 

Grand total of students and pupils 
attending High, Continuation, Vo 
cational, Public and Separate 
Schools 

Amount paid for the salaries of Public 
and Separate School Teachers . . 

Total amount paid for Public and 
Separate School purposes 



1867 



102 



4,261 
161 

4,524 
5,696 



Amount paid for Continuation School 
Teachers' salaries 



Total amount paid for Continuation 
School purposes 

Amount paid for High School (and 
Collegiate Institute) Teachers' sal- 
aries 

Total amount paid for High School 
and Collegiate Institute purposes. . 

Amount paid for Vocational School 
Teachers' salaries 

Total amount paid for Vocational 
School purposes 

Grand total paid for Educational 
purposes as above 

Male Teachers in Public and Separate 
Schools 

Female Teachers in Public and Separ 
ate Schools 

Total Public and Separate School 
Teachers 

Continuation School Teachers 

High School and Collegiate Institute 
Teachers 

Day Vocational School Teachers . . . 

Number of all Teachers, as specified 
above 



382,719 
18,924 

407,339 
,093,517 
,473,189 



$ 94,820 
$ 124,181 

$ 



$1,597,370 
2,849 
2,041 
4,890 



1872 



1,620,851 
104 



4,490 
171 

4,765 
7,968 



433,256 
21,406 

462,630 
1,371,594 
2,207,364 



141,812 
210,005 



159 



5,049 



2,417,369 
2,626 
2,850 
5,476 



1877 



104 



4,955 

185 

5,244 
9,229 



465,908 
24,952 

500,089 
2,038,099 
3,073,489 



211,607 
343,710 



3,417,199 
3,020 
3,448 
6,468 



239 



5,715 



280 



6,748 



1882 



1,926,922 
104 



5,013 
190 

5,307 
12,348 



445,364 
26,148 

483,860 
2,144,449 
3,026,975 



1887 



112 



5,277 
229 

5,618 
17,459 



462,839 
30,373 

510,671 
2,458,540 
3,742,104 



253,864 
343,720 



3,370,695 
3,062 
3,795 
6,875 



332 



7,189 



327,452 
495,612 



4,237,716 
2,718 
4,876 
7,594 



398 



7,992 



Included in Public and Separate School attendances, f Included with 

year ended six months after 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



283 



STATISTICAL ABSTRACT 

Education in Ontario, as connected with Public, Separate, Continuation, High 
to 1922, compiled from Returns to the Department of Education. 



No. 


1892 


1897 


1902 


1907 


1912 


1917 


1921 


1922 


1 


2,114,321 




2,182,947 

-134 
65 




12,527,292 




2,933,662 




2 
3 


128 


130 

44 


143 
107 


148 
138 


162 

137 

11 

6,103 

548 


170 

160 

14 

6,280 

621 


175 
181 


4 




16 


5 
6 


5,577 
312 


5,574 
340 


5,671 
391 


5,819 
449 


5,939 
513 


6,289 
656 


7 


6,017 


6,088 


6,261 


6,518 


6,738 


6,961 


7,245 


7,317 


8 
9 


22,837 


24,390 
*1,618 


24,472 
*2,190 


30,331 
*4,744 


32,608 
6,094 


1(33,024 
15,104 


1141,040 

17,505 


1[46,340 
18,777 


10 










13,674 


117,522 


19,402 


11 












1T14,597 

458,436 


132,545 
503,769 


133,511 
515,202 


12 


458,553 


453,256 


420,094 


413,510 


429,030 


13 


37,466 


41,620 


45,964 


51,502 


61,297 


70,048 


83,977 


88,546 


14 


518,856 




490,530 


495,343 


529,029 


584,883 


676,358 


701,778 


15 


2,752,629 


2,886,061 


3,198,132 


4,389,524 


6,109,547 


8,398,450 


15,473,049 


16,690,982 


16 
17 


4,053,918 


4,215,670 
Included 

with 

No. 15 

Included 

with 
No. 16 


4,825,160 
Included 

with 

No. 15 

Included 

with 
No. 16 


7,556,179 
Included 

with 

No. 15 

Included 

with 
No. 16 


11,273,960 

202,875 

265,087 

1,232,537 


14,111,835 

228,362 

324,621 

1,554,049 


29,714,793 

406,162 

649,474 

2,531,069 


31,920,884 

474,241 

881,431 

2,963,001 


18 




19 


472,029 


532,837 


547,402 


783,782 


20 


696,114 


715,976 


769,680 


1,213,697 


1,953,061 


2,418,975 


4,790,211 


6,742,875 


21 














625,849 


799,193 


22 














1,585,086 
36,739,564 


1,891,845 


23 


4,750,032 


4,931,646 


5,594,840 


8,769,876 


13,492,108 


16,855,431 


41,437,035 


24 


2,770 


2,784 


2,311 


1,813 


1,511 


1,317 


1,641 


1,740 


25 


5,710 


6,344 


7,320 


8,387 


9,617 


11,445 


12,763 


13,132 


26 

27 


8,480 


9,128 

f44 


9,631 

|86 

593 


10,200 
fl40 

750 


11,128 
226 


12,762 
241 


14,404 
286 


14,872 
323 


28 
29 


522 


579 


917 


1,051 
132 

14,186 


1,302 
212 

16,204 


1,420 
286 


30 


9,002 


9,707 


10,224 


10,950 


12,271 


16,901 



Public and Separate School Teachers. JCensus of 1911. IFigures for the School 
the calendar year specified. 



284 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS 



No. 


Consolidated 
School 


Sections Consolidated 


Assessment 


No. of 
Class- 
rooms 


Area of 
Grounds 
in acres 


1 


Barwick 


4, 11, 12 Barwick, Rainy River District.. . 


$127,637 


4 


5 


2 


Dorion 


1, 2, 3 Dorion, Thunder Bay Dist 

7 9 Stamford, Welland Co 


82,440 

8,185,495 
25,653 

386,450 
80,000 

404,906 


2 


5 


3 


Falls View 


7 


5'/ 2 

5 


4 


Gooderham 


2, 4, 5 Glamorgan, Haliburton Co 


4 


5 


Grantham 

Hudson . . . 


5, 6 Grantham, Lincoln Co 


7 
2 


5 


6 




2'/2 

3 


7 


Humber Heights.. 


5 Etobicoke (3 schools), York Co, 


5 


8 


Macdonald 


6 1 / 2 7 Guelph, Wellington Co 


402,905 
290,885 


4 


3 


9 


Mallorytown 


4, 5, 6 Front of Yonge, 19 Front of Escott,. 
Leeds Co 


4 


7 


10 


Mindemoya 


1, 4 Carnarvon, Manitoulin Island 


123,700 


4 


5 


11 


Morley 


7 Morley; 9 Morley and Dilke; 1 Long 
Sault, Rainy River Dist 


276,725 


3 








8 


12 


Nipigon 


1, 2, 3 Nipigon, Thunder Bay Dist 

1 Carling; 3 Macdougall, Parry Sound 
Dist 


443,210 


4 


5Vi 


13 


Nobel 


237,000 


2 


5 


14 


North Mountain . 


9, 12, 13, 14 Mountain, Dundas Co 


303,665 


8 


7 


1S 


Paudash. . 


16 7 Cardiff, Haliburton Co 


12,210 
166,621 


1 

3 




16 


Savard 


1, 3 Savard; 2 Robillard, Timiskaming 
Dist... 








5 


17 


Tamworth 


3. 6, 10 Sheffield; 28 Camden, Lennox 


250,000 


5 








and Addington 


5 


18 


Tweed 


3, 5 Hungerford, Tweed Village, Hastings 
Co 


743,034 


6 








3'/ 2 


19 


Wellington 


11, 14, 15, 10 Hillier; 8, 10 Hallowell, 
Wellington Village, Prince Edward Co. 


1,215,153 


9 


6i/ 2 


90 


West Guilford 

Wilberforce 


2 3 Guilford, Haliburton Co 


48,080 
27,494 


2 
2 


4 


21 


2, 6 Monmouth; 8 Cardiff, Haliburton 
Co 


31/2 


22 


Burriss 


1, 2 Burriss Tp., Rainy River Dist 


98,800 


2 


10 


?3 


Grant 


3, 15 Nepean Tp., Carleton Co 


638,810 


6 


5 









1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



285 



THE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS (Continued) 



Consolidated 
School 



No. and Type 

of 
Conveyances 



Owned by 
Con- 
tractors 
or Section 



Length 

of 
Routes 
in miles 



No. of 
Pupils 
Conv'y'd 



Drivers' 
Daily 
Wages 



Av 



/erage Cost per 
Day per Pupil 
Transp'd (in cents) 



To Sect. To Govt 



Barwick. 
Dorion. . 



Falls View. . 
Gooderham. 



Grantham 
Hudson . . 



Humber Heights 



Macdonald. . 
Mallorytown 



Mindemoya. 
Morley 



Nipigon 

Nobel 

North Mountain 



Paudash. 
Savard. . 



Tarn worth. 



Tweed 



Wellington. 



West Guilford. 



Wilberforce 

Burriss. . . . 
Grant 



2 horse-drawn 
4 horse-drawn 



1 motor 

1 horse-drawn 

3 horse-drawn 



1 motor 

1 motor 

2 horse-drawn 

2 horse-drawn 

street cars 
4 horse-drawn 



2 horse-drawn 

3 motors 
3 sleighs 

2 motors 

1 motor 

2 horse-drawn 

2 motor 

3 horse-drawn 



2 horse-drawn 
5 horse-drawn 



3 horse-drawn 
1 motor 



2 motors 

3 horse-drawn 



3 motors 

2 horse-drawn 



2 horse-drawn 
1 motor 



1 horse-drawn 

5 horse-drawn 
1 motor 



Cont. 
Sect. 

Cont. 
Cont. 



Cont. 
Sect. 



Sect. 

Cont. 

Cont. 
Cont. 

Cont. 

Sect. 

Cont. 



Cont. 
Sect. 



Cont. 
Sect. 



Sect. 
Cont. 



Cont. 



Cont. 



Sect. 

Cont. 
Sect. 



4 
4 
51/2 

33/ 4 
3 

21/2 

7 
4 

31/2 

3 
6 

6 

7 
4 

6V2 

43/4 
2 

51/2, 

3 

2 

8 

9 

7 

5 

3 

7 

IV2 

51/2 

3 

7 

4 

31/2 

21/2 

5 
6 

6V2 
41/2 

61/4 

6% 

4 
4 

4 

3'/ 2 

3 
7 
7 
6 
6 
4 
7 
5 

51/2 

6,4 

2'/ 2 
3 

l 3 /4 
1% 

6 

1^,6 
2V2 



40 
66 

53 
50 



28 
80 



46 

27 
59 



55 
36 

27 

43 

103 



31 
87 

62 
100 

131 
47 

22 

77 
14 



$2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 



50 
50 

50 
00 
00 

00 



10.50 



50 
50 

25 
00 
75 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 
28 
50 
10 
00 
50 
50 
00 
75 
00 
50 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
60 
50 
60 
3 00 

3 00 

4 25 
00 
50 
25 
00 
50 
50 
95 
05 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

8 00 
3 25 



5. 
5.8 

22.4 
9.4 



8.4 
3.8 



15.2 

3.3 
7.3 



5.1 
10.8 

14. 

7.4 
11.3 



7.7 
9.2 

3.9 
10.5 

11.1 
6.7 
6.7 



7.5 
8.7 

9.6 
14.1 



5. 
5.7 



6.5 

1.4 
3.9 



7.6 
16 2 

21. 
11. 
4.8 

11.6 
13.7 



5.8 



4.5 



5.1 



10.1 



10.1 



286 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS (Continued) 



Consolidated 
School 



Barwick. . 
Dorion . . . 
Falls View 



Gooderham . 
Grantham. . 



Hudson 

Humber Height; 

Macdonald .... 

Mallorytown . . . 

Mindemoya.. . . 

Morley 



Nipigon 

Nobel 

North Mountain 



Paudash. 
Savard . . 



Tamworth, 



Tweed .... 
Wellington. 



West Guilford. 
Wilberforce . . . 

Burriss 

Grant 



No. of 

Pupils in 

Fifth 

Class 



21 
3 



23 



No. in 
Con- 
tinuation 
School 



39 



35 



87 



41 



Certificates 

of 

Teachers 



1, I. 
1,11. 

2, II. 

6, II. 



2, II. 

4, II. 

2, II. 

5. II. 



1, I. 
3, II. 
1, K.P. 

1, I. 
3, II. 

2, I . 

2, II. 

1,1. 
1,11. 

1, III. 

3, II. 

2, II. 

1, H.S. Pr 
1,1. 
4,11. 



1, 


II. 


1, 


Ill 


2, 


II. 


1, 


Ill 


2, 


I. 


2, 


II. 


1, 


Ill 



6, II. 

2,1. 
5, II. 



1, II. 
1, III. 
2,11. 

3, II. 

3, II. 



Salaries 



$1,800 
1,100 
1,200 
1,000 
2,350 
1,350 

(2) 1,200 

(2) 1,000 
1,100 
1,000 
1,350 
1,100 

(2) 1,000 
1,500 
1,000 
1,800 

(2) 1,100 

(2) 1,000 
1,800 
1,150 

(3) 1,000 
1,600 
1,100 

(2) 1,000 
1,500 
(2) 1,300 
1,000 
1,800 
1,100 
1,100 
1,200 
(2) 1,000 
1,400 
1,100 
2,200 
1,700 
1,300 
1,200 
1,100 
1,000 

800 

800 
1,400 
1,000 

985 
2,000 
1,500 
1,050 
1,000 

900 
1,800 
(5) 1,000 
2,000 
1,225 
1,100 
1,000 

900 
1,100 

900 
1,000 

900 
1,400 
1,100 
1,600 
1,300 



(3) 



(2) 
(2) 



No. of 

Pupils 

Enrolled 



Average 
Attendance 



106 

71 

239 

96 
165 

100 
203 

134 

136 

124 

89 

110 

56 

170 



38 
90 

182 



241 

257 

56 

53 

86 

124 



78 

54 

187 

75 
116 

64 

179 

112 
98 

105 

63 

99 

39 

142 



28 
56 

144 

217 
219 

40 

47 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



287 



THE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS (Continued) 
Cost of Maintenance 



No. 



Consolidated 
School 



Teachers' 
Salaries 



Secretary's 
Salary 



Caretaker 



Trans- 
portation 



Fuel 



Total 



Barwick. . . 
Dorion 
Falls View. 



Gooderham 



5 
6 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 

12 
13 
14 

15 
16 

17 
18 
19 
20 



Grantham. 
Hudson . . , 



Humber Heights. 

Macdonald 

Mallorytown .... 



Mindemoya 
Morley 



Nipigon 

Nobel 

North Mountain. 



Paudash, 
Savard. . 



Tarn worth , 



Tweed , 



Wellington 



West Guilford. 



2 1 Wilberforce . 



22 

23 



Burriss. 
Grant. . 



$2,900 00 
2,200 00 
7,432 94 

1,840 00 

4,450 00 
2,500 00 

5,290 00 
4,670 96 
4,720 00 

5,100 00 
3,440 00 

3,200 00 
2,500 00 
8,500 00 

1,122 38 
3,385 00 

6,450 00 
6,747 00 
8,225 00 
2,000 00 

1,800 00 

School in 
not 
do. 



$35 00 
100 00 

75 00 

36 50 

150 00 
50 00 

300 00 
50 00 
50 00 

50 00 
100 00 

120 00 

50 00 

100 00 

80 00 
150 00 



10 00 



75 00 



100 00 



40 00 



25 00 

operation 

yet availab 

do. 



$400 00 

275 00 

1,847 22 

77 78 

1,000 00 
200 00 

832 00 
840 00 
600 00 

360 00 

788 35 

600 00 



600 00 

70 70 
250 00 

480 00 

435 00 

830 00 

90 00 

130 00 

only since 
le. 

do. 



$1,000 00 
1,900 00 
3,508 00 

1,497 70 



124 00 
(2 mos.) 
1,966 19 



1,888 

255 00 
1,517 00 

675 50 
2,000 25 

1,890 00 
1,038 00 

801 60 

(3 mos.) 

660 00 
4,000 00 

1,305 00 

3,760 58 

4,752 00 

1,570 00 

710 40 

September 
do. 



$235 00 

172 50 

1,772 50 

53 41 

500 00 
200 00 

900 87 
477 64 

712 75 

245 00 
490 00 

360 00 



313 


75 


1,063 


00 


60 00 


200 


00 


874 00 


590 


76 


1,127 


00 


80 


00 


150 00 


1923; Com 


do. 





$4,570 00 

4,647 50 

14,635 66 

3,505 39 

6,224 00 
4,916 19 

9,210 87 
6,243 60 
7,599 75 

6,430 50 
6,818 60 

6,170 00 

3,901 75 

11,064 60 

1,993 08 
7,985 00 

9,119 00 
11,608 34 
15,034 00 

3,780 00 

2,815 40 
plete report 
do. 



288 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS (Continued) 
Legislative Grants 



No. 

1 
2 

3 
4 

5 
6 



Consolidated 
School 



Trans- 
portation 



Salaries, 
Accom- 
modations, 
Equipment 



Fifth 
Class 



Con- 
tinuation 
School 



Salaries 
Special 



Total 
Grants 



Barwick. 
Dorion . . 



Falls View. . 
Gooderham. 

Grantham . . 
Hudson 



Humber Heights. 

Macdonald 

Mallorytown 



10 
11 

12 
13 
14 

15 
16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 
22 
23 



Mindemoya. 
Morlev 



Nipigon 

Nobel 

North Mountain. 



Paudash. 
Savard. . 



Tarn worth, 



Tweed , 



Wellington. 



West Guilford. 



Wilberforce . 

Burriss 

Grant 



$600 00 
1,125 60 

1,041 00 
899 70 



37 20 

(2 mos.) 
818 25 



1,062 00 

76 50 

568 88 

810 60 
1,200 15 

680 40 

622 80 
360 72 

396 00 
1,874 11 

857 22 

937 80 

1,425 60 
942 00 
426 24 



$1,302 00 
1,305 00 

2,384 50 
1,188 00 

1,370 00 
1,260 00 

1,820 00 
1,451 00 
1,578 00 

1,070 00 
1,564 00 

1,584 00 
1,150 00 
1,320 00 

510 00 
1,373 00 

890 00 

2,050 00 

1,524 00 

977 00 

1,050 00 



$271 80 



84 55 



156 54 



331 20 



150 00 



77 20 



1,690 00 



803 70 



876 50 



635 90 



$200 00 
200 00 

560 00 
200 00 

120 00 
200 00 

500 00 
385 00 
400 00 

400 00 
260 00 

300 00 
200 00 
600 00 

150 00 
260 00 

500 00 

600 00 

630 00 
200 00 
200 00 



$2,373 80 
2,630 60 

3,995 50 
2,372 25 

1,527 20 
2 ; 278 25 

3,382 00 
1,912 50 
2,703 42 

3,790 60 
3,355 35 

2,564 40 
2,123 00 
3,084 42 

1,056 00 
3,507 IT 

3,123 72 

3,587 80 

4,215 50 
2,119 00 
1,755 44 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



289 



THE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS (Concluded) 



No. 

1 

2 

3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 
9 

10 
11 

12 
13 
14 

15 
16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 
22 
23 



Falls View. , 
Gooderham. 

Grantham . . 
Hudson 



Consolidated 
School 



Barwick. 
Dorion . . 



Humber Heights. 

Macdonald 

Mallorytown .... 



Mindemoya. . 
Morley 



Nipigon 

Nobel 

North Mountain. 

Paudash 

Savard 



Tarn worth. 



Tweed 



Wellington. 



West Guilford 



Wilberforce . 

Burriss 

Grant 



Net Cost 
to Section 

of 
Maintenance 



$2,196 20 
2,016 90 

10,640 16 
1,133 14 

4,696 80 
2,637 94 

5,828 87 
4,331 10 
4,896 33 

2,459 90 
2,463 25 

3,605 60 
1,778 75 
7,980 18 

877 08 
4,477 89 

5,995 18 

8,020 54 

10,818 50 
1,661 00 
1,059 96 



Net Cost 

to Section 

per Pupil 

of Enrolled 

Attendance 



$20 72 
28 41 

44 52 
11 80 

28 47 

26 38 

28 71 
32 32 
36 00 

19 84 

27 68 

32 78 

29 98 
46 94 

23 08 
49 75 

32 94 

33 24 

42 09 
29 66 

20 00 



Net Cost 

to Section 

per Pupil 

of Average 

Attendance 



$28 67 

37 35 

56 90 
15 11 

40 49 

41 22 

32 56 

38 67 
49 96 

23 42 

39 10 

36 42 
45 61 
56 20 

31 32 
79 96 

41 63 

36 96 

49 40 
41 52 
22 55 



Cost to 

Government 

per Pupil 

of Average 

Attendance 



$30 43 

48 71 

21 37 
31 63 

13 17 

35 59 

18 90 
17 08 

27 59 

37 81 

53 26 

25 90 

54 44 
21 72 

37 71 
62 63 

21 68 

16 53 

19 25 
52 97 
37 35 



Total Cost 

per Pupil 

of Average 

Attendance 



$59 10 
86 06 

78 27 
46 74 

53 66 

76 81 

51 46 

55 75 

77 55 

61 23 
92 36 

62 32 
100 05 

77 92 

69 03 
142 59 

63 31 
53 49 

68 65 
94 49 
59 90 



10 D.E. 



290 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES 
Statistics, 1922, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1923 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Popula- 
tion 



Total _ 
Expendi- 
ture 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circula- 
tion 



Legisla 

tive Grant 

paid in 

1923 



Amount 
expended 
on Books 

in 1922 



Acton , 

Ailsa Craig , 

Almonte 

Amherstburg 

Arn prior 

Arthur 

Aurora 

Aylmer , 

Ayr 

Barrie 

Beamsville 

Beaverton 

Beeton 

Belleville 

Belmont 

Bothwell 

Bracebridge 

Brampton 

Brantford 

Brighton 

Brockville 

Brussels 

Burk's Falls 

Campbellford 

Cardinal. 

Carleton Place . . , 

Cayuga 

Chatham 

Chesley 

Clifford 

Clinton 

Collingwood 

Cornwall 

Delhi 

Deseronto 

Drayton 

Dresden 

Dundas , 

Durham 

Elmira , 

Elora 

Erin 

Essex , 

Exeter , 

Fergus 

Forest , 

Fort Frances 

Fort William 

Fort William Br, 

Gait 

Gananoque , 

Garden Island. . . , 

Georgetown , 

Glencoe , 

Goderich , 

Grand Valley. . . 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 



1,742 

547 

2,367 

2,800 

4,500 

1,222 

2,300 

2,242 

817 

7,000 

1,166 

1,100 

600 

12.314 



# c. 
501 56 
202 54 
699 03 

2,215 02 
851 98 
400 47 
601 85 

1,229 54 
624 19 

3,845 19 

783 16 

225 05 

10 71 

4,802 60 



No annual report for 



650 
2,463 
4,970 
31,091 
1,353 
9,384 

950 

915 
3,100 
1,250 
4,123 

800 

15,084 

1,803 

500 
1,922 
6,237 
7,853 

726 



182 78 

1,492 13 

3,058 61 

12,328 91 

385 73 

3,406 12 

1,137 49 

353 07 

1,787 96 

297 27 

646 20 

117 77 

7,334 10 

619 92 

358 95 

1,404 93 

4,184 86 

1,851 43 

563 85 



No annual report for 

602| 659 45| 
No annual report for 



R.R. 
R.R. 



5,094 
1,587 
2,392 
1,200 
425 
1,600 
1,507 
1,762 
1,422 
3,000 
20,451 

13,322 

3,665 

75 

2,121 

900 
4,700 

582 



3,470 46 

752 93 

1,159 18 

1,065 77 

313 36 

1,225 73 

1,026 76 

1,152 00 

1,147 35 

2,374 54 

16,095 56 

3,488 13 

7,228 83 

2,046 07 

27 00 

1,363 47 

155 98 

2,514 23 

833 03 



4,356 
3,422 
3,632 
5,011 
4,552 
4,031 
3,813 
9,140 
4,438 
8 513 
5,414 
2,142 
2,612 

12,948 

1922 
3,183 
5,910 
7,942 

34,999 
4,448 

16,343 
4,749 
3,219 
3,360 
3,170 
7,949 
1,951 

13,653 
3,210 
4,447 
8,561 

10,780 
6,502 
2,772 

1922 
3,904 

1922 
7,095 
3,819 
5,622 
8,219 
3,351 
4,240 
5,092 
5,005 
4,299 
3,787 

30,609 
5,730 

11,362 
6,720 
5,000 
4,063 
2,100 
6,486 
3,663 



11,030 
5,340 
6,032 

13,134 
8,260 
6,771 
9,437 

20,589 
7,003 

35,639 

14,388 
1,330 
2,468 

76,127 

4,827 

16,486 

24,857 

148,006 

5,820 
34,611 

6,370 

3,873 
27,126 

3,524 

14,621 

757 

79,560 

8,462 

5,788 
20,062 
17,868 
14,788 

5,919 

6,540 

34,882 

9,080 

11,384 

9,417 

4,801 

9,061 

10,746 

12,072 

16,621 

15,211 

162,531 

34,228 

58,974 

26,069 

495 

13,591 



# c 

90 88 

62 42 

152 43 

229 90 
200 00 

73 03 

90 56 

245 61 

114 37 

260 00 

88 82 

71 92 

10 00 

260 00 

28 62 

230 43 
260 00 
260 00 

69 52 
260 00 
110 07 

44 76 

231 95 
51 63 

120 13 
15 00 
260 00 
128 22 
47 22 
260 00 
260 00 
205 61 
144 35 

118 38 

177 05 
68 70 



23,747 
5,602 



191 33 
183 10 
121 32 
207 06 

85 82 

74 97 
115 24 
209 11 
260 00 
260 00 
260 00 
257 54 

20 13 
200 13 

70 00 
260 00 

84 93 



» c. 

179 87 

73 63 
281 82 
382 26 
471 77 

116 66 
123 80 
436 30 

117 49 
1,133 37 

130 18 

61 22 

1,63 i' 03 

45 00 

320 35 

456 96 

3,136 47 

99 06 
642 83 

50 70 

74 40 
530 59 

84 97 
210 90 

V,7i6*55 

195 83 

80 60 

569 63 

290 57 

345 58 

242 27 

135 41 

427 07 

89 50 

281 59 

270 79 

205 06 

238 31 

150 55 

97 30 

63 10 

351 54 

2,099 10 

889 46 

689 73 

966 76 

24 50 

395 59 



571 65 
169 77 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



291 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Continued) 
Statistics, 1922, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1923 (Continued) 



Library 



Gravenhurst , 

Grimsby 

Guelph 

Hagersville 

Hamilton 

Hamilton Br 

Hanover 

Harriston 

Hensall 

Hespeler 

Hillsburg 

Ignace 

Ingersoll 

Kemptville 

Kenora 

Kincardine 

Kingston 

Kingsville 

Kitchener 

Lakefield 

Lanark 

Lancaster 

Leamington 

Lindsay 

Listowel 

Little Britain 

London 

London, East 

London, South. . . . 
London, Southeast 

Lucknow 

Markdale 

Merrickville 

Merritton 

Midland 

Millbrook 

Milverton 

Mimico 

Mitchell 

Mount Forest 

Newcastle 

New Hamburg. . . . 

New Liskeard 

Newmarket 

Niagara Falls 

North Bay 

Norwich 

Norwood 

Oakville 

Oakwood 

Orange ville 

Orillia 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa, South 
Ottawa, West 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
RR. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
RR 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



Popula- 
tion 



1,437 

1,897 

18,420 

1,271 

120,235 

2,842 
1,311 

780 
2,707 

350 

300 
5,385 
1,200 
6,200 
2,200 
21,975 
2,000 
23,571 
1,193 

583 



7,831 

2,400 

200 

61,369 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



$ c, 
134 72 
1,408 60 
9,825 59 
886 41 
62,929 50 
2,304 44 
2,053 78 
1,729 78 
356 63 
1,356 45 
358 29 
202 85 
2,167 67 
700 41 
2,864 26 
819 38 
12,033 00 
849 56 
12,173 09 
462 34 
106 75 
No annual report for 
3,668 1,702 04 
3,432 68 
1,149 11 
418 56 
21,532 05 
2,536 39 
1,831 53 
2,843 71 
950 972 84 
1,000 708 94 

900 352 91 

2.800 348 56 
7,129 3,190 37 

740 418 03 

1,054 711 16 

4,385 3,478 75 

1.801 782 47 
1,752 1,057 81 

Library made free by 
1,401 
2,300 
3,590 
15,404 
11,768 
1,307 
No annual report for 
1,208 40 
171 14 
1,594 49 
2,836 12 
3,680 16 
84,606 97 
2,033 35 
3,185 60 



665 


83 


1,923 


74 


826 


78 


8,816 


70 


5,663 


38 


1,069 


79 



3,286 


250 


2,503 


7,750 


10,126 


116,205 



2,665 

4,799 
22,396 

2,705 
55,859 
10,663 

4,433 

4,268 

2,378 

5,588 
262 
666 

6,792 

4,183 

4,829 

4,668 
19,660 

4,964 
18,448 

1,572 

2,065 
1922 

6,229 

9,018 

5,650 

2,458 
45,341 

8,432 

3,737 

2,391 

3,321 

3,472 

3,422 

2,858 

9,004 

2,980 

3,557 

4,305 

5,723 

4,674 
vote, May 

3,098 

5,189 

4,627 
18,586 

7,577 

3,817 
1922 

5,333 

2.187 

7,359 

8,918 

6,542 
82,937 

3,840 

6,724 



Circula- 
tion 



2,300 

20,116 

122,082 

1,375 

374,066 

122,456 

17,729 

33,840 

6,013 

12,865 

3,560 



Legisla 

tive Grant 

paid in 

1923 



25,934 
12,110 
24,747 

5,087 

162,471 

11,604 

94,185 

8,502 

2,681 

23,502 
24,294 
11,264 

2,238 
238,881 
40,712 
28,215 
35,362 
10,335 

7,609 

3,873 

8,699 
37,022 

7,765 

7,088 
29,055 

6,269 

12,492 

30th, 1923 

7,537 
11,162 
10,217 
81,737 
43,654 
15,240 

7,329 

1,822 
17,123 
36,577 
32,885 
289,828 
20,274 
29,190 



$ c 

79 05 

188 05 

260 00 

192 16 

260 00 

260 00 

226 91 

89 09 

85 45 



226 
71 

95 00 
257 05 

92 47 
225 06 

91 55 
260 00 
154 33 
260 00 
151 97 

22 86 

259 70 

260 00 
104 33 
104 03 
260 00 
260 00 
200 00 
200 00 

52 03 
56 39 
48 09 
81 41 

256 91 

104 10 
38 65 

248 62 
86 52 

108 89 

78 84 
215 53 

96 19 
260 00 
260 00 
171 72 

206 09 
51 71 
153 40 
260 00 
260 00 
260 00 
241 77 
260 00 



Amount 
expended 
on Books 

in 1922 



$ c. 

42 32 

458 08 
2,043 77 

273 67 

8,650 88 

1,983 13 

344 54 

95 26 

169 48 

408 23 

222 78 

175 00 

643 62 

144 96 

459 11 
133 15 

4,069 27 

257 89 

2,689 68 

247 79 



384 23 
789 46 
183 30 
161 79 
4,220 09 
625 45 
658 56 
944 34 
219 78 

81 89 
139 10 
160 56 
887 40 
148 88 

82 62 
997 58 
132 02 
179 60 

98 41 
364 10 
168 47 
1,962 48 
991 34 
297 88 

294 02 



330 08 
510 08 
1,259 54 
8,954 04 
385 72 
735 64 



292 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Continued) 
Statistics, 1922, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1923 (Continued) 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circula- 
tion 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1923 



Amount 
expended 
on Books 

in 1922 



Otterville 

Owen Sound 

Paisley 

Palmerston 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Parry Sound 

Pembroke 

Penetanguishene. . . 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Port Arthur 

Port Carling 

Port Colborne 

Port Elgin 

Port Hope 

Port Rowan 

Prescott 

Preston 

Renfrew 

Richmond Hill. . . . 

Ridgeway 

St. Catharines 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Saltfjeet 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie. . . 
SaultSte. Marie, W 

Schreiber 

Seaforth 

Shelburne , 

Simcoe 

Smith's Falls 

South River 

Springfield 

Stayner 

Stirling 

Stouffville 

Stratford 

Strathroy , 

Streetsville 

Sudbury 

Sundridge 

Sutton, West 

Swansea , 

Tara 

Tavistock , 

Teeswater , 

Thorold , 

Tilbury 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



600 

12,360 

749 

1,800 

4,400 

1,213 

3,500 

8,309 

4,009 

3,800 

21,605 

3,282 

15,681 

363 

3,420 

1,500 

4,575 

627 

2,723 

5,580 

4 787 

1,165 

750 

21,194 

4,017 

17,779 

250 

15,176 

22,039 

' 1,402 

1,985 

1,100 

3,951 

7,000 

500 

432 

1,030 

850 

1,084 

18,244 

2,642 

600 

9,076 

455 

751 

1,890 

537 

990 

833 

5,205 



$ c. 

152 82 

4,935 88 

598 99 

2,165 88 

1,917 87 

734 29 

1,352 27 

3,121 94 

1,805 16 

1,653 23 

9,450 68 

2,385 97 

9,846 27 

362 45 

1,035 62 

1,104 47 

1,718 95 

186 98 

1,514 64 

3,297 04 

3,323 95 

342 57 

228 89 

10,595 21 

1,561 63 

9,017 04 

530 59 

7,830 66 

8,584 00 

2,035 81 

256 25 

1,424 55 

674 21 

4,871 24 

2,345 57 

94 45 

152 75 

157 90 

832 28 

776 48 

6,944 31 

805 16 

358 84 

1,751 57 

63 27 

270 81 

83 80 

464 05 

916 87 

846 06 

1,852 81 



No annual report for 



2,313 

10,466 

5,975 

3,470 

12,735 

2,894 

4,324 

7,751 

6,953 

5,133 

19,566 

7,936 

17,824 

2,129 

2,970 

5,558 

8,007 

1,987 

7,493 

9,569 

5,551 

4,952 

2,774 

15,376 

10,293 

17,963 

3,353 

17,680 

11,490 

2 232 

1,737 

6,332 

4,812 

11,674 

7,259 

1,178 

2,257 

2,368 

2,973 

6,668 

16,638 

9,677 

3,021 

2,845 

1,041 

1,835 

343 

2,186 

4,767 

5,239 

7,102 

1922 



4,060 

43,996 

10,096 

9,629 

33,857 

5,317 

25,001 

28,505 

15,811 

17,946 

101,766 

27,835 

106,106 

3,558 

11,556 

12,149 

27,000 

1,798 

20,619 

29,681 

46,010 

8,829 

4,120 

97,713 

24,176 

101,204 

12,885 

61,894 

86,400 

25,028 

6,275 

15,850 

7,911 

28,574 

26,850 

1,154 

3,481 

1,814 

7,616 

18,706 

77,232 

37,377 

5,263 

21,040 

1,546 

7,863 

3,311 

5,712 

8,604 

9,514 

10,643 



$ c. 

46 34 
260 00 
103 62 

88 64 
260 00 
144 38 

168 90 
260 00 

248 81 

120 71 
260 00 
260 00 
260 00 
106 30 
235 84 

121 97 
95 35 
36 78 

245 18 
260 00 

249 37 
70 09 
32 68 

260 00 

169 25 
260 00 

47 82 
260 00 
260 00 
260 00 

39 00 
256 60 

95 25 

260 00 

241 70 

23 77 

28 08 

40 00 
148 62 
240 11 
260 00 
105 56 

59 03 

164 32 

20 07 

53 50 

10 00 

112 73 

80 41 

98 24 

112 14 



$ c. 

91 24 
1,108 83 
172 51 
128 56 
383 71 
158 98 
430 89 
1,260 35 
391 90 
170 51 
1,612 40 
553 20 
434 71 
139 13 
364 64 
245 99 
230 51 

53 24 
545 60 
559 56 
673 89 

98 76 

96 79 

2,403 96 

332 58 

1,761 51 

152 19 

1,789 31 

1,227 20 

613 06 

53 95 
444 15 
216 95 
759 88 
749 94 

61 45 

37 58 



285 38 

283 63 
2,210 13 

158 47 
76 20 

325 18 
32 12 
59 00 



175 48 
146 71 
178 61 
206 29 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



293 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Concluded) 
Statistics, 1922, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1923 (Concluded) 



No. 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Popula- 
tion 



Total i 
Expendi- 
ture 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circula- 
tion 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1923 



Amount 
expended 
on Books 

in 1922 



165 
166 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 



Tillsonburg 

Toronto : — 

Beaches. . . . 

Church 

College 

Deer Park . . 

Dovercourt . 

Earlscourt . . 

Eastern .... 

High Park.. 

Municipal. . 

Northern . . . 

Queen &Lisgar 

Riverdale. . . 

Western .... 

Wychwood . 

Yorkville . . . 

Trenton 

Uxbridge 

Walkerton 

Walkerville 

Wallaceburg. . . . 

Waterford 

Waterloo 

Watford 

Welland 

Weston 

Whitby 

Windsor 

Wingham 

Woodstock 

Wroxeter 



Totals. 



R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



3.020 



538,771 



6,000 
1,389 
2,200 
7,377 
4,530 
1,102 
6,096 
1,039 
8,888 
3,299 
4,174 

42,122 
2,470 

10,196 
344 



,582,851 



$ c. 
1,717 68 

13,232 06 

21,572 58 

116,312 84 

11,093 38 

23,116 72 

16,270 61 

9,176 22 

14,773 13 

2,728 20 

6,486 87 

11,495 97 

69 

66 

77 



19,978 

13,321 

12,072 

11,354 84 

3,637 25 

827 25 

1,818 85 

11,175 64 

2,696 91 

861 18 

3,257 48 

745 91 

9,194 39 

1,738 67 

1,428 89 

17,785 47 

1,176 32 

4,903 60 

320 54 



873,686 21 



4,758 

13,149 

57,415 

190,743 

13,362 

22,510 

13,110 

8,592 

16,673 

1,818 

8,964 

18,048 

20,086 

15,896 

12,721 

16,759 

4,281 

7,052 

5,331 

11,304 

5,293 

1,653 

12,640 

4,796 

5,086 

5,472 

4,262 

36,184 

7,371 

13,170 

6,170 



1,731,827 



21,358 

151,904 

84,160 

693,143 

108,031 

295,577 

210,421 

95,168 

174,599 

9,027 

49,888 

106,489 

243,399 

138,050 

126,382 

107,284 

45,229 

11,952 

13,019 

73,421 

33,910 

6,322 

26,208 

11,525 

23,148 

32,535 

17,809 

166,558 

13,790 

570,023 

2,385 



7,791,492 



$ c. 
187 49 

255 00 
260 00 
260 00 
255 00 
260 00 
255 00 
245 99 
255 00 
250 00 

252 41 
255 00 
260 00 
255 00 
255 00 
255 00 

253 32 
78 03 

233 91 
260 00 
173 66 
113 10 
260 00 

97 22 
214 34 
252 16 
185 72 
260 00 
260 00 
260 00 

48 37 



32,083 02 



$ c. 
325 25 



1,758 47 

982 67 

16,156 15 

1,482 32 

2,636 27 

2,368 52 

2,160 62 

1,890 77 

752 27 

1,008 77 

1,578 92 

2,149 12 

1,870 82 

1.337 42 

1.338 47 
1,263 07 

93 49 
321 02 

1,586 48 
279 49 
265 56 
368 17 
150 01 
450 03 
419 09 
310 70 

4,784 21 
406 03 

1,008 61 
98 98 



149,453 08 



294 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES 
Statistics, 1922, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1923 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circula- 
tion 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1923 



Amount 
expended 
on Books 

in 1922 



Admaston 

Agincourt 

Allenford 

Alliston 

Alma 

Alton 

Angus 

Arkona 

Assiginack, Mani- 
to waning P.O. . 

Athens 

Atwood 

Auburn 

Badjeros 

Bala 

Bancroft 

Bath 

Bayfield 

Bayham 

Baysville 

Beachville 

Beech wood 



22 Belwood. 



Birch Cliff 

Blenheim 

Bloomfield 

Blyth 

Bobcaygeon .... 

Bolton. . . # 

Bowmanville. . . . 

Bridgeburg 

Brigden 

Brooklin 

Brougham 

Brownsville 

Brucefield 

Burgessville 

Burlington 

Burnstown 

Caledon 

Cambray 

Camden, East. . . 

Canfield 

Cannington 

Capreol 

Cargill 

Chalk River. . . . 

Chatsworth 

Cheapside 

Chesterville 

Claremont 

Clarksburg 

Clarkson 

Claude 

Cobourg 

Cochrane 

Colborne 

Coldstream 

Cold water 

Comber 

Cookstown 

Copetown 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



Rural 
450 
542 
1,321 



$ c. 

27 66 
299 14 
211 24 

878 06 



1,542 
1,934 

452 
1,027 



No annual report for year 1922 
419 
420 
418 



No annual 

775 

600 

250 
Rural 

350 

800 

350 

387 
No annual 

1681 
No annual 
Rural 

350 
1,742 
1,650 

600 

700 

943 

650 

3,200 

2,600 

No annual 

Rural I 

300 

250| 
No annual 

2001 
2,484l 
No annual 

500 

280 

200 

750 

900 
No annual 

250 

400 

303 

500 

149 

350 

600 

200 

37 

5,400 



118 80 


5,268 


103 32 


1,129 


157 35 


2,918 



R.R. 



3,000 
1,000 
100 
635 
600 
500 
Rural 



report for 
236 46 
84 75 
71 79 
69 67 
89 65 

288 45 
165 38 
189 67 

report for 
132 791 

report for 
203 69 
187 15 
450 43 
670 39 
7 50 
113 65 
338 23 
179 30 
565 46 
379 71 

report for 

174 59 

13 20 

302 75 

report for 
233 221 
973 55l 

report for 
189 07 
171 75 
131 25 
151 89 
185 07 

report for 

283 58 

150 75 

223 79 

78 70 

420 41 

189 85 

375 56 

98 49 

87 15 

765 68 

392 22 

122 75 

80 8*-' 

135 71 

368 32 

121 00 

289 54 



year 1922 

2,166 

1,316 

1,742 

790 

396 

719 

1,173 

986 

year 1922 

1,1671 
year 1922 
1,662 
2,837 
955 
5,557 

819 ... 
2,644 
3,703 
2,362 
5,365 
3,003 
year 1922 
3,329 

300 .. . 

2,103 

year 1922 

1,1581 

5,090| 

year 1922 

3,341 

2,554 

2,135 

1,194 

4,371 

year 1922 

3,619 

87 

1,808 

2,631 

977 

2,940 

2,744 

594 

3,756 

5,440 

626 

2,247 

2,129 

2,353 

2,503 

1,898 

228 



852 

4,842 

3,056 

11,210 

3,927 
1,820 
1,690 



4,804 
1,353 
1,684 
493 
425 
3,047 
3,993 
2,511 

2,036 

1,681 

1,312 

4,121 

12,952 



2,656 
3,668 
5,360 
11,789 
4,439 

3,112 



4,210 

1,568 
19,633 

1,050 

1,100 

420 

2,285 
3,964 

4,884 



1,371 
1,121 
4,988 
1,901 
6,716 
1,312 

773 

18,045 

2,515 

699 
2,443 
7,187 
6,760 

672 

200 



$ c 
10 00 

185 44 
60 74 

125 35 

28 03 
30 22 
26 20 



33 15 

15 71 

24 37 
21 86 
45 26 
44 66 
32 25 
20 43 

27 80 

97 49 

51 35 

102 17 

109 62 

25 00 

32 01 
118 81 

65 35 
97 29 
74 73 

28 24 

35 00 
65 28 

33 55 
115 18 

74 98 
60 16 

36 31 
63 14 
51 15 

94 00 

37 38 

38 56 

16 41 
37 08 
43 43 
88 02 

29 52 
43 09 

109 25 
117 05 
31 55 
47 55 
15 72 
80 06 
31 67 
142 15 



264 63 
160 75 
246 86 

47 43 
47 05 
40 82 



185 61 
26 83 

" 45*45 

60 00 

118 56 

" 88*87 

99 76 

121 41 

84 65 
344 74 

85 71 



66 15 
138 75 

61 80 
135 30 
149 49 

20 33 



156 66 

101 07 
303 53 

129 85 
108 55 

86 90 
107 20 

62 00 

156 83 
12 50 

107 51 
62 00 

136 23 
75 20 

123 73 

41 07 
71 75 

148 55 
193 60 

42 75 
27 43 
53 15 
60 71 
82 44 

206 97 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



295 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Continued) 
Statistics, 1922, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1923 (Continued) 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circula- 
tion 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1923 



Amount 
expended 
on Books 

in 1922 



Copleston , 

Copper Cliff. . . . 

Craighurst 

Creemore 

Delaware 

Delta 

Depot Harbour. 

Don 

Dorchester. 

Drumbo 

Duart 

Dundalk 

Dungannon 

Dunnville 

Dutton 

East Linton 

Elmvale 

Elmwood 

Embro 

Emo 

Emsdale 

Ennotville 

Espanola 

Ethel 

Fenelon Falls. . , 

Fen wick 

Flesherton 

Fonthill 

Fordwich 

Forester's Falls. . 

Fort Erie 

Frankford 

Fullarton , 

Glamis 

Glan worth , 

Glen Allen 

Glen Morris. . . 

Gore Bay 

Gore's Landing. 

Gorrie 

Grafton 

Granton 

Haileybury. 
Haliburton .... 
Harrietsville 
Harringron .... 

Harrow 

Hastings 

Hawkesbury . . . 
Hawkesville. . . , 

Hepworth 

Highgate 

Highland Creek 

Hillsdale 

Hillview 

Holstein 

Honey wood 

Huntsville 

Inglewood 

Inkerman 

Inwood 

Iroquois 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 



$ c, 
Re-organized, October 

3,5001 1,054 911 
No annual report for 

653f 243 40| 
No annual report for 



400 
800 
150 
500 
400 



185 

160 42 
115 39 
162 56 

161 56 



No annual report for 



600 

Rural 

3,500 

900 

200 

320 

Rural 

500 

500 



352 28 
144 84 
847 30 
654 83 
94 18 

191 64 
197 15 

192 40 
140 78 



No annual report for 



Rural 
3,500 

550 
1,028 

360 

410 
1,000 

221 
1,557 
1,500 

900 



254 61 

1,214 13 

175 16 

431 07 

353 35 

92 90 

272 76 

87 00 

76 70 

270 26 

318 84 



No annual report for 



Rura 
100 
200 
250 
650 
200 
400 
250 
300 
3,433 
1,200 

Rural 
200 
750 



57 82 

178 47 

46 00 

316 47 

240 95 

62 95 

39 98 

90 39 

152 11 

78 87 

44 58 

200 25 

92 08 

422 19 



R.R. 



No annual report for 

5,089| 123 72| 
No annual report for 
No annual report for 
1,000 

680 

300 

290 

300 

100 
2,316 

400 

300 

350 

840 



668 


23 


70 


83 


77 


45 


18 


05 


186 


40 


71 


01 


454 


28 


124 


20 


222 


82 


110 


46 


195 


21 



26th, 1923 
3, 184| 
year 1922 

7661 
year 1922 
1,291 
1,379 
1,904 
1,280 
3,094 
1922 
1,793 
2,754 
6,435 
2,849 

450 
2,726 
1,804 

651 

972 
1922 
5,093 
2,574 
1,557 
5,122 

936 
1,251 
4,195 
2,316 
1,484 
4,265 
1,183 
1922 
1,059 

578 
1,404 
3,167 

813 
1,773 
2,133 
1,235 

147 

767 
1,923 
1,380 
2,173 
2,227 
1922 

802 
1922 
1922 

981 
1,871 
2,112 

626 
2,383 

969 
4,513 
1,636 

113 
1,986 
2,077 



15,562 

4,177 

2,423 
3,461 
552 
2,344 
3,993 

3,431 

3,442 

14,849 

10,030 

33 

4,566 

2,762 

4,210 

3,958 



1,194 
4.100 
1,695 
4,554 
1,634 
1,914 
6,568 
1,024 
1,346 
3,888 
3,113 

1,366 

846 

536 

989 

1,004 

1,356 

657 

1,595 

131 

642 

1,711 

2,825 

1,240 

5,271 

1,364 



5,900 
1,062 
1,004 
1,001 
3,311 
1,095 
4,157 
1,450 
988 
3,777 
3,395 



$ c. 

50 00 

193 41 

40 51 

55 25 

65 62 
33 50 

56 88 

66 43 

15 00 

36 96 

200 00 

145 14 

15 97 

44 83 
36 53 
32 69 

45 45 

73 14 
95 98 
47 35 
69 27 
55 85 

16 77 
81 60 
19 34 
18 68 
64 88 

41 22 

14 45 

31 12 
10 00 

32 47 
72 22 
13 08 

15 34 
29 02 

108 11 
50 00 

16 61 
69 79 
26 62 
62 24 

16 00 



71 93 

10 00 

18 87 

10 00 

50 74 

28 47 

80 37 

52 19 

101 83 

15 00 

57 54 



296 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Continued) 
Statistics, 1922, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1923 (Continued) 



Library 



Iroquois Falls. 

Islington 

Ivanhoe 

Jarvis 

Kars 

Kearney 

Kemble 

Kinmount 

Kintore 

Kirkfield 

Kirkton 

Komoka 

Lake Charles 

Lakeside 

Lefroy 

Linwood 

Long Branch 

Lome Park , 

Lucan 

Lyn 

Madoc 

Mandaumin 

Manilla 

Manotick 

Maple 

Markham 

Markstay 

Marksville 

Marmora 

Martintown 

Matilda, Brinston 

P.O 

Maxville 

Meaford 

Melbourne 

Metcalfe 

Mildmay 

Millbank 

Millgrove 

Milton 

Minden 

Monkton 

Mono Centre 

Mono Mills 

Mono Road 

Moorefield 

Morrisburg 

Morriston 

Mount Albert 

Mount Brydges. . . 

Mount Hope 

Nanticoke 

Napanee 

Napier 

Newburgh 

Newbury 

New Dundee 

Newington 

New Toronto 

Niagara 

Norland 

North Cobalt 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture 



1,798 
Rural 

540 

500 
Rural 
No annual 

400 
1,897 

300 

200 

200 

300 

250 
Rural 
Rural 
No annual 
Organized, 

230 

700 

250 
1,056 

200 

200 
No annual 
No annual 

1,0001 
No annual 

450 
1,000 

376 

100 

900 
2,400 

210 
No annual 
No annual 

500| 
No annual 
2,000 

300 

300 
60 

320 

120 

600 
1,500 

250 

550 

371 

200 

100 
2,863 

200 

432 

300 

371 

300 
3,126 
1,508 

380 
No annual 



$ c. 
514 30 
190 06 

70 37 
139 84 
127 42 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



583 

3,324 

96 

3,958 

1,940 



report for 1922 

1,604 
1,804 
2,039 
2,513 
694 
1,574 
2,146 
142 
1,049 

report for 1922 

January 25th, 1923 



182 


32 


166 


75 


134 


15 


142 


30 


116 


50 


175 


51 


36 


97 


134 


30 


53 


10 



Circula- 
tion 



55 10 
334 34 
177 27 
430 59 
232 93 
363 77 



681 
1,868 
1,230 
3,216 
1,655 
5,466 



report for 1922 

report for 1922 

609 551 2,9£ 

report for 1922 



106 27 
504 38 
373 60 

87 00 

285 11 
1,054 90 

149 64 
report for 
report for 

286 391 
report for 

506 78 

78 62 

85 96 

45 80 

"84'20 
124 78 
393 69 

97 93 
362 63 
109 52 
223 46 

72 40 
1,075 19 

66 95 
166 30 

85 39 
143 65 

95 27 

457 31 

453 75 

124 25 

report for 



941 
823 
1,162 

609 

697 
6,210 
1,341 
1922 
1922 

1,018 
1922 
5,060 
2,168 
1,484 

952 

848 
1,472 

415 
3,625 
1,589 
1,759 
1,201 

720 
2,619 
9,661 

657 
2,533 
1,302 
1,354 
1,003 

593 
9,810 
1,575 
1922 



812 
6,096 

223 
2,672 

845 

1,093 
4,597 
2,090 
1,672 
1,189 
1,526 
489 
208 
1,333 



470 
5,011 

2,372 
8,367 
2,083 
3,188 



3,014 

4,282 
7,299 
2,078 

1,926 

3,151 

18,403 

1,296 



2,873 

9,131 

1,447 

1,784 

879 



1,820 
1,600 
5,412 
1,502 
3,224 
779 
2,600 
1,243 

16,702 
621 
1,558 
1,987 
2,844 
1,750 
8,900 

16,812 
2,432 



Legisla- 


tive Grant 


paid in 


1923 




$ 


c. 


231 


96 


79 


21 


21 


36 


37 


67 


44 


37 


33 


19 


15 


00 


51 


72 


55 


69 


32 


97 


38 


83 


13 


08 


84 


08 


18 


22 


26 


27 


79 


19 


47 


62 


36 


90 


73 


17 


146 


64 


15 


51 


16 


37 


100 48 


30 


89 


21 


81 


62 


70 


247 


10 


21 


96 


93 


61 


134 


90 


22 


07 


20 


61 


20 


08 


50 


00 


27 


94 


18 


97 


104 


27 


20 


27 


74 


72 


24 


26 


17 


54 


12 


61 


207 


55 


28 


80 


24 


55 


10 


00 


51 


92 


20 09 


186 


58 


162 


06 


22 


79 



Amount 

expended 

on Books 

in 1922 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF ECUDATION 



297 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Continued) 
Statistics, 1922, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1923 (Continued) 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circula- 
tion 



Legisla 

tive Grant 

paid in 

1923 



Amount 
expended 
on Books 

in 1922 



North Gower. . . 

Odessa 

Omemee 

Orono 

Oxford Mills.... 

Pakenham 

Palermo 

Park Head 

Pickering 

Pinkerton 

Plattsville 

Plympton, Cam- 

lachie P.O 

Point Edward . . . 

Port Credit 

Port Dover 

Port Perry 

Port Stanley. . . . 

Powassan 

Princeton 

Queensville 

Rainy River. . . . 

Ridgetown 

Ripley 

Riversdale 

Rodney 

Romney 

Rossdale 

Runnymede 

Russell 

St. George 

St. Helen's 

Sandwich 

Scarboro'.. 
Scarboro' Bluffs. 

Scotland.- 

Shakespeare. . . . 

Sheddon 

Shetland 

Singhampton.. . . 

Smithville 

Solina 

Sombra 

Sonya 

Southampton . . . 

Southcote 

South Mountain. 
South Woodslee. 

Sparta" 

Speedside 

Stevensville 

Strathcona 

Stratton 

Sydenham 

Thamesford 

Thamesville 

Thedford 

Thornbury 

Thorndale 

Thornhill 

Tiverton 

Tobermory 



R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



350 

700 

500 
No annual 

3001 
No annual 

100 

250 

600 
Rural 

600 

335 
1,300 
1,200 
1,500 
1,200 

721 

510 

300 

300 



$ c. 

143 82 

167 30 

202 53 

report for 

71 76| 
report for 
61 96 
105 51 

230 13 
121 62 

231 80 

113 49 
95 40 
401 85 
413 52 
370 22 

258 32 
341 65 

259 00 
150 91 



2,464 
1,567 
1,813 

1922 
1,354 

1922 

209 

702 

2,059 

2,199 

2,834 

1,826 
4,188 
3,489 
1,198 
3,156 
2,434 
1,363 
914 
2,548 



No annual report for 1922 
2,300 322 13 4,597 
800 128 58 2,233 

400 21 00 1,540 

756 226 15 1,522 

149 123 04 4,225 

Rural 109 25 488 

4,500 414 41 2,941 
700 324 09 822 

700 436 11 5,593 
Rural 106 98 2.536 

Organized, April 9th, 1923 
Rural | 164 Oil 5,472 
No annual report for 1922 

4001 258 361 2,122 
Re-organized, November 29th 



400 
350 
100 
500 

Rural 
215 
300 
1,710 

Rural 
350 

Rural 



177 08 
307 24 

62 07 
164 23 

43 33 
393 35 

76 13 
247 56 

41 16 

173 43 

174 20 



2,246 

1,370 
342 

1,353 
586 
650 
399 

6,278 
201 

1,161 
57 



1923 



Re-organized, October 27th, 1923 



250 
350 
340 
126 
200 
600 
817 
600 



57 73 
131 53 

95 08 
105 85 
329 72 
174 39 
345 48 
161 75 



1,694 
988 
1,710 
190 
1,948 
2,957 
2,634 
3,537 



No annual report for 1922 
400 271 11 1,166 
350 148 24 618 
300 100 77 1,524 
385 124 42 180 



3,670 
1,557 
1,324 

982 

426 
1,989 
2,658 
1,010 
3,432 

2,655 
1,843 
8,667 
2,170 
6,244 
4,810 
3,982 
2,240 
2,637 

6,346 
2,695 
1,701 
2,221 
1,454 
605 
4,465 
2,137 
3,762 
1,973 

2,735 

1,909 

1,400 

4,636 
540 

3,779 
651 
756 
737 

7,230 
201 

1,404 
61 

475 
1,928 
713 
612 
3,511 
3,325 
2,419 
4,073 



29,712 

541 

1,581 

464 



$ c. 
17 61 

40 52 
48 06 

20 00 

29 07 
17 66 
71 58 
26 20 
59 33 

48 71 
15 00 
43 83 
50 00 
75 64 
56 59 
145 21 
25 00 

30 06 

81 64 
32 37 



32 52 
53 53 
66 06 
81 00 
70 02 
37 32 
21 60 

61 36 

59 88 

21 92 

75 19| 

30 00 

25 96 

30 30 

115 26 

21 44 

37 36 

30 00 

23 51 

74 29 
50 00 
11 56 

49 05 
19 69 
45 07 
89 36 

33 15 
89 97 
59 53 

75 84 

50 18 
13 95 
66 28 



$ c. 
42 00 
33 60 
53 93 

29 75 

41 16 

32 55 

90 78 

41 87 

113 00 

77 35 



102 00 
150 00 

57 29 

89 92 

260 25 



79 38 

126 24 

27 67 



109 35 

82 85 

69 42 

255 60 

'60 13 

105 30 

59 20 

150 05 

40 67 

51 85 

124 58 

19 50 

46 54 

42 10 

297 27 

24 63 

137 90 

30 00 

88 10 

73 20 



31 01 
60 62 
45 00 

43 73 
99 53 
58 30 

113 45 
105 33 

138 06 
77 93 

44 60 
103 70 



298 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Concluded) 
Statistics, 1922, showing Legislative Grants paid in 1923 (Concluded) 



No. 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circula- 
tion 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1923 



Amount 
expended 
on Books 

in 1922 



246 
247 
248 
249 
250 
251 
252 
253 

254 

255 
256 
257 
258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 



Tottenham 

Trout Creek 

Tweed 

Underwood 

Unionville 

VankleekHill 

Varna 

Victoria, Caledonia 

P.O 

Victoria Mines, 

Coniston P.O. . . 

Victoria Road 

Walton 

Wardsville 

Warkworth 

Waterdown 

Wellesley 

Westford 

West Lome 

White Lake 

Wiarton 

Williamstown 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 



266 I Winchester. . . 



267 
268 
269 
270 
271 



Woodville. . . 
Worthington . 

Wyoming 

Zephyr 

Zurich 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



Totals. 



600 
404 

1,400 
216 
500 

1,646 
Rural 

Rural 

1,500 
500 
Rural 
212 

2,400 
800 
600 
150 
850 
130 

1,809 
300 

1,058 
440 
350 
450 
625 

1,500 



$ c. 

73 40 

59 95 
388 58 
220 29 

62 51 
526 66 
166 82 

146 50 

110 37 
124 85 

21 20 
142 42 
200 43 
209 03 
183 11 
4 05 
260 44 

73 35 
534 89 

52 00 
193 22 

147 98 
219 13 
173 60 
107 28 
109 65 



2,642 
1,189 
2,571 

855 
1,896 
1,803 

219 

3,936 

1,595 

694 
1,487 
2,336 
1,640 
1,316 
2,702 
2,359 
1,681 

988 
3,786 
2,480 
2,060 
2,608 

805 
1,299 
1,616 

456 



2,149 
852 
8,111 
1,552 
1,913 
2,000 
2,144 

999 

2,081 
204 
1,466 
3,344 
731 
4,037 
1,710 



4,893 

770 

6,329 

1,218 

4,758 

1,197 

1,271 

842 

1,756 

813 



$ c. 

10 00 

18 89 

53 06 

56 42 

14 69 
117 27 

49 89 

20 01 

44 91 
10 00 
10 00 
44 85 

15 00 

16 25 
38 92 



86 
33 
95 
10 
47 
49 
85 
71 
20 
15 



$ c. 

16 40 

24 78 
126 71 
135 85 

19 58 
184 54 

99 71 

110 37 

58 32 
78 96 



80 90 



63 25 
61 13 



193 57 

54 85 

186 38 



44 79 



78 83 
13 51 
41 90 
34 65 



164,082 



52,603 50 



476,930 



742,019 



12,483 90 



22,147 76 



Six new libraries were added during 1923. 

Two libraries were added to the list of Free Libraries during 1923: New- 
castle and Swansea. Of these libraries, Swansea was formerly an Association 
Library. 

Five Association Libraries have been added to the list. Four of these, 
Granton, Inkerman, Long Branch and Sandwich, are new libraries. Shakespeare 
is a reorganized library. 



1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 299 



Grants to Historical, Literary and Scientific Institutions 

The following Historical, Literary and Scientific Institutions, etc., duly- 
reported according to the requirements of the Act, and received the under- 
mentioned grants during the fiscal year ending October 31st, 1923: 

$ c. 

Brant Historical Society . 100 00 

Elgin Historical and Scientific Association 100 00 

Essex Historical Society 100 00 

Huron Institute 100 00 

Kent Historical Society - 100 00 

Kingston Historical Society 100 00 

L'Alliance Francaise, Ottawa .^ 400 00 

Lennox and Addington Historical Society 100 00 

Lundy's Lane Historical Society 200 00 

London and Middlesex Historical Society 100 00 

Niagara Historical Society 350 00 

Ontario Historical Society 1,000 00 

Thunder Bay Historical Society, Fort William 100 00 

Wentworth Historical Society 200 00 

Women's Canadian Historical Society of Ottawa 400 00 

Women's Canadian Historical Society of Toronto 200 00 

Women's Wentworth Historical Society 300 00 

Hamilton Scientific Association 400 00 

Royal Canadian Institute 2,500 00 

Club Litteraire Canadien Francais, Ottawa 300 00 

L'Institut Canadien Francais, Ottawa 300 00 

Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club 200 00 

Royal Astronomical Society, Toronto .' 600 00 

Society of Chemical Industry 300 00 

Ontario Library Association 400 00 

St. Patrick's Literary Association of Ottawa 200 00 

Waterloo Historical Society 100 00 

United Empire Loyalists 200 00 

York Pioneers 200 00 

Intitut Jeanne D'Arc, Ottawa 200 00 

Le Cercle Social, Ottawa 200 00 

Folk Lore Society 100 00 

Grenville Pioneer and Historical Society 100 00 

Georgian Bay Historical Society 200 00 

Parry Sound Historical Society 100 00 

Owen Sound Historical Society 100 00 

Gore Bay Historical Society 50 00 

Little Current Historical Society 50 00 

Manito waning Historical Society 50 00 

Aryan Society 200 00 

Le Cercle St. Francois d'Assise 300 00 



300 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPEN 
TEACHERS' 

FINANCIAL 



Name of Institute 



<2 § £ 



Receipts 






03 

.2* 
^O 



1 Algoma East 

2 Algoma (Eastern Division) 

3 Brant 

4 Bruce East 

5 Bruce West 

6 Carleton East 

7 Carleton West, and Lanark East 

8 Dufferin 

9 Dundas 

10 Elgin East 

11 Elgin West 

12 Essex North 

13 Essex South 

14 Frontenac North, and Addington.. . . 

15 Frontenac South 

16 Glengarry 

17 Grey East 

18 Grey West 

19 Grey South 

20 Haldimand 

21 Haliburton 

22 Halton 

23 Hastings Centre 

24 Hastings North 

25 Hastings South, and Belleville 

26 Huron East 

27 Huron West 

28 Kenora 

29 Kent East . 

30 Kent West, and City of Chatham. ... 

3 1 Lambton East 

32 Lambton West 

33 Lanark West, and Smith's Falls 

34 Leeds East, and Brockville (No. 2).. . 

35 Leeds West (No.l) 

36 Leeds and Grenville (No. 3) 

37 Lennox 

38 Lincoln 

39 Manitoulin 

40 Middlesex East 

41 Middlesex West 

42 Muskoka 

43 Nipissing, and Timiskaming South. . , 

44 Norfolk 

45 Northumberland and Durham, No. 1 

46 Northumberland and Durham, No. 2 

47 Northumberland and Durham, No. 3 

48 Ontario North 

49 Ontario South 

50 Oxford 

5 1 Parry Sound East 

52 Parry Sound West 

53 Peel 

54 Perth and City of Stratford 

55 Peterborough 

56 Prescott and Russell 



172 

36 
140 
120 
130 
195 
103 
111 
100 
111 
121 

84 
177 

56 
105 
112 

67 
130 
113 
108 

48 
119 
102 

58 
141 
130 
136 

48 
108 
162 
108 
162 
128 
114 

89 
105 
136 

62 
103 
107 
103 

87 
109 
102 
102 

84 

99 
113 
234 

80 

74 
122 
232 
107 

91 



50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 



50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
75 00 
50 00 

50 00 
75 00 
50 00 
50 00 



50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
83 19 
100 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 

'so'66 

50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
82 59 
50 00 
50 00 



50 00 
50 00 
164 54 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 



ioo'oo 

50 00 


'5606 

100 00 
50 00 


"56*66 

50 00 
75 00 


so '66 

75 00 

50 00 



$ c 
86 00 
18 00 

102 00 

'27*66 
92 50 

103 50 
83 75 

100 00 
55 00 



44 25 
14 00 

26 25 
18 00 

4 75 
65 00 
23 00 

27 25 
10 25 
58 00 

45 50 
14 50 
36 00 
57 50 

63 50 

52 66 

40 50 
56 00 
82 00 

28 00 
56 00 
44 00 

42 00 
48 75 
61 59 
61 00 

64 00 

53 00 
48 50 

43 50 
113 00 



47 50 

52 00 

107 00 

13 25 

18 50 

122 00 

116 00 

49 50 

22 70 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



301 



DIX M 
INSTITUTES 

STATEMENT 



*T3 !> 

co O 

CQO 



Expenditure 



.5 oT 

CL, d 



g 0) 

'Stag 

2 ^ £ 

rS-3 g 



O X 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 



$ c. 
133 86 

87 25 
140 94 
366 28 
302 02 

34 65 
101 07 
246 87 
148 30 
272 96 
184 56 
129 42 
400 45 

34 41 
167 85 
210 00 
117 96 
121 59 
251 09 
771 31 

63 58 
188 50 
121 51 

87 50 
40 90 

238 98 
179 36 

47 61 
489 30 
349 16 

29 69 
155 61 
309 32 

90 08 

89 39 
258 85 

20 37 
126 07 
166 50 
202 08 
263 30 
151 11 

32 02 
246 41 
291 61 
479 29 

209 76 
53 25 

246 15 
57 

210 26 
136 20 

48 99 
308 59 

88 34 
297 16 



$ c. 
219 86 
155 25 
342 94 
466 28 
429 02 
227 15 
337 76 
480 62 
348 30 
427 96 
284 56 
204 42 
544 70 
98 41 
294 10 
278 00 
222 71 

286 59 
374 09 
898 56 
123 83 
346 50 
267 01 
152 00 
209 49 
396 48 
342 86 

47 61 
541 30 
489 66 
185 69 
452 15 
437 32 
246 08 
233 39 
400 85 
144 12 

287 66 
277 50 
416 08 
416 30 
249 61 
125 52 
459 41 
441 61 
579 29 
259 76 
200 75 
398 15 
257 57 
273 51 
154 70 
270 99 
574 59 
237 84 
369 86 



« c. 

6 96 

7 85 
36 39 
21 59 
12 25 

5 82 
68 02 
55 25 
20 74 
51 63 

4 98 

8 00 
30 65 

5 50 
20 52 
11 38 
11 05 
17 36 

15 09 

11 70 
7 20 

29 65 
20 95 

7 57 

8 38 

16 00 
39 97 

6 70 
55 94 

9 80 
19 45 
29 87 

12 86 
15 00 
12 57 

15 85 

16 05 



17 
6 

22 



98 
05 
10 



33 66 
12 97 

11 98 
42 86 
17 00 

162 93 
3 39 
8 95 

12 00 
12 68 
11 93 
10 80 

8 66 
28 44 
24 63 
22 05 



15 50 

109 89 

14 00 

155 00 

50 00 

18 25 

129 75 

7 00 

61 25 



28 11 
9 50 

'66*50 

37 00 
120 00 
12 50 
25 15 
210 87 
89 46 
15 00 
49 13 
61 75 
11 25 



63 55 

52 66 

6 95 
126 00 

51 00 
83 63 

*2i*75 

52 30 
22 50 

7 10 
42 50 
25 50 

9 35 

50 00 

129 81 



50 00 

36 90 

65 02 

3 25 

'50'22 

171 13 

52 50 

148 40 



$ c. 

105 00 

59 30 

106 45 
115 75 
137 75 

94 70 

153 33 

174 95 

217 00 

207 22 

37 86 

72 00 

277 86 

64 80 

75 00 

75 00 

115 36 

81 55 
47 00 

263 77 
69 35 

100 65 
41 00 
72 85 
45 45 

60 92 
176 10 

10 00 
72 55 

35 35 
112 07 
205 00 
122 30 

86 00 
126 05 
85 00 
88 10 
120 88 
44 46 
91 58 

82 60 
54 90 
58 25 

178 30 
122 30 
267 88 
197 50 
137 65 
100 30 
111 15 

36 60 
17 00 

185 31 
238 65 
102 41 
117 92 



$ c. 
Ill 96 

82 65 
252 73 
151 34 
305 00 

150 52 
239 60 
359 95 
244 74 
320 10 

42 84 

80 00 
308 51 

98 41 
105 02 

86 38 
186 91 
135 91 
182 09 

287 97 

101 -70 
341 17 

151 41 
95 42 

102 96 
138 67 
227 32 

16 70 
128 49 
108 70 
184 18 
241 82 
261 16 

152 00 
222 25 
100 85 
125 90 
191 16 

73 01 

120 78 

158 76 

93 37 

79 58 

271 16 

269 11 

430 81 

200 89 

196 60 

149 20 

188 85 

51 78 

27 80 

244 19 

438 22 

179 54 

288 37 



$ c. 

107 90 

72 60 

90 21 

314 94 

124 02 

76 63 

98 16 

120 67 

103 56 

107 86 

241 72 

124 42 

236 19 

i89 08 

191 62 
35 80 

150 68 

192 00 
610 59 

22 13 

5 33 

115 60 

56 58 
106 53 
257 81 
115 54 

30 91 
412 81 
380 96 
1 51 
210 33 
176 16 

94 08 

11 14 
300 00 

18 22 

96 50 
204 49 
295 30 
257 54 
156 24 

45 94 
188 25 
172 50 
148 48 

58 87 

4 15 

248 95 

68 72 
221 73 
126 90 

26 80 
136 37 

58 30 

81 49 



302 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



TEACHERS' 
FINANCIAL 



Name of Institute 






£ o 



QJ 









Receipts 



S 

c 

O u 






57 Prince Edward 

58 Rainy River 

59 Renfrew North 

60 Renfrew South 

61 Simcoe East 

62 Simcoe North 

63 Simcoe South-West 

64 Stormont 

65 Sudbury 

66 Thunder Bay 

67 Timiskaming North 

68 Timiskaming Centre 

69 Victoria 

70 Waterloo 

71 Welland 

72 Wellington North 

73 Wellington South 

74 Wentworth 

75 York, No. 1 

76 York, No. 2 . . : 

77 York, No. 3 

78 York, No. 4 

79 *Ontario Educational Association 

Cities 

80 Brantford 

81 Guelph 

82 Hamilton 

83 Kingston 

84 London 

85 Ottawa 

86 Peterborough 

87 St. Catharines and Niagara Falls 

88 Toronto 

89 " 

90 " 

91 " 

92 " 

93 " 

94 " 

95 Windsor and Walkerville 

Totals, 1922 

Totals, 1921 

Increases 

Decreases 

♦Statement for 1922-3. 



101 
69 

135 
154 
120 
124 
110 
139 
190 
245 
75 

143 

298 
238 

89 
161 
143 

95 
162 
146 
162 



122 
63 
434 
83 
247 
425 
82 
105 
269 
272 
274 
236 
238 
181 
266 
233 



12,910 
13,309 



$ c. 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
100 00 
75 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
2,000 00 



50 00 
25 00 

150 00 
50 00 
75 00 

125 00 
50 00 
50 00 
75 00 
75 00 
75 00 
75 00 
75 00 
75 00 
75 00 
75 00 



6,900 00 
6,275 00 



625 00 



$ c 
50 00 

50 00 

50 00 
50 00 



50 00 
59 - 40 



50 00 
81 55 
63 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 

50 00 



50 00 
50 00 

150 00 
50 00 
75 00 

100 00 
50 00 
50 00 
75 00 
75 00 
75 00 
75 00 
75 00 
75 00 
75 00 
75 00 



4,459 27 
4,411 50 



47 77 



$ c. 
91 00 
69 00 
59 00 
66 30 
32 50 
31 00 
49 50 
58 50 
44 75 
61 25 
75 00 

'74' 75 

162 50 
56 00 
22 50 
84 50 

131 00 
44 00 
97 50 
73 00 
78 50 

927 40 



38 50 

272*50 

39 00 
230 00 
306 00 

61 50 

52 50 

63 25 

66 25 

68 75 

61 25 

62 00 
48 75 
62 75 

100 60 



6,540 84 
6,244 00 



296 84 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



303 



INSTITUTES (Concluded) 

STATEMENT (Concluded) 





Expenditure 




3*5 


en 
o 


i 


.8* 


CO 

3 
O 


u 

3 






tfl o 

a >-> 

TO 4-) 

CQO 


"3 

o 
H 


c3 


Libraries 
Educatio 
Journals, 


c 

% 

a 


Total 
Expendit 


en 

&> 

o 

c. 
PQ 




$ C. 


% c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


57 


3 07 


194 07 


20 75 


50 20 


103 12 


174 07 


20 00 


58 


73 10 


192 10 


9 35 


20 65 


95 30 


125 30 


66 80 


59 


179 49 


338 49 


19 00 


25 00 


156 65 


200 65 


137 84 


60 


300 11 


466 41 


11 35 


102 25 


43 00 


156 60 


309 81 


61 


250 94 


383 44 


20 00 


156 50 


153 00 


329 50 


53 94 


62 


41 72 


122 72 


13 00 


34 00 


70 45 


117 45 


5 27 


63 


235 54 


335 04 


14 94 


81 75 


188 16 


284 85 


50 19 


64 


172 54 


331 04 


13 25 


80 55 


163 66 


257 46 


73 58 


65 


173 85 


268 60 


15 58 




62 60 


78 18 


190 42 


66 


102 81 


273 46 


36 36 


"si 66 


129 60 


216 96 


59 50 


67 


75 13 


200 13 


15 32 




66 50 


81 82 


118 31 


68 


132 94 


182 94 


1 84 




28 30 


30 14 


152 80 


69 


138 34 


313 09 


25 20 


35 00 


100 35 


160 55 


152 54 


70 


184 80 


528 85 


64 00 


98 08 


269 98 


432 06 


96 79 


71 


248 72 


442 72 


13 89 


169 90 


163 52 


347 31 


95 41 


72 


115 21 


237 71 


36 78 


89 32 


21 00 


147 10 


90 61 


73 


368 89 


553 39 


45 07 


92 75 


229 30 


367 12 


186 27 


74 


338 50 


569 50 


65 67 


110 87 


377 12 


553 66 


15 84 


75 


292 27 


436 27 


90 76 


107 35 


99 68 


297 79 


138 48 


76 


311 97 


509 47 


74 57 


75 19 


209 02 


358 78 


150 69 


77 


386 66 


509 66 


77 85 


102 50 


271 43 


451 78 


57 88 


78 


215 90 


394 40 


82 75 


113 60 


105 10 


301 45 


92 95 


79 


3,969 63 


6,897 03 


1,519 72 




3,200 26 


4,719 98 


2,177 05 


80 


19 84 


158 34 


6 00 


79 00 


70 34 


155 34 


3 00 


81 


26 73 


101 73 


3 19 


55 00 


33 70 


91 89 


9 84 


82 


168 28 


740 78 


31 85 


225 00 


152 00 


408 85 


331 93 


83 


91 73 


230 73 


10 66 


116 35 


71 84 


198 85 


31 88 


84 


62 44 


442 44 


34 16 


45 84 


137 00 


217 00 


225 44 


85 


360 88 


891 88 


47 90 


156 44 


469 85 


674 19 


217 69 


86 


21 05 


182 55 


1 00 


30 75 


124 00 


155 75 


26 80 


87 


67 98 


220 48 


9 99 


50 01 


45 54 


105 54 


114 94 


88 


179 93 


393 18 


28 67 


124 00 


233 25 


385 92 


7 26 


89 


284 20 


500 45 


34 02 


374 93 


91 50 


500 45 




90 


312 98 


531 73 


43 23 


74 50 


397 70 


515 43 


'l630 


91 


161 27 


372 52 


45 95 




322 62 


368 57 


95 


92 


240 54 


452 54 


32 96 


'75 73 


240 00 


348 69 


103 85 


93 


643 56 


842 31 


52 17 


33 96 


672 16 


758 29 


84 02 


94 


261 84 


474 59 


33 75 


80 93 


353 50 


468 18 


6 41 


95 


104 19 


354 79 


57 39 


11 72 


111 25 


180 36 


174 43 




21,859 78 


39,759 89 


3,977 49 


5,743 50 


16,089 38 


25,810 37 


13,949 52 




18,730 20 


35,660 70 


2,698 64 


5,807 92 


12,341 19 


20,847 75 


14,812 95 




3,129 58 


4,099 19 


1,278 85 


'6442 


3,748 19 


4,962 62 


'863 "43 



304 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPEN 
FIFTH CLASSES 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 

(In the case of rural schools the 

section number and the name 

of the township are given.) 



Post Office 



Algoma (in part) 1 

2 
3 

Brant and North Norfolk (in part) ... 4 

Bruce, East 5 

6 

7 

Bruce, West 

9 

Dundas 10 

Elgin, East 11 

12 

Elgin, West 13 

Grey, East 14 

15 
16 

Grey, South 17 

Grey, West 18 

Haldimand 19 

Haliburton and E. Muskoka 20 

21 
22 
23 
24 

Halton and Wentworth (in part) 25 

26 

Hastings, Centre 27 

28 
29 
30 
31 

Huron, East 32 

33 

Huron, West 34 

35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 



U. 2 Tarbutt and Laird 

4 Laird and McDonald. . . . 

1 McDonald 

11 Windham 

Mildmay 

3 Amabel and Arran 

2 Brant and Greenock 

Tiverton 

3 Greenock 

4 Winchester 

7 Yarmouth 

13 Yarmouth 

1 Aldboro' 

U.12 Artemesia 

3 Euphrasia 

U. 4 Euphrasia 

Neustadt 

14 Keppel 

3 Walpole 

3 Dysart 

Gooderham Consolidated. 

4 Monmouth 

Wilberforce Consolidated. 

1 McLean 

9 West Flamboro' 

10 West Flamboro' 

1 Hungerford 

13 Hungerford 

1 and 3 Huntingdon 

10 Huntingdon 

20 Rawdon 

7 Howick 

17 Howick 

Hensall 

Bayfield 

U. 8 Ashfield 

7 Hay 

5 Stephen 

U.16 Stephen 

6 Usborne 

4 West Wawanosh 



MacLennan 

Bar River 

Echo Bay , 

Vanessa, R. R. 3 . . . 

Mildmay , 

Allenford 

Cargill , 

Tiverton , 

Chepstow, R. R. 1. . 

Winchester, R. R. 1. 

Sparta 

St. Thomas, R. R. 5. 

Rodney 

Priceville 

Kimberley 

Heathcote 

Neustadt 

North Keppel 

Selkirk 

Haliburton 

Gooderham 

Tory Hill 

Wilberforce 

Baysville 

Dundas, R. R. 4 

Puslinch, R. R. 3... . 

Thomasburg 

Bogart 

West Huntingdon . . . 

Crookston 

Springbrook 

Gorrie 

Fordwich 

Hensall 

Bayfield 

Dungannon 

Zurich 

Crediton 

Dash wood 

Woodham, R. R. 1 . . 
Lucknow, R. R. 1 . . . 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



305 



DIX N 
922-23 



Teachers 



Name of Principal and 
Degree if any 



.2 rt 
55 o 
en y3 

o C 



cs 


a 


o\ 


3 


•H 


Cu 






§b 


"o 


C o3 




<^ 


o 



Pupils 



<u as 
> £ 



Grade of 
Fifth Class 



o 

OS g OJ 

> > g 

5 a 3 

oacr 



1 Marguerite Martin. . . 

2 Reginald Canning. . . . 

3 Jean MacDougall. . . . 

4 Revah E. Miller 

5 Wilfred W. Tanner. . . 

6 Reginald Koch 

7 Marguerite Mclntyre 

8 Maude B. Alexander.. 

9 Elizabeth T. Clifford. 

10 Clara Allison 

11 Emma B. Fritz 

12 Selma M. Caverly. . . 

13 Margaret Kelly 

14 Corah G. Patterson. . 

15 G. Blanche Murphy. . 

16 Delia E. Agnew 

17 H. M. Ermel 

18 Laura J. McFarlane.. 

19 John Henry 

20 W. N. Campbell 

21 Anna McLay 

22 Gladys Durling 

23 Harvey Knight 

24 Isobel Bowes 

25 Verna J. McLaughlin. 

26 NinaM. Kirk 

27 Earl Davidson 

28 Elizabeth McGrath . . 

29 Lottie Sprague 

30 Anna W. Wilson 

31 Laura West 

32 Gordon Jefferson 

33 Geo. H. Jefferson. . . . 

34 James L. Kerr 

35 Mary C. Smith 

36 Frederick Ross 

37 Melville Milliken 

38 Merton Morley 

39 Peter B. Moffatt 

40 Lila McCullock 

41 DorothyDouglas 



II 
II 
II 


$ 

1,400 
1,350 
1,200 


12 
9 
6 


10 
8 
5 




i 


T 




i 


II 


1,000 


5 


4 




i 




I 

I 

II 


1,400 
1,350 
1,100 


5 

11 

5 


4 

10 

4 


i 


i 




i 




II 
II 


1,300 
1,000 


8 
3 


7 
3 




i 


i 


II 


1,000 


2 


2 


1 






II 
I 


1,200 
1,300 


7 
2 


2 
2 




i . 


i 


II 


1,100 


3 


2 






1 


I 

II 
II 


1,100 
1,150 
1,000 


12 

10 

3 


10 
8 
3 




i . 
i . 
i . 




II 


1,250 


2 


2 




i . 




I 

II 

II 
II 
II 
II 
II 


900 

1,750 

1,200 
1,100 
1,000 
1,000 
1,100 


3 

28 

5 

4 

4 

10 

7 


2 
26 

4 

3 
4 
7 
6 






l 


i 
i 




.... . 


"i 




i . 
i . 


I 
I 


1,400 
1,200 


7 
5 


4 
4 




i . 
i . 




I 
I 
I 

II 
II 


1,400 
1,175 
1,400 
1,200 
1,200 


6 

3 

11 

3 

7 


5 
2 

10 
3 

5 


i 
i 
i 
i 
i 






II 
II 


1,650 
1,650 


4 

24 


3 
19 


.... 


i . 




I 
I 

II 

II 

II 

I 

I 

I 


1,300 
1,100 
1,500 
1,400 
1,100 
1,350 
1,435 
1,100 


46 

3 

11 

25 

20 

8 

13 

7 


41 
2 
8 

22 

17 
7 

13 
6 


i 
i 

i 
i 

i 
i 
i 
i 







# c 

133 71 

88 95 

235 31 

218 78 

566 80 
189 57 
160 35 

386 86 
121 45 

360 20 

258 69 
201 50 

97 05 

139 35 
250 89 
135 35 

210 42 

85 00 

724 62 

336 91 
270 97 
129 71 

248 00 
210 75 

327 48 
183 82 

238 19 
123 99 
250 87 
127 00 
91 10 

278 30 
357 33 

507 00 
341 00 

236 00 
322 00 
449 00 
356 00 
276 00 
234 00 



306 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



FIFTH CLASSES 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 

(In the case of rural schools the 

section number and the name 

of the township are given.) 



Post Office 



Kenora (in part), etc 42 

Kent, West 43 

44 
45 

Lambton, East 46 

47 

Lambton, West 48 

49 
50 
51 

Leeds and Grenville, No. 1 52 

Leeds and Grenville, No. 2 53 

Leeds and Grenville, No. 3 54 

Lincoln 55 

Manitoulin and Algoma (in part) 56 

57 

Middlesex, East 58 

59 

Northumberland and Durham, No. 1 . . 60 

61 

Northumberland and Durham, No. 3. . 62 

Ontario, North 63 

64 
65 

Ontario, South 66 

Oxford, North 67 

Oxford, South 68 

Parry Sound, South 69 

70 
71 
72 
73 

Parry Sound, East, etc 74 

75 
76 
77 
78 
79 



Sioux Lookout 



9 Chatham. 
1 Romney. . 
6 Romney. . 



Sioux Lookout 



8 Euphemia. 
23 Enniskillen 

Courtright. 

6 Moore. . . . 
1 1 Moore .... 

7 Sombra. . . 



Newboro 

Mallorytown Consolidated 
1 & 5 Oxford and Marlborough 
10 S. Grimsby 



1 Rutherford 
1 Lewis 



14 & 9 N. and S. Dorchester. . 
16 Darlington 



3 Manvers. 
7 Manvers. 



Tupperville. 

Merlin 

Coatsworth. 



Inwood, R. R. 1.. 
Petrolia, R. R. 1 . 



Courtright. 
Corunna.. . 
Brigden. . . 
Sombra. . . 



Newboro 

Mallorytown 

Burritt's Rapids. . . 
Smithville, R. R. 1. 



Killarney. 
Cutler. . . 



Mossley, R. R. 1 
Enniskillen 



16 & 18 Murray and Brighton 



U. 4 Brock. 
1 Mara. 
5 Scott.. 



8 Pickering. 
6 E. Zorra. , 
6 Dereham. 



Perth, North 80 

Peterborough, W., and Victoria, E. . .81 



U. 1 Chapman 

7 Humphrey 

1 McKellar.... 

Nobel Consolidated. 
1 Wallbridge 



Pontypool . 
Janetville. , 



Wooler. 



Manilla 

Brechin, R. R. 1.. . 
Zephyr 



Whitevale , 
Hickson. . . 
Mt. Elgin . 



4 Himsworth, South. 

1 McConkey 

1 Nipissing 

Kearney 

Sundridge 

Trout Creek 



U. 6 Logan and Elma 
3 Somerville 



Magnetawan , 

Rosseau 

McKellar 

Nobel 

Byng Inlet.. . 



Callander.. . 

Loring 

Nipissing. . . 
Kearney 
Sundridge . . . 
Trout Creek. 



Monkton. 
Kinmount. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



307 



1922-23 (Continued) 



Teachers 



Name of Principal and 
Degree if any 



a* 

.2 « 



o «-< 



On 

Is >^ 

<c/3 



Pupils 



a 

Oh 

"o 

6 



> -M 
<< 



Grade of 
Fifth Class 



A 



a a/3 

oacr 



42 N. G. Hanley 

43 Gladys Morgan 

44 Laura McAlister 

45 Annie Cole 

46 Edna M. Aitchison. . . . 

47 Sadie M. Cran 

48 Edward Witty 

49 Gladys Callaghan 

50 Win. E. Jarrott 

51 Thos. C. Hewitt 

52 B. Frank Bolton 

53 W. L.Oliver 

54 Stella B. McCreary. . . 

55 Mrs. Ethel Aikenhead . 

56 Edward Osendorff 

57 Basil O.Young 

58 Kathleen Robb 

59 E. E. Staples 

60 Mrs. I. Carscadden.. . . 

61 G. A. Biggs 

62 Eva M. Rose 

63 Mrs. W. A. Townshend 

64 Alice Speedie 

65 Julius Rynard 

66 Ada Wainman 

67 Louie May Currah. . . . 

68 Arthur W. Pow 

69 Godfrey Grunig 

70 C. E.Stuart 

71 Beryl J. Johnston 

72 Mrs. G. Ketcheson 

73 J. H. Stubbs 

74 Roy W. Warnica 

75 Thomas McKay 

76 Wilfrid Barbour 

77 Joseph R. Teasdale. . 

78 Lome Skuce 

79 J. B. Marshall 

80 Eldon H. Twamley. . . 

81 C. J. Nixon 



I 

II 
II 

I 

I 

II 
II 
II 
II 

II 

I 

I 

I 

I 
II 

II 
II 

II 
II 



2,000 

1,200 
1,200 
1,100 

1,200 
1,100 

1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,100 

1,200 

1,620 

1,400 

1,200 

1,500 
1,350 

1,100 
1,100 

1,100 
1,100 

1,200 

1,200 
1,200 
1,350 

1,200 

1,100 

1,500 

1,600 
2,000 
1,200 
1,400 
1,500 

1,500 
1,200 
1,350 
1,400 
1,400 
1,100 

1,450 

1,200 



19 

6 

3 



6 

26 

3 

6 

23 

7 

7 

5 
6 

6 
3 

3 
3 

16 

10 
6 



13 

15 

9 

2 

10 

7 
6 
3 
12 
12 
4 



15 

4 

2 

7 

4 
3 

2 

5 

23 

2 

4 

16 

5 

6 

4 
4 

6 

2 

3 

2 

14 

9 

5 
6 

5 

5 

5 

11 

11 
8 
2 
6 

5 
2 
3 

10 

10 

3 

3 

2 



» c. 

377 47 

284 11 
88 91 
90 62 

90 31 

40 00 

230 05 
117 89 

484 08 
93 75 

178 65 

215 40 

335 34 

189 86 

80 00 
112 00 

195 59 
58 55 

61 75 
68 00 

300 95 

244 67 

20 28 

211 03 

95 4 

81 45 

239 98 

490 62 
244 41 
322 71 
101 05 
264 63 

250 00 
236 00 
298 00 
440 00 
354 00 
318 00 

220 84 

222 76 



308 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



FIFTH CLASSES 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 

(In the case of rural schools the 

section number and the name 

of the township are given.) 



Post Office 



Prescott and Russell, 



Rainy River. 



Renfrew, North, 
Simcoe, East. . . 



Simcoe, South-West 
Sudbury (in part) . . , 



Timiskaming, Centre. 
Timiskaming, North. 
Timiskaming, South . . 



..82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 

..89 
90 
91 
92 
93 

..94 
95 

..96 
97 
98 

..99 
100 

,101 
102 
103 
104 
105 

106 

107 



U. 2 Cumberland 

4 Cumberland 

5 Cumberland 

U.10 Plantagenet, North 

1 Plantagenet, South. 

4 Plantagenet, South. 

L'Orignal 



5 Lash 

Morley Consolidated. . 

Barwick Consolidated. 
3 Devlin and Burriss. . . 
5 Shenstone 



3 Buchanan 
6 Ross 



Port McNicoll. . . 

Victoria Harbour. 

12 Tay 



Victoria, West 
Waterloo, North . . 
Welland, North . . . 
Wellington, South, 

Wentworth 



York, North (No. 1). 



York, West (No. 2). 



.108 
109 

.110 

.111 

.112 

.113 
114 

.115 
116 

,117 
118 
119 
120 
121 

122 
123 
124 
1251 



1 Creighton and Snider. 

2 Denison and Drury. . . 

1 Levack and Dowling. . 

2 Neelon 

Webbwood 



1 
2 
U. 2 

8 

16 

4 

6 

4 

5 
3 

9 

2 

19 

23 
12 



James. . 
Kendry. 



Lyell and Murchison, 
Mattawa 



Eldon. . . . 
Wellesley . 
Thorold . . 



Erin. . 
Nichol 



Ancaster, 
Saltfleet. 



Georgina. . . 

King 

King 

King 

Whitchurch . 



New Toronto 
Woodbridge. . 
Etobicoke. . . 



Vars 

Leonard, R. R. 1 
Cumberland .... 

Pendleton 

Bradley Creek. . . 

Fournier , 

L'Orignal 



Emo 

Stratton . . 
Barwick. . 
La Vallee. 
Barwick. . 



Chalk River. . . 
Forester's Falls. 



3 Sunnidale Brentwood. 

7 Essa Ivy. 



Port McNicoll. . . 
Victoria Harbour. 
Waubaushene. . 



Creighton Mine, 
Worthington 

Levack 

Coniston 

Webbwood 



Elk Lake 

Smooth Rock Falls, 



Madawaska . 
Mattawa. . . 



Kirkfield 

Wellesley 

Port Robinson, 



11 

14 Etobicoke iHumberside 



Hillsburg 

Guelph, R. R. 5, 



Ancaster. . . , 
Stony Creek. 



Pefferlaw 

King 

Nobleton , 

King 

Stouffville, R. R. 3. 



New Toronto , 
Woodbridge. . 
Humber Bay. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



309 



1922-23 (Continued) 



Teachers 



Name of Principal and 
Degree if any 



3* 

.2 3 



o <-• 

u <u 

a, u 



<3 >> ^S 



C eg 



Pupils 


Grade of 
Fifth Class 




>> 


















'3, 

3 










cu 


<y aj 


A 


R 


C 


.. ■ 


bfl*o 








o 
6 


5 C 








fc 


« 









o 

> > s 

~ o a 

3 a'3 
o a, cr 



82 Grace J. Hunter 

83 Charles Coulthart 

84 Alta A. Robinson 

85 Mary Watson 

86 VeraH. Hobbs 

87 Alma MacGillvray 

88 Sr. St. Armand 

89 Percy W. Farr 

90 Gena Benson 

91 M. T. Cathcart 

92 Mrs. J. N.Abbott 

93 Ruby H. Strachan 

94 Mrs. Mary Dipsam. . . 

95 Helen G. McKim 

96 L. C. Armstrong 

97 Gordon Chisholm 

98 JohnH, Lukes 

99 Vincent Noonan 

100 Elsie M. Speers 

101 Ursula M. Black 

102 Edward C. McDermott 

103 Mabel H.Smith 

104 JohnT. Kidd 

105 Sidney Geiger 

106 G. A. Kemp 

107 J. P.Archibald 

108 W. L. Hunter 

109 J. G. Crawford 

110 Mona A. Ross 

111 Wm. H. Hartman 

112 Jean C. Love 

113 Harry E. Tate 

114 Mary A. McClelland.. 

115 Gordon Thompson. . . . 

116 R.Lloyd Hyslop 

117 Wallace Umphrey 

118 Tillie A. Patton 

119 Henry M. Brown 

120 Walter Rolling 

121 Marjorie N. Heaslip.. . 

122 Wm. H. Mole, B.A... 

123 Geo. W. Shore 

124 Peter O. Nelson 

125 Fanny E. Hamilton. . . 



I 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 

I 

I 

I 

II 

II 

II 
I 

I 
II 
II 

II 
II 

II 

I 

II 

II 

I 

II 

II 

II 
II 

II 

II 

II 

II 
II 

II 
II 

II 
II 
II 
II 
II 

I 
II 
II 
II 



1,300 
1,100 
1,200 
1,200 
1,100 
1,000 
800 

1,850 
1,680 
1,800 
1,200 
1,200 

1,200 
1,500 

1,500 
1,450 
1,540 

1,100 
1,100 

1,700 
1,500 
1,300 
1,700 
1,600 

1,200 

1,750 

1,500 
1,200 

1,000 

1,350 

1,300 

1,400 
1,200 

1,800 
1,700 

1,000 
1,100 
1,100 
1,200 
1,100 

2,900 
1,700 
2,200 
1,000 



) 
8 
5 

10 
4 
4 
5 
5 


7 
4 
8 
3 
3 
4 
4 


1 
... 

1 




$ c. 
304 21 
158 00 
240 36 

- . 209 24 
206 12 

1 125 25 
333 79 


1 




29 
4 

21 
6 
3 


22 
3 

12 
5 
3 


1 

1 

.... 


"i '.'. 


321 00 
319 00 
709 00 
263 00 
1 94 00 


10 

25 


7 
15 


i 


i .. 


97 86 

275 76 


16 

23 

9 


13 

19 

5 


l 
l 

l 




241 76 
307 70 
358 39 


3 
3 

3 

8 

4 

17 

13 


2 
2 

3 
7 
4 
16 
8 






1 141 56 
1 60 00 

134 00 

145 00 

1 80 00 

467 00 

475 00 






l 
l 




l 

l 




• 7 


6 




i .. 


117 56 


7 


5 




i .. 


174 64 


5 

7 


3 
5 




i .. 
i .. 


157 14 
118 81 


5 


4 




i .. 


230 51 


5 


2 


l 




236 26 


10 


8 


l 




100 43 


5 
3 


4 

2 




i .. 
i .. 


266 66 
96 00 


8 
12 


7 
10 


l 
l 




419 80 
280 29 


4 
4 
3 
6 

5 

7 
5 
5 
5 


3 
3 
2 
4 
3 

5 
5 
4 
3 




i . . 
i . . 
i .. 


252 00 

218 00 

217 00 

1 222 00 

1 217 00 

405 20 

400 88 

87 75 

98 65 1 






i 
i 
l 


T '.'. 



310 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



FIFTH CLASSES 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 

(In the case of rural schools the 

section number and the name 

of the township are given.) 



Post Office 



York, South (No. 4). 



126 

127 

• 128 

129 
R.C. Separate Schools: — 

Inspector Finn 130 

131 

Inspector Gratton 132 

Inspector Jones 133 

134 
135 

Inspector Lapensee 136 

Inspector Lee 137 

138 
139 

140 



Inspector Melady 



Inspector Quarry. 



Inspector Scanlan 

Acting Inspector Beneteau , 



141 

142 
143 
144 
145 
146 



147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 

154 
155 

156 



7 York 

15 York 

22 York 

27 York 

3 Mara 

4 Emily 

Chelmsford 

16 Cornwall 

15 Charlottenburgh 

10 Lancaster. 

10 Alfred 

6 Toronto Gore 

13 Waterloo 

4 Wellesley 

11 Wellesley 

U. 1 Carrick and Culross 

Mildmay 

2 Ashfield 

U. 6 Stephen and McGillivray 

U. 6 Ellice and Logan 

U. 2 Hibbert, McKillop and 
Logan 

Cobalt 

Kearney 

Killaloe 

Mattawa 

5 Bagot 

1 Brougham 

7 Bromley 

7 East Hawkesbury 

1 Caldwell 

Belle River 



Todmorden 

Fairbank, R. R. 1... 

Swansea , 

Todmorden 

Brechin 

Downey ville , 

Chelmsford 

St. Andrew's West. . . 
St. Raphael West.... 
Dalhousie Sta., P.O. 

R. R. 1 

Alfred 

Bolton, R. R. 5 

Breslau, R. R. 1 

Linwood , 

St. Clements 

Formosa 

Mildmay 

Goderich, R. R. 3 

Parkhill, R. R. 8 

Sebringville, R. R. 1 . 

Dublin 

Cobalt 

Kearney , 

Killaloe 

Mattawa 

Calabogie , 

Ashdad, R. R. 1 

Douglas 

St. Eugene 

Verner 

Belle River 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



311 



1922-23 (Concluded) 



Teachers 



Name of Principal and 
Degree if any 











Grade of 






Pupns 


Fifth Class 








>> 






















_ 


<T> 




"5 










ON 


a 

3 


a> cj 








.2 rt 


'— • 


Oh 


A 


H 


C 


en ^c 


Is h 


'o 


TO Q 










§"3 


6 


£s 








CO 


<C/) 


£ 


<< 









o a 
a 3 



bit) rt 

(L) V* 

JO 



126 A. E. Lehman. 

127 John Gilchrist. 

128 John A. Short. 

129 Viola M. Isard. 



130 Rosella Fitzgerald. 

131 Helen F. Shannon. 



132 Sr. Joseph-Eugene, B.A. 



133 Sr. M. Camilla. .. 

134 Sr. M. St. Fiorina. 

135 Sr. M. St. Hilda.. 



136 Sr. M. Joseph-Herman. 



137 Mary F. O'Reilly. 

138 Sr. M. Eileen 

139 Herbert J. Helm. . 

140 Sr. M. Chrysologa. 



141 Sr. M. Raphael, B.A.. 

142 Sr. M. Solania 

143 Sr. M. Isabel, B.A... . 

144 Bernadette O'Donnell 

145 Sr. M. St. Albin 



146 M. M. Ambrose 



147 Lily Charlebois. . . . 

148 Agnes Walsh 

149 Sr. M. Nativity.... 

150 Wm. A. Ostrander. 

151 Katie Windle 

152 Sr. St. Jerome 

153 Sr. M. Margaret. . . 



154 Sr. F. Zavier... 

155 Sr. St. Ambrose. 



156 Sr. Ambrosia, B.A. 

Totals, 1922-23.. 
Totals, 1921-22. . 



Increases. 
Decrease. 



Dist. 

II 
II 
II 
II 

II 
II 

I 

I 

I 



II 

II 

I 

I 

II 

II 

I 

I 
III 



2,600 
2,000 
2,250 
1,400 

1,100 
1,400 

1,800 

1,380 
1,500 
1,500 

800 

1,100 
1,100 
1,200 
1,150 

1,350 
1,000 
1,100 
1,200 
1,200 

1,300 

1,200 
1,150 

850 
1,500 
1,200 

800 
1,200 

400 
1,000 

900 



* 1,308 

* 1,287 



21 



7 

16 
10 



18 

28 



31 
42 
60 



4 
5 
9 

5 

10 

7 
21 

7 
23 

76 

6 
2 
33 
19 
11 
31 
59 

21 
12 

10 



1,643 
1,338 



305 



15 

24 



20 
34 
51 



3 
4 
6 
4 

6 

6 

19 

6 
20 

61 

5 
2 
29 
11 
9 
24 
51 

18 
11 



1,312 
1,100 



212 



80 
54 



20 



* c. 

79 21 
195 78 
150 39 
152 45 

.310 78 
194 85 

372 62 

482 05 
768 75 

1,223 59 

311 08 

72 00 

108 00 

83 00 

85 00 

238 18 

483 07 
748 41 
215 79 

1,083 77 

684 86 

112 00 
76 00 
392 64 
624 39 
173 25 
270 08 
668 71 

491 54 
221 20 

218 90 



53 23 40,485 37 

54 17 36,434 97 



$ c- 

117 92 
129 58 
150 04 
105 24 

134 88 
129 48 

397 00 

154 36 

180 46 
160 00 

126 83 

62 20 
120 80 

118 30 
118 50 

158 81 
182 18 
185 00 
131 58 
185 00 

181 28 

306 40 
196 20 
202 15 
423 40 
82 32 
128 00 

182 95 

75 55 
256 44 

146 89 



f22,812 29 
15,964 63 



4,050 40 6,847 66 



* Average salary. 

f In addition, there was paid on equipment the sum of $231.37 to schools that did not 
qualify as Fifth Classes in 1922-23. 



312 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPENDIX O 
LIST OF INSPECTORATES AND INSPECTORS 



Inspectorates 


Public School Inspectors 


Post Office 


Algoma District in part; City of Sault Ste. 
Marie; Town of Bruce Mines 


D. T. Walkom, B.A 


Sault Ste. Marie. 


Brant and Norfolk in part; Town of Paris; 
Village of Waterford (Joint Inspectorate) 

Bruce East; Towns of Chesley, Walkerton, 
Wiarton; Villages of Hepworth, Lion's 
Head, Mildmay, Tara 


T. W. Standing, B.A 


Brantford. 


John McCool, M.A 


Walkerton. 


Bruce, West; Towns of Kincardine, South- 
ampton; Villages of Lucknow, Paisley, 
Port Elgin, Teeswater, Tiverton 

Carleton, East 


W. F. Bald, B.A., LL.B 

T. P. Maxwell, B.A 


Port Elgin. 
Ottawa. 


Carleton, West; Town of Eastview, Village 
of Richmond 


R. C. Rose, B.A 


Ottawa. 


Dufferin; Town of Orangeville; Villages of 
Grand Valley, Shelburne 


W. R. Liddy, B.A 


Orangeville. 


Dundas; Villages of Chesterville, Iroquois, 
Morrisburg, Winchester 


Hiram B. Fetterly, M.A 

J. C. Smith, B.A 


Winchester. 


Elgin, East; Town of Aylmer; Villages of 
Springfield, Vienna 


St. Thomas. 


Elgin, West; City of St. Thomas; Villages 
of Dutton, Rodney, Port Stanley, West 
Lome (Joint Inspectorate) 


John A. Taylor, B.A 


St. Thomas. 


Essex; Towns of Amherstburg, Essex, Ford, 
Kingsville, Leamington, Riverside, Tecum- 
seh; Villages of Belle River, St. Clair Beach 


D. A. Maxwell, B.A., LL.B., 
Ph. D 


Kingsville. 


Essex, North (in part only) 

Frontenac, South; Village of Portsmouth. . . 

Frontenac, North, and Addington (Joint 

Inspectorate) 


V. C. Quarry, B.A 


Parkhill, R.R. 8. 


S. A. Truscott, M.A 


Kingston. 


M. R. Reid, M.A 


Sharbot Lake. 


Glengarry; Town of Alexandria; Villages of 
Lancaster, Maxville 


J. W. Crewson, B.A 


Alexandria. 


Grey, East; Towns of Meaford, Thornbury; 
Village of Flesherton 


Samuel Huff, B.A., B.Paed 


Meaford. 


Grey, West; City of Owen Sound; Villages 


Owen Sound. 


Grey South; Towns of Durham, Hanover; 
Villages of Dundalk, Markdale, Neu- 
stadt 


Robert Wright, B.A 


Hanover. 


of Caledonia, Cayuga, Hagersville, Jar- 
vis 


J. L. Mitchener, B.A 


Cayuga. 


Haliburton and E. Muskoka; Town of 
Huntsville 


Geo. E. Pentland, M.A 

James M. Denyes, B.A 

J. E. Minns, B.A 


Fenelon Falls. 


Halton and Wentworth in part; Towns 
of Burlington, Georgetown, Milton, Oak- 
ville; Village of Acton (Joint Inspectorate) 

Hastings, Centre; Villages of Deloro, Madoc, 
Marmora, Stirling, Tweed 

Hastings, South, and City of Belleville; 
Towns of Deseronto, Trenton; Village of 
Frankford (Joint Inspectorate) 

Hastings, North; Village of Bancroft 

Huron, East; Towns of Clinton, Seaforth, 
Wingham; Villages of Blyth, Brussels, 
Wroxeter 


Milton. 
Tweed. 


H. J. Clarke, B.A 


Belleville. 


Jas. Colling, B.A 


Bancroft. 


John M. Field, B.A., Ph. D.... 


Goderich. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



313 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors (Continued) 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors 



Post Office 



Huron, West; Town of Goderich; Villages of 
Bayfield, Exeter, Hensall 

Kenora Dist. in part, Thunder Bay 
Dist. (East); Algoma Dist. in part; 
Sudbury Dist. in part; City of Fort 
William; Towns of Dryden, Sfoux Lookout 
(Joint Inspectorate) 

Kent, East; Towns of Blenheim, Bothwell, 
Dresden, Ridgetown; Villages of Erieau, 
Highgate, Thamesville 

Kent, West, and City of Chatham; Towns 
of Tilbury, Wallaceburg; Village of Wheat 
ley (Joint Inspectorate) , 

Lambton, East (No. 2); Town of Petrolia; 
Villages of Alvinston, Arkona, Oil Springs, 
Watford • 



J. Elgin Tom 



W. J. Hamilton, B.A. 



Rev. W. H. G. Colles, 



J.H.Smith, M.A.. 
J. J. Edwards, B.A. 



Lambton, West (No. 1); City of Sarnia 
Town of Forest; Villages of Courtright, 
Point Edward, Thedford, Wyoming (Joint 
Inspectorate) 

Lanark, East (No. 1); Towns of Almonte 
Carleton Place; Village of Lanark 

Lanark, West (No. 2); Towns of Perth 
Smith's Falls (Joint Inspectorate) 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 1); Town of 
Gananoque; Villages of Newboro, West- 
port 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 2) ; Town of 
Brockville; Village of Athens (Joint 
Inspectorate) 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 3) ; Town of 
Prescott; Villages of Cardinal, Kempt- 
ville, Merrickville (Joint Inspectorate) . . 

Lennox; Town of Napanee; Villages of 
Bath, Newburgh (see also Frontenac, 
North) 

Lincoln; Towns of Grimsby, Merritton, 
Niagara; Villages of Beamsville, Port 
Dalhousie 



Henry Conn, B.A 

J. C. Spence, B.A., B.Paed.. 
Thomas C.Smith, M.A 



James F. McGuire, M.A. 



W. C. Dowsley, M.A, 



T. A. Craig. 



E. J. Corkill, B.A. 



Geo. A. Carefoot, B.A., B.Paed 



Manitoulin Dist.; Algoma Dist. in part; 
Towns of Blind River, Gore Bay, Little 
Current, Thessalon 

Middlesex, East; Village of Lucan 

Middlesex, West; Towns of Parkhill, Strath- 
roy; Villages of Ailsa Craig, Glencoe, 
Newbury, Wardsville 

Muskoka, South and West, District; Towns 
of Bala, Bracebridge, Gravenhurst; Village 
of Port Carling 



James W. Hagan, M.A. 
P. J.. Thompson, B.A... 



J. H. Sexton, B.A. 



John C. Stothers, M.A. 



Muskoka, East (see Haliburton). 
Muskoka, North (see Parry Sound East). 
Nipissing (see Timiskaming South Dist.) 

Norfolk; Town of Simcoe; Villages of Delhi, 

Port Dover, Port Rowan (see Brant 

Co.) 

Northumberland and Durham, West (No. 

1); Towns of Bowmanville, Port Hope; 

Village of Newcastle |E. E. Snider, B.A. 



H. Frank Cook, B.A. 



Goderich. 

Fort William. 
Chatham. 
Chatham. 
Petrolia. 

Sarnia. 

Carleton Place 
Perth. 

Westport. 

Brockville. 

Kemptville. 

Napanee. 

St. Catharines. 



Gore Bay. 
London. 



Strathroy. 
Bracebridge. 



Simcoe. 



Port Hope. 



314 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors (Continued) 



Inspectorates 



Northumberland and Durham, Centre (No 
2); Town of Cobourg; Village of Mill 
brook 

Northumberland and Durham, East (No. 
3); Town of Campbellford; Villages of 
Brighton, Colborne, Hastings 

Ontario, North; Town of Uxbridge; Villages 
of Beaverton, Cannington 

Ontario, South; Towns of Oshawa, Whitby 
Village of Port Perry. 

Oxford, North, and City of Woodstock; 
Villages of Embro, Tavistock (Joint 
Inspectorate) 

Oxford, South; Towns of Ingersoll, Till 
sonburg; Village of Norwich (Joint In- 
spectorate) 

Parry Sound, South, District; Town of 
Parry Sound; Village of Magnetawan . . . 

Parry Sound, East, District; Muskoka 
North; Towns of Kearney, Powassan, 
Trout Creek; Villages of Burk's Falls, 
South River, Sundridge 

Peel; Town of Brampton; Villages of Bolton, 
Port Credit, Streetsville 

Perth, North; Towns of Listowel, Mitchell, 
St. Mary's; Village of Milverton 

Perth, South, and City of Stratford (Joint 
Inspectorate 

Peterborough, East; Villages of Havelock, 
Lakefield, Norwood 

Peterborough, West, and Victoria, East; 
Town of Lindsay; Villages of Bobcaygeon, 
Omemee (Joint Inspectorate) 

Prescott and Russell; Towns of Hawkes- 
bury, Rockland, Vankleek Hill; Villages 
of Casselman, L'Orignal 

Prince Edward; Town of Picton; Villages of 
Bloomfield, Wellington 

Rainy River District and Kenora District 
in part; Towns of Fort Frances, Keewatin, 
Kenora, Rainy River 

Renfrew, North; Town of Pembroke; Village 
of Cobden 

Renfrew, South; Towns of Arnprior, Ren- 
frew ; Villages of Braeside, Eganville, 
Killaloe Station 

Simcoe, North; Towns of Barrie, Colling- 
wood, Penetanguishene 

Simcoe, South; Towns of Alliston, Stayner; 
Villages of Beeton, Bradford, Creemore, 
Tottenham 

Simcoe, East; Towns of Midland, Orillia; 
Villages of Coldwater, Port McNicoll, 
Victoria Harbour 



Stormont; Town of Cornwall; Village of 
Finch 



Sudbury District in part; Towns of Capreol 
Copper Cliff, Frood Mine, Massey, 
Sudbury, Webbwood 



Public School Inspectors 



J. W. Odell, B.A. 



Robert Boyes 

T. R. Ferguson, M.A. 
R. A. Hutchison, B.A. 



J. M. Cole. 



R. A. Paterson, B.A. 
J. L. Moore, B.A.. . 



R. O. White 

W. J. Galbraith, M.A. 
William Irwin, B.A. . . 
James H. Smith, B.A. 
Richard Lees, M.A 



R. F. Downey, B.A., B.Paed. 



Archibald McVicar, M.A. 
F. P.Smith, M.A 



Samuel Shannon, B.A. . . 
I. D. Breuls, B.A 



G. G. McNab, M.A... 
Joseph L. Garvin, B.A. 

Edwin Longman 



Isaac Day, B.A 

James Froats, M.A., B. Paed. 



D. M. Christie, B.A Sudbury. 



Post Office 



Cobourg. 

Campbellford. 

Uxbridge. 

Whitby. 

Woodstock. 

Jngersoll. 
Parry Sound. 

North Bay. 

Brampton. 

Stratford. 

Stratford. 

Peterborough. 

Lindsay. 

Vankleek Hill. 
Picton. 

Kenora. 
Pembroke. 

Renfrew. 
Barrie. 

Barrie. 

Orillia. 
Finch. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



315 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors (Continued) 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors 



Post Office 



Thunder Bay District, West; City of Port 
Arthur 

Timiskaming, Central; Towns of Charlton 
Englehart, Haileybury, New Liskeard; 
Village of Thornloe 

Timiskaming, North; Cochrane* District 
Towns of Cochrane, Hearst, Iroquois Falls 
Kapuskasing, Matheson, Timmins 

Timiskaming District, South; Nipissing 
Towns of Bonfield, Cache Bay, Cobalt, 
Latchford, Mattawa, North Bay, Sturgeon 
Falls 

Victoria, West; Villages of Fenelon Falls, 
Sturgeon Point, Woodville 

Victoria, East (see Peterborough West). 

Waterloo, North (No. 1); City of Kitchener; 
Towns of Elmira, Waterloo (Joint In- 
spectorate) 

Waterloo, South (No. 2); City of Gait; 
Towns of Hespeler, Preston; Villages of 
Ayr, New Hamburg (Joint Inspectorate) 

Welland, North; Cities of Niagara Falls, 
Welland; Tov/n of Thorold; Villages of 
Chippawa, Fonthill (Joint Inspectorate) . . 

Welland, South; Towns of Bridgeburg, Port 
Colborne; Villages of Fort Erie, Humber- 
stone 

Wellington, North; Towns of Harriston, 
Mount Forest, Palmerston; Village of 
Clifford 

Wellington, South; Villages of Arthur, 
Drayton, Elora, Erin, Fergus 

Wentworth; Town of Dundas; Village of 
Waterdown 

York (No. 1); Towns of Aurora, Newmarket; 
Villages of Holland Landing, Sutton 
West 

York (No. 2); Towns of Mimico, New 
Toronto, Weston; Village of Wood 
bridge 

York (No. 3); Villages of Markham, Rich 
mond Hill, Stouffville 



John Ritchie. 



W. Asbury Wilson, B.A. 



L. A. Marlin, M.A. 



P. W. Brown, B.A. 



T. W. Jennings, B.A. 



F. W. Sheppard , 



Lambert Norman, B.A. 



John W. Marshall, B.A. 



James McNiece, B.A. 



Robt. Galbraith, B.A. 



J. J. Craig, B.A. 



York (No. 4); Town of Leaside; Village of 
Forest Hill 



Brantford, 


City of 


Guelph, 


do 


Hamilton, 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Kingston, 


do 


London, 


do 


do 


do 


Ottawa, 


do 


do 


do 



Jno. B. Robinson, B.A., B.Paed 



C. W. Mulloy, B.A. 



A. L. Campbell, M.A. 



W. W. A. Trench, B.A. 



A. A. Jordan, B.A. 



E. E. C. Kilmer, B.A 

Wm. Tytler, B.A 

W. H. Ballard, M.A 

Jas. Gill, B.A., B.Paed 

Frank E. Perney, B.A., B.Paed 

E. T. Seaton, B.A., B.Paed 

J. Russell Stuart - 

V. K.Greer, M.A 

G. A. Wheable, B.A 

J. H. Putman, B.A., D.Paed.. . 
E. T. Slemon, B.A., D.Paed... 



Port Arthur. 

Haileybury. 

Cochrane. 

North Bay. 
Lindsay. 

Kitchener. 

Gait. 

Welland. 

Welland. 

Mount Forest. 

Fergus. 

Hamilton 

Aurora. 

Weston. 

Richmond Hill. 

Toronto, 63 
Orchard View 
Boulevard 

Brantford. 

Guelph. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Kingston. 

London. 

London. 

Ottawa. 

Ottawa. 



316 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors (Continued) 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors 



Post Office 



Peterborough, City of 
St. Catharines do 
Toronto, do 



do 


do 


do. 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Windsor, 


do 



Sandwich and Walkerville, Towns. 



A. Mowat, B.A 

D. C. Hetherington 

R. H. Cowley, M.A., Chief In 

spector 

Jos. W. Rogers, M.A 

Geo. H. Armstrong, M.A., 

B. Paed 

D. D. Moshier, B.A., B.Paed. 
N. S. MacDonald, B.A., D.Paed. 
W. E. Hume, B.A., D.Paed. . 
Miss A. E. Marty, M.A., LL.D. 

J. E. Benson, M.A 



Peterborough. 
St. Catharines. 

Toronto. 
Toronto. 



Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 

Windsor. 



R.C. Separate School Inspectors 

J. F. Power, M.A Toronto, 33 Dalton Rd. 

J. F. Sullivan, B.A London, 873 Hellmuth Ave. 

Jas. E. Jones, B.A Ottawa, 104 Henderson Ave. 

J. P. Finn, B.A Peterborough. 

W. J. Lee, B.A Toronto, 434 Brunswick Ave. 

J. M. Bennett, B.A Toronto, 47 Browning Ave. 

Vincent C. Quarry, B.A Parkhill, R.R. 8. 

Thomas S. Melady Stratford, 304 Ontario St. 

English-French Public and Separate School Inspectors 

J. S. Gratton Toronto, 280 Jarvis St. 

Jno. C. Walsh, B.A Ottawa, i0 Sweetland Ave. 

James Scanlan, B.A Toronto, 41 Harvie Ave. 

Joseph Lapensee, B.A Plantagenet. 

Public and Separate Schools 

John Waugh, M.A., D.Paed., Chief Insp Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

W. I. Chisholm, M.A., Assistant Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

J. B. McDougall, B.A., D.Paed., General 

Inspector for the Districts North Bay. 

Neil McDougall, B.A., General Inspector. . . .Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

High School Inspectors 

J. A. Houston, M.A Toronto, 105 Roxborough St. W. 

I. M. Levan, B.A Toronto, 144 Balmoral Ave. 

Geo. F. Rogers, B.A Toronto, 104 Glencairn Ave. 

Continuation School Inspectors 

G. K. Mills, B.At Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

J. P. Hoag, B.A Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

Manual Training and Household Science Inspector 

Albert H. Leake Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Education 

J. B. Dandeno, B.A., Ph.D Toronto, 13 Hazleton Ave. 

Inspector of Auxiliary Classes 
S. B. Sinclair, M.A., Ph.D Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 



Toronto, January, 1924. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



317 



APPENDIX P 

RURAL SCHOOL LIBRARIES, OCT. 1st, 1922, TO OCT. 1st, 1923 



Inspectorate 



o 

O fcjo- 






0-£ M « 



bo 



+-> 0> -o 

5 £.«•£ o 

O &y 3 ^ W 

r 1 <u (cTjO. u 



O oj 

o <u 
H 6 



a a ^ 

j- J-, o 

P.*3 o 

>- — i (L> 

*«— . a 

O o en 

. O C 



<— -.3 bfl 
O.Q C 

O +j S3 



Algoma 

Brant and Norfolk in part 

Bruce East 

Bruce West 

Carleton East 

Carleton West 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Elgin East 

Elgin West 

Essex 

Essex North in part 

Frontenac North and Addington 

Frontenac South 

Glengarry 

Grey East 

Grey South 

Grey West 

Haldimand 

Haliburton and Muskoka East. 
Halton and Wentworth in part . 

Hastings Centre 

Hastings North 

Hastings South 

Huron East 

Huron West 

Kenora in part, Thunder Bay 

East, and Algoma in part. . . . 

Kent East 

Kent West 

Lambton East 

Lambton West 

Lanark East 

Lanark West 

Leeds and Grenville, No. 1 

Leeds and Grenville, No. 2 

Leeds and Grenville, No. 3 

Lennox 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin, etc 

Middlesex East 

Middlesex West 

Muskoka South-West 

Norfolk 

Northumberland and Durham, 

No. 1 

Northumberland and Durham, 

No. 2 

Northumberland and Durham, 

No. 3 

Ontario North 

Ontario South 

Oxford North 

Oxford South 

Parry Sound East, etc 

Parry Sound South 

Peel 



5 

29 

20 

66 

12 

18 

25 

31 

43 

2 

25 

4 

15 

17 

7 

5 

3 

12 
20 
12 
22 
13 
19 
27 
18 



6 
23 
29 
24 
12 

4 
43 

3 
20 

6 

4 
27 
12 
25- 
19 
12 
16 

20 

12 

9 
14 

4 
15 
6 
7 
4 
13 



» c. 

53 53 
397 92 
266 03 
951 83 
201 16 
233 37 
339 61 
487 76 
516 15 

20 00 
442 92 

56 58 
169 36 

255 54 
101 64 

68 19 

32 35 

159 85 

270 08 
168 27 
331 41 
147 65 
231 70 
307 42 
203 57 
107 17 

91 25 
368 42 
386 77 

271 81 
149 61 

49 96 
573 39 

32 00 

256 26 
67 86 
45 69 

531 76 
199 77 
309 16 
208 39 
206 07 
206 86 

245 70 

130 77 

199 44 

205 47 
51 80 

270 08 
84 82 
94 90 

50 70 
212 66 



$ c. 

23 02 
169 93 

99 92 
403 38 

71 24 
100 34 
139 63 
199 53 
223 23 

8 60 
158 87 

24 34 

72 82 
102 10 

41 96 
29 19 
13 92 
68 75 

105 66 
70 18 

131 90 
63 48 
99 61 

131 91 

87 54 
44 48 

39 24 
142 39 
164 86 
116 88 

61 85 

21 48 
238 82 

13 76 
110 21 

29 19 

19 65 
193 05 

80 96 

132 07 
89 64 
74 42 

88 20 

102 33 
56 24 



71 


42 


88 


51 


22 


28 


92 


74 


36 46 


40 81 


21 


80 


76 90 



48 
77 
84 
83 
54 
62 
92 
73 
75 
30 
97 
15 
77 
94 
75 
82 
66 
73 
74 
63 
69 
70 
56 
50 
84 
99 

27 
70 
66 
87 
81 
72 
56 
75 
68 
73 
82 
64 
55 
103 
85 
76 
83 

63 

74 

66 
76 
42 
58 
48 
73 
69 
74 



318 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



RURAL SCHOOL LIBRARIES, OCT. 1st, 1922, TO OCT. 1st, 1923 (Concluded) 



Inspectorate 


No. of schools 
purchasing 
books to the 
value of $10 
during the year 


Total amount 
expended by 
such schools 
during the year 
for books 
recommended 


Total Govern- 
ment grant 


No. of rural 
school libraries 
in inspectorate 


No. of libraries 
established 
during the year 


Perth North 


21 
11 
20 

15 

4 

25 


$ c. 
226 26 
180 05 

225 95 

186 54 

75 65 

266 61 


$ c. 
97 30 
72 63 
97 16 

80 12 

27 69 

114 64 


68 
44 
71 

57 
81 
75 
42 
75 
82 
56 
59 
89 
75 
62 
48 
56 

30 

52 
73 
40 
42 
34 
43 
62 
68 
67 
66 
41 
46 
11 

14 
42 
21 
11 
51 
60 
5 

12 
26 




Perth South 








Peterborough West and Victoria 
Kast 




Prescott and Russell 




Prince Kdward 




Rainy River and Kenora in part 

Renfrew North 

Renfrew South 




2 

7 
15 

6 
13 
20 
23 

8 
15 

9 

5 
8 

14 
13 
16 
21 
10 
21 
33 
61 
18 
15 
6 

9 
19 

5 
4 
22 
10 
3 
3 
2 


44 50 
104 66 
305 39 

63 75 
216 49 
290 30 
309 90 
100 00 
334 84 

339 72 

75 62 
106 89 
192 85 
158 93 
199 43 
321 73 
129 60 
331 03 
512 48 
713 00 
353 43 
245 81 
386 89 

102 48 

258 13 

52 85 

59 82 

276 30 

166 62 

30 00 

30 05 

32 20 


19 14 

44 80 
124 10 

27 41 

71 57 
124 25 
131 76 

43 00 
113 32 

72 68 

32 51 

45 20 
79 45 
68 33 

85 76 
129 91 

52 32 
136 31 
204 73 
306 61 
128 20 

86 83 
56 90 

81 60 
170 02 
42 28 
36 00 
198 81 
95 25 
24 00 
24 04 
18 00 




Simcoe East 




Simcoe North 




Simcoe South 










5 


Thunder Bay West 


1 


Timiskaming Centre 


3 


Timiskaming North, and 

Algoma in part 


4 


Timiskaming South, and Nipis- 
sing 




Victoria West 




Waterloo North 




Waterloo South 

Welland North 




Welland South 




Wellington North 








Wentworth 


1 


York, No. 1 




York, No. 2 


1 


York, No. 3 




York, No. 4 




R. C. Separate Schools: 

Inspector Bennett 

" Finn 


1 


Jones 




' ' Lee 


1 


" Melady 


1 


" Quarry 




" Sullivan 

Walsh 


..... 


Acting Inspector Beneteau . 




Totals, 1922-23 


1,399 
1,330 


20,029 18 
19,511 48 


8,276 32 
8,348 07 


5,645 
5,581 


25 


Totals, 1921-22 


23 


Increases 


69 


517 70 




64 


2 


Decrease 


71 75 















1923 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 319 



APPENDIX 
CADET CORPS, 1923 

Collegiate Institutes, High, Public and Separate Schools having Cadet Corps 
with at least twenty members between the ages of 12 and 18 years in the case of 
Public and Separate Schools* and between 16 and 18 years in other cases. 

Collegiate Institutes: Barrie, Brantford, Brockville, Clinton, Cobourg, 
Collingwood, Fort William, Gait, Goderich, Guelph, Hamilton, Ingersoll, 
Kingston, London, Lindsay, Morrisburg, Napanee, Niagara Falls, Orillia, 
Ottawa, Owen Sound, Perth, Peterborough, Picton, Port Arthur, Renfrew, 
St. Mary's, Sarnia, Sault Ste. Marie, Smith's Falls, Stratford, Strathroy, Toronto 
(Harbord, Humberside, Jarvis, Malvern, North, Oakwood, Parkdale, Riverdale), 
Windsor and Woodstock. Total 42. 

High Schools: Amherstburg, Arnprior, Aurora, Belleville, Bowmanville, 
Brampton, Campbellford, Carleton Place, Cornwall, Dundas, Dunnville, Dutton, 
Essex, Fergus, Georgetown, Haileybury, Harriston, Kenora, Kincardine, Kings- 
ville, Leamington, Lucan, Markdale, Markham, Meaford, Midland, Newmarket, 
Niagara Falls South, Norwood, Orangeville, Oshawa, Parry Sound, Port Hope, 
Scarborough, Stirling, Tillsonburg, Toronto (Davenport), Trenton, Tweed, 
Uxbridge, Walkerton, Wallaceburg, Welland, Whitby, Wingham. Total 45. 

Vocational Schools: Hamilton, London, Ottawa, Toronto (Commerce, 
Central Technical). Total 5. 

Continuation Schools: Fenelon Falls, Lakefield. Total 2. 

Public Schools: U. 4. Ancaster and Barton, No. 5 Ancaster, Aylmer, 
Barrie, Belleville (3), Blenheim, Bowmanville, Brampton, Brockville, Campbell- 
ford, Chatham (3), Coniston (2 Neelon), Dundas, Dresden, 3 and 4 Etobicoke 
and York, Fairbank (15 York) (3), Fort Frances, Guelph (3), Hamilton (21), 
Keewatin, Kenora, Kingston (7), London (13), Millbrook, Mimico, Orangeville, 
Ottawa (9), Paris, Parry Sound, Peterborough (4), Port Arthur (5), Port Hope, 
St. Catharines (6), St. Mary's, St. Thomas (6), Stratford (5), Sudbury, Tod- 
morden (27 York), Toronto (64), Walkerton, Walkerville, Waubaushene (12 
Tay), 22 Westminster, Windsor (5), Woodbridge, 7 York, 33 York. Total 189. 

R. C. Separate Schools: Hamilton (8), London, Toronto (25). Total 34. 

Total number of Cadet Corps, 317. 



320 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPENDIX R 
SUPERANNUATED TEACHERS 

(Ryerson Superannuation Scheme) 
Summary for Years 1882-1923 



Year 


Number of 

Teachers 

on List 


Expenditure 
for the Year 


Gross 
Contributions 
to the Fund 


Amount 

Refunded to 

Teachers 

or to the Estates 

of Teachers 


1882 


422 
454 
456 
424 
407 
375 
297 
245 
159 
154 


$ c. 

51,000 00 

58,295 33 

63,750 00 

62,800 33 

64,244 92 

63,018 55 

t52,696 90 

t48,232 00 

155,799 75 

152,655 00 


$ c. 

13,501 08 

1,489 00 

1,313 50 

847 00 
1,073 50 

766 00 

t504 65 

f353 60 

f4 00 


$ c. 
3,660 10 


1887 


3,815 80 


1892 


786 86 


1897 


620 27 


1902 


722 78 


1907 


764 54 


1912 


t443 01 


1917 


t810 92 


1922 


■5-73 80 


1923 









The annual allowance to each Superannuated Teacher was increased by the Legislature in 
1920. Payments are at the rate of $11 per year of service instead of at $6 as formerly, 
t For fiscal year ending 31st October. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



321 



APPENDIX S 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE ONTARIO COLLEGE 
OF EDUCATION 

For the Year Ending 30th June, 1923 

Expenditures for salaries and maintenance for the year ending 30th 

June, 1923, as detailed below $159,754 28 

Legislative Grant received therefor $130,855 00 

Fees received 34,536 00 

$165,391 00 

Net amount unused returned to Provincial Treasurer 5,636 72 

$159,754 28 



Expenditures 



Salaries 



Payment 

to 

Officer 



Professors, each 12 months to 30th June: 

W. Pakenham, Dean, @ $6,000 $5,850 00 

H. J. Crawford, Classics, also Headmaster of University Schools, 
@ $5,220. Obit. 2nd August, balance of salary to June 30th 

paid as compassionate allowance to widow 5,209 13 

P. Sandiford, Educational Psychology, @ $4,800 4,680 00 

Associate Professors, each 12 months to 30th June: 

G. A. Cornish, Science, @ $4,375 4,265 62 

J. T. Crawford, Mathematics, @ $4,375 4,265 62 

W. C. Ferguson, Modern Languages, @ $4,375; honorarium as 

Acting Headmaster of University Schools, $500, 4,765 62 

Assistant Professors, each 12 months to 30th June: 

G. M. Jones, English and History, @ $4,375 4,265 62 

F. E. Coombs, Elementary Subjects, @ $4,290 4,182 75 

W. E. Macpherson, Librarian, etc., @ $4,190 4,085 25 

Miss L. L. Ockley, Household Science, @ $3,000 2,925 00 

D. E. Hamilton, Instructor in University Schools, 1st July to 30th 
September, @ $3,125; Assistant Professor of Methods in 
Classics and Head of Department of Classics, 1st October 

to 30th June, @ $3,900 3,613 60 

Lecturers, also Instructors in University Schools, each 12 months to 
30th June: 

S. W. Perry, Art and Commercial Work, @ $3,875 3,778 13 

A. N. Scarrow, Manual Training, @ $3,560 3,471 00 

G. N. Bramfitt, Music, @ $3,250 3,168 75 

F. Halbus, Physical Training, @ $2,625 2,559 36 

Miss A. E. Robertson, Instructor in Household Science, 12 months 

to 30th June, @ $2,500. ... ^ 2,437 50 

J. G. Althouse, Headmaster, University Schools, 6 months from 1st 

January, @ $4,375 per annum 2,132 81 

Instructors in University Schools, each 12 months to 30th June: 

J. O. Carlisle, @ $3,560 3,471 00 

G. A. Cline, @ $3,250 3,168 75 

E. L. Daniher, @ $3,125 3,046 88 

H. A. Grainger, @ $3,875 3,778 13 

J. A. Irwin, @ $3,750 3,656 25 

W. J. Lougheed, ® $3,875 3,778 13 

N. L. Murch, @ $3,125 3,046 88 

T. M. Porter, @ $3,875 : 3,778 13 

W. L. C. Richardson, @ $3,250 3,168 75 

J. F. Van Every, @ $3,300 3,217 50 

W. H. Williams, @ $3,750 3,656 25 

J. G. Workman, @ $3,560 3,471 00 

J. B. Dandeno, Special Instructor in Agriculture 200 00 

11 D. E. 



Superan. 
reservation , 
7 Geo. V, 

Cap. 58 

$150 00 



10 87 
120 00 

109 38 
109 38 

109 38 

109 38 

107 25 

104 75 

75 00 



92 65 



89 


00 


81 


25 


65 


64 


62 


50 


54 


69 


89 


00 


81 


25 


78 


12 


96 


87 


93 


75 


96 


87 


78 


12 


96 


87 


81 


25 


82 


50 


93 


75 


89 


00 



322 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Salaries — Continued 



Supply Teachers, (cy, $7.50 per day: 

C. L. Rowe, 6 days 

Miss I. Eadie, 2 days 

A. Holmes, 2 days 

P. A. McDougall, 1 day 

N. F. Nelson, 1 day 

Miss M. M. Wilson, 1 day 

Clerical Staff, each 12 months to 30th June: 

Miss L. Swinarton, Secretary 

Miss E. G. Seldon 

Messenger Service: 

Miss Ella Campbell, 12 months' salary 



Payment 

to 

Officer 

$45 

15 

15 

7 

7 

7 



Superan. 
reservation, 
7 Geo. V, 

Cap. 58 



00 
00 
00 
50 
50 
50 



1,550 00 
1,150 00 



600 00 



$110,490 91 $2,605 34 
110,490 91 



Retiring Allowances: 

Teachers' Insurance and Annuity Association, contribution of 

College for year ending 30th June, 1923, to fund for retiring $2,053 86 
Professor W. E. Macpherson, reimbursement of amount paid 

directly to T.I. & A. Association 47 91 

Charges on Investment: 

Accountant, Supreme Court of Ontario, proportion of annual 
payment on debenture issue of 1909, for interest and sinking 
fund 

Maintenance of Building: 

Fuel $2,358 61 

Light 1,169 58 

Water 407 43 

Caretaker's supplies 570 06 

Cleaning 2,581 10 

Repairs and renewals 2,082 37 

Telephone service 162 96 

Grounds 893 50 

Engineer and caretaker 1,600 00 

Firemen 628 15 

Nightwatchmen 1,354 47 

Maintenance of Instruction: 

Use of city schools $9,460 00 

Payment for use of rural schools 238 29 

Assistance in Laboratory, also with piano in Physical Training. 161 00 
Office supplies, including office furniture, printing, postage, 

circulars and contingencies 1,322 44 

General supplies and apparatus for classroom use, etc 4,110 30 

Library assistance, books and periodicals 1,444 13 

Physical Training, including rent and care of grounds and rink, 

Field Day sports, etc 669 57 

Luncheon equipment 22 30 

Summer Session — Instructors: 

J. W. Bridges 300 00 

F. E. Coombs 300 00 

D. E. Hamilton 300 00 

W. E. Macpherson 300 00 

Dean W. Pakenham 120 00 

Graduate Scholarship in Education: 

J. A. Long 500 00 

Publication of "The School" 1,500 00 



$113,096 25 



2,101 77 



10,000 00 



13,808 23 



20,748 03 
$159,754 28 



Toronto, 

15th January, 1924. 



Certified correct, , 

F. A. Moure, 



Bursar. 



1923 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



323 



APPENDIX T 
EXAMINATIONS 

HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1923 



Collegiate 
Institutes 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's 
recommendation 


Number taking 

Departmental 

Examination 


Number passed 

Departmental 

Examination 


High Schools 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's 
recommendation 


Number taking 

Departmental 

Examination 


Number passed 

Departmental 

Examination 


Barrie . 




150 
106 
176 
140 

47 
133 
120 
243 
293 

98 

62 
341 
124 
158 
433 
118 
303 

55 
123 
166 
168 
177 
672 
256 
118 
102 

87 
212 
149 
264 
128 
256 
321 
129 

75 
162 
216 
110 
902 

96 
135 

84 


123 

69 

143 

63 

36 

111 

114 

217 

272 

87 

36 

140 

97 

107 

410 

106 

183 

50 

91 

125 

134 

124 

343 

209 

96 

80 

65 

188 

113 

216 

111 

228 

278 

96 

62 

142 

141 

84 

180 

46 

86 

60 


Alexandria 




82 

59 

78 

75 

112 

80 

53 

67 

22 

105 

43 

45 

82 

11C 

38 

139 

33 

56 

77 

61 

70 

103 

36 

44 

60 

68 

49 

33 

140 

21 

65 

138 

86 

52 

65 

58 

48 

128 

48 

116 

19 

67 

52 

79 

65 

85 

61 

60 

57 

49 

43 

52 

24 


68 


Brantford 


280 


Alliston 




41 


Brockville 


Almonte 




48 


Chatham . . 


103 


Amherstburg 




56 




Arnpiior 




79 






Arthur 




57 


Collingwood 




Athens 




30 


Fort William. 




Aurora 




59 


Gait 




Avon more 




12 


Goderich